Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 954 views
  • 43 votes
  • 43 voters
  • 1%
Best Tobacco products of All Time

More about Best Tobacco products of All Time:

Best Tobacco products of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Tobacco products of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Tobacco products of All Time has gotten 954 views and has gathered 43 votes from 43 voters. O O

Best Tobacco products of All Time is a top list in the General category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of General or Best Tobacco products of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about General on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Tobacco products of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Tobacco products of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Vaporizer

    Vaporizer

    A vaporizer or vapouriser is a device used to extract for inhalation the active ingredients of plant material, commonly cannabis, tobacco, or other herbs or blends. Vaporization is an alternative to burning (smoking) that avoids the production of irritating toxic and carcinogenic by-products by heating the material so its active compounds boil off into a vapor. No combustion occurs, so no smoke or taste of smoke is present. Vapor ideally contains virtually zero particulate matter or tar, and significantly lower concentrations of noxious gases such as carbon monoxide. Vaporizers contain various forms of extraction chambers including straight bore, venturi, or sequential venturi, and are made of materials such as metal or glass. The extracted vapor may be collected in a jar or inflatable bag, or inhaled directly through a hose or pipe. With little to no smoke produced and cooler temperatures, less material is required to achieve a given level of effect. Hence, the irritating and harmful effects of smoking are reduced, as is secondhand smoke. Precise vaporizers use an electric heating element, often featuring thermostatic temperature control. High-end models may cost several hundred
    7.25
    8 votes
    2
    Pipe cleaner

    Pipe cleaner

    A pipe cleaner or chenille stem is a type of brush originally intended for cleaning dottle from smoking pipes. Besides cleaning pipes, they can be used for any application that calls for cleaning out small bores or tight places. Special pipe cleaners are manufactured specifically for cleaning out medical apparatus and for engineering applications. They are popular for catching drips, bundling things together, colour coding, and applying paints, oils, solvents, greases, and similar substances. Smoking pipe cleaners normally use some absorbent material, usually cotton or sometimes viscose. Bristles of stiffer material, normally monofilament nylon or polypropylene are sometimes added to better scrub out what is being cleaned. Microfilament polyester is used in some technical pipe cleaners because polyester wicks liquid away rather than absorbing it as cotton does. Some smoking pipe cleaners are made conical or tapered so that one end is thick and one end thin. The thin end is for cleaning the small bore of the pipe stem and then the thick end for the bowl or the wider part of the stem. When cleaning a pipe, pipe cleaners are normally discarded after one or two uses. Many children
    8.40
    5 votes
    3
    Rolling papers

    Rolling papers

    Rolling papers are small sheets, rolls, or leaves of paper which are sold for rolling cigarettes either by hand or with a rolling machine. When rolling a cigarette, one fills the rolling paper with tobacco, cannabis, cloves, damiana or other herbs. In Europe and North America, where taxation of machine-made cigarettes has caused economic disincentive for some smokers, rolling papers have become an increasingly popular method of tobacco consumption. In addition, people who roll their own cigarettes can customize the cigarette for any blend, and to any shape, size, and form they choose. Rolling papers are sold in lengths of 70mm - 110mm and a range of widths. Rolling papers are most commonly made with wood pulp, hemp, flax, or rice straw as a base material. Some companies may use esparto, which might lead to a slightly higher carcinogen level when burned. The basic design of a single paper is a long rectangle with a narrow strip of glue or gum all along one of the long edges. Longer, rice-based rolling papers are also often used to make spliffs or used for rolling longer cigarettes. Rolling papers are also called skins or rollies (a term which can also mean the hand-rolled cigarettes
    8.25
    4 votes
    4
    Smoking pipe

    Smoking pipe

    A smoking pipe that is specifically made to smoke tobacco typically consists of a chamber (the bowl) for the combustion of material and a thin stem (shank) ending in a mouthpiece (the bit). Pipes can range from the very simple machine-made briar pipe to highly-prized handmade and artful implements created by renowned pipemakers which are often very expensive collector's items. "Estate pipes" are previously owned pipes that are sold to new owners. The bowls of tobacco pipes are commonly made of briar, meerschaum, corncob or clay. Less common are cherrywood, olivewood, maple, mesquite, oak, and bog-wood. Generally a dense-grained wood is ideal. Minerals such as catlinite and soapstone have also been used. Pipe bowls of all these materials are sometimes carved with a great deal of artistry. Unusual, but still noteworthy pipe bowl materials include gourds, as in the famous Calabash pipe, and pyrolytic graphite. Metal and glass are uncommon materials for tobacco pipes, but are common for pipes intended for other substances, such as cannabis. The stem needs a long channel of constant position and diameter running through it, although filter pipes have varying diameters and can be
    7.00
    3 votes
    5
    Lighter

