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    2

    A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus

    • Year Released: 1828
    A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus is a four volume biographical account of Christopher Columbus written by Washington Irving in 1828. The work was the most popular biography of Columbus in the English-speaking world until the publication of Samuel Eliot Morison's biography Admiral of the Ocean Sea was published in 1942. Irving was invited to Madrid to translate Spanish-language source material on Columbus into English. Irving decided instead to use the sources to write his own four volume biography and history. Irving employed 19th century critical methods, but much of his material has been changed by modern research. Historians have noted Irving's "active imagination" and called some aspects of his work "fanciful and sentimental." One glaring weakness is Irving's enduring story that it was only the voyages of Columbus that finally convinced Europeans of his time that the Earth is not flat. In truth, no educated or influential member of medieval society believed the Earth to be flat. The idea of a spherical Earth had long been espoused in the classical tradition and was inherited by medieval academics. That people believe otherwise was listed in 1945 by the
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    3

    A Season with Verona

    A Season With Verona is the title of a 2002 book by Verona based British author Tim Parks. It tells the story of a single season following the fortunes of Italian football club Hellas Verona, and deals especially with Parks' relationship with the infamous hard core Brigate Gialloblù who make up Verona's travelling support. All the matches are detailed as well as many off-field dealings. Aside from detailing Hellas Verona's on the pitch exploits, Parks provides a commentary of political events in Italy at the time (namely the national election held in 2001 that brought Silvio Berlusconi into power). The author also describes the way in which the city of Verona is viewed by other parts of the country, with particular emphasis on the xenophobic reputation the football club and the city of Verona are sometimes characterized with.
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    4

    A Tramp Abroad

    • Year Released: 1880
    A Tramp Abroad is a work of non-fiction travel literature by American author Mark Twain, published in 1880. The book details a journey by the author, with his friend Harris (a character created for the book, and based on his closest friend, Joseph Twichell), through central and southern Europe. While the stated goal of the journey is to walk most of the way, the men find themselves using other forms of transport as they traverse the continent. The book is the third of Mark Twain's five travel books and is often thought to be an unofficial sequel to the first one, The Innocents Abroad. As the two men make their way through Germany, the Alps, and Italy, they encounter situations made all the more humorous by their reactions to them. The narrator (Twain) plays the part of the American tourist of the time, believing that he understands all that he sees, but in reality understanding none of it. The first half of the book covers their stay in south-western Germany (Heidelberg, Mannheim, a trip on the Neckar river, Baden-Baden and the Black Forest). The second part describes his travels through Switzerland and eastern France (Lucerne, Interlaken, Zermatt, Chamonix and Geneva). The end of
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    5

    A Turn in the South

    • Year Released: 1989
    A Turn in the South is a travelogue of the American South written by Nobel Prize-winning author V. S. Naipaul. The book was published in 1989 and is based upon the author's travels in the southern states of the U.S.. Naipaul has written fiction and non-fiction about life in the Caribbean, India, Africa and South America. In this book the subject is the U.S.A., including South Carolina, Florida, Mississippi, et cetera. He discusses topics such as Martin Luther King, the economy, technology, industrialization, tourism, religion, rednecks and racism. The book works to compare the American South to its geographical neighbors, the nations of the Caribbean.
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    6

    A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

    A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers is a book by Henry David Thoreau, first published in 1849. The book is ostensibly the narrative of a boat trip from Concord, Massachusetts to Concord, New Hampshire and back Thoreau had taken with his brother John in 1839. As John had died from tetanus in 1842, Thoreau wrote the book as a tribute to his memory. The book's first draft was completed while Thoreau was living at Walden Pond. Upon completing the book, Thoreau was unable to find a publisher willing to publish it, and so had it published at his own expense. Few copies of the book sold, and Thoreau was left with several hundred extra copies, and put into debt. A slightly revised version of the book, based on corrections Thoreau had made himself, was published in 1868, six years after his death. While the book may appear to be a travel journal, broken up into chapters for each day, the book is rarely about that topic, as the actual trip took two weeks. While given passages are a literal description of the journey from Concord, Massachusetts, down the Concord River to the Middlesex Canal, to the Merrimack River, up to Concord, New Hampshire, and back, much of the text is in the form
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    7

    A Year in Provence

    A Year in Provence is a 1989 bestselling autobiographical novel by Peter Mayle about his first year in Provence, and the local events and customs. It was adapted into a television miniseries starring John Thaw and Lindsay Duncan. Reviewers praised the book's honest style, wit and its refreshing humour. The book was turned into an equally popular radio version. Peter Mayle and his wife move to Provence, and are soon met with unexpectedly fierce weather, underground truffle dealers and unruly workers, who work around their normalement schedule. The book was turned into a mini-series, starring Lindsay Duncan and John Thaw, with appearances from Alfred Molina and James Fleet amongst others. See: "A Year in Provence" (1993) The non-fiction sequels to this book by Peter Mayle are: See also (a movie based on this novel and a fiction novel Chasing Cezanne also by Peter Mayle):
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    9

    An Area of Darkness

    • Year Released: 1964
    An Area of Darkness is a book authored by V.S. Naipaul in 1964. It is a travelogue detailing Naipaul's trip through India in the early sixties. It was the first of Naipaul's acclaimed Indian trilogy which includes India: A Wounded Civilization and India: A Million Mutinies Now. A deeply pessimistic work, An Area of Darkness conveys the acute sense of disillusionment which the author experiences on his first visit to his native land. True to his style, the narration is anecdotal and descriptive.
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    10
    An Historical Relation of the Island Ceylon

    An Historical Relation of the Island Ceylon

    • Year Released: 1681
    An Historical Relation of the Island Ceylon together With somewhat Concerning Severall Remarkable passages of my life that hath hapned [sic] since my Deliverance out of Captivity is a book written by the English trader and sailor Robert Knox in 1681. It describes his experiences some years earlier on the South Asian island now best known as Sri Lanka and provides one of the most important contemporary accounts of 17th century Ceylonese life. Knox spent 19 years on Ceylon after being taken prisoner by King Râjasimha II. He survived by knitting caps, selling goods and lending rice and corn. He finally escaped with one companion in 1679 and reached Arippu, a Dutch settlement on the north-west coast of the island, from where he was able eventually to return to England in 1680. The book was written during the voyage back to England. It came to the attention of Knox's employers, the directors of the British East India Company, who recommended its publication. The historian and biographer John Strype, Knox's cousin, helped him to prepare the book for publication with the encouragement of the natural philosopher and polymath Robert Hooke. It was printed by Richard Chiswell, the printer to
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    12

