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    1

    20 Hrs., 40 Min.

    • Year Released: 1928
    20 Hrs., 40 Min.: Our Flight in the Friendship is the title of a book written by pioneering aviator Amelia Earhart. It was first published in 1928, but has continued to be reprinted in periodic new editions nearly 80 years later. In this book, Earhart writes about her experiences as a passenger in the Friendship, which made her the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean by air in 1928 (she later accomplished the feat in a solo flight). Earhart combines actual log entries made during the flight with recollections of her childhood and how she first became interested in aviation. This was the first of two books Earhart would write in her lifetime; the other being 1932's The Fun of It. A third book credited to her, Last Flight, was published posthumously and consisted of diary entries from her ill-fated 1937 flight around the world. National Geographic named 20 Hrs., 40 Min. one of the "100 greatest adventure books of all time" and republished the work in 2003 under its National Geographic Adventure Classics imprint.
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    2

    A Fete Worse Than Death

    • Year Released: 2003
    A Fête Worse Than Death: A Journey through an English Summer (ISBN 0-7553-1191-4) is a travel book by Iain Aitch. It was written in the summer of 2002 when the author took a trip around England to see what made the English act so strangely in the summer. The book was initially published by Review in 2003 and then in paperback in 2004.
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    3

    A Little Tour in France

    • Year Released: 1884
    A Little Tour in France is a book of travel writing by Henry James. Originally published under the title En Province in 1883–1884 as a serial in The Atlantic Monthly, the book recounts a six-week tour James made of many provincial towns in France, including Tours, Bourges, Nantes, Toulouse, Arles and several others. The first book publication was in 1884. A second, extensively revised edition was published in 1900. James gives the idea for the book in the first paragraph of the first installment of the original magazine serial: "France may be Paris, but Paris is not France." He conceived the book as a description of and even homage to the provinces. James had tried living in Paris before settling in London in 1876. He returned to France in 1882 to discover more of French provincial life than he had previously been able to see. James began his tour in Touraine, then journeyed southwest through Provence, and then north along the flooding Rhône River to Burgundy. The resulting book was a pleasant mix of art and architecture criticism, references to classic literature as well as guide-books and pamphlets, sharp observation of people and places, and knowledgeable discussion of French
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    4

    A Tramp Abroad

    • Year Released: 1880
    A Tramp Abroad is a work of non-fiction travel literature by American author Mark Twain, published in 1880. The book details a journey by the author, with his friend Harris (a character created for the book, and based on his closest friend, Joseph Twichell), through central and southern Europe. While the stated goal of the journey is to walk most of the way, the men find themselves using other forms of transport as they traverse the continent. The book is the third of Mark Twain's five travel books and is often thought to be an unofficial sequel to the first one, The Innocents Abroad. As the two men make their way through Germany, the Alps, and Italy, they encounter situations made all the more humorous by their reactions to them. The narrator (Twain) plays the part of the American tourist of the time, believing that he understands all that he sees, but in reality understanding none of it. The first half of the book covers their stay in south-western Germany (Heidelberg, Mannheim, a trip on the Neckar river, Baden-Baden and the Black Forest). The second part describes his travels through Switzerland and eastern France (Lucerne, Interlaken, Zermatt, Chamonix and Geneva). The end of
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    5

    A Turn in the South

    • Year Released: 1989
    A Turn in the South is a travelogue of the American South written by Nobel Prize-winning author V. S. Naipaul. The book was published in 1989 and is based upon the author's travels in the southern states of the U.S.. Naipaul has written fiction and non-fiction about life in the Caribbean, India, Africa and South America. In this book the subject is the U.S.A., including South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi, et cetera. He discusses topics such as Martin Luther King, the economy, technology, industrialization, tourism, religion, rednecks and racism. The book works to compare the American South to its geographical neighbors, the nations of the Caribbean.
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    6

    Among the Believers: An Islamic Journey

    • Year Released: 1981
    Among the Believers: An Islamic Journey is a book by the Nobel laureate V. S. Naipaul. Published in 1981, the book was based on a six month journey across the Asian continent. V.S. Naipaul explores the culture and the explosive situation in countries where Islamic fundamentalism was growing. His travels (and travails) start with Iran, on to Pakistan, Malaysia and end in Indonesia, with a short stop in Pakistan and Iran on the return to the UK. The proposed aim of the author was to study cultures which have a long pre-Islamic history and their modern attempts to establish a religious state. Naipaul does not include Arab countries as he is interested in "converted peoples". Iran: he went to Iran just after the revolution and could listen to all the mixed voices, guided around the holy places like Qom by a communist, Behzad. Ayatollah Sadegh Khalkhali is interviewed. Pakistan: is a country based on Islam, at the same time with strong Indian-English tradition. Being of Indian origin, Naipaul has strong views on Pakistan, and gives a controversial portrait of the country. Malaysia: Naipaul meets with the famous Anwar Ibrahim, when he is a rising star. Anwar had been to Iran and met
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    7

    An Area of Darkness

    • Year Released: 1964
    An Area of Darkness is a book authored by V.S. Naipaul in 1964. It is a travelogue detailing Naipaul's trip through India in the early sixties. It was the first of Naipaul's acclaimed Indian trilogy which includes India: A Wounded Civilization and India: A Million Mutinies Now. A deeply pessimistic work, An Area of Darkness conveys the acute sense of disillusionment which the author experiences on his first visit to his native land. True to his style, the narration is anecdotal and descriptive.
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    8

    Arabian Sands

    • Year Released: 1959
    Arabian Sands is a 1959 book by explorer and travel writer Wilfred Thesiger. The book encompasses the author's travels across the Arabian Empty Quarter in the periods between 1945 and 1950, attempting to capture the lives of the Bedu People and other inhabitants of the Arabian peninsula. It is considered a classic of the travel book genre. The book largely reflects on the changes and large scale development that took place after the Second World War and the subsequent gradual erosion of traditional Bedouin ways of life that had previously existed unaltered for thousands of years. In 2008, Majid Abdulrazak (a film director from the United Arab Emirates) produced a film version of Arabian Sands which was self-funded and employed actors from the UAE and Oman in most of the major roles.
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    9

