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Best The Pogues albums

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    Rum Sodomy & the Lash

    Rum Sodomy & the Lash

    Rum, Sodomy & the Lash is the second studio album by the London-based folk punk band The Pogues, released in 1985. The album's title is taken from a quotation often attributed to Winston Churchill: "Don't talk to me about naval tradition. It's nothing but rum, sodomy, and the lash." Singer and primary songwriter Shane MacGowan claimed that the title was suggested by drummer Andrew Ranken. The cover artwork is based on The Raft of the Medusa, a painting by Théodore Géricault, with the band members' faces replacing those of the men on the raft. The album reached number 13 in the UK charts. The track "A Pair of Brown Eyes", based on an older Irish tune, went on to reach number 72 in the UK singles chart. "The Old Main Drag" later appeared on the soundtrack to the film My Own Private Idaho. A remastered and expanded version of Rum, Sodomy & the Lash was released on 11 January 2005. The cut "A Pistol for Paddy Garcia", and the B-side of "Dirty Old Town", which only appeared on the initial cassette release, was moved to the bonus tracks. A poem by Tom Waits was also added to the expanded release. Rum, Sodomy & the Lash received positive reviews from critics. Mark Deming of Allmusic
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    Poguetry in Motion

    Poguetry in Motion is an EP by The Pogues and their first single to make the UK Top 40. It peaked at Number 29. It features the songs "London Girl", "Rainy Night in Soho", "The Body of an American" and "Planxty Noel Hill". "Planxty Noel Hill" refers to Noel Hill, a renowned traditional Irish musician who, at the time of the release of the band's second album, Rum Sodomy and the Lash, claimed that the Pogues were disrespecting the whole Irish music tradition. Planxty has come to mean something akin to "cheers", though its use in the song's title is insincere. On the first Pogues tour of Ireland, some members of the band participated along with Hill in a panel discussion on Irish radio, during the course of which Hill described the music of the Pogues as a "terrible abortion" (the incident is described in and the quote is taken from "The Lost Decade"). The confrontation occurred during the course of a studio debate on RTÉ Radio hosted by BP Fallon. The EP's tracks were not originally featured on any Pogues album but are included as bonus tracks on the 2004 re-issue of Rum, Sodomy, and the Lash. The song "Body of an American" was featured on the TV series The Wire during police
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    The Best of The Pogues

    The Best of the Pogues is a 1991 greatest hits compilation album by The Pogues. The album was dedicated to the memory of Deborah Korner.
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    Pogue Mahone

    Pogue Mahone is the seventh and last studio album by The Pogues, released in 1996. The title is a variant of the Irish phrase póg mo thóin, meaning "kiss my arse", from which the band's name is derived. It was the band's second studio album recorded after the departure of Shane MacGowan, and features Spider Stacy in the role of lead singer. The album was not a critical or commercial success. After its release founding member Jem Finer left the band, and the remaining members decided to end their run together as well. The album yielded one single, "How Come". "Love You Till the End" was to be the second single, but this was never released. The song appears at the end of the 1999 movie Mystery, Alaska and later on would appear on the soundtrack to the movie P.S. I Love You. The 2004 reissue added the following two tracks: with:
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    Waiting for Herb

    Waiting for Herb is a 1993 album by The Pogues, their first without former lead singer Shane MacGowan. The album saw the band continue to expand their musical reach past the traditional Irish roots it had been founded on, and was only their second full-length album without a single traditional song. The album featured the track "Tuesday Morning", which was the band's first Top Twenty hit since "Fairytale of New York." With MacGowan (who was often considered the heart, soul, head and liver of the band) departed, his singing and songwriting duties fell to the other members. While Spider Stacy took the role of lead vocalist, much of the songwriting fell to Jem Finer, who along with Terry Woods had previously been the most prolific songwriter apart from MacGowan. However, the album saw contributions by other members who had not written songs for the band previously, including James Fearnley, Andrew Ranken, and Darryl Hunt. Ranken also sang lead vocals on "My Baby's Gone". Upon the album's release, there was some speculation that the "Herb" in the title referred to marijuana; however, according to Stacy it was from the name of a German pornographic cartoon character. On 2004 Re-issue
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    Red Roses for Me

    Red Roses for Me was the first full length album by the London-based band The Pogues and was released in 1984. It is filled with traditional Irish music performed with punk influences. Traditional songs and ballads mixed with Shane MacGowan's "gutter hymns" about drinking, fighting and sex was innovative at the time. Or as lead singer MacGowan explained the music: "I couldn't believe that nobody else were doing it, so we went on doing it ourselves..." The title "Red Roses for Me" is the name of a play by Sean O'Casey, though his works do not show any direct influence upon the band. O'Casey's song of the same name has been recorded by The Dubliners. The album reached number 89 in the UK album charts. The front of the album shows the band with the exception of drummer of Andrew Rankin (pictured in inset) sitting in front of a picture of United States president John F. Kennedy. The back features Shane MacGowan pictured with his foot in a cast. Accordion player James Fearnley has a bottle sticking out of his coat, while bass player Cait O'Riordan is seen holding a can of beer. Mark Deming of Allmusic gave Red Roses for Me three and a half out of five stars, calling it "good and rowdy
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    39

    Peace and Love

    Peace and Love is a 1989 album by The Pogues, their fourth full-length studio production. The album continued the band's gradual departure from traditional Irish music. It noticeably opens with a heavily jazz-influenced track. Also, several of the songs are inspired by the city in which the Pogues were founded, London ("White City", "Misty Morning, Albert Bridge", "London You're a Lady"), as opposed to Ireland, from which they had usually drawn inspiration. Nevertheless, several notable Irish personages are mentioned, including Ned of the Hill, Christy Brown, whose book Down All The Days appears as a song title, and Napper Tandy, mentioned in the first line of "Boat Train", and was adapted from a line in the Irish rebel song "The Wearing of the Green". Likewise the MacGowan song "Cotton Fields" draws on the Lead Belly song of the same name. Mark Deming of Allmusic said that Peace and Love "isn't as good