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  • Feb 20th 2014
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Most famous Dishes from Indonesia

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    1
    Krupuk

    Krupuk

    Krupuk or kerupuk in Indonesia; keropok in Malaysia; kropek in the Philippines; bánh phồng tôm in Vietnam; kroepoek in the Netherlands is a popular snack in parts of East and Southeast Asia as well as former colonizer the Netherlands and another of its former colonies, Suriname. Krupuk are deep fried crackers made from starch and other ingredients that usually give the taste. Prawn based krupuk are popular types of krupuk. These are called krupuk udang in Indonesian, prawn crackers in British and also in Australian English, shrimp chips or shrimp crackers in American English, Krabbenchips (Crab chips) in German, Nuvole di Drago (Dragon's Clouds) in Italian, 炸庀虾片 (fried prawn crisps) in Chinese. Prawn chips in Australia. Indonesia has perhaps the largest variety of krupuk. In Indonesia, the term krupuk refers to the type of relatively large crackers, while the term kripik or keripik refers to smaller bite-size crackers; the counterpart of chips (or crisps) in western cuisine. For example potato chips are called kripik kentang in Indonesia. Usually krupuk is made from the dried paste from the mixture of starch with other ingredients, while kripik is usually made entirely from thinly
    7.14
    7 votes
    2
    Soto

    Soto

    Soto, sroto, tauto or coto is a common dish, found in many regional variations of Indonesian cuisine. It is a traditional soup mainly composed of broth, meat and vegetables. There is no clear definition of what makes a soto, but normally many traditional soups are called soto, whereas foreign and Western influenced soups are called sop. Soto is sometimes considered Indonesia's national dish, as it is served from Sumatra to Papua, in a wide range of variations. Soto is omnipresent in Indonesia, available in many an open-air eateries and on many street corners to fine dining restaurants and luxurious hotels. Soto, especially soto ayam (chicken soto), is considered as Indonesian counterpart of chicken soup. Soto is a comforting soup, because it is always served warm with tender texture in most of Indonesian households, and naturally considered as Indonesian comfort food. Although soto was undoubtly developed in Indonesian archipelago and each region has developed their own distinctive soto recipes, some historians suggest that it was influenced by foreign culinary tradition. Denys Lombard in his book Le Carrefour Javanais suggested that the soto origin was a Chinese soup called caudo
    6.67
    6 votes
    3
    Lemang

    Lemang

    Lemang is a traditional Malay food made of glutinous rice and coconut milk and cooked in a hollowed bamboo stick lined with banana leaves in order to prevent the rice from sticking to the bamboo. The cooking method using bamboo container is popular in Iban Dayak tribe of Borneo. Usually prepared for celebrations such as the Iban harvest festival of Hari Gawai, lemang is usually eaten with meat dishes such as chicken curry. In fact, the cooking process used in making lemang, also known as "pansoh/pansuh", is the traditional delicacy preparation by indigenous Dayak communities for a wide variety of meats. Lemang is popular in Malaysia, Malay communities of Indonesia, Minangkabau people and Iban communities of Borneo, Manado usually prepared by using the tapai method. Lemang can now be found throughout Indonesia due to the spread of Minangkabau people throughout the country. Lemang is ubiquitous among Malay communities and commonly eaten to mark the end of daily fasting during the annual Muslim Malaysian holidays of Hari Raya Aidilfitri and Hari Raya Haji. The aboriginal communities of West Malaysia (Orang Asli) also practice cooking rice in bamboo.. In East Malaysia, the Negrito,
    7.20
    5 votes
    4
    Congee

    Congee

    Congee or conjee (from Tamil kañji, the English form may have arrived in the language via Portuguese. The derivation of the Tamil word is unknown as it appears to be non-Dravidian.) is a type of rice porridge or gruel popular in many Asian countries. When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients, such as meat, fish, and flavorings, are added whilst preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation. Despite its many variations, it is always a thick porridge or soup of rice which has usually disintegrated after prolonged cooking in copious water. To prepare the dish, rice is boiled in a large amount of water until it softens significantly. Congee can be made in a pot or in a rice cooker. Some rice cookers have a "congee" setting, allowing it to be cooked overnight. The type of rice used can be either short or long grain, depending on what is available and regional cultural influences. Culture also often dictates the way congee is cooked and eaten. In other Asian cultures, it is also called kanji (Tamil/Tulu), kaṇni /Malayalam), pakhal bhat (Oriya),
    7.00
    5 votes
    5
    Rendang

    Rendang

    Rendang is a spicy meat dish which originated from the Minangkabau ethnic group of Indonesia, and is now commonly served across the country. One of the characteristic foods of Minangkabau culture, it is served at ceremonial occasions and to honour guests. Also popular in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, the southern Philippines and southern Thailand, rendang is traditionally prepared by the Indonesian community during festive occasions. Culinary expert often describe rendang as: 'West Sumatra caramelized beef curry'. Though rendang is sometimes described as being like a curry, and the name is sometimes applied to curried meat dishes in Malaysia, authentic rendang is nothing like a curry. In 2011 an online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International chose Rendang as the number one dish of their 'World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods' list. Rendang is rich in spices; next to main meat ingredient, rendang uses coconut milk (Minangkabau: karambia), and mixture of ground spices paste, which include ginger, galangal, turmeric leaves, lemon grass, garlic, shallot, chillies and other spices. These spices are called pemasak in Minangkabau language. Spices used in rendang are known as a natural
    7.00
    5 votes
    6
    Ketupat