    Lighter

    A lighter is a portable device used to generate a flame. It consists of a metal or plastic container filled with a flammable fluid or pressurized liquid gas, a means of ignition, and some provision for extinguishing the flame. The first lighters were invented in the 16th century and were converted flintlock pistols that used gunpowder. One of the first lighters was invented by the German chemist named Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner in 1823 and was often called Döbereiner's lamp. This lighter worked by passing flammable hydrogen gas, produced within the lighter by a chemical reaction, over a platinum metal catalyst which in turn caused it to ignite and give off a great amount of heat and light. The device was very large and highly dangerous and fell out of production by the end of the 19th century. The patenting of ferrocerium (often misidentified as flint) by Carl Auer von Welsbach in 1903 has made modern lighters possible. When scratched, it produces a large spark which is responsible for lighting the fuel of many lighters, and is suitably inexpensive for use in disposable items. Using Carl Auer von Welsbach's flint, companies like Ronson were able to develop practical and easy to use
    5.25
    4 votes
    6
    Match

    Match

    A match is a tool for starting a fire under controlled conditions. A typical modern match is made of a small wooden stick or stiff paper. One end is coated with a material that can be ignited by frictional heat generated by striking the match against a suitable surface. Matches are usually sold in quantity; wooden ones are packaged in boxes, and paper matches are clustered in rows stapled into matchbooks. They are commonly sold by tobacconists and many other kinds of shops. The coated end of a match, known as the match "head," contains either phosphorus or phosphorus sesquisulfide as the active ingredient and gelatin as a binder. There are two main types of matches: safety matches, which can be struck only against a specially prepared surface, and strike-anywhere matches, for which any suitably frictional surface can be used. Some match-like compositions, known as electric matches, are ignited electrically and do not make use of heat from friction. Historically, the term match referred to lengths of cord (later, cambric) impregnated with chemicals, and allowed to burn continuously. These were used to light fires and fire guns (see matchlock) and cannons (see linstock). Such matches
    9.50
    2 votes
    7
    Bong

    Bong

    A bong (also water pipe,"popper bottle", bubbler, moof, bewg) is a filtration device/apparatus generally used for smoking cannabis, tobacco, or other herbal substances. In construction and function a bong is similar to a hookah, except smaller and especially more portable. A bong may be constructed from any air- and water-tight vessel by adding a bowl and stem apparatus (or slide) which guides air downward to below water level whence it bubbles upward ("bubbler") during use. To get fresh air into the bong and harvest the last remaining smoke, a hole known as the "carburator", "carb", "choke", "bink", "rush" "shotty" "kick hole" or simply "hole", somewhere on the lower part of the bong above water level, is first kept covered during the smoking process, then opened to allow the smoke to be drawn into the respiratory system. The word bong is an adaptation of the Thai word baung (Thai: บ้อง [bɔːŋ]), which refers to a cylindrical wooden tube, pipe, or container cut from bamboo, and which also refers to the bong used for smoking. Bongs have been in use by the Hmong, in Laos and Thailand, and all over Africa for centuries. One of the earliest recorded uses of the word in the West is in
    8.50
    2 votes
    8
    Hookah

    Hookah

    A hookah (hukkā or huqqah) also known as a waterpipe, narghile, or qalyān is a single or multi-stemmed instrument for smoking flavored tobacco called Mu‘assel in which the smoke is passed through a water basin (often glass based) before inhalation. The origin of the hookah is in India and Persia, or at a transition point between the two. The word hookah is a derivative of "huqqa", which is what the Indians used to call it. According to author Cyril Elgood (pp. 41, 110), who does not mention his source, it was Abul-Fath Gilani (d. 1588), a Persian physician at the Indian court of the Mughal emperor Akbar, who "first passed the smoke of tobacco through a small bowl of water to purify and cool the smoke and thus invented the hubble-bubble or hookah." Nevertheless, a quatrain of Ahli Shirazi (d. 1535) refers to the use of the ḡalyān in Safavid Iran. (Falsafī, II, p. 277; Semsār, 1963, p. 15). Smoking the hookah has gained popularity outside of its native region, in India, Iran, Pakistan and the Middle East, and is gaining popularity in North America, South America, Europe, Australia and South Africa. Nargile (but sometimes pronounced Argileh or Argilee) is the name most commonly used
    8.50
    2 votes
    9
    Rolling Tobacco