    Around the World in 80 Days

    Around the World in 80 Days is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC TV program Around the World in 80 Days. This trip was intended to follow in the footsteps of the (fictitious) Phileas Fogg in the Jules Verne book Around the World in Eighty Days. The use of aeroplanes was not allowed, a self-imposed restriction. Steam liners don't exist anymore, so all of the long sea journeys had to be on container ships or freighters. The one exception was the trip from Dubai to Mumbai (Bombay) on a dhow, a high point of the trip. This book, like the other books that Michael Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. Unlike the following books, in which the pictures were taken (almost) exclusively by Basil Pao, the pictures in this book are from many sources. (Basil Pao did provide the pictures for the Hong Kong to Shanghai stretch.) To some extent the book reads like a diary, as Michael Palin starts each section of the book with a heading like "Day 42 - Hong Kong". This reflects the fact that the whole trip was a kind of "race against time" effort, and being aware of how many days have
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    10

    Aunt Jane's Nieces and Uncle John

    Aunt Jane's Nieces and Uncle John is a young-adult novel written by L. Frank Baum, famous as the creator of the Land of Oz. It is the sixth volume in the ten-book series Aunt Jane's Nieces, Baum's greatest commercial success after the Oz books themselves. Like the other books in the series, this sixth volume was issued under the pen name "Edith Van Dyne," one of Baum's multiple pseudonyms. Unlike the Oz books and Baum's other fantasies, the Aunt Jane's Nieces stories were set in the contemporary world, and so could be enriched with the author's real-life experiences. Baum based much of the material in the sixth book on a trip that he and his wife took through the American Southwest in February and March 1904 — just as he had earlier relied on his 1906 trip to the Mediterranean and Egypt for his books Aunt Jane's Nieces Abroad (1907) and The Last Egyptian (1908). Aunt Jane's Nieces and Uncle John bears some noteworthy resemblances to Baum's earlier novel Annabel (1906). Both books involve a rich man and a lost child suffering in poverty; both plots depend heavily on coincidence, and both end with a nod to divine providence. Aunt Jane's Nieces and Uncle John picks up the continuing
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    11

    Bill Bryson's African Diary

    • Year Released: 2002
    Bill Bryson's African Diary is a 2002 book by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. The book details a trip Bryson took to Kenya in 2002. Bryson describes his experiences there and observations about Kenyan culture, geography, and politics, as well as his visits to poverty-fighting projects run by CARE International, to which he donated all royalties for the book.
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    12

    Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before

    • Year Released: 2002
    Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before (United States), or Into the Blue: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before (Australia), is a travel book by Tony Horwitz. In it, the Pulitzer prize winning journalist travels to different parts of the world, following in the footsteps of explorer James Cook. The book compares the current conditions of the places Cook visited to what Cook documented at the time, and describes the different legacies Cook has left behind. Horowitz begins with his experience as a volunteer deckhand on the replica of HM Bark Endeavour. Some of the places that Horowitz visits in following the footsteps of Cook, are Australia, the small island nation of Niue, the Society Islands, Tonga, New Zealand, the birth place and home of Cook in North Yorkshire England, Alaska and Hawaii.
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    13

    Brazilian Adventure

    • Year Released: 1933
    Brazilian Adventure is a book by Peter Fleming about his search for the lost Colonel Percy Fawcett in the Brazilian jungle. Fawcett along with his son and another companion had disappeared while searching for the Lost City of Z in 1925. Fleming was working as literary editor for The Times when he answered a small ad asking for volunteers to join an expedition to find out what had happened to Fawcett. The story of Fleming's 1932 expedition is told in Brazilian Adventure. Despite a great deal of fanfare, the expedition seems to have been very poorly organized and Fleming and his companions do not seem to have done much preparation, not even bothering to learn Portuguese. The expedition, commanded by an eccentric American "Major George Lewy Pingle" (in reality, an alias for Captain J. G. Holman), eventually made its way to the Araguaya river and proceeded down it, blasting away at any creature that moved. When the expedition reached the Tapirapé River, which Fawcett was known to have traveled, the group broke up, with Major Pingle refusing to go any farther. Fleming and two other colleagues resigned from the expedition and headed up river alone. After some difficult traveling, they
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    14
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    15

    Come, Tell Me How You Live

    • Year Released: 1983
    Come, Tell Me How You Live is a short book of autobiography and travel literature by crime writer Agatha Christie. It is one of only two books she wrote and had published under both of her married names of "Christie" and "Mallowan" (the other being Star Over Bethlehem and other stories) and was first published in the UK in November 1946 by William Collins and Sons and in the same year in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company. The UK edition retailed for ten shillings and sixpence (10/6) and the US edition at $3.00. The book's title, a quote from verse three of the White Knight’s poem, Haddocks' Eyes from chapter eight of Through the Looking-Glass (1871) by Lewis Carroll, is also word play on the word "Tell", used to describe an archaeological mound or site. Christie first thought of writing the book in 1938 and wrote to her literary agent, Edmund Cork, in July of that year, suggesting the project and telling him that it would be "not at all serious or archaeological". In the event, she wrote the book during the Second World War after her husband, Max Mallowan, had been posted to Egypt with the British Council in February 1942 and she was living alone in London. She occupied her hours by
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    16

    Congo Journey

    Congo Journey (1996) is an autobiographical novel by British author Redmond O'Hanlon, following his trip across Congo-Brazzaville (now Republic of the Congo), taking a friend to Lake Tele in search of Mokèlé-mbèmbé, a legendary Congo dinosaur. Travel writer Michael Shapiro considers the book as one of the "top 30 travel books of all time," and declares the book, chronicling the author's search for the legendary dinosaur, to be in the literary tradition of Joseph Conrad. O’Hanlon's adventure, he says, is by turns dangerous and funny, as he "takes the long way to the lake and nearly gets killed by a village headman", trying to save a baby gorilla, while he "battles his demons and the haunting spirits of Central Africa." According to Shapiro, O’Hanlon emerges from the jungle a changed man. The novel was republished in 1997 for USA readers as No Mercy: A Journey to the Heart of the Congo.
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    17
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    18

    De Nieuwe en Onbekende Weereld

    • Year Released: 1671
    De Nieuwe en Onbekende Weereld (Dutch) or The New and Unknown World (English) is a book by Arnoldus Montanus (1625–1683), a Dutch teacher and author. The full title of the work in Dutch is De Nieuwe en Onbekende Weereld: of Beschryving van America en 't Zuid-Land, Vervaetende d'Oorfprong der Americaenen en Zuid-landers, gedenkwaerdige togten derwaerds, Gelegendheid Der vaste Kuften, Eilanden, Steden, Sterkten, Dorpen, Tempels, Bergen, Fonteinen, Stroomen, Huisen, de natuur van Beesten, Boomen, Planten en vreemde Gewasschen, Gods dienst en Zeden, Wonderlijke Voorvallen, Vereeuwde en Nieuwe Oorlogen: Verciert met Af-beeldsels na 't leven in America gemaekt, en beschreeven door Arnoldus Montanus' The full title of the work in English is The New and Unknown World: or Description of America and the Southland, Containing the Origin of the Americans and South-landers, remarkable voyages thither, Quality of the Shores, Islands, Cities, Fortresses, Towns, Temples, Mountains, Sources, Rivers, Houses, the nature of Beasts, Trees, Plants and foreign Crops, Religion and Manners, Miraculous Occurrences, Old and New Wars: Adorned with Illustrations drawn from the life in America, and described by
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    19