    Ketupat

    Ketupat or packed rice is a type of dumpling from Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines (where it is known by the name pusô in Cebuano, bugnóy in Hiligaynon, patupat in Kapampangan, or ta’mu in Tausug), and Singapore. It is made from rice that has been wrapped in a woven palm leaf pouch and boiled. As the rice cooks, the grains expand to fill the pouch and the rice becomes compressed. This method of cooking gives the ketupat its characteristic form and texture of a rice dumpling. Ketupat is usually eaten with rendang or served as an accompaniment to satay(chicken or beef or lamb in skewers) or gado-gado (mixed vegetables with peanut sauce). Local stories passed down through the generations have attributed the creation of this style of rice preparation to the seafarers' need to keep cooked rice from spoiling during long sea voyages. The coco leaves used in wrapping the rice are always shaped into a triangular form and stored hanging in bunches in the open air. The shape of the package facilitates moisture to drip away from the cooked rice while the coco leaves allow the rice to be aerated and at the same time prevent flies and insects from touching it. There are many
    8.50
    4 votes
    7
    Serabi

    Serabi

    Serabi, surabi or called srabi is an Indonesian pancake that is made from rice flour with coconut milk or just plain shredded coconut as an emulsifier. Each province in Indonesia has various serabi recipes corresponding to local tastes.
    8.00
    4 votes
    8
    Soto ayam

    Soto ayam

    Soto ayam is a yellow spicy chicken soup with lontong or nasi empit or ketupat (all compressed rice that is then cut into small cakes) and/or vermicelli or noodles, commonly found in Indonesia, Singapore, and Suriname. Turmeric is added as one of its ingredients to get yellow chicken broth. Besides chicken and vermicelli, it is also served with hard-boiled eggs, slices of fried potatoes, Chinese celery leaves, and fried shallots. Occasionally, people will add "koya", a powder of mixed prawn crackers with fried garlic or bitter Sambal (orange colored). Krupuk are a very common topping. Different regions have their own variation of this dish, for instance:
    8.00
    4 votes
    9
    Stir frying

    Stir frying

    Stir frying is an umbrella term used to describe two Chinese cooking techniques for preparing food in a wok: chǎo (炒) and bào (爆). The term stir-fry was introduced into the English language by Buwei Yang Chao, in her book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese, to describe the chǎo technique. The two techniques differ in their speed of execution, the amount of heat used, and the amount of tossing done to cook the food in the wok. Cantonese restaurant patrons judge a chef's ability to perform stir frying by the "wok hei" produced in the food. This in turn is believed to display their ability to bring out the qi of the wok and essence of the food cooking. As stir frying is a technique The chao technique is similar to the Western technique of sautéing. A traditional round-bottom cast iron or carbon steel pan called a wok is heated to a high temperature. A small amount of cooking oil is then poured down the side of the wok (a traditional expression in China regarding this is "hot wok, cold oil"), followed by dry seasonings (including ginger and garlic), then at the first moment the seasonings can be smelled, meats are added and agitated. Once the meat is seared, vegetables along with liquid
    6.20
    5 votes
    10
    Otak-otak

    Otak-otak

    Otak-otak (Chinese: 鲤鱼包) is a cake made of fish meat and spices. It is widely known across Southeast Asia, where it is traditionally served fresh, wrapped inside a banana leaf, as well as in many Asian stores internationally - being sold as frozen food and even canned food. Otak-otak is found in certain parts of Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. The southern Malaysian town of Muar in Johor is a popular destination for it — people from surrounding states and even Singaporeans often visit to buy the famous otak-otak in bulk. It is commonly known in Singapore as otah. Otak means brains in Indonesian and Malay, and the name of the dish is derived from the idea that the dish somewhat resembles brains, being grey, soft and almost squishy. It can be eaten as a snack or with bread or rice as part of a meal. Otak-otak is made by mixing fish paste (usually mackerel) with a mixture of spices. In Indonesia, the mixture typically contains fish paste, shallots, garlic, green onions, egg, coconut milk, and sago flour or can be substituted for cassava starch. While in Malaysia, it is usually a mixture between fish paste, chillies, garlic, shallots, turmeric, lemon grass and coconut milk. The
    7.50
    4 votes
    11
    Bubur kacang hijau

    Bubur kacang hijau

    Es kacang hijau or bubur kacang hijau is an Indonesian and Malaysian dessert made from mung beans with coconut milk and palm sugar or cane sugar. The beans are boiled till soft, and sugar and coconut milk are added. It is sometimes referred to simply as "kacang hijau," meaning "green bean" (i.e. mung bean). Es means "ice" and bubur means porridge. Slightly different names may be used in different regions of Indonesia, such as Kacang ijo in Javanese areas. Sometimes a special bubur kacang hijau mix with durian is prepared. It is served as it is or can be eaten together with bread.
    6.00
    5 votes
    12
    Bakmi

    Bakmi

    Bakmi consists of two Hokkien Chinese words literally translated to English as "meat noodles" (肉麵, Pe̍h-ōe-jī: bah-mī). Bakmi is a wheat based noodle which was brought to Southeast Asia by Chinese merchants, and is today a common noodle dish, especially in Indonesia and in Thailand. The dish has also been further developed to more closely align with the local tastes. Bakmi is between Chinese style wheat noodles and Japanese Udons in thickness, and there are several variants of bakmi in Indonesia. The most common type of bakmi in Indonesia is bakmi kuning, or 'yellow noodles'. And the most common recipe of bakmi dish in Indonesia is chicken noodle (Indonesian: bakmie ayam or mie ayam). Mie ayam is wheat noodle topped with diced chicken meat seasoned in soy sauce. Mie ayam often accompanied with wonton (Indonesian: pangsit) either crispy fried or in soup, and also bakso (meatball). Bakmi ayam is a popular Chinese Indonesian dish and ubiquitous in Indonesian cities, it can be served in a restaurant to a humble travelling cart. The other popular Indonesian bakmi recipe is fried bakmi (Indonesian: bakmie goreng or mie goreng). In Thailand, wheat noodles are also known as bami (Thai:
    9.00
    3 votes
    13
    Nasi kuning

