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  • Feb 21st 2014
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Most famous Books from Turkey is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on February 21st 2014. Items on the Most famous Books from Turkey top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Most famous Books from Turkey has gotten 410 views and has gathered 242 votes from 242 voters. O O

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    Snow

    Snow (Turkish: Kar) is a novel by Turkish author Orhan Pamuk. It was published in Turkish in 2002 and in English (translated by Maureen Freely) in 2004. The story encapsulates many of the political and cultural tensions of modern Turkey and successfully combines humor, social commentary, mysticism, and a deep sympathy with its characters. Kar is the word for Snow, but the main character also abbreviates his name to Ka (his initials) with the novel set in the eastern Turkish city of Kars. An opening (and recurring) theme concerns reasons behind a suicide epidemic among teenage girls (which actually took place in the city of Batman). Though most of the early part of the story is told in the third person from Ka's point of view, an omniscient narrator sometimes makes his presence known, posing as a friend of Ka's who is telling the story based on Ka's journals and correspondence. This narrator sometimes provides the reader with information before Ka knows it or foreshadows later events in the story. At times, the action seems somewhat dream-like. Ka is a poet, who returns to Turkey after 12 years of political exile in Germany. He has several motives, first, as a journalist, to
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    The White Castle

    The White Castle (original Turkish title: Beyaz Kale) is a novel by Turkish author Orhan Pamuk. The story is about a young Italian scholar sailing from Venice to Naples who is taken prisoner by the Ottoman Empire. Soon after, he becomes the slave of a scholar known as Hoja (master), a man who is about his own age, and with whom he shares a strong physical resemblance. Hoja reports to the Pasha, who asks him many questions about science and the world. Gradually Hoja and the narrator are introduced to the Sultan, for whom they eventually design an enormous iron weapon. The events of this story take place in 17th century Istanbul. The slave is told to instruct the master in Western science and technology, from medicine to astronomy. But Hoja wonders why he and his slave are the persons they are and whether given knowledge of each other's most intimate secrets, they could actually exchange identities. The story begins with a frame tale in the form of a preface written by historian Faruk Darvinoglu (a character referenced in Pamuk’s previous book, The Silent House) between 1984 and 1985, according to the fictional dedication to the character’s late sister at the beginning of the frame
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    The Museum of Innocence

    The Museum of Innocence (Turkish: Masumiyet Müzesi) is a novel by Orhan Pamuk, Nobel-laureate Turkish novelist published on August 29, 2008. The book is a long and detailed account of the obsessive love that Kemal, a wealthy businessman, bears for Füsun, a lower class shop girl 12 years Kemal's junior, for over 30 years starting in 1975. Kemal loves without regard to the interests or situation of Füsun. Oblivious to his own selfishness, Kemal first refuses to give up his fiancée to be with the love of his life, and then becomes an obsessive collector of the artefacts of his life with Füsun. This is a relationship that is both lengthy and increasingly bizarre as Kemal objectifies Füsun and becomes a collector intent on satisfying his emotional obsession with his object of desire (Füsun) rather carrying on a healthy human relationship with his beloved. The book is filled with references to butterflies, a caged bird and other collectibles and collectors as Kemal carries out the fetishism of a collector. Kemal, while enthralled by Füsun, can’t in the end treat her as a subject, rather than an object – a human being rather than a thing. But Kemal is not the only person that treats the
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    A Mind at Peace

    A Mind at Peace (Archipelago Books, 2008; English translation of Huzur, 1949) is an iconic Turkish novel by Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar (1901-62), one of the pioneers of literary modernism in Turkey. Tanpınar was a poet, novelist, and critic who worked as a professor of Ottoman and Turkish literature at Istanbul University. Though he was known in his lifetime as a major poet, renowned scholar, and prolific essayist, he was not recognized as a major fiction writer until a decade after his death. It was in the context of the growing interest in the 19th and early 20th century Ottoman past that Tanpinar’s fiction was rediscovered and given new meaning. His subject matter has become relevant to contemporary interests and his aesthetic complexity (including a dense Perso-Arabic vocabulary) is no longer objectionable. Today, he is considered to be an icon of Turkish literature and is an influence on many contemporary Turkish novelists, foremost among them Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk. A Mind at Peace first appeared in serial in the daily newspaper Cumhuriyet. The novel is part of a multi-volume roman fleuve that includes the untranslated novels, Song in Mahur and Waiting in the Wings. It is set
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    The Silent House