    Death in the Afternoon

    • Year Released: 1932
    Death in the Afternoon is a non-fiction book by Ernest Hemingway about the ceremony and traditions of Spanish bullfighting. It was originally published in 1932. The book provides a look at the history and what Hemingway considers the magnificence of bullfighting. It also contains a deeper contemplation on the nature of fear and courage. Any discussion concerning bullfighting would be incomplete without some mention of the controversy surrounding it. Toward that end Hemingway commented, "anything capable of arousing passion in its favor will surely raise as much passion against it." The chances are that the first bullfight any spectator attends may not be a good one artistically; for that to happen there must be good bullfighters and good bulls; artistic bullfighters and poor bulls do not make interesting fights, for the bullfighter who has ability to do extraordinary things with the bull which are capable of producing the intensest degree of emotion in the spectator but will not attempt them with a bull which he cannot depend on to charge... — Ernest Hemingway, from "Death in the Afternoon" Hemingway became a bullfighting aficionado after seeing the Pamplona fiesta in the 1920s,
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    20

    Down Under

    • Year Released: 1999
    °° Down Under is the British title of a 2000 travelogue book about Australia written by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. In the United States and Canada it was published titled In a Sunburned Country, a title taken from the famous Australian poem, "My Country". It was also published as part of Walk About, which included Down Under and another of Bryson's books, A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail, in one volume. Bill Bryson describes his travels by railway and car throughout Australia, his conversations with people in all walks of life about the history, geography, unusual plants and animals of the country, and his wry impressions of the life, culture and amenities (or lack thereof) in each locality. In a style similar to his book A Walk in the Woods, or William Least Heat-Moon's Blue Highways, Bryson's research enabled him to include many stories about Australia's 19th-century explorers and settlers who suffered extreme deprivations, as well as details about its natural resources, culture, and economy. His writings are intertwined with recurring humorous themes, notably, in the chapter Crossing Australia he makes constant reference to
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    21

    Du Chakay Duniya

    • Year Released: 1986
    Du Chakay Duniya (Bengali: দু চাকায় দুনিয়া ) (Meaning :The World on Two Wheels in English) is a Bengali book written by the first Indian Globe -Trotter Bimol Mukerji (1903–1987) based on his experiences of traveling through the world on a bicycle. In 1926 Bimol Mukerji went on an epic world tour on a bicycle. Already before that he had completed touring India on his bicycle during the period 1921 - 1926. Banking on a meager budget and an insatiable thirst of knowing the unknown world he went on his epic adventure of world tour. He traveled through Arab, Iran, Turkey, Syria, Britain, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Russia, Greece, Egypt, Sudan, Italy, Switzerland, France,Denmark, Germany, USA, Columbia,Ecuador, Peru, Hawaii, Japan, China, HongKong, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and many other countries before returning to India again in 1937. As the fist Indian globe trotter he has jotted down all of his amazing and awesome experiences of globe trotting in this book. Amarendra Chakravorty, the editor of the popular Bengali travel magazine Bhraman has done this great job of editing and re-publishing this adventurous journey of Bimol Mukerji. In Chakravorty's words as on the
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    22

    English Hours

    English Hours is a book of travel writing by Henry James published in 1905. The book collected various essays James had written on England over a period of more than thirty years, beginning in the 1870s. The essays had originally appeared in such periodicals as The Nation, The Century Magazine, Scribner's Magazine, The Galaxy and Lippincott's Magazine. James wrote a new introduction for the book and extensively revised many of the essays to create a more coherent whole. England was James' adopted country, so it is not surprising that the essays in English Hours are primarily positive and sometimes downright cheerful. The essay on London which begins the book gives full play to the British capital's definitely non-beautiful impression on James when he arrived in 1869: "It was not lovely - it was in fact rather horrible; but as I move again through dusky, tortuous miles, in the greasy four-wheeler to which my luggage had compelled me to commit myself, I recognize the first step in an initiation of which the subsequent stages were to abound in pleasant things." Some of the most pleasant things were James' trips to the English countryside, memorably described in essays such as "North
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    23

    Following the Equator

    • Year Released: 1897
    Following the Equator (American English title) or More Tramps Abroad (English title) is a non-fiction travelogue published by American author Mark Twain in 1897. Twain was practically bankrupt in 1894 due to a failed investment into a "revolutionary" typesetting machine. In an attempt to extricate himself from debt of $100,000 (equivalent of about $2.5 million in 2010) he undertook a tour of the British Empire in 1895, a route chosen to provide numerous opportunities for lectures in the English language. In Following the Equator, an account of that travel published in 1897, the author criticizes racism, imperialism and missionary zeal in observations woven into the narrative with classical Twain wit. In keeping with that wit, and Twain's love of a tall tale, Twain included a number of fictional stories in the body of what is otherwise a non-fiction work. In particular, the story of how Cecil Rhodes made his fortune by finding a newspaper in the belly of a shark, and the story of how a man named Ed Jackson made good in life out of a fake letter of introduction to Cornelius Vanderbilt, were anthologized in Charles Neider (ed) The Complete Short Stories of Mark Twain, (Doubleday,
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    24

    Full Circle – Michael Palin

    Full Circle is a travel book by writer and television presenter Michael Palin. Full Circle is a written accompaniment for Palin's 1997 BBC travel documentary Full Circle with Michael Palin. The book recounts the journey of Palin and the BBC film crew to countries and regions around the rim of the Pacific Ocean in 1996 and 1997. Full Circle consists of text by Palin and photographs by Basil Pao, who accompanied the crew on the trip. Basil Pao also produced a book, Full Circle - The Photographs, containing many more of his pictures. Palin visits various locations in the Russia, United States, Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam, Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, Mexico and Canada, with each region appearing as a separate chapter. Each chapter features a day-by-day recount, similar to a diary, with headings such as "Day 43 - Huis Ten Bosch". There are occasional breaks in this format, however, where particular days are not mentioned. The trip described in the book covered 50,000 miles (80,000 km) through 17 countries over a period of ten months, the longest of Palin's trips. This book was made available as an audiobook, read by
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    25