    Around the World in 80 Days

    Around the World in 80 Days is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC TV program Around the World in 80 Days. This trip was intended to follow in the footsteps of the (fictitious) Phileas Fogg in the Jules Verne book Around the World in Eighty Days. The use of aeroplanes was not allowed, a self-imposed restriction. Steam liners don't exist anymore, so all of the long sea journeys had to be on container ships or freighters. The one exception was the trip from Dubai to Mumbai (Bombay) on a dhow, a high point of the trip. This book, like the other books that Michael Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. Unlike the following books, in which the pictures were taken (almost) exclusively by Basil Pao, the pictures in this book are from many sources. (Basil Pao did provide the pictures for the Hong Kong to Shanghai stretch.) To some extent the book reads like a diary, as Michael Palin starts each section of the book with a heading like "Day 42 - Hong Kong". This reflects the fact that the whole trip was a kind of "race against time" effort, and being aware of how many days have
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    14

    Bad Land: An American Romance

    • Year Released: 1996
    Bad Land: An American Romance is a travelogue of Jonathan Raban's research, over a two year period, into the settlement of southeastern Montana in the early 20th century. The focus of the book is on the least-populated and least-known area of the USA - the badland area between Marmarth, ND and Terry, MT along the route of the Milwaukee Road railroad and the goings on of various settler families who homesteaded in that area. Emigrants came from Britain, Scandinavia, Russia and Germany in search of a new life in the New World. Nowadays, their ruined houses still stand among forlorn fenceposts trailing whiskers of rusty barbed wire in the arid landscape of eastern Montana, dotted with low buttes and scored with dry creek-beds. The settlers attempted to build a hopeful civilization on the prairie, only to see it collapse within little more than a decade during the time of the Dirty Thirties. The book begins by going into detail how the area was initially settled. The author places a particularly heavy emphasis on "scientific" developments of the time, sociological conditions, and the exploitation of those developments and conditions by the United States Government and the Milwaukee
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    16

    Begums Thugs and White Mughals

    • Year Released: 2002
    Begums Thugs and White Mughals - The Journals Of Fanny Parkes is a 2002 historical travel book based on the journals of Fanny Parkes and edited by William Dalrymple. Dalrymple's Begums Thugs and White Mughals - The Journals Of Fanny Parkes followed his earlier book White Mughals. This is an edited edition of the travel journals of the traveller, Fanny Parkes who was in India from 1822 to 1846. Dalrymple edited Parkes's book, Wanderings of a Pilgrim in Search of the Picturesque. He wrote the introduction in which he challenged some of the preconceptions of academic studies of travel writing, which attempt to fit all English views on India into the 'Orientalist' template laid down by Edward Said. "Fanny was a passionate lover of India and though a woman of her time, in her writing and her travels did her best to understand and build bridges across the colonial divide," he writes "[A]s Colin Thubron has pointed out, ‘To define the genre [of travel writing] as an act of domination – rather than of understanding, respect or even catharsis – is simplistic. If even the attempt to understand is seen as aggression or appropriation, then all human contact declines into paranoia.’ The attacks
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    17

    Beyond the Mexique Bay

    Beyond the Mexique Bay is a travel book by Aldous Huxley, first published in 1934. In it, he describes his experiences traveling through the Caribbean to Guatemala and southern Mexico in 1933.
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    19

    Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before

    • Year Released: 2002
    Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before (United States), or Into the Blue: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before (Australia), is a travel book by Tony Horwitz. In it, the Pulitzer prize winning journalist travels to different parts of the world, following in the footsteps of explorer James Cook. The book compares the current conditions of the places Cook visited to what Cook documented at the time, and describes the different legacies Cook has left behind. Horowitz begins with his experience as a volunteer deckhand on the replica of HM Bark Endeavour. Some of the places that Horowitz visits in following the footsteps of Cook, are Australia, the small island nation of Niue, the Society Islands, Tonga, New Zealand, the birth place and home of Cook in North Yorkshire England, Alaska and Hawaii.
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    20

    City of Djinns

    • Year Released: 1993
    City of Djinns (1994) is a travelogue by William Dalrymple about the historical capital of India, Delhi. It is his second book, and culminated as a result of his six-year stay in New Delhi. City of Djinns was the first product of Dalrymple’s love affair with India, centring on Delhi, a city with ‘a bottomless seam of stories’. Shaped more like a novel than a travel book, he and his wife encounter a teeming cast of characters: his Sikh landlady, taxi drivers, customs officials, and British survivors of the Raj, as well as whirling dervishes and eunuch dancers (‘a strange mix of piety and bawdiness’). Dalrymple describes ancient ruins and the experience of living in the modern city: he goes in search of the history behind the epic stories of the Mahabharata. Still more seriously, he finds evidence of the city’s violent past and present day - the 1857 mutiny against British rule (anticipating The Last Mughal); the Partition massacres in 1947; and the riots after the assassination of Indira Gandhi in 1984. The book followed his established style of historical digressions, tied in with contemporary events and a multitude of anecdotes. The book has now been made into a play by Rahul
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    21

    Coasting

    Coasting is a travel book by Jonathan Raban. It has received a positive review by Beryl Bainbridge. Written as a travelogue, Coasting describes Jonathan Raban's single-handed 4,000 mile voyage around Britain which he made in 1982 (at the age of 40) in an old restored 32-foot sea-going ketch, the Gosfield Maid. An important point is that Raban sailed with a chart and a hand-bearing compass; he sailed by the look of the coastline. His story takes various digressions, just as his journey does, as he mulls over his childhood as the son of a vicar in the Church of England, and the current state of Britain under Margaret Thatcher during the time of the Falklands War. Chapter Two is a description of the dogged insularity of the Manx, who he compares to the Falkland Islanders, whilst the Isle of Man becomes a metaphor for the insularity of the larger island on which he himself had been brought up and lived up till this point. Raban himself has commented on his own attitude to England and the influence of Margaret Thatcher on Britain at the time of writing his book. The British he sees as being famous for their insular arrogance and condescension. As he describes them: 'They love fine
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    22

    Come, Tell Me How You Live

    • Year Released: 1983
    Come, Tell Me How You Live is a short book of autobiography and travel literature by crime writer Agatha Christie. It is one of only two books she wrote and had published under both of her married names of "Christie" and "Mallowan" (the other being Star Over Bethlehem and other stories) and was first published in the UK in November 1946 by William Collins and Sons and in the same year in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company. The UK edition retailed for ten shillings and sixpence (10/6) and the US edition at $3.00. The book's title, a quote from verse three of the White Knight’s poem, Haddocks' Eyes from chapter eight of Through the Looking-Glass (1871) by Lewis Carroll, is also word play on the word "Tell", used to describe an archaeological mound or site. Christie first thought of writing the book in 1938 and wrote to her literary agent, Edmund Cork, in July of that year, suggesting the project and telling him that it would be "not at all serious or archaeological". In the event, she wrote the book during the Second World War after her husband, Max Mallowan, had been posted to Egypt with the British Council in February 1942 and she was living alone in London. She occupied her hours by
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    25