    Nasi kuning

    Nasi Kuning (or sometimes Nasi Kunyit) is an Indonesian rice dish cooked with coconut milk and turmeric, hence the name nasi kuning (yellow rice). Nasi kuning might come in the form of a cone called a tumpeng and is usually eaten during special events. The rice looks like a pile of gold, so it is often served at parties and opening ceremonies as a symbol of good fortune, wealth and dignity. It is usually served with a variety of side dishes such as shredded omelette, serundeng (relish of grated coconut and spices), urap (vegetable in shredded coconut dressing), teri kacang (fried anchovy and peanuts), sambal goreng (fried tempeh and potato caramelized in spicy sauce), ayam goreng (Javanese-style fried chicken), balado udang (shrimp in chilli), or perkedel (potato fritters). More elaborate nasi kuning might include fried cow's brain, fried cow's lung, beef and seafood. It is common to serve nasi kuning with kerupuk udang (shrimp cracker) and a decoratively cut cucumber. The top of the tumpeng is customarily given to the most senior person in attendance. Nasi Tumpeng - Its Meaning and Function
    6.50
    4 votes
    14
    Gudeg

    Gudeg

    Gudeg is a traditional food from Yogyakarta and Central Java, Indonesia which is made from young Nangka (jack fruit) boiled for several hours with palm sugar, and coconut milk . Additional spices include garlic, shallot, candlenut, coriander seed, galangal, bay leaves, and teak leaves, the latter giving a reddish brown color to the dish. It is also called Green Jack Fruit Sweet Stew. Gudeg is served with white rice, chicken, hard-boiled egg, tofu and/or tempeh, and a stew made of crisp beef skins (sambal goreng krecek) . There are several types of gudeg; dry, wet, Yogyakarta style, Solo style and East-Javanese style. Dry gudeg has only a bit of coconut milk and thus has little sauce. Wet gudeg includes more coconut milk. The most common gudeg came from Yogyakarta, and usually sweeter, more dry and reddish in color because the addition of teak leaves. The Solo gudeg from the city of Surakarta is more watery and soupy with lots of coconut milk and whitish in color because teak leaves is absent. The East-Javanese style gudeg employs a spicier and hotter taste, compared to the Yogyakarta-style gudeg, which is sweeter. Gudeg is traditionally associated with Yogyakarta, and Yogyakarta
    8.00
    3 votes
    15
    Klepon

    Klepon

    Klepon (pronounced Klê-pon) is a traditional rice cake, popular in Indonesia and Malaysia. It is a boiled rice cake, stuffed with liquid gula jawa (palm sugar), and rolled in grated coconut. Klepon is green because it is flavored with a paste made from the pandan or dracaena plant whose leaves are used widely in South East Asian cooking. In other parts of Indonesia, such as in Sumatra and in neighboring Malaysia, klepon is called as onde-onde. While in Java onde-onde is refer to Chinese Jin deui, rice cake ball coated with sesame seeds filled with sweet greenbean paste. Although popular across Southeast Asia, klepon might be originated from Java. Klepon, along with getuk and cenil usually eaten as morning or afternoon snacks. To eat klepon must be careful because freshly boiled one usually contains hot palm sugar liquid that will pop out in a bite. A well known klepon comes from Pasuruan (East Java), sold in a box by small kiosk that make a long line on the roadside that connect Malang and Surabaya. They are also sold by seller that get on the Bus that goes to or from Malang / Surabaya. In the 50's klepon was introduced by Indo immigrants to the Netherlands and is readily available
    8.00
    3 votes
    16
    10.00
    2 votes
    17
    Arak

    Arak

    Arak or Araq is a highly alcoholic spirit (~50%-63% Alc. Vol./~100-126 proof) from the anis drinks family. It is a clear, colorless, unsweetened anise-flavored distilled alcoholic drink (also labeled as an Apéritif). It is the traditional alcoholic beverage of Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Iran, Israel, the Palestinian territories, and Syria. The word arak comes from Arabic ′araq عرق, meaning "sweat", its pronunciation varies depending on local varieties of Arabic: /ʕaraʔ, ʕaraɡ/. Arak is not to be confused with the similarly named liquor, arrack (which in some cases, such as in Indonesia—especially Bali, also goes by the name arak). Another similarly sounding word is aragh, which in Armenia, Iran, Azerbaijan and Georgia is the colloquial name of vodka, and not an aniseed-flavored drink. Raki, zivania, and ouzo are aniseed-flavored alcoholic drinks, related to arak, popular in Turkey, Cyprus, and Greece, respectively. Arak is usually mixed in approximately 1/3 arak and 2/3 water in a traditional Levantine water vessel called "Ibrik", in Arabic "إبريق"; then the mixture is poured in small ice filled cups, like in the picture. This dilution causes the clear liquor to turn a translucent
    7.33
    3 votes
    18

    Sate kambing

    Sate kambing is part of the cuisine of Indonesia. It is very popular in the country, especially in Java. Sate kambing is the Indonesian name for mutton satay, since it is made of goat meat. This food is made by roasting goat meat that has been mixed with seasoning. A set of Sate Kambing usually consists of the satay itself, complemented by a sauce made of soya sauce or peanut sauce. Some people eat it with rice while others prefer to eat it with traditional rice box named lontong or ketupat. In some areas sate kambing is sold together with another popular food named gule kambing (goat soup). Sate can also be made by other meat e.g. meat of buffalo, chicken, fish, and others.
    7.00
    3 votes
    19
    Nasi campur