    Green Hills of Africa

    • Year Released: 1935
    Green Hills of Africa is a 1935 work of nonfiction written by Ernest Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961). Hemingway's second work of nonfiction, Green Hills of Africa is an account of a month on safari he and his wife, Pauline Marie Pfeiffer, took in East Africa during December 1933. Green Hills of Africa is divided into four parts: Pursuit and Conversation, Pursuit Remembered, Pursuit and Failure, and Pursuit as Happiness, each of which plays a different role in the story. Much of narrative describes Hemingway's adventures hunting in East Africa, interspersed with ruminations about literature and authors. Generally the East African landscape Hemingway describes is in the region of Lake Manyara in Tanzania. The book starts with Part 1 ("Pursuit and Conversation"), with Hemingway and a European expat in conversation about American writers. Relations between the white hunters and native trackers are described, as well as Hemingway's jealousy of the other hunters. Part 2 ("Pursuit Remembered") presents a flashback of hunting in northern Tanzania with a description of the Rift Valley and descriptions of how to field dress prey. Hemingway kills a rhino, but Karl kills a bigger one.
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    26

    Hemingway Adventure

    Michael Palin's Hemingway Adventure is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC TV program Michael Palin's Hemingway Adventure. This book, like the other books that Michael Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. All of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the team who did the trip. The idea behind this trip was to visit all of the places where Ernest Hemingway had lived and traveled and visited. Michael Palin tried also to meet some people who had known Hemingway, and to do some of the things Hemingway had done. The book contains eight chapters: Chicago/Michigan, Italy, Paris, Spain, Key West, Africa, Cuba, and American West. The material follows Ernest Hemingway's life in chronological order, except that some chapters, for example Africa, cover several visits to the same place at different times in Hemingway's life. (This is somewhat different from the associated TV program, which makes almost no attempt to follow Hemingway's life chronologically.) The book also contains a three-page Introduction, a two-page world map
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    27

    Himalaya

    • Year Released: 1993
    Himalaya is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC television documentary series Himalaya with Michael Palin. This book, like the other books that Michael Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. All of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the team who did the trip (Pao also produced a book, Inside Himalaya, containing many more of his pictures). The book contains eight chapters: Pakistan, India, Nepal, Tibet, Yunnan (China), Nagaland and Assam(India), Bhutan, and Bangladesh. The book is presented in a diary format; Palin starts each section of the book with a heading such as "Day Forty One: Srinagar". Not all days are mentioned, a result of the trip as a whole being broken up into shorter trips (a fact that is not mentioned in the series). Palin makes several treks up into the mountains, including one trek up to Everest Base Camp at 17,500 feet (5,300 meters). Not bad, considering that Palin was 60 years old at the time. Other encounters and experiences that are related by Michael Palin include finding out that the Dalai
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    28

    In Patagonia

    • Year Released: 1977
    In Patagonia is an English travel book by Bruce Chatwin, published in 1977. In 1972, Chatwin was hired by the Sunday Times Magazine as an adviser on art and architecture. His association with the magazine cultivated his narrative skills and he travelled on many international assignments, writing on such subjects as Algerian migrant workers and the Great Wall of China, and interviewing such people as André Malraux, in France, and Nadezhda Mandelstam, in the Soviet Union. In 1972, Chatwin interviewed the 93-year-old architect and designer Eileen Gray in her Paris salon, where he noticed a map of the area of South America called Patagonia which she had painted. "I've always wanted to go there," Bruce told her. "So have I," she replied, "go there for me." Two years later, in November 1974, Chatwin flew out to Lima in Peru, and reached Patagonia a month later. When he arrived there he severed himself from the newspaper with a telegram: "Have gone to Patagonia." He spent six months there, a trip which resulted in the book In Patagonia (1977), which established his reputation as a travel writer. "With this book," a reviewer noted, "Chatwin redefined the genre of travel writing with his
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    30

    In Xanadu: A Quest

    • Year Released: 1989
    In Xanadu is a 1989 travel book by William Dalrymple. Unlike typical travel books, In Xanadu traces the path taken by Marco Polo from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem to the site of Shangdu, famed as Xanadu in English literature, in Inner Mongolia, China. The book begins with William Dalrymple taking a vial of holy oil from the burning lamps of the Holy Sepulchre, which he is to transport to Shang-du (Xanadu), the summer seat of the King Kubla Khan. It has been mentioned that Kubla Khan wanted a hundred learned men armed with Christian knowledge to come to his Khanate and spread the knowledge of Christianity. However, that plan was abandoned, and Marco Polo, along with his uncle, set out from Jerusalem on the silk route to Shang-du, to deliver a vial of the holy oil, which was rumoured to be inexhaustible, and therefore kept the lamps at the Sepulchre constantly burning. The rest of the journey is outlined with descriptions of most of the ancient sites along the Silk Route, which Marco Polo was supposed to have passed. The author compares the old time splendor of the cities on the silk route to their present physical and political conditions, and thereby illustrates
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    31

    Into the Wild

    • Year Released: 1996
    Into the Wild is a 1996 non-fiction book written by Jon Krakauer. It is an expansion of Krakauer's 9,000-word article on Christopher McCandless entitled "Death of an Innocent", which appeared in the January 1993 issue of Outside. The book was adapted into a 2007 movie of the same name directed by Sean Penn with Emile Hirsch starring as McCandless. Chris McCandless grew up in suburban Annandale, Virginia. After graduating in 1990 with high grades from Emory University, McCandless ceased communicating with his family, gave away his college fund of $25,000 to Oxfam, and began traveling, later abandoning his car. In April 1992, McCandless hitchhiked to the Stampede Trail in Alaska. There, McCandless headed down the snow-covered trail to begin an odyssey with only 10 pounds of rice, a .22 caliber rifle, several boxes of rifle rounds, a camera, and a small selection of reading material – including a field guide to the region's edible plants, Tana'ina Plantlore. His backpack was later found to contain his wallet, containing multiple forms of identification, his social security card, $300, and library cards. A map of the area was also found in his backpack. He declined an acquaintance's
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    32

    Italian Hours

    Italian Hours is a book of travel writing by Henry James published in 1909. The book collected essays that James had written over nearly forty years about a country he knew and loved well. James extensively revised and sometimes expanded the essays to create a more consistent whole. He also added two new essays and an introduction. Italian Hours ends with the phrase, "the luxury of loving Italy," and everything in the book indicates that James enjoyed this luxury to the fullest. But he was by no means a blind lover. His opening essay on Venice, for instance, doesn't gloss over the sad conditions of life for the city's people: "Their habitations are decayed; their taxes heavy; their pockets light; their opportunities few." Still, James goes on to sketch enough of the beauty of Venice to make it seem a fair compensation. Throughout the book he constantly comes back to the beauty and amenity of Italian life, despite the all too frequent material shortcomings. Venice and Rome get the most extended treatment, but James doesn't neglect the rest of the country. His Roman essays, though, show the strongest touch of his own experiences, especially his long rides on horseback through the
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    33