    Destination Unknown

    • Year Released: 1954
    Destination Unknown is a work of detective fiction by Agatha Christie and first published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club on November 1, 1954 and in US by Dodd, Mead and Company in 1955 under the title of So Many Steps to Death. The UK edition retailed at ten shillings and sixpence (10/6) and the US edition at $2.75. Hilary Craven, a deserted wife and bereaved mother, is planning suicide in a Moroccan hotel, when she is asked by British secret agent Jessop to undertake a dangerous mission as an alternative to taking an overdose of sleeping pills. The task, which she accepts, is to impersonate a dying woman to help find the woman's husband, Thomas Betterton, a nuclear scientist who has disappeared and may have defected to the Soviet Union. Soon she finds herself in a group of travellers being transported to the unknown destination of the title. The destination turns out to be a secret scientific research facility disguised as a modern leper colony and leprosy research center at a remote location in the Atlas Mountains. The fabulously wealthy Mr Aristides has built the facility and lured the world's best young scientists to it so that he can later sell their services back to the
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    26

    Doctor Dealer

    Doctor Dealer: The Rise and Fall of an All-American Boy and His Multimillion-Dollar Cocaine Empire is a 2000 year book written by Mark Bowden.
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    29

    Five Days in Paris

    • Year Released: 1995
    Five Days In Paris is a 1995 fiction novel, authored by Danielle Steel and published by Delacorte Press. The plot follows two Americans, Peter Haskell, a man with a strong career and family and Olivia Thatcher, two citizens from different backgrounds and cultures who meet in the Ritz in Paris, France on the night of a bomb threat. The latter character is a woman who is unhappily married to a leading senator, and the first being the president of a significant pharmaceutical empire. The book analyzes honour, integrity and commitment into relationships, as well as hope. The book was a best-seller of Publishers Weekly for eighteen weeks.
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    30

    Following the Equator

    • Year Released: 1897
    Following the Equator (American English title) or More Tramps Abroad (English title) is a non-fiction travelogue published by American author Mark Twain in 1897. Twain was practically bankrupt in 1894 due to a failed investment into a "revolutionary" typesetting machine. In an attempt to extricate himself from debt of $100,000 (equivalent of about $2.5 million in 2010) he undertook a tour of the British Empire in 1895, a route chosen to provide numerous opportunities for lectures in the English language. In Following the Equator, an account of that travel published in 1897, the author criticizes racism, imperialism and missionary zeal in observations woven into the narrative with classical Twain wit. In keeping with that wit, and Twain's love of a tall tale, Twain included a number of fictional stories in the body of what is otherwise a non-fiction work. In particular, the story of how Cecil Rhodes made his fortune by finding a newspaper in the belly of a shark, and the story of how a man named Ed Jackson made good in life out of a fake letter of introduction to Cornelius Vanderbilt, were anthologized in Charles Neider (ed) The Complete Short Stories of Mark Twain, (Doubleday,
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    31

    From the Holy Mountain

    • Year Released: 1998
    From the Holy Mountain is a 1997 historical travel book by William Dalrymple. Dalrymple's third book From the Holy Mountain: A Journey in the Shadow of Byzantium (1997) saw him trace the ties of Eastern Orthodox congregations scattered in the Middle East to their ancient origins; it also deals with the question of how they have fared over centuries of Islamic rule and the complex relationship of Islam, Judaism, and Christianity in the Middle East. In his first book In Xanadu Dalrymple had followed the route taken by Marco Polo from Jerusalem to Mongolia. In this book he follows the route taken by sixth-century monk John Moschos who traveled through the Eastern Byzantium world, culminating at Constantinople, where Moschos wrote his book Pratum Spirituale or The Spiritual Meadow. Dalrymple's journey in the footsteps of Moschos starts from Mount Athos, Greece, proceeds to Istanbul, and thence to Eastern Turkey. Here he crosses the border and enters Syria. The next stop is Lebanon which is just at the end of its civil war, after which he crosses into Israel, the West Bank and concludes his trip in Egypt at the monastery of Deir ul-Muharraq which had just been attacked by the Gemaat
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    33

    Generation of Swine

    • Year Released: 1988
    Gonzo Papers, Vol. 2: Generation of Swine: Tales of Shame and Degradation in the '80s is a book by the American writer and journalist Hunter S. Thompson, originally published in 1988. The book contains 100 of Thompson's columns from the San Francisco Examiner, which discuss the politics and culture of the 1980s, with significant coverage of the Iran-Contra Affair. He predicts that the Democrats will self-destruct in the 1988 presidential campaign. He also makes bets about the Democratic Party candidates odds of winning their elections. People he dislikes are described as "money-sucking animals," "brainless freaks," "geeks," "greed-crazed lunatics" and so on. It is the second volume of the four-volume The Gonzo Papers series. One oft-quoted, and misquoted, passage from Volume 2 is about the television broadcasting business, specifically television journalism:
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    34

    Getting Stoned with Savages

    Getting Stoned with Savages: A Trip Through the Islands of Fiji and Vanuatu is a 2007 travelog by J. Maarten Troost. The book is a humorous account of the author and his wife's time on the Pacific island nations of Vanuatu and Fiji. It is a follow-up to Troost's first work The Sex Lives of Cannibals.
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    35

    Great Cities of the Ancient World

    • Year Released: 1972
    Great Cities of the Ancient World is a 1972 history book by L. Sprague de Camp, published by Doubleday. A translation into German has also appeared. The work is a study of the ethnology, history, geography, and everyday life in such famous ancient capital cities as Thebes, Jerusalem, Nineveh, Tyre, Babylon, Memphis, Athens, Syracuse, Alexandria, Anuradhapura, Rome, Pataliputra, and Constantinople. The narrative is enlivened by personal observation, the author having personally traveled to each of the sites treated. New World sites are not treated.
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    36