    Nasi campur

    Nasi campur, (Indonesian: "mixed rice", also called nasi rames), referring to a dish of rice topped with various meats, vegetables, peanuts, eggs and fried-shrimp krupuk. Depending on which areas it originate, a nasi campur vendor can several different side dishes, including vegetables, fish and meats. It is a staple meal of the Southeast Asian countries, and popular especially in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and the Netherlands. A form of it called chanpurū also exists in Okinawa. There is no exact rule, recipe or definition of what makes a nasi campur, since Indonesians and by large Southeast Asians commonly consume steamed rice surrounded with several side dishes consists of various kinds of vegetables and meat. As the result either the question of origin or recipe is obscure. Yet nasi campur is commonly perceived as steamed rice surrounded with various dishes that might consists of vegetables and meats, served in personal portion, in contrast of tumpeng that served in larger collective portion or Rijsttafel that setted in lavish colonial banquet. There are several local variations emerges throughout Indonesia; from Bali, Java and Indo colonial to Chinese Indonesian versions
    8.50
    2 votes
    20
    Karedok

    Karedok

    Karedok is a raw vegetable salad in peanut sauce from West Java, Indonesia. It is one of the Sundanese signature dish. It is made from cucumbers, bean sprouts, cabbage, legumes, Thai basil, and small green eggplant, covered in peanut sauce dressing. It is very similar to gado-gado, except all the vegetables are raw, while most of gado-gado vegetables are boiled, and it uses kencur, Thai basil and eggplant. Karedok is also known as lotek atah (raw lotek or raw gado-gado) for its fresh and raw version of the vegetable covered with peanut sauce. Karedok is widely served as daily food in the Sundanese family, usually eaten with hot rice, tofu, tempeh and krupuk. Nowadays karedok can be found in many variation from hawkers carts, stalls (warung) as well as in restaurants and hotels both in Indonesia and worldwide. Karedok is part of a wide range of Indonesian dressing and salad combinations, along with lotek, pecel and gado-gado. In many places, to retain authenticity in both the production and flavor, the peanut sauce is made in individual batches, in front of the customers. However, since the dish has gained popularity (because of the increase of Asian-themed restaurants) Karedok
    6.33
    3 votes
    21
    Lumpia

    Lumpia

    Lumpia are pastries of Chinese origin similar to fresh popiah or fried spring rolls popular in Southeast Asia. The term lumpia derives from Hokkien lunpia (Chinese: 潤餅; pinyin: rùnbǐng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: jūn-piáⁿ, lūn-piáⁿ), which is an alternate term for popiah. The recipe, both fried and fresh versions, was brought by the Chinese immigrants from the Fujian province of China to Southeast Asia and became popular where they settled in Indonesia and the Philippines. In the Netherlands and Flanders, it is spelled loempia which is the old Indonesian spelling for lumpia and has also become the generic name for "spring roll" in Dutch. A variant is the Vietnamese lumpia, wrapped in a thinner piece of pastry, in a size close to a spring roll though, the wrapping closes the ends off completely, which is typical for lumpia. Lumpiang hubad literally naked spring roll. It is basically an unwrapped lumpiang sariwa (without the crepe). Lumpiang sariwa, or fresh spring rolls in English, consist of minced ubod (heart of palm), flaked chicken, crushed peanuts, and jicamas as an extender in a double wrapping of lettuce leaf and a yellowish egg crepe. The accompanying sauce is made from chicken or pork
    8.00
    2 votes
    22
    Pempek

    Pempek

    Pempek, mpek-mpek or empek-empek is a savoury fishcake delicacy from Palembang, Indonesia, made of fish and tapioca. Pempek is served with yellow noodles and a dark, rich sweet and sour sauce called kuah cuka or kuah cuko (lit. vinegar sauce). Pempek is the best-known of Palembang's dishes. Its origin is undoubtly Palembang, however the history behind the creation of this savoury dish is unclear. According to local tradition, around the 16th century there was an old Chinese immigrant who lived near the Musi river. He noticed an abundance of fish caught by the local fishermen. In the Sumatran tropical climate, before the invention of refrigeration technology, most of these unsold leftover fish decayed and were wasted. The indigenous people, however had limited knowledge and techniques for processing fish. During that period, most of the indigenous people simply grilled, fried or boiled their fish instead of adding other ingredients to make new dishes. The old Chinese man mixed in some tapioca and other spices, which he then sold around the village on his cart. The people referred to this old man as 'pek-apek, where apek is a Chinese slang word to call an old man. The food is known
    8.00
    2 votes
    23
    Swikee

    Swikee

    Swikee or Swike is a Chinese Indonesian frog leg dish. The dish can be served as soup, deep fried or stir fried frog legs. Originally a Chinese dish, this dish is popular in Indonesia. "Swikee" is originated from Hokkian dialect (水雞, Pe̍h-ōe-jī: súi-ke) sui (water) and ke (chicken), which probably an euphemism to refer frogs as "water chicken". It is sometimes identified as a traditional food of Purwodadi, a city in Central Java. The main ingredient is frogs' legs (mainly from "green frogs") with the condiments of garlic, ginger and fermented soy paste (tauco), salt, and pepper. Once it is served, fried garlic and chopped celery may be added. Swikee is usually served with plain white rice. The taste and texture of frog meat approximately between chicken and fish. They are often said to taste like chicken because of their mild flavor, with a texture most similar to chicken wings. However there was a slight fishiness that some might perceived that frog legs is also taste mildly like fish. Normally, the legs are the only part served in the soup, since the legs are the most meaty parts; the skin of the frogs may, however, also be dried under the sun, and fried as chips. The salted
    8.00
    2 votes
    24
    Wingko