    Journey to the End of the Whale

    • Year Released: 2005
    Journey to the End of the Whale (2005) is a novel by John David Morley, a book that almost killed its author in the making. Swiss orphan, insurance agent and amateur marine biologist Daniel Serraz free-floats with life’s currents until a traumatic midlife episode sends him on a journey of discovery to the remote east Indonesian island of Lefó. There, he will uncover the secret of his origins, but not before risking everything hunting with the islanders, the last torchbearers of an ancient tradition by which whales are bested by men in teak boats, harpooned by hand on the open sea. Writing in The Observer, novelist and critic Adam Mars-Jones described the book as “a paean to the majesty, complexity and otherness of the world's whales; and an elegy for a way of life which depended on killing them.” In The Sunday Telegraph, Matthew Alexander wrote: "A marvellous and original work of fiction, which has not quite received all of the recognition it deserves" was the verdict of novelist and broadcaster Melvyn Bragg, who chose Journey to the End of the Whale as one of his 'Books of the year' in The Observer. In The Observer magazine, Joe Holden concluded simply: “If ever a writer put his
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    La 628-E8

    La 628-E8

    • Year Released: 1907
    La 628-E8 is a 'novel' by the French novelist and playwright Octave Mirbeau, published by Fasquelle in 1907. La 628-E8 is noteworthy for its genre indeterminacy. Part travelogue, part fantasy, part cultural commentary and critique, Mirbeau’s book highlights its own unclassifiability: “Is it a diary?”, the narrator wonders. “Is it even the account of a trip?” Titled after the number of Mirbeau’s licence plate, La 628-E8 begins by recounting Mirbeau’s travels to Belgium, whose colonial exploitation of Belgian Congo rubber and abuse of the indigenous people Mirbeau excoriates. The book then proceeds to the Netherlands, where he finds remembrances of Rembrandt, Van Gogh and also Claude Monet. It is during his sojourn in this country that Mirbeau encounters his old friend, the deranged speculator Weil-See, whose reflections on mathematics and metaphysics are among Mirbeau’s most colorful pages. Mirbeau’s fictional car trip then takes him to Germany, whose industry, cleanliness, and order stand in contrast to what Mirbeau regarded as the slovenliness and laxity of his own countrymen. To Mirbeau, the automobile represents an ideal instrument for combatting ethnocentrism and xenophobia.
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    Labbaik

    Labbaik (Urdu: لبیک) is a travelogue and reportage of Mumtaz Mufti's Hajj. Its a classic of Urdu and is one of the best selling books in Pakistan. In this journey he was accompanied with Qudrat Ullah Shahab and had many mystical experiences.
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    Last Flight

    • Year Released: 1937
    Last Flight is the title of a book published in 1937 consisting of diary entries and other notes compiled by aviatrix Amelia Earhart during her ill-fated attempt that year at flying around the world. Her husband, publisher George Palmer Putnam, edited the collection which was published posthumously as a tribute to his wife. Consisting of hand-written diary entries, Earhart's writings cover the period from March 1937 up until her final entry on July 1, the day before her plane was reported missing en route to Howland Island in the South Pacific. The work is augmented by additional material written by Putnam, as well as a poem, "Courage", which Earhart had herself written. Although credited to Earhart, historians have cast doubt as to how much of this book was actually written by Earhart and how much had been rewritten or embellished by Putnam.
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    Letters from an American Farmer

    Letters from an American Farmer

    • Year Released: 1782
    Letters From An American Farmer And Sketches Of Eighteenth-Century America was published by Jean de Crèvecœur in 1782 but written before the American Revolution. Crèvecœur provided one of the first examples of American literature to Europeans. Through a series of letters, Crèvecœur illustrates the idealized version of a free society, America. While the first letters portray a perfect conception of America, through his secluded farm called Pine Hill, the following letters depict a land damaged and destroyed by society and civilization. One such entity is slavery, which is described throughout the book. The view of Crèvecœur on immigration and emigration is worthy of notice: "Ubi panis ibi patria".
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    Local color

    Local Color is the third published book by the American author Truman Capote, released in the Fall of 1950. Local Color includes notes and sketches about persons and places, including travel journal-style essays on cities and countries Capote had lived in or visited. Local Color was published while Capote was vacationing in Venice. Because Capote was in the habit of working with a number of fashionable magazines he was very keen to take a personal part in the layout and formatting of the physical book, including color schemes and photographic layouts. The book includes nine vignettes: Local Color received mixed reviews upon its publication. It received a brief unfavorable review from the Los Angeles Times.. The Boston Sunday Herald gave Truman's writing an unfavorable review, but praised some of the work's photography. The Providence Sunday Journal offered a positive review of Capote's writing style, stating: Sales of Local Color reached approximately 4,500 books total.
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    Mingling Among the Mongols

    Mingling Among the Mongols

    Mingling Among the Mongols is a 1985 travelogue written by Israeli born historian Christopher Gudgeon. It chronicles the author's travels through Russia via the Trans-Siberian Railway, Mongolia and the northern regions of China. The book was noted for the author's complete immersion into the culture and tradition of the people he came to meet - as well as chronicling his own descent into alcoholism, spurred by his appreciation for Mongolian vodka. Alcoholism remains a problematic feature of the region, and Gudgeon is a continuing sponsor of alcohol support groups in Ulanbataar, the country's capital.
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    New Europe

    New Europe is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC television documentary series Michael Palin's New Europe. This book, like the other books that Michael Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. All of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the team who did the trip. The book contains 21 chapters: Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Moldova, Romania, Serbia, Hungary, Ukraine, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Kaliningrad/Russia, Poland, Slovakia, Czech Republic and Germany. The book is presented in a diary format; Palin starts each section of the book with a heading such as "Day Forty One: Selçuk". Not all days are mentioned, in part a result of the trip as a whole being broken up into several shorter trips. A recurring theme in the book are the questions of how the citizens of these countries compare the current situation with the Communist years, and the expectations these people have of the future and the enlarged European Union. New Europe has been released as an audio
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    One for the Road