    Green Hills of Africa

    • Year Released: 1935
    Green Hills of Africa is a 1935 work of nonfiction written by Ernest Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961). Hemingway's second work of nonfiction, Green Hills of Africa is an account of a month on safari he and his wife, Pauline Marie Pfeiffer, took in East Africa during December 1933. Green Hills of Africa is divided into four parts: Pursuit and Conversation, Pursuit Remembered, Pursuit and Failure, and Pursuit as Happiness, each of which plays a different role in the story. Much of narrative describes Hemingway's adventures hunting in East Africa, interspersed with ruminations about literature and authors. Generally the East African landscape Hemingway describes is in the region of Lake Manyara in Tanzania. The book starts with Part 1 ("Pursuit and Conversation"), with Hemingway and a European expat in conversation about American writers. Relations between the white hunters and native trackers are described, as well as Hemingway's jealousy of the other hunters. Part 2 ("Pursuit Remembered") presents a flashback of hunting in northern Tanzania with a description of the Rift Valley and descriptions of how to field dress prey. Hemingway kills a rhino, but Karl kills a bigger one.
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    37

    Himalaya

    • Year Released: 1993
    Himalaya is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC television documentary series Himalaya with Michael Palin. This book, like the other books that Michael Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. All of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the team who did the trip (Pao also produced a book, Inside Himalaya, containing many more of his pictures). The book contains eight chapters: Pakistan, India, Nepal, Tibet, Yunnan (China), Nagaland and Assam(India), Bhutan, and Bangladesh. The book is presented in a diary format; Palin starts each section of the book with a heading such as "Day Forty One: Srinagar". Not all days are mentioned, a result of the trip as a whole being broken up into shorter trips (a fact that is not mentioned in the series). Palin makes several treks up into the mountains, including one trek up to Everest Base Camp at 17,500 feet (5,300 meters). Not bad, considering that Palin was 60 years old at the time. Other encounters and experiences that are related by Michael Palin include finding out that the Dalai
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    44

    Made in America

    • Year Released: 1994
    Made In America is a nonfiction book by Bill Bryson describing the history of the English language in the United States and the evolution of American culture.
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    45

    Maximum City

    • Year Released: 2004
    Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found is a narrative nonfiction book by Suketu Mehta, published in 2004, about the Indian city of Mumbai ("Bombay"). It was published in hardcover by Random House's Alfred A. Knopf imprint. When released in paperback, it was published by Vintage, a subdivision of Random House. The book combines elements of memoir, travel writing as well as socio-political analysis of the history and people of Mumbai. Mehta writes as a person who is at one level outsider to this magnificent city and on the other hand is the one who is born here and has lived his childhood in the city then known as Bombay. As a person who comes back with his experience of returning to the city as an adult, as well as a parent and resident. His family left Mumbai for the US in 1977, settling in the Jackson Heights, section of Queens, in New York City. Mehta's return to Mumbai as an adult details his frustration with everyday day life in a developing nation. He frankly describes the slums and how they can crop up anywhere, even alongside the railroad tracks. In explaining the slums and squatting, Mehta delves into the politics of modern Mumbai: the party divisions along Hindu versus Muslim
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    48

    Notes from a Big Country

    • Year Released: 1999
    Notes from a Big Country, or as it was released in the United States, I'm a Stranger Here Myself, is a collection of articles written by Bill Bryson for The Mail on Sunday's Night and Day supplement during the 1990s, published together first in Britain in 1998 and in paperback in 1999. The book discusses Bryson's views on relocating to Hanover, New Hampshire after spending two decades in Britain. The American and British editions are not quite identical as, besides spelling differences, some explanatory information suitable for each intended audience is added or omitted within individual articles. This is freely acknowledged in the introduction.
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    49

    Notes from a Small Island

    • Year Released: 1995
    Notes from a Small Island is a humorous travel book on Great Britain by American author Bill Bryson, first published in 1995. Bryson wrote Notes from a Small Island when he decided to move back to his native United States, but wanted to take one final trip around Great Britain, which had been his home for over twenty years. Bryson covers all corners of the island observing and talking to people from as far afield as Exeter in the West Country to John O'Groats at the north-eastern tip of Scotland's mainland. During this trip he insisted on using only public transport, but failed on two occasions: in Oxfordshire and on the journey to John O' Groats he had to rent a car. On his way, Bryson provides historical information on the places he visits, and expresses amazement at the heritage in Britain, stating that there were 445,000 listed historical buildings, 12,000 medieval churches, 1,500,000 acres (600,000 ha) of common land, 120,000 miles (190,000 km) of footpaths and public rights-of-way, 600,000 known sites of archaeological interest and that in his Yorkshire village at that time, there were more 17th-century buildings than in the whole of North America. Bryson also pays homage to
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    51

    People of the Deer

    People of the Deer (published in 1952, revised in 1975) is Canadian author Farley Mowat's first book, which brought him literary recognition. The novel is based upon a series of travels the author undertook in the Barrens region, west of Hudson Bay, out of which the most important one was in the winter of '47-'48. During this period he studied the lives of the Ihalmiut, a small population of Inuit people, whose existence heavily relied on the very large population of caribou that lived there. Besides fascinating descriptions of nature and life in the Arctic, Mowat's book tells a sad story of how this population, once prosperous and widely spread, slowly degraded to the brink of extinction due to unscrupulous economic interest and lack of understanding. The factuality of this book was debated in the House of Commons of Canada in 1953. Mowat was derided as a liar by Jean Lesage (then Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources) and the existence of the Ihalmiut was questioned. The book was awarded the Anisfield-Wolfe Book Award by the Anisfield-Wolfe Foundation in 1953. The New York Times Book Review published a dismissive review on February 24, 1952. The Beaver was quite
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    52

    Pole to Pole

    Pole to Pole is a book written by Michael Palin to accompany his BBC television series Pole to Pole. The book follows each of his seven trips made for the BBC, consisting of both his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. Most of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the expedition team. The book chronicles the journey in five chapters: This book was made available as an audio book, read by Michael Palin. The audio book is available in abridged and unabridged versions.. Basil Pao produced an accompaniment called Pole to Pole - The Photographs. Full text of the book on Michael Palin's official website.
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    54

    Roughing It

    • Year Released: 1872
    Roughing It is a book of semi-autobiographical travel literature written by American humorist Mark Twain. It was written during 1870–71 and published in 1872 as a prequel to his first book Innocents Abroad. This book tells of Twain's adventures prior to his pleasure cruise related in Innocents Abroad. Roughing It follows the travels of young Mark Twain through the Wild West during the years 1861–1867. After a brief stint as a Confederate cavalry militiaman, he joined his brother Orion Clemens, who had been appointed Secretary of the Nevada Territory, on a stagecoach journey west. Twain consulted his brother's diary to refresh his memory and borrowed heavily from his active imagination for many stories in the novel. Roughing It illustrates many of Twain's early adventures, including a visit to Salt Lake City, gold and silver prospecting, real-estate speculation, a journey to the Kingdom of Hawaii, and his beginnings as a writer. In this memoir, readers can see examples of Twain's rough-hewn humor, which would become a staple of his writing in his later books, such as Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. U.S.
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    55