    Wingko

    Wingko, which is sometimes called Wingko Babat, is a traditional Javanese pancake-like snack made from coconut. It is a kind of cake made mainly of coconut and other ingredients. Wingko is popular especially along the north coast of Java island. It is sold mostly by peddlers on trains, at bus stations, train stations, or in the producer’s own shop. This might explain why it's very popular in Java to use wingko as a gift to families upon returning from traveling. Wingko is typically a round, almost hard coconut cake that is typically served in warm, small pieces. Wingko is sold either in the form of a large, plate-sized cake or small, paper wrapped cakes. It's delicious due to the combined sweetness of sugar and the unique, fresh taste of crispy coconut. The price varies, depending on where it's sold. The more famous the brand of cake, the more expensive the cake. Your bargaining skills might lower the price a little. The most famous wingko is made in Babat. As its full name, wingko babat, suggests, wingko actually originated in Babat, a small regency in Lamongan, a municipality in East Java. Babat is near the border with Bojonegoro, another municipality in East Java which is now
    8.00
    2 votes
    25
    Dadiah

    Dadiah

    Dadih (Indonesian: Dadih), a traditional fermented milk of West Sumatra, Indonesia, is made by pouring fresh raw unheated buffalo milk into a bamboo tube capped with a banana leaf, and allowing it to ferment spontaneously at room temperature for two days. The milk is fermented by indigenous lactic bacteria of the buffalo milk. Its natural fermentation provides different strains of indigenous lactic bacteria involved in each fermentation. The natural indigenous lactic acid bacteria observed in dadih could be derived from the bamboo tubes, buffalo milk or banana leaves involved in milk fermentation. Dadih is usually eaten for breakfast, mixed together with ampiang (traditional glutinous rice krispies) and palm sugar. Dadih can also be eaten with hot rice and sambal. Some studies on probiotic properties of indigenous strains isolated from dadih fermented milk demonstrated to exhibit antimutagenic, acid, and bile tolerance as well as antipathogenic properties. Natural wild strains isolated from dadih show inhibitory, competitive and displacing properties against pathogens, and they are promising candidates for future probiotics. Viable cells of Lactobacillus plantarum strains from
    10.00
    1 votes
    26
    Nasi goreng

    Nasi goreng

    Nasi goreng, literally meaning "fried rice" in Indonesian and Malay, can refer simply to fried pre-cooked rice, a meal including stir fried rice in small amount of cooking oil or margarine, typically spiced with kecap manis (sweet soy sauce), shallot, garlic, tamarind and chilli and accompanied with other ingredients, particularly egg, chicken and prawns. There is also another kind of nasi goreng which is made with ikan asin (salted dried fish) which is also popular across Indonesia. Nasi goreng has been called the national dish of Indonesia, though there are many other contenders. There are many Indonesian cuisines but few national dishes. Indonesia's national dish knows no social barriers. It can be enjoyed in its simplest manifestation from a tin plate at a roadside warung, travelling night hawker's cart; eaten on porcelain in restaurants, or constructed at the buffet tables of Jakarta dinner parties. In 2011 an online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International chose Nasi Goreng as the number two of their 'World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods' list after rendang. Nasi goreng can trace its origin from Chinese fried rice, however it is not clear when Indonesians began to adopt the
    10.00
    1 votes
    27
    Betutu

    Betutu

    Betutu is a Balinese dish of steamed or roasted chicken or duck. This highly seasoned and spiced dish is a popular dish in Bali and Lombok. An even spicier version is available using extra-spicy sauce made from uncooked (raw) onion slices mixed with red chili peppers and coconut oil. This traditional dish is very popular nowadays. It can be found in the menu of luxury hotels or restaurants in Bali. It takes at least 24 hours to cook. Many travelers from other regions of Indonesia brought Betutu dishes as Balinese-gift for their families. This dish is also popular among tourists who travel to Bali. Common side dishes may include plecing kangkung, crispy-fried peanuts and sambal terasi. In Bali, betutu's tastes and ways of cooking are different according to regions; Translated from KOMPAS with some edits, Ayam Betutu Gilimanuk, “Nak Seken Nee…” January 21, 2007, Sunday. Retrieved on May 2, 2007.
    6.00
    3 votes
    28
    Kolak

    Kolak

    Kolak or Kolek is an Indonesian dessert made with palm sugar and coconut milk, with pandanus leaf (P. amaryllifolius) for flavour. In some versions, mung beans are also used, and cooked till soft. Banana may be added to this base, the dish then being known as kolek pisang. Pumpkin, sweet potato, jackfruit, plantain and/or cassava, and sometimes pearl tapioca may also be added. It is served either hot (especially if freshly cooked) or cold. Kolak is popular during the holy month of Ramadan, and is usually served cold during Iftar.
    9.00
    1 votes
    29
    9.00
    1 votes
    30
    Nasi uduk

    Nasi uduk

    Nasi uduk is an Indonesian style steamed rice cooked in coconut milk dish originally from Jakarta, which can be widely found across the country. Nasi uduk literally means "mixed rice" in Indonesian. The name describes the dish preparation itself which requires more ingredients than common rice cooking and also varieties additional side dishes. Nasi uduk is made by cooking rice soaked in coconut milk instead of water, along with clove, cassia bark, and lemongrass. It is commonly served with an assortment of side dishes, such as eggs (omelette, shredded omelette, or telur balado, a hard boiled egg in sambal sauce), empal (fried beef), semur (beef stew in sweet soy sauce), fried chicken or ayam suwir (shredded chicken), teri kacang (anchovy with peanuts), bihun goreng (rice vermicelli), fritters such as fried tempeh, perkedel kentang (potato patties) or perkedel jagung (corn fritter), emping (melinjo chips) or krupuk bawang (onion cracker), and bawang goreng (fried onion) sprinkled on the top of the rice. Hot chili sambal is also common in nasi uduk preparation. The most common type of sambal that usually served with nasi uduk is sambal kacang (peanut sambal), it is also optional as a
    9.00
    1 votes
    31
    Murtabak