    One for the Road

    "One For The Road" is a travel book by Bjørn Christian Tørrissen, first published in 2008. The book was translated from Norwegian, where it was published under the title "I pose og sekk!" (2005). The book is a non-fiction travel book, narrated in the first person by the independently travelling author. Three different journeys from the period 2001-2003 are described in three main chapters: The Utterly Deep South While traveling in Patagonia the author manages to get a discounted "last minute ticket" to a cruise to Antarctica. He has to wait a couple of weeks in South America for the cruise to begin, and spends the time hiking in Torres del Paine National Park in Chile and near El Calafate in Argentina. The main part of the chapter is dedicated to describing what visiting Antarctica is like. In and Out of Africa A travelogue from two months of independent travel ("[backpacking]") in Southern Africa. The trip begins and ends in Cape Town, looping through South Africa and its neighbouring countries, most of the time visiting national parks and small towns. Summer in the Pity A month of travel on and along the Trans-Siberian Railway, starting in Vladivostok and ending in Moscow, with
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    44

    Outposts: Journeys to the Surviving Relics of the British Empire

    • Year Released: 1985
    Outposts, Journeys to the surviving relics of the British Empire (ISBN 0141011890) is a book by Simon Winchester. It details his travels to each of the remaining dependencies of the British Empire and was first published in 1985. It was reprinted in 2003 with a new foreword written to address the changing political climate and attitudes in relation to the British Empire, most importantly concerning the handover of Hong Kong to China. The book takes on an elegaic tone as Winchester searches hopefully for remnants of imperial order, and as such marks a distinct period during Margaret Thatcher's government when a resurgence of British patriotism was mismatched to its still-diminishing former empire. This is particularly evident in his chapter on the Falkland Islands, which Britain had just defended from an Argentine invasion in 1982. In Outposts, Winchester travels to, or writes about, the following places.
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    Pictures from Italy

    Pictures from Italy

    • Year Released: 1846
    Pictures from Italy is a travelogue by Charles Dickens, written in 1846. The book reveals the concerns of its author as he presents, according to Kate Flint, the country "like a chaotic magic-lantern show, fascinated both by the spectacle it offers, and by himself as spectator". In 1844, Dickens took a respite from writing novels and traveled to France and Italy with his family for several months. They visited the most famous sights: Genoa, Rome, Naples (with Vesuvius still smouldering), Florence and Venice. In his travelogue the author portrays a nation of great contrasts: between grandiose buildings and urban desolation, and everyday life beside ancient monuments. But it is his encounters with Italy's colorful street life that captures the imagination. Dickens is particularly drawn to the costumes, cross-dressing, and sheer exuberance of the Roman carnival. From the book we learn that Dickens was an early riser and walker, enjoying touring the major attractions on foot.
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    Pictures from the Water Trade

    • Year Released: 1985
    Pictures from the Water Trade: An Englishman in Japan (1985) — published in the US as Pictures from the Water Trade: Adventures of a Westerner in Japan — is a novel by John David Morley, a cultural investigation of Japan in the 1970s. Told from the perspective of an authorial alias called ‘Boon’ (‘Bun-san’ to the Japanese), the book describes a series of initiations into Japanese language, family relations, love rites, shodo and the mizu-shobai itself — the ‘water trade’ — a seedy night-world of cabarets, bars and brothels. Writing in The New York Times Book Review, novelist Anne Tyler described the book as “travel literature at its best” and hailed its author as “one of those rare travelers who manages truly to enter the heart of a foreign territory.” "Morley's success places him, with a single book, in the front rank of the world’s travel writers,” wrote Dennis Drabelle in the Smithsonian. Dutch novelist and travel writer Cees Nooteboom praised it as “a very special book” in his review in Vrij Nederland Boekenbijlage. "A splendid book," declared Kazuo Ishiguro in the London Review of Books, while in the Literary Review Jonathan Keates acclaimed it as “maybe the best record of
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    Pole to Pole

    Pole to Pole is a book written by Michael Palin to accompany his BBC television series Pole to Pole. The book follows each of his seven trips made for the BBC, consisting of both his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. Most of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the expedition team. The book chronicles the journey in five chapters: This book was made available as an audio book, read by Michael Palin. The audio book is available in abridged and unabridged versions.. Basil Pao produced an accompaniment called Pole to Pole - The Photographs. Full text of the book on Michael Palin's official website.
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    48

    Roughing It

    • Year Released: 1872
    Roughing It is a book of semi-autobiographical travel literature written by American humorist Mark Twain. It was written during 1870–71 and published in 1872 as a prequel to his first book Innocents Abroad. This book tells of Twain's adventures prior to his pleasure cruise related in Innocents Abroad. Roughing It follows the travels of young Mark Twain through the Wild West during the years 1861–1867. After a brief stint as a Confederate cavalry militiaman, he joined his brother Orion Clemens, who had been appointed Secretary of the Nevada Territory, on a stagecoach journey west. Twain consulted his brother's diary to refresh his memory and borrowed heavily from his active imagination for many stories in the novel. Roughing It illustrates many of Twain's early adventures, including a visit to Salt Lake City, gold and silver prospecting, real-estate speculation, a journey to the Kingdom of Hawaii, and his beginnings as a writer. In this memoir, readers can see examples of Twain's rough-hewn humor, which would become a staple of his writing in his later books, such as Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. U.S.
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    Sahara

    Sahara is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC television documentary series Sahara with Michael Palin. This book, like the other books that Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. All of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the team who did the trip (Basil Pao also produced a book, Inside Sahara, containing many more of his pictures). This trip involved traveling all around and through the Sahara Desert, starting and ending at Gibraltar. The book contains 13 chapters: Gibraltar, Morocco, Algeria, Western Sahara, Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Niger, Algeria, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, and Gibraltar. The reason Algeria is featured three times is that the trip first cut through part of western Algeria, then later up through south, central and eastern Algeria, and finally on the return trip followed the Mediterranean coast of northern Algeria. Some of these countries are huge; for example, Algeria is four times the size of France or three times the size of Texas. The Sahara Desert is roughly the same size as the United States,
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    50

    Seven Years in Tibet

    • Year Released: 1952
    Seven Years in Tibet (German: Sieben Jahre in Tibet. Mein Leben am Hofe des Dalai Lama) is an autobiographical travel book written by Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer based on his real life experiences in Tibet between 1944 and 1951 during the Second World War and the interim period before the Communist Chinese People's Liberation Army invaded Tibet in 1950. The book covers the escape of Harrer, and his companion Peter Aufschnaiter, from a British internment camp in India. Harrer and Aufschnaiter then travelled across Tibet to Lhasa, the capital. Here they spent several years, and Harrer describes the contemporary Tibetan culture in detail. Harrer subsequently became a tutor and friend of the 14th Dalai Lama. The book shows the difference between the way Harrer thinks of the 14th Dalai Lama and the way the country of Tibet sees the 14th Dalai Lama. Seven Years in Tibet was translated into 53 languages, became a bestseller in the United States in 1954, and sold three million copies. At the beginning of the Flamingo edition of the book a message from the Dalai Lama praises the work: "Harrer has always been such a friend to Tibet. His most important contribution to our cause, his
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    Smile, You're Traveling