    Sahara

    Sahara is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC television documentary series Sahara with Michael Palin. This book, like the other books that Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. All of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the team who did the trip (Basil Pao also produced a book, Inside Sahara, containing many more of his pictures). This trip involved traveling all around and through the Sahara Desert, starting and ending at Gibraltar. The book contains 13 chapters: Gibraltar, Morocco, Algeria, Western Sahara, Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Niger, Algeria, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, and Gibraltar. The reason Algeria is featured three times is that the trip first cut through part of western Algeria, then later up through south, central and eastern Algeria, and finally on the return trip followed the Mediterranean coast of northern Algeria. Some of these countries are huge; for example, Algeria is four times the size of France or three times the size of Texas. The Sahara Desert is roughly the same size as the United States,
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    56

    Sailing Alone Around the World

    • Year Released: 1899
    Sailing Alone Around the World (1900) is a sailing memoir by Joshua Slocum about his single-handed global circumnavigation aboard the sloop Spray. Slocum was the first person to sail around the world alone. The book was an immediate success and highly influential in inspiring later travelers. Captain Slocum, a highly experienced navigator and ship-owner, rebuilt and refitted the derelict sloop Spray in a seaside pasture at Fairhaven, Massachusetts during a thirteen-month period between early 1893 and 1894. Between April 24, 1895 and June 27, 1898, Slocum, aboard the Spray, crossed the Atlantic twice (to Gibraltar and back to South America), negotiated the Strait of Magellan, and crossed the Pacific. He also visited Australia and South Africa before crossing the Atlantic (for the third time) to reach home after a journey of 46,000 miles. There was considerable international interest in Slocum's journey, particularly once he had entered the Pacific; he was awaited at most of his ports of call, and gave lectures and lantern-slide shows to well-filled halls. His journal, which is masterfully self-deprecating, was first published in installments before being issued in book form in 1900.
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    58

    Scarlett

    • Year Released: 1991
    Scarlett is a novel written in 1991 by Alexandra Ripley as a sequel to Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind. The book debuted on the New York Times bestsellers list, but both critics and fans of the original novel found Ripley's version to be inconsistent with the literary quality of Gone with the Wind. Reviewing the novel for the New York Times in 1991, Janet Maslin said the book was a "stunningly uneventful 823-page holding action." Donald McCaig, author of Rhett Butler's People, said it was his impression that the Margaret Mitchell estate was "thoroughly embarrassed" by Scarlett. Scarlett, universally panned by critics, nevertheless was a commercial success. The book sold millions of copies and remains in print. It was adapted as a television mini-series of the same title in 1994 starring Timothy Dalton as Rhett Butler and Joanne Whalley-Kilmer as Scarlett O'Hara. The book begins where Gone with the Wind left off, with Scarlett attending the funeral of her former sister-in-law and rival for Ashley Wilkes' affection, Melanie Wilkes, at which her estranged husband, Rhett Butler, is not present. Scarlett, heartbroken and aggravated that Rhett has left her completely, sets out for
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    59

    Soft City

    Soft City is the first book written by Jonathan Raban, and published by The Harvill Press in 1974. Soft City records one man's attempt to plot a course through the urban labyrinth. Holding up a revealing mirror to the modern city, it is used as the locale for a demanding and expressive personal drama. Jonathan Raban’s soft city is the malleable material from which identity is formed. “It invites you to remake it, to consolidate it into a shape you can live in . . . Decide who you are, and the city will again assume a fixed form around you.” This soft city is the mythic city, where illusion, dream, aspiration, and nightmare are all fixed into place; it comes into focus as it is passed through and acted upon by an individual or a collective. Where is the ‘Soft City” now? – Feb 2007 Introduced by Tim Waterman Hosted by Andrew Stuck, Rethinking Cities Ltd.
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    61

    Speed Tribes

    Speed Tribes: Days and Nights with Japan's Next Generation is a 1995 book by Karl Taro Greenfeld. It is a collection of fiction short stories, each focusing on a specific Japanese youth in the early 1990s, a turbulent time in Japan following the collapse of the late 1980s "bubble" economy. Its subjects include a young Yakuza, a nightclub hostess, an office girl, a motorcycle gangster, a hacker, an ultra-right-wing nationalist, and 'Choco Bon-Bon', a porn star. Popular 1990s rock band Zi:Kill appears in a chapter that documents the writer's time spent with the band and the events that nearly caused their break up.
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    62
    Tales of the Alhambra

    Tales of the Alhambra

    • Year Released: 1832
    Tales of the Alhambra is a collection of essays, verbal sketches, and stories by Washington Irving. Shortly after completing a biography of Christopher Columbus in 1828, Washington Irving traveled from Madrid, where he had been staying, to Granada, Spain. At first sight, he described it as "a most picturesque and beautiful city, situated in one of the loveliest landscapes that I have ever seen." Irving was preparing a book called A Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada, a history of the years 1478–1492, and was continuing his research on the topic. He immediately asked the then-governor of the historic Alhambra Palace as well as the archbishop of Granada for access to the palace, which was granted because of Irving's celebrity status. Aided by a 35-year old guide named Mateo Ximenes, Irving was inspired by his experience to write Tales of the Alhambra. Throughout his trip, he filled his notebooks and journals with descriptions and observations though he did not believe his writing would ever do it justice. He wrote, "How unworthy is my scribbling of the place." Irving continued to travel through Spain until he was appointed as secretary of legation at the United States Embassy in
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    65

    Tarzan of the Apes

    • Year Released: 1912
    Tarzan of the Apes is a novel written by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first in a series of books about the title character Tarzan. It was first published in the pulp magazine All-Story Magazine in October, 1912; the first book edition was published in 1914. The character was so popular that Burroughs continued the series into the 1940s with two dozen sequels. For the novel's centennial anniversary, Library of America will be publishing a hardcover edition based on the original book in April 2012 with an introduction by Thomas Mallon (ISBN 978-1-59853-164-0). The novel tells the story of John Clayton, born in the western coastal jungles of equatorial Africa to a marooned couple from England, John and Alice (Rutherford) Clayton, Lord and Lady Greystoke. Adopted as an infant by the she-ape Kala after his parents died (his father is killed by the savage king ape Kerchak), Clayton is named "Tarzan" ("White Skin" in the ape language) and raised in ignorance of his human heritage. Feeling alienated from his peers due to their physical differences, he discovers his true parents' cabin, where he first learns of others like himself in their books, with which he eventually teaches himself to
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    66