    Rolling Tobacco

    Shag, also known as rolling tobacco and loose tobacco is fine-cut tobacco used to make self-made cigarettes by hand rolling the tobacco into rolling paper or injecting it into filter tubes. It got its name from the finely cut strands appearing like 'shag' and was originally considered poor quality. Various types of cut are used; most shag blends use a simple mixture of cutting styles, consisting mostly of loose cut but also krumble kake, ribbon cut and flake may be used. Some shag blends use cuts reminiscent of pipe tobacco. A cigarette made with shag tobacco may be called a rollie, a roll-up/dole-up or hand-rolled. The flat bags in which shag is typically packaged for commercial sale are often called tobacco pouches. Oppositely, pre-processed and packaged cigarettes may be referred to colloquially as tailor-mades or straights. There are several shag blends or tobacco styles using different tobaccos, curing techniques and cutting types. Sometimes additives like sugar, glycerol and fruit flavors are added. Shag tocacco has always had a high market-share on the Dutch tobacco-market, although it is declining. In 1989 some 53% of the combined shag and cigarette market was for
    8.00
    2 votes
    10

    Pipe tobacco

    Pipe tobacco is a tobacco or blend of tobaccos and other pipe tobacco components intended to be smoked in a smoking pipe.
    7.50
    2 votes
    11
    Rolling machine

    Rolling machine

    A rolling machine is a machine that is designed to roll either tobacco or cannabis into individual cigarettes or joints. To roll a cigarette with cannabis, one must break up the smoking material as well as remove any stems so they won't puncture the paper. Rolling a cigarette with tobacco does not require prep work because the leaf is already shredded. Once the material is ready, one opens up the rolling machine by sliding one of the rollers up and over; this exposes a channel where the material is loaded. Care must be taken to place a uniform amount of product in the channel or the burn rate will change as the cigarette or joint is smoked. When ready the roller is slid back into position and locks into place. The product is cradled and confined in a round space and gets rolled when the user begins to turn one of the rollers. After a few turns, a single sheet of rolling paper is fed into the back of the channel with the "ungummed" side going in first. When rolled carefully the paper will make a complete revolution in the channel and will wrap around and under itself. At this point the user licks the gummed part of the rolling paper and continues to roll the rest of the rolling
    10.00
    1 votes
    12
    Humidor

    Humidor

    A humidor is any kind of box or room with constant humidity, used to store cigars, cigarettes, or pipe tobacco. For private use, small wooden or acrylic glass humidor boxes for a few dozen cigars are used, while cigar shops may have walk-in humidors, sometimes consisting of a whole floor. Humidors can be used to store other goods for which a certain level of humidity is desirable; the Colorado Rockies Major League Baseball team stores game balls in a large humidor at their home stadium, Coors Field, to counteract the effects of Denver's high altitude and generally low humidity. Humidors of all sizes use hygrometers to keep track of the humidity levels. Room humidor Most common in cigar bars or stores. One room is built as or converted to a humidor where all the cigars are stored. Cabinet humidor Usually placed on the floor as a piece of furniture. Typically holds 1000-5000 cigars. Table humidor Often quite heavy, though portable in theory, it's usually kept in one location. Capacity ranges from three hundred to a few thousand cigars. It usually comes with a polished wood exterior, marble, leather or combination of exotic elements, and glass top. Personal humidor Semi-regular cigar
    7.00
    2 votes
    13
    Cheroot

    Cheroot

    The cheroot or stogie is a cylindrical cigar with both ends clipped during manufacture. Since cheroots do not taper, they are inexpensive to roll mechanically, and their low cost makes them particularly popular. Typically, stogies have a length of 3.5 to 6.5 inches, and a ring gauge of 34 to 37. (Ring gauge is a measure of diameter, scaled in 64ths of an inch. A stogie is slightly over 1/2" in diameter.) The term stogie is often misused to refer to any cigar with a foul stench, or as slang, to a cigarette. Many stogies are made of flavored tobaccos, and given that a stogie may last a half hour, as opposed to the 2–8 minutes that a cigarette typically lasts, there can be quite a pungent and pervasive aroma produced. The word stogie is short for Conestoga. The cigar was the smoke of choice for teamsters driving Conestoga wagons in the cigar-making Conestoga valley area around Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The word cheroot comes from French cheroute, from Tamil curuttu/churuttu/shuruttu (சுருட்டு)- roll of tobacco. This word could have been absorbed into the French language from Tamil during the 18th century, when the French were trying to stamp their presence in South India. The word
    8.00
    1 votes
    14
    Beedi