    Smile, You're Traveling (spelled Smile, You're Travelling in the second, British edition) is the third book in the Black Coffee Blues trilogy by Henry Rollins. It includes portions of his travel journal from 1997–1998 which includes personal encounters of spending time with the band Black Sabbath, a vacation to Africa, and trips elsewhere as part of his spoken word tours. It has received a 3.91 rating from approximately 67 reviews at Goodreads.com.
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    The American Scene

    • Year Released: 1905
    The American Scene is a book of travel writing by Henry James about his trip through the United States in 1904-1905. Ten of the fourteen chapters of the book were published in the North American Review, Harper's and the Fortnightly Review in 1905 and 1906. The first book publication was in 1907, and there were significant differences between the American and the English versions of the book. Without question the most controversial and critically discussed of James' travel books, The American Scene sharply attacked what James saw as the rampant materialism and frayed social structure of turn-of-the-century America. The book has generated controversy for its treatment of various ethnic groups and political issues. The book still has relevance to such current topics as immigration policy, environmental protection, economic growth, and racial tensions. James spent nearly a year on his American tour from August, 1904 to July, 1905. He travelled the entire country and even made decent money from public lectures, usually to ladies' organizations that he made "pay me through the nose." The American Scene covers his trips up and down the Eastern seaboard, concentrating on New York City and
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    The Atlas

    • Year Released: 1996
    The Atlas is a 1996 semi-autobiographical work by American novelist William T. Vollmann. A mixture of fiction and non-fiction, this book was drawn from Vollmann's experiences traveling around the world. He relates these experiences through 53 interconnected stories that weave their way through the novel. Vollmann has said that Yasunari Kawabata's Palm-of-the-Hand Stories were an important influence on the structure of the collection. Several of the short stories share the same titles as some of Vollmann's earlier novels, such as Fathers and Crows, Butterfly Stories and The Rifles; he describes these as miniature versions of the larger works. The stories in the first half of the book are numbered from one to 26 until the central story, also called "The Atlas". In the second half, the stories are numbered in reverse from 26 to one. The pairs of stories created by this system often comment on each other in a variety of ways. In addition to the table of contents, the stories are also listed according to the longitude and latitude of their setting. When Vollmann went on a literary reading tour following the publication of The Atlas, he gained some notoriety for firing a gun loaded with
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    The Emerald Route

    • Year Released: 1980
    The Emerald Route is a travelogue by R. K. Narayan. It was published by Indian Thought Publications in 1980. It is a pseudo-travel guide for Karnataka, India. The book was commissioned by the Government of Karnataka, and the initial non-commercial version was published in 1977 as part of a government publication. The book is focused on local history, culture and heritage, and doesn't exhibit much of Narayan's characteristic personal narrative.
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    56
    The Innocents Abroad

    The Innocents Abroad

    The Innocents Abroad, or The New Pilgrims' Progress is a travel book by American author Mark Twain published in 1869 which humorously chronicles what Twain called his "Great Pleasure Excursion" on board the chartered vessel Quaker City (formerly USS Quaker City) through Europe and the Holy Land with a group of American travelers in 1867. It was the best selling of Twain's works during his lifetime and one of the best selling travel books of all time. At first glance, Innocents Abroad is an ordinary travel book. It is based on an actual event, in a retired Civil War ship (the USS Quaker City). The excursion upon which the book is based was billed as a Holy Land expedition, with numerous stops along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, as well as a train excursion from Marseilles, France to Paris for the 1867 Paris Exhibition, and a side trip through the Black Sea to Odessa, all before the ultimate pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Twain recorded his observations and critiques of various aspects of culture and society he met on the journey, some more serious than others, which gradually turned from witty and comedic to biting and bitter as he drew closer to the Holy Land. Once in the Holy
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    57

    The Jaguar Smile

    • Year Released: 1987
    The Jaguar Smile is Salman Rushdie's first full-length non-fiction book, which he wrote in 1987 after visiting Nicaragua. The book is subtitled A Nicaraguan Journey and relates his travel experiences, the people he met as well as views on the political situation then facing the country. The book was written during a break the author took from writing his controversial novel, The Satanic Verses. After a period of political and economic turmoil under dictator Anastasio Somoza Debayle, the leftist Sandinista National Liberation Front (commonly known by the initial FSLN or as the Sandinistas) came to power in Nicaragua in 1979 supported by much of the populace and elements of the Catholic Church. The government was initially backed by the US under Jimmy Carter, but the support evaporated under the presidency of Ronald Reagan in light of evidence that the Sandinistas were providing help to the FMLN rebels in El Salvador. The US imposed economic sanctions and a trade embargo instead which contributed to the collapse of the Nicaraguan economy in the early-to-mid 1980s. While the Soviet Union and Cuba funded the Nicaraguan army, the US financed the contras in neighboring Honduras with a
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    59

    The Muses Are Heard

    The Muses Are Heard is an early journalistic work of Truman Capote. Originally published in The New Yorker, it is a narrative account of the cultural mission by The Everyman's Opera to the U.S.S.R. in the mid-1950s. Capote was sent to accompany the Opera as it staged a production of Porgy and Bess. First published in two parts, it was later released as a short non-fiction book. The book's title comes from a speech given by one of the Soviet cultural ministry staff, who declared, “When the cannons are heard, the muses are silent. When the cannons are silent, the muses are heard.” The book opens with the cast, directors, support personnel and Mrs. Ira Gershwin waiting in West Berlin for their visas to be returned by the Russian Embassy. They are briefed by U.S. Embassy Staff, and among other questions, ask if they will be under surveillance, presumably by the K.G.B., during their visit. They also consider political issues and how to answer sensitive questions, especially those about the “Negro situation” - also whether it is safe to drink the water: the company includes several children. Capote, who is present in the narrative, returns to his hotel room to find a brown paper parcel
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    60