    Murtabak

    Martabak or murtabak, also mutabbaq, (Arabic: مطبق‎) is a stuffed pancake or pan-fried bread which is commonly found in Saudi Arabia (especially the Hejaz region), Yemen, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, and Brunei. Depending on the location, the name and ingredients can significantly vary. The name mutabbaq (or sometimes mutabbag) in Arabic means "folded". In Malaysia, where it is called "Murtabak", it is sold by Mamak salesmen, and usually includes minced mutton, along with garlic, egg and onion, and is eaten with curry sauce. Murtabak also usually includes mutton in Yemen. In Indonesia, particularly Jakarta, it is called "martabak", and has two versions: a sweet one, and a savory one. Vegetarian murtabaks exist, too, and can be found around Singapore's "Little India" neighborhood, among other places. Murtabak originated in Yemen and hijaz region of Saudi Arabia the word mutabbaq in Arabic means folded,through traders it has spread to India and southeast of Asia. The dish referred to as Murtabak is a multi layered pancake that originated in the state of Kerela where the people referred to disparagingly as "mamak's" (or uncle) hail from. The word mutabar is the correct
    6.50
    2 votes
    32
    Lupis

    Lupis

    Lupis (sometimes lopis) is a traditional food from Indonesia. It is a sweet cake made of glutinous rice. It can be sweetened further with shredded coconut topped with a thick palm sugar syrup. It is usually eaten as a breakfast or side dish in the evening tea time. Lupis is often found in traditional markets throughout Indonesia, and in Javanese area, especially in the middle and eastern of Java.
    5.00
    3 votes
    33
    Lontong

    Lontong

    Lontong is an Asian dish made of compressed rice wrapped inside banana leaf that is then cut into small cakes as staple food replacement of steamed rice. The smaller size of lontong filled with vegetables (carrot, common bean and potato) sometimes also filled with meat, are eaten as snack. Popular in Indonesia and Malaysia, the dish is usually served cold or at room temperature with sauce-based dishes such as gado-gado and salads, although it can be eaten as an accompaniment to other dishes such as Satay and curries. It is also used in Soto as an alternative to vermicelli noodles. Lontong is traditionally made by boiling the rice until it is partially cooked and packing it tightly into a rolled-up banana leaf. The leaf is secured and cooked in boiling water for about 90 minutes. Once the compacted rice has cooled, it can be cut up into bite-sized pieces. Alternative ways of cooking lontong include placing uncooked rice into a muslin bag then letting the water seep in and cause the rice to form a solid mass (Ingram, 2003).
    6.00
    2 votes
    34
    Sayur asem

    Sayur asem

    Sayur asem or sayur asam is a popular Indonesian tamarind dish. Common ingredients are peanuts, young jackfruit, melinjo, bilimbi, chayote, long beans, all cooked in tamarind-based soups and sometimes enriched with beef stock. Quite often, the recipe also includes corn. The origin of the dish can be traced to Sundanese people of West Java, Banten and Jakarta region. It is well-known belongs within Sundanese cuisine and Betawi daily diet. Several variations exist including sayur asem Jakarta (a version from the Betawi people of Jakarta), sayur asem kangkung (a version which includes water spinach), sayur asem ikan asin (includes salted fish, usually snakehead murrel), and sayur asem kacang merah (consists of red beans and green beans in tamarind and beef stock). The Karo version of sayur asem is made using torch ginger buds and, more importantly, the sour-tasting seed pods. The sweet and sour flavour of this dish is considered refreshing and very compatible with fried or grilled dishes, including fish and lalapan, a kind of vegetable salad usually raw but can also be cooked, and is usually eaten with sambal terasi.
    6.00
    2 votes
    35
    Fried rice

    Fried rice

    Fried rice is a popular component of Asian cuisine, especially Chinese food. It is made from steamed rice stir-fried in a wok, often with other ingredients such as eggs, vegetables, and meat. It is sometimes served as the penultimate dish in Chinese banquets (just before dessert). As a home-cooked dish, fried rice typically is made with left over ingredients from other dishes, leading to countless variations. There are many popular varieties of fried rice, each with its own specific list of ingredients. In Asia, the more famous varieties include Yangzhou and Fujian fried rice. Elsewhere, Chinese restaurants catering to non-Chinese clientele have invented their own varieties of fried rice including egg fried rice, Malaysian (spicy) fried rice and the ubiquitous 'special fried rice'. Fried rice is a common staple in American Chinese cuisine, especially in the form sold at fast-food stands. The most common form of American Chinese fried rice consists of some mixture of eggs, scallions, and vegetables, with chopped meat added at the customer's discretion, and usually flavored with soy sauce instead of table salt (more typical for Chinese-style fried rice). Fried rice made in American
    5.50
    2 votes
    36

    Rambak petis

    Rambak petis is a Javanese snack food, made of deep fried cow hide served with petis, a sauce made from sweet soya sauce and fermented prawn paste. It is traditionally served as an appetizer.
    5.50
    2 votes
    37
    Cendol