    Beedi

    A beedi ( /ˈbiːdiː/; from Hindi: बीड़ी; also spelled bidi or biri) is a thin, Indian cigarette filled with tobacco flake and wrapped in a tendu leaf tied with a string at one end. The word comes from beeda, Marwari for a leaf wrapped in betel nuts, herbs, and condiments. A traditional method of tobacco use throughout South Asia and parts of the Middle East, today beedies are popular and inexpensive in India. There, beedi consumption outpaces that of conventional cigarettes although these tobacco-filled leaves deliver more nicotine, carbon monoxide and tar and carry a greater risk of oral cancers. Beedies accounted for 48% of Indian tobacco consumption in 2008. Like all tobacco use, beedis increase the risk of certain kinds of cancers, heart disease and lung disease. Indian tobacco cultivation began in the late 17th century, and beedies were first created when tobacco workers took left over tobacco and rolled it in leaves. The commercial Indian beedi industry saw rapid growth during the 1930s probably driven by an expansion of tobacco cultivation at the time but also helped by Gandhi's support of Indian industry and Indian products. Perhaps due to this, educated classes in India
    5.00
    2 votes
    15
    Cigar

    Cigar

    A cigar is a tightly-rolled bundle of dried and fermented tobacco that is ignited so that its smoke may be drawn into the mouth. Cigar tobacco is grown in significant quantities in Brazil, Cameroon, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Indonesia, Mexico, Nicaragua, the Philippines, and the Eastern United States. The word "cigar" originated from sikar, the Yucatec Mayan word for smoking, which became cigarro in Spanish, probably from the Mayan sikar ("to smoke rolled tobacco leaves" – from sik, "tobacco;") or from the Spanish word cigarra ("grasshopper"). However, the word itself, and variations on it, did not come into general use until 1730. New names for cigars include "Jules", "Havana", "Vitole" and "Puro". An older alternate spelling is "segar", not uncommon in 19th century signs and advertisements. Explorer Christopher Columbus is generally credited with the introduction of tobacco to Europe. Two of Columbus's crewmen during his 1492 journey, Rodrigo de Jerez and Luis de Torres, are said to have encountered tobacco for the first time on the island of Hispaniola, when natives presented them with dry leaves that spread a peculiar fragrance. Tobacco was widely diffused among
    4.50
    2 votes
    16
    Chewing tobacco

    Chewing tobacco

    Chewing tobacco is a type of smokeless tobacco product consumed by placing a portion of the tobacco between the cheek and gum or upper lip teeth and chewing. Unlike dipping tobacco, it is not ground and must be manually crushed with the teeth to release flavor and nicotine. Unwanted juices are then expectorated (spit). Chewing tobacco is typically manufactured as several varieties of product – most often as loose leaf (or scrap), pellets (tobacco "bites" or "bits"), and "plug" (a form of loose leaf tobacco condensed with a binding sweetener). Nearly all modern chewing tobaccos are produced via a process of leaf curing, cutting, fermentation and processing or sweetening. Historically, many American chewing tobacco brands (which were popular during the American Civil War era) were made with cigar clippings. Chewing is one of the oldest methods of consuming tobacco. Native Americans in both North and South America chewed the leaves of the plant, frequently mixed with the mineral lime. Chewing tobacco was the most prevalent form of tobacco use in the United States until it was overtaken by cigarette smoking in the early 20th century. According to the International Agency for Research
    5.00
    1 votes
    17
    Cigarette

    Cigarette

    A cigarette (from the French for "small cigar". Cigar comes, through the Spanish and Portuguese cigarro, from the Mayan siyar; "to smoke rolled tobacco leaves") is a small roll of finely cut tobacco leaves wrapped in a cylinder of thin paper for smoking. The cigarette is ignited at one end and allowed to smoulder; its smoke is inhaled from the other end, which is held in or to the mouth and in some cases a cigarette holder may be used as well. Most modern manufactured cigarettes are filtered and include reconstituted tobacco and other additives. The term cigarette, as commonly used, refers to a tobacco cigarette but can apply to similar devices containing other herbs, such as cloves or cannabis. A cigarette is distinguished from a cigar by its smaller size, use of processed leaf, and paper wrapping, which is normally white, though other colors are occasionally available. Cigars are typically composed entirely of whole-leaf tobacco. Rates of cigarette smoking vary widely, and have changed considerably over the course of history — since cigarettes were first widely used in the mid-20th century. While rates of smoking have over time leveled off or declined in the developed world, they
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Tobacco products of All Time

    Top List Voters