    The River at the Center of the World

    • Year Released: 1996
    The River At The Center Of The World : A Journey Up the Yangtze, and Back in Chinese Time (ISBN 0-312-42337-3) is a book by Simon Winchester. It details his travels up the Yangtze river in China and was first published in 1996. Viewing an ancient Chinese painting scroll drawn by Wang Hui gives the author the inspiration on how to structure his book. He starts his journey in Shanghai, at the Yangtze river's delta, and makes his way upriver to the headwaters. At the same time, his narration also makes a journey back in time, writing about contemporary times in Shanghai and Nanjing, and writing about events that date back increasingly farther in cities upriver. He makes the travel with a companion — a Chinese lady who is referred to in the book only as Lily to protect her identity. The chapter titled A Great New Wall is devoted to the 3 Gorges Dam that is being constructed.
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    61

    The Romanian: Story of an Obsession

    The Romanian: Story of an Obsession is a novel by Bruce Benderson. The autobiographical novel describes Benderson's encounters and journeys with a male Romanian street hustler through Romania and Hungary, whom he meets while on a journalism assignment and falls in love with. The plot is intertwined with a travelogue of Romania and references to Romanian history and culture, such as the life of the artist Constantin Brâncuşi, the writer Panait Istrati and the love affair between Romania's interbellum king, Carol II, and his mistress, Magda Lupescu. The book was initially published in French, in 2004, under the title Autobiographie érotique (Erotic autobiography). It won the prestigious Prix de Flore award in 2004, thus making Benderson the first US author to win the prize. In 2006, it was published in English, released in the United States and the United Kingdom.
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    62

    The Snow Leopard

    • Year Released: 1978
    The Snow Leopard is a 1978 book by Peter Matthiessen, which is an account of his two month journey along with naturalist George Schaller in 1973 to Crystal Mountain, in the Dolpo region on the Tibetan Plateau in the Himalayas. The Snow Leopard won the 1979 National Book Award in category Contemporary Thought and the 1980 National Book Award for Nonfiction (paperback). It has garnered more critical acclaim since then. It is included in numerous lists of best travel books including World Hum's ten most celebrated books, Washington Post Book World's Travel Books That Will Take You Far, and National Geographic Traveler's Around the World in 80+ Books. and
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    63

    Thrilling Cities

    • Year Released: 1963
    Thrilling Cities is the title of a collection of non-fiction travel articles by the James Bond author and The Sunday Times journalist Ian Fleming. The book was published in the UK in November 1963 by Jonathan Cape. The book is a collection of articles Fleming wrote for the The Sunday Times, based on two trips he took between 1959 and 1960 at the behest of the features editor Leonard Russell. The book version includes material edited out of the original articles. The book has recently been re-issued by Ian Fleming Publications (2009), including an introduction from the celebrated travel writer Jan Morris, and a finely printed limited edition of Thrilling Cities was included within the collected works of Ian Fleming published by Queen Anne Press in 2008. Fleming's first trip involved a tour of the Far East and the United States. His essays highlighted the following cities: As Fleming's essay on New York was intensely critical, the editors of the American edition of Thrilling Cities asked him to provide some extra material as some form of mitigation. Fleming obliged with "007 in New York," a short story describing James Bond's impressions of New York, while waiting to perform an
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    64

    Travels with Charley: In Search of America

    • Year Released: 1962
    Travels with Charley: In Search of America is a travelogue written by American author John Steinbeck. It recounts tales of a 1960 road trip with his French standard poodle, Charley, around the United States. He wrote that he was moved by a desire to see his country on a personal level, since he made his living writing about it. He wrote of having many questions going into his journey, the main one being, "What are Americans like today?" However, he found that the "new America" did not live up to his expectations. Steinbeck tells of traveling throughout the United States in a specially-made camper he named Rocinante, after the horse of Don Quixote. His travels start in Long Island, New York, and roughly follow the outer border of the United States, from Maine to the Pacific Northwest, down into his native Salinas Valley in California, across to Texas, up through the Deep South, and then back to New York. Such a trip encompasses nearly 10,000 miles. According to Thom Steinbeck, the author's oldest son, the real reason for the trip was that Steinbeck knew he was dying and wanted to see his country one last time. Thom says he was surprised that his stepmother (Steinbeck's wife) allowed
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    65

    Typee

    • Year Released: 1846
    Typee (1846; in full: Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life) is American writer Herman Melville's first book, a classic in the literature of travel and adventure partly based on his actual experiences as a captive on the island Nuku Hiva (which Melville spelled as Nukuheva) in the South Pacific Marquesas Islands, in 1842. The title comes from the name of a valley there called Tai Pi Vai. It was Melville's most popular work during his lifetime, but made him notorious as the "man who lived among the cannibals." For 19th century readers, his career seemed to decline afterward, but during the early 20th century it was seen as the beginning of a career that peaked with Moby-Dick (1851). Typee was "in fact, neither literal autobiography nor pure fiction." Melville "drew his material from his experiences, from his imagination, and from a variety of travel books when the memory of his experiences were inadequate." The three week stay on which Typee is based takes place over the course of four months in the narrative. Melville drew extensively on contemporary accounts by Pacific explorers to add cultural detail to what might otherwise have been a straightforward story of escape, capture, and
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    66

    What Am I Doing Here

    • Year Released: 1988
    What Am I Doing Here (1988) is a book by British Author Bruce Chatwin and contains a collection of essays, profiles and travel stories from his life. It was the last book published during Chatwin's life and draws on various experiences from it. These experiences include trekking in Nepal, sailing down the Volga, interviewing Madeleine Vionnet and making a film with Werner Herzog.
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    67

    When the Going Was Good

    When The Going Was Good (1946) is an anthology of four travel books written by English author Evelyn Waugh. The book consists of fragments from the travel books Labels (1930), Remote People (1931), Ninety-Two Days (1934), and Waugh In Abyssinia (1936). The author writes that these pages are all that he wishes to preserve of the four books.
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    68
    Zone Policeman 88

    Zone Policeman 88

    • Year Released: 1913
    Zone Policeman 88: a close range study of the Panama Canal and its workers is a non-fiction book written by Harry A. Franck published in 1913. Franck, a travel writer who had produced a highly successful 1910 travelogue Vagabond Journey Around the World, took a position as a police officer in the Panama Canal Zone, reporting his experiences and observations in a book that proved, like his debut, popular. The book was generally critically well received. Franck, who had supported himself as a teacher prior to the success of his first travelogue, took a three month job on the Canal Zone Police force, helping to patrol the workers assigned to the Panama Canal Zone. There, he helped keep peace as plain-clothesman but also served administrative duties, including as a census enumerator. The book was generally critically well received. The American Review of Reviews lauded the author as "a born story-teller and a born tramp", the combination of which gives "something worth while" to the reader; "In this book, which is full of speaking pictures, the reader gets not only a picture of the Canal Zone as seen by the curious tourist in a hurry, but the life and spirit of all the great
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