    The Age of Kali

    • Year Released: 1998
    The Age of Kali is a 1998 travel book by William Dalrymple. The book's theme is trouble in the Indian subcontinent and the Hindu belief in a time called the Kali Yuga when many problems will come to exist in the world. The book gives an overview of many of the top controversies in the region at the time of publication, including interviews with players in those events. Dalrymple's fourth book, The Age of Kali (1998), saw him return to the subject of India. It was released in India renamed as At the Court of the Fish-Eyed Goddess (ISBN 8172233329). (The "fish eyed goddess" refers to the Goddess Meenakshi of Madurai.) The book is a collection of essays collected through almost a decade of travel around the Indian subcontinent. It deals with many controversial subjects such as Sati, the caste wars in India, political corruption and terrorism. This chapter on Patna includes discussions of the 13 February 1992 massacre of high caste people by low caste people in Barra, Bihar; the arrest and political style of Anand Mohan Singh; violence in Patna; and a profile of and interview with Laloo Prasad Yadav. This chapter includes a discussion of the culture of 19th century Lucknow; the general
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    67

    The American Scene

    • Year Released: 1905
    The American Scene is a book of travel writing by Henry James about his trip through the United States in 1904-1905. Ten of the fourteen chapters of the book were published in the North American Review, Harper's and the Fortnightly Review in 1905 and 1906. The first book publication was in 1907, and there were significant differences between the American and the English versions of the book. Without question the most controversial and critically discussed of James' travel books, The American Scene sharply attacked what James saw as the rampant materialism and frayed social structure of turn-of-the-century America. The book has generated controversy for its treatment of various ethnic groups and political issues. The book still has relevance to such current topics as immigration policy, environmental protection, economic growth, and racial tensions. James spent nearly a year on his American tour from August, 1904 to July, 1905. He travelled the entire country and even made decent money from public lectures, usually to ladies' organizations that he made "pay me through the nose." The American Scene covers his trips up and down the Eastern seaboard, concentrating on New York City and
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    68

    The Bean Trees

    • Year Released: 1988
    The Bean Trees, first published in 1988, is the first book written by Barbara Kingsolver, followed by a sequel Pigs in Heaven. The protagonist of the novel, Taylor Greer, a native of Kentucky, finds herself in Oklahoma near Cherokee territory. The novel begins with a woman leaving an American Indian infant with Taylor. The remainder of the novel traces the experiences of Taylor and the child, whom Taylor has named Turtle. Covering Turtle's early childhood, the story includes a colorful cast of characters: Lou Ann, her roommate; Esperanza and Estevan, a Guatemalan couple; and Mattie, the owner of "Jesus Is Lord Used Tires". The novel also makes reference to the issue of Native American parental rights. The Bean Trees opens in rural Kentucky. Taylor goes on to tell the story of how she is scared of tires. Taylor was the one to escape small-town life. She did so by avoiding pregnancy, getting a job working at the hospital, and saving up enough money to buy herself an old Volkswagen bug. About five years after high school graduation, she decides to go on a journey to see what life has to offer her. Her car breaks down in the middle of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma. As she sits in her
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    71

    The Dark Heart of Italy

    • Year Released: 2003
    The Dark Heart of Italy: Travels Through Time and Space Across Italy is a 2003 non-fiction book by British journalist Tobias Jones detailing his four years spent in Italy, along with discussions on the history and politics of the country. The Dark Heart of Italy was a bestseller in Britain, Italy and the United States. ("The Dark Heart will ensure Italy remains an object of our fascination". Sebastian Skeaping, The Observer 2003.)Following its publication, he was short-listed for the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year award. An Italian translation by Chicca Galli was published by Rizzoli with the title "Il cuore oscuro dell'Italia - Un viaggio tra odio e amore".
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    72

    The Grey Seas Under

    The Grey Seas Under is a non-fiction book by well-known Canadian author Farley Mowat about the Atlantic Salvage Tug Foundation Franklin, operated by the firm Foundation Maritime in Canada's Maritime provinces from 1930 to 1948. The book traces the history of the company and its discovery of a powerful salvage tug, the former Royal Navy tug HMS Frisky, was constructed by the John Lewis and Sons Shipbuilding at Aberdeen, Scotland. Decommissioned and in 1924 sold to a German company as the SS Gustavo Ipland, she was purchased and renamed by Foundation Maritime in 1930. The book follows the tug's various captains and crews in many daring rescues during the Great Depression and World War II based out of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The book finishes with Franklins last voyage in January 1948 while nearly sinking while towing the Motor Ship Arosa though a hurricane. Suffering severe damage, the thirty year old Franklin limped home, arriving at Halifax on February 5, 1948. The tow of Arosa was completed by another Foundation salvage vessel, Foundation Josephine. The Grey Seas Under is one of the few nonfiction books to detail the adventures of a salvage tug and its crews. It was inspired when
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    73

    The History of Mr Polly

    • Year Released: 1910
    The History of Mr. Polly is a 1910 comic novel by H. G. Wells. The protagonist of The History of Mr. Polly is an antihero inspired by H.G. Wells' early experiences in the drapery trade: Alfred Polly, born circa 1870, a timid and directionless young man living in Edwardian England, who despite his own bumbling achieves a sort of contented serenity with little help from those around him. Mr. Polly's most striking characteristic is his "innate sense of epithet," which leads him to coin hilarious expressions like "the Shoveacious Cult" for "sunny young men of an abounding and elbowing energy," and "dejected angelosity" for the ornaments of Canterbury Cathedral. Alfred Polly lives in the imaginary town of Fishbourne in Kent (not to be confused with Fishbourne, West Sussex—the town in the story is thought to be based on Sandgate, Kent where Wells lived for several years). The novel begins in medias res by presenting a miserable Mr. Polly: "He hated Foxbourne, he hated Foxbourne High Street, he hated his shop and his wife and his neighbours -- every blessed neighbour -- and with indescribable bitterness he hated himself." The rest of the The History of Mr. Polly is divided in three parts.
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    74

    The Jaguar Smile

    • Year Released: 1987
    The Jaguar Smile is Salman Rushdie's first full-length non-fiction book, which he wrote in 1987 after visiting Nicaragua. The book is subtitled A Nicaraguan Journey and relates his travel experiences, the people he met as well as views on the political situation then facing the country. The book was written during a break the author took from writing his controversial novel, The Satanic Verses. After a period of political and economic turmoil under dictator Anastasio Somoza Debayle, the leftist Sandinista National Liberation Front (commonly known by the initial FSLN or as the Sandinistas) came to power in Nicaragua in 1979 supported by much of the populace and elements of the Catholic Church. The government was initially backed by the US under Jimmy Carter, but the support evaporated under the presidency of Ronald Reagan in light of evidence that the Sandinistas were providing help to the FMLN rebels in El Salvador. The US imposed economic sanctions and a trade embargo instead which contributed to the collapse of the Nicaraguan economy in the early-to-mid 1980s. While the Soviet Union and Cuba funded the Nicaraguan army, the US financed the contras in neighboring Honduras with a
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    75
    The Last Grain Race

    The Last Grain Race

    • Year Released: 1956
    The Last Grain Race is a 1956 book by Eric Newby, a travel writer, about his time spent on the four-masted steel barque Moshulu during the vessel's last voyage in the Australian grain trade. In 1938 the 18 year old Newby shipped aboard the four-masted barque Moshulu as an apprentice. His outbound passage from Europe to Australia was via the Cape of Good Hope. His return was around Cape Horn. Moshulu was at the time the largest sailing ship still transporting grain. Newby finds out that his advertising agency, The Wurzel Agency, has lost a lucrative cereal account and he decides to write to Gustav Erikson of Mariehamn for a place on one of his grain ships, having been inspired with tales of the sea by an old family friend, Mr Mountstewart. Much to his surprise, he is accepted by 'Ploddy Gustav', the owner of the largest fleet of square-rigged deep-water sailing vessels in the world at that time. After fitting himself out with heavy-weather gear, Newby makes his way to Belfast where Moshulu is discharging her cargo in York Dock. He meets some of the crew and they take him out on a drinking binge, but not before the second mate has order him 'op the rigging'. As the ship waits in
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    76
    The Last Voyage of Columbus

    The Last Voyage of Columbus

    • Year Released: 2005
    The Last Voyage of Columbus: Being the Epic Tale of the Great Captain's Fourth Expedition, Including Accounts of Swordfight, Mutiny, Shipwreck, Gold, War, Hurricane and Discovery (also referred to as The Last Voyage of Columbus,) is a non-fiction book, authored by Martin Dugard and published in 2005 by Little, Brown and Company. The plot is a life-long account of explorer Christopher Columbus and his founding of what is now often referred to as the New World. The book received positive reviews by critics. The books topic focuses on Christopher Columbus, who was one of the first European founders of the Americas. The book tells the story of his life, as well as the problems he faced with his journeys. Columbus had seduced some of the most powerful woman in Europe to pay the expenses of his trip. The book follows Columbus' departure from Spain prior to his first voyage before sunrise on August 3, 1492. After three days of sailing on the Pinta, the rudder became loose, unable to cope with the strength of the seas, Columbus and his fleet stayed for a month on the Canary Islands. After repairing the ship, the fleet resumed sailing, despite pleas from fellow crew members for Columbus to
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    77

    The Lawless Roads

    • Year Released: 1993
    The Lawless Roads (1939) is a travel account by Graham Greene, based on his 1938 trip to Mexico, to see the effects of the government's campaign of forced anti-Catholic secularisation and how the inhabitants had reacted to the brutal anticlerical purges of President Plutarco Elías Calles. A Catholic and conservative man, Greene travels to Mexico to find the remnants of Catholicism. His journey takes him from the northern border towns, through the cosmopolitan capital, and then into the states of Puebla and Chiapas. The voyage produced two books, the factual The Lawless Roads (published as Another Mexico in the U.S.), and the novel The Power and the Glory.
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    78

    The Megalithic European

    • Year Released: 2004
    The Megalithic European : The 21st Century Traveller in Prehistoric Europe is Julian Cope's second book on historic sites, this time looking at continental Europe and Ireland. Like its predecessor - The Modern Antiquarian - the book is split into a shorter, discursive introduction with the bulk of the text being a gazetteer of sites. As with The Modern Antiquarian, sites are listed alphabetically within their sections.
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    79

    The Modern Antiquarian

    • Year Released: 1998
    The Modern Antiquarian: A Pre-Millennial Odyssey Through Megalithic Britain is a book written by Julian Cope, published in 1998. It explores a number of sites of Britain's megalithic heritage, including Stonehenge and Avebury. As well as stone circles, The Modern Antiquarian includes other megalithic monuments, hill forts, barrows and unusual places. In the introduction Cope explains how a visit to Avebury Stone Circle inspired his enthusiasm for the subject. He was disappointed with the quality of available guidebooks, so decided to write his own. He visited and researched hundreds of sites over eight years, selecting about 300 of the most significant for the book. The book is divided into two sections, the first being ten essays by Cope about various aspects of megalithic British culture. The second section and the bulk of the book is a geographically arranged gazetteer of the sites. Each entry includes an essay, directions to the site, map references, Cope's own account of his visit, photographs, drawings and (sometimes) poems. A documentary film of the same name was made for the BBC in mid-2000. Based on the guidebook The Modern Antiquarian website was launched in 2000. It
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    80
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    81
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    82

    The River at the Center of the World

    • Year Released: 1996
    The River At The Center Of The World : A Journey Up the Yangtze, and Back in Chinese Time (ISBN 0-312-42337-3) is a book by Simon Winchester. It details his travels up the Yangtze river in China and was first published in 1996. Viewing an ancient Chinese painting scroll drawn by Wang Hui gives the author the inspiration on how to structure his book. He starts his journey in Shanghai, at the Yangtze river's delta, and makes his way upriver to the headwaters. At the same time, his narration also makes a journey back in time, writing about contemporary times in Shanghai and Nanjing, and writing about events that date back increasingly farther in cities upriver. He makes the travel with a companion — a Chinese lady who is referred to in the book only as Lily to protect her identity. The chapter titled A Great New Wall is devoted to the 3 Gorges Dam that is being constructed.
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    83

    The Roads to Sata

    • Year Released: 1985
    The Roads to Sata, written in 1985 by Alan Booth (1946-1993), tells the story of his journey, on foot, from Cape Soya in Hokkaidō, the northernmost point of Japan, to Sata, the southernmost point of Japan. Booth's journey lasted 128 days and covered 2,000 miles. The book was originally published by John Weatherhill Inc in 1985, but was republished by Kodansha Globe in 1997 in paperback.
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    86

    The Scrambled States of America

    • Year Released: 1998
    The Scrambled States of America is a children's book by author and illustrator Laurie Keller. Her first book, it was released by Henry Holt Books for Young Readers in 1998, and tells the story about the 50 states of America becoming bored and organizing a party, where the states meet each other, hit it off, and decide to trade places. Publishers Weekly gave the book a positive review, noting that "[i]t's hard to imagine a more engaging (or comical) way to learn the 50 states and their locations." A tie-in card game of the same name was published in 2002 by Gamewright It is a two to four-player game geared toward players 8 years old and up.
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    87