    The Silent House (1983) is Orhan Pamuk's second novel published after Cevdet Bey and His Sons. The novel tells the story of a week in which 3 siblings go to visit their grandmother in Cennethisar, a small town near Istanbul. The Silent House consists of 32 chapters. Each chapter is narrated from a different narrator's point of view in the first person. The names of the five narrators in the novel in turn are Recep, Buyukhanim, Hasan, Faruk and Metin. The narrator of the opening chapter is Recep and the narrator of the closing chapter is Buyukhanim. Each of the narrators has a different number of chapters to tell. Hasan has eight, Buyukhanim seven, Recep six, Faruk six, and Metin has five chapters. The distribution of the chapters to the narrators are as following: Place: Cennethisar Time: July 1980. The Silent House takes place just one month before the military coup of September 12 in Turkey. Therefore, the novel carries the influence of the great political tension. Behcet Necatigil summarizes the plot of the novel: One of the five narrators of The Silent House, historian Faruk does some research on Ottoman History in an archive in Gebze which is a small town near Istanbul. →
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    My Name is Red

    My Name Is Red (Benim Adım Kırmızı) is a 1998 Turkish novel by Nobel laureate author Orhan Pamuk. The English translation won the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 2003,. The French version won the French Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger and the Italian version the Premio Grinzane Cavour in 2002. The novel and its English translation established Pamuk's international reputation and contributed to his winning of the Nobel prize. In recognition of its status in Pamuk's oeuvre, the novel was re-published in Erdağ Göknar's translation as part of the Everyman's Library Contemporary Classics series in 2010. The influences of authors Joyce, Kafka, Mann, Nabokov and Rushdie can be seen in Pamuk's work. BBC Radio 4 broadcast an adaptation of the novel in 2008. The main characters in the novel are miniaturists in the Ottoman Empire, one of whom is murdered in the first chapter. From this point, Pamuk — in a postmodern style reminiscent of Jorge Luis Borges — plays with the reader and with literary conventions. The last paragraph of the English translation involves metafiction. Each chapter of the novel has a different narrator, and usually there are thematic and chronological
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    The Black Book

    The Black Book (Kara Kitap in Turkish) is a novel by Turkish author Orhan Pamuk. It was published in Turkish in 1990 and first translated and published in English in 1994. In 2006, it was translated into English again by Maureen Freely. The protagonist, an Istanbul lawyer named Galip, finds one day that his wife Rüya (the name means "dream" in Turkish) has mysteriously left him with very little explanation. He wanders around the city looking for his clues to her whereabouts. He suspects that his wife has taken up with her half-brother, a columnist for Milliyet named Celal, and it happens that he is also missing. The story of Galip's search is interspersed with reprints of Celal's columns, which are lengthy, highly literate meditations on the city and its history. Galip thinks that by living as Celal he can figure out how Celal thinks and locate both him and his wife, so he takes up residence in Celal's apartment, wearing his clothes and eventually writing his column. Galip starts getting mysterious phone calls from one of Celal's obsessed fans, who displays an astonishing familiarity with the columnist's writings. After Galip's columns under Celal's name start to take the form of
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    The New Life

    The New Life (Yeni Hayat in Turkish) is a 1994 novel by Turkish author Orhan Pamuk, translated to English in 1998 by Güneli Gün. The plot centers around a young engineering student in Istanbul who discovers a "new life" in the pages of a book of the same name. The protagonist is so thrilled by this novel that he sets off in search of the new life it describes, finding a number of other readers who have become similarly consumed as well as a few people who seek to destroy the book because of the effect it has on its followers. No passages from the book are revealed, and readers of the novel are left to hypothesize about its nature through the actions of the main character and other obsessed readers. Pamuk's stream of consciousness writing style is reminiscent of Jack Kerouac's On The Road. His agitated, phantasmagorical prose style has been compared to Franz Kafka's body of work, too.
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