    Cendol

    Cendol ( /ˈtʃɛndɒl/) is a traditional dessert originating from South East Asia which is popular in Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar (where it is known as mont let saung or မုန့်လက်ဆောင်း), Singapore, Vietnam, and Thailand. There is popular belief in Indonesia that the name "cendol" is related to and originated from the word jendol; in Javanese, Sundanese and Indonesian, it means "bump" or "bulge", in reference the sensation of drinking the green worm-like jelly. In Vietnam, it is called "bánh lọt," or fall cake. Bánh lọt is a common ingredient in a Vietnamese dessert called chè, or more commonly chè ba màu. In Thailand it is called lot chong (Thai: ลอดช่อง) which can be translated as "gone through a hole", indicating the way it is made by pressing the warm dough through a sieve in to a container with cold water. The dessert's basic ingredients are coconut milk, a worm-like jelly made from rice flour with green food coloring (usually derived from the pandan leaf), shaved ice and palm sugar. Other ingredients such as red beans, glutinous rice, grass jelly, creamed corn, might also be included. In Sunda, Indonesia, cendol is a dark-green pulpy dish of rice (or sago) flour worms with
    7.00
    1 votes
    38
    Oxtail soup

    Oxtail soup

    Oxtail soup is made with beef tails. The use of the word "ox" in this context is a legacy of nomenclature; no specialized stock of beef animals are used. At least five popular and unrelated versions of oxtail soup exist: a traditional Korean dish, a Chinese dish which is more like a stew, a fried/barbecued oxtail combined with soup variation which is a popular dish in Indonesia where it is called as sop buntut. An ethnic dish of the American South which traces its lineage back to the pre-revolutionary war era, and a thick, rich, gravy-like soup popular in the United Kingdom since the 18th century. Creole oxtail soup is made from a tomato base with oxtails, potatoes, green beans, corn, mirepoix, garlic, and herbs and spices. Though translated literally as a soup (牛尾汤 niú-wěi-tāng), this version of the dish is somewhere between a soup and a stew. One of the defining characteristics of oxtail soup is that it contains a large mass of solid ingredients, rather than ingredients that have been diced or shredded as is the norm with Chinese soup. Chunks of oxtail, potato, carrots, cabbage, tomato, and mushrooms are mixed in water, and salted to taste. The mixture should be heated at a slow
    7.00
    1 votes
    39
    Pecel

    Pecel

    Pecel is an Indonesian sauce based on chillies, peanuts, tamarind and coconut sugar. It is commonly served over boiled vegetables. It is similar to the sauce used in Gado-gado.
    7.00
    1 votes
    40
    Tumpeng

    Tumpeng

    Tumpeng is a cone-shaped rice dish like mountain with its side dishes (vegetables and meat). Traditionally featured in the slamatan ceremony, the cone shape of rice is made by using cone-shaped weaved bamboo container. The rice itself could be plain steam rice, uduk rice (cooked with coconut milk), or yellow rice (uduk rice colored with kunyit (turmeric)). The cone shaped rice erected on tampah (rounded woven bamboo container) covered with banana leaf, and surrounded by assorted of Indonesian dishes. People in Java, Bali and Madura usually make Tumpeng to celebrate important event. However, all Indonesians are familiar with Tumpeng. The philosophy of Tumpeng is related to the geographical condition of Indonesia, especially Java as fertile island with numerous mountains and volcanos. Tumpeng dated back to ancient Indonesian tradition that revered mountains as the abode of ancestors and gods. The cone-shaped rice meant to mimics the holy mountain. The feast served as somekind of thanks giving for the abundance of harvest or any other blessings. In gratitude ceremony (syukuran or slametan), after the people pray, the top of tumpeng is cut and delivered to the most important person. He
    7.00
    1 votes
    41

    Teh talua

    Teh Talua or Teh Telor is a beverage from West Sumatra that is popular throughout the region. Its ingredients (in addition to boiling water) are tea, sugar, egg yolk and calamondin. A traditional method of preparing this drink is: stir the egg yolk and 2 spoons of sugar in a glass, until a batter has developed. Pour 1 spoon of boiling water onto the tea powder. Pour the tea into the batter and stir. Add calamondin according to taste.
    5.00
    2 votes
    42
    Satay

    Satay

    Satay ( /ˈsæteɪ/,  /ˈsɑːteɪ/ SAH-tay), or sate, is a dish of marinated, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce. Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef, pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings. Satay originated in Java, Indonesia. Satay is available almost anywhere in Indonesia, where it has become a national dish. It is also popular in many other Southeast Asian countries, such as: Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Thailand as well as in the Netherlands, as Indonesia is a former Dutch colony. Satay is a very popular delicacy in Indonesia; Indonesia's diverse ethnic groups' culinary arts (see Indonesian cuisine) have produced a wide variety of satays. In Indonesia, satay can be obtained from a travelling satay vendor, from a street-side tent-restaurant, in an upper-class restaurant, or during traditional celebration feasts. In Malaysia, satay is a popular dish—especially during celebrations—and can be found throughout the country. Close
    5.00
    1 votes
    43
    Gado-gado

    Gado-gado

    Gado-gado (in Indonesian or Betawi language), also known as Lotek (in Sundanese and Javanese) is an Indonesian dish consisting of boiled vegetable salad served with a peanut sauce dressing. It is differed from lotek atah or karedok for its fresh and raw version of the vegetable covered with peanut sauce. Another similar dish is Javanese pecel. It is thought to have originally been a Sundanese dish. It is widely served from hawkers carts, stalls (warung) as well as in restaurants and hotels both in Indonesia and worldwide. Gado-gado is part of a wide range of Indonesian dressing and salad combinations, along with lotek, pecel and karedok. In many places, to retain authenticity in both the production and flavor, the peanut sauce is made in individual batches per order, in front of the customers to suit customers' personal preference on the degree of spiciness (the amount of chili pepper). However, since the dish has gained popularity (because of the increase of Asian-themed restaurants) Gado-gado sauce is now mostly made ahead of time and cooked in bulk, although this is probably more common in Western restaurants rather than in Indonesia. Compared to Western and Indonesian salads,
    4.00
    1 votes
    44
    Mie goreng

    Mie goreng

    Mie goreng (Indonesian: mie goreng or mi goreng; Malay: mee goreng or mi goreng; both meaning "fried noodles") is a dish common in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. It is made with thin yellow noodles fried in cooking oil with garlic, onion or shallots, fried prawn, chicken, or beef, sliced bakso (meatballs), chili, Chinese cabbage, cabbages, tomatoes, egg, and acar (pickles). Ubiquitous in Indonesia, it can be found everywhere in the country, sold by all food vendors from street-hawkers to high-end restaurants. Mie goreng is Indonesian one-dish meal favorite, at the street food hawkers mie goreng is very common to be sold together with nasi goreng (fried rice). It is commonly available at mamak stalls in Singapore and Malaysia and is often spicy. The dish is derived from Chinese chow mein and believed to have been introduced by Chinese immigrants in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. Mie goreng is also similar to Japanese yakisoba. However mie goreng has been more heavily integrated into Indonesian cuisine; for example the application of popular sweet soy sauce, spinkle of fried shallots, addition of spicy sambal and the absence of pork and lard in favour for shrimp, chicken,
    4.00
    1 votes
    45
    Bakpia Pathok

    Bakpia Pathok

    'Bakpia Pathok(Chinese:肉饼)are small, round-shaped Indonesian sweet rolls, usually stuffed with mung beans , but have recently come in other fillings as well (e.g. chocolate, durian, and even cheese ). They are one of Yogyakarta's specialties named after a "suburb" in this city (Pathok) where these sweet pastries were originated. These sweet rolls are similar to bigger Indonesian "pia" - the only difference being the size. They are commercially packaged in small boxes and sold at many food shops in Yogyakarta. Bakpia was influenced and originated from Chinese sweet rolls.
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    46
    Pisang goreng

    Pisang goreng

    Pisang goreng (fried banana in Malay/Indonesian) is a snack food mostly found throughout Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. In Singapore and some parts of Malaysia it is incorrectly known as "goreng pisang" (banana fritter) due to direct translation from "fried banana". It is consumed as a snack in the morning and afternoon. In Indonesia, pisang goreng is often sold by street vendors, although some sellers have a storefront from which to sell their wares. Pisang Goreng Pontianak are widely popular in Indonesia and exclusively sold in certain retail outlets. The banana is battered and then deep fried. The fritters that result are often sprinkled with cinnamon sugar and occasionally served with fresh cream. Today's pisang goreng are more sophisticated and served in various ways, such as with cheese, jam, or chocolate. In Suriname and The Netherlands this snack is also known as bakabana (meaning baked banana in Surinamese). Plantain is often used as the batter adds some flavour to the banana. Pisang Raja is a popular kind of banana used for pisang goreng. Pisang Goreng was introduced in 1511 by the Portuguese who had banana fritters as a breakfast staple. Prior to the coming of the
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    47
    Siomay

    Siomay

    Siomay (also Somay), is an Indonesian steamed fish dumpling with vegetables served in peanut sauce. It is derived from Chinese Shumai. It is considered a light meal that is similar to the Chinese Dim Sum, but is cone shaped. It is traditionally made from tenggiri (wahoo) fish meat. Sometimes other types of seafood such as tuna, mackerel, and prawn also can be used to make siomay. Other complements to siomay are steamed cabbage, potatoes, bitter gourd and tofu. Siomay is cut into bite size pieces and topped with peanut sauce, sweet soy sauce, chili sauce and a dash of lime juice. Siomay is ubiquitous in Indonesian cities. It can be found in street-side foodstalls, travelling carts, bicycle vendors, and restaurants. Just like bakso, lumpia, and pempek, siomay was influenced by Chinese Indonesian cuisine. However Chinese Indonesian siomay usually served not with peanut sauce, but in sweet-sour and spicy chili sauce. Siomay has been incorporated into Indonesian cuisine for a long time, and the most famous variety is Siomay Bandung. It has been adapted into local Sundanese cuisine. Today, most of Siomay sellers are Sundanese. Another variety of siomay is called Batagor, also originated
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    48
    Spekkoek

    Spekkoek

    Spekkoek (also called Spiku in some cities in Indonesia) or more popularly called lapis legit in Indonesia is a Dutch-Indonesian layered cake. It was developed during colonial times in the Dutch East Indies and may have been based on Dutch cake recipes using local ingredients. The cake is the Indische (Dutch people that had lived for years if not generation in Indonesia during the colonial time) version of Baumkuchen and contain popular mix spices of cinnamon, clove, mace and anise. In Indonesia, the cake is very popularly known as lapis legit, which literally means (very) rich layer-cake. The cake is very rich for a 20 cm × 20 cm size cake contains up to thirty egg yolks, 500 g of butter, and 400 g sugar. The name of the cake is derived from its layered structure. This layered structured is achieved because of the many very thin layers of cake that are piled on the top of each other. A good lapis legit has more than eighteen layers. This makes the baking of spekkoek a very labour-intensive process. The product is therefore a rather expensive delicacy: about EUR 20 per kilogram in 2010. In Indonesia, a 20x20cm-sized spekkoek (or lapis legit) can cost up to IDR 400,000 (approx. EUR
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