    The Sex Lives of Cannibals

    The Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific is a 2004 travelogue by author J. Maarten Troost describing the two years he and his girlfriend spent living on the Tarawa atoll in the Pacific island nation of Kiribati. In the book Troost describes how he came to discover that the tiny sliver of land in the South Pacific, barely known to the outside world, was not the tropical paradise he thought it would be. Nevertheless, he and his girlfriend Sylvia built a home for themselves in Kiribati, alongside a host of colorful local characters, all the while having new encounters with the bizarre and unfamiliar. In those two years, he learned to overcome the dearth of practically all food except fish ("raw or boiled"), the extreme heat (only Mormon missionaries wore pants), and a lethargic government he describes as "coconut Stalinism"—"though Stalin, at least, got something done." He meets the poet laureate, a twenty-one-year-old Englishman who hasn't written a poem since arriving on the island and can't pronounce the name of the country he's in, and survives the "Great Beer Crisis," when the Australian supply ship went to Kiritimati Island instead of Tarawa, thus failing to
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    88
    The Silverado Squatters

    The Silverado Squatters

    • Year Released: 1883
    The Silverado Squatters (1883) is Robert Louis Stevenson's travel memoir of his two-month honeymoon trip with Fanny Vandegrift (and her son Lloyd Osbourne) to Napa Valley, California in the late spring and early summer of 1880. In July 1879, Stevenson received word that his future American wife's divorce was almost complete, but that she was seriously ill. He left Scotland right away and traveled to meet her in Monterey, California (his trip detailed in The Amateur Emigrant (1894) and Across the Plains (1892)). Broken financially, suffering from a life-long fibrinous bronchitis condition, and with his writing career at a dead end, he was nursed back to health by his doctor, his nurse, and his future wife, while living briefly in Monterey, San Francisco and Oakland. His father having provided money to help, on May 19, 1880 he married the San Francisco native, whom he had first met in France in 1875, soon after the events of An Inland Voyage. Still too weak to undertake the journey back to Scotland, friends suggested Calistoga in the upper Napa Valley with its healthy mountain air. They first went to the Hot Springs Hotel in Calistoga, but unable to afford the 10 dollars a week, they
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    89
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    90
    The Tent Dwellers

    The Tent Dwellers

    The Tent Dwellers is a book by Albert Bigelow Paine, chronicling his travels through inland Nova Scotia on a trout fishing trip with Dr. Edward "Eddie" Breck, and with guides Charles "the Strong" and Del "the Stout", one June in the early 1900s. Originally published in 1908, the book takes place in what is now Kejimkujik National Park (or "Kedgeemakoogee", as Paine spelled it) and the adjacent Tobeatic Game Reserve. The Reserve later became the Tobeatic Wildlife Management Area, and in 1998 was included within the newly created Tobeatic Wilderness Area. Paine was well known in American literary circles at the time, chiefly as the biographer of Mark Twain. Breck held a Ph. D., spoke five languages, and was listed in Who's Who in America. The book chronicles a three-week fishing trip through central Nova Scotia, and is an excellent account of the unspoiled Nova Scotia wilderness that existed at the time, which has been largely diminished since. The group encounters moose (which Eddie tries to capture and bring back alive), beaver, and numerous trout, the first of which is now very scarce in the region, and legions of mosquitos, moose flies, black flies, noseeums, and midges, all of
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    91

    The Turks Today

    The Turks Today is a book by Andrew Mango about Turkey's development since the death of the founder of Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in 1938 until today.
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    93
    Trainspotting

    Trainspotting

    • Year Released: 1993
    Trainspotting is the first novel by Scottish writer Irvine Welsh. It takes the form of a collection of short stories, written in either Scots, Scottish English or British English, revolving around various residents of Leith, Edinburgh who either use heroin, are friends of the core group of heroin users, or engage in destructive activities that are implicitly portrayed as addictions that serve the same function as heroin addiction. The novel is set in the late 1980s and has been called "the voice of punk, grown up, grown wiser and grown eloquent". The novel has since achieved a cult status, added to by the global success of the film based on it, Trainspotting (1996), directed by Danny Boyle. Welsh later wrote a sequel, Porno, in 2002. Skagboys, a novel that serves as a prequel was published in April 2012. The novel is split up into seven sections: the first six contain multiple chapters of varying length and differing focus. The novel's origins in short fiction are still visible though no segment or chapter is wholly independent of the others. The majority of the stories are narrated by the novel's central protagonist, Mark Renton. Each character narrates differently, in a fashion
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    96

    Typee

    • Year Released: 1846
    Typee (1846; in full: Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life) is American writer Herman Melville's first book, a classic in the literature of travel and adventure partly based on his actual experiences as a captive on the island Nuku Hiva (which Melville spelled as Nukuheva) in the South Pacific Marquesas Islands, in 1842. The title comes from the name of a valley there called Tai Pi Vai. It was Melville's most popular work during his lifetime, but made him notorious as the "man who lived among the cannibals." For 19th century readers, his career seemed to decline afterward, but during the early 20th century it was seen as the beginning of a career that peaked with Moby-Dick (1851). Typee was "in fact, neither literal autobiography nor pure fiction." Melville "drew his material from his experiences, from his imagination, and from a variety of travel books when the memory of his experiences were inadequate." The three week stay on which Typee is based takes place over the course of four months in the narrative. Melville drew extensively on contemporary accounts by Pacific explorers to add cultural detail to what might otherwise have been a straightforward story of escape, capture, and
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    99

    West with the Night

    • Year Released: 1942
    West With the Night is a 1942 memoir by Beryl Markham, chronicling her experiences growing up in Kenya (then British East Africa), in the early 1900s, leading to a career as a bush pilot there. It is considered a classic of outdoor literature, and in 2004, National Geographic Adventure ranked it number 8 in a list of 100 best adventure books. There are some questions of whether Markham is the real author of her memoir West With The Night. According to the 1993 biography, "The Lives of Beryl Markham," by Errol Trzebinski, the book's real author was her third husband, the ghost writer and journalist Raoul Schumacher. Trzebinski also claimed that Beryl Markham had an advance from Houghton Mifflin to do a book on the famous international jockey Tod Sloan, that Raoul Schumacher was supposed to write. Apparently Schumacher never did, and she was forced to go it alone, resulting in a manuscript submission that the publisher rejected as worthless, and not from the same person who had written West With The Night. Author Mary S. Lovell, who visited and stayed with Markham in Kenya shortly before Markham's death in 1986, expressed no doubts in Markham's biography that she was the sole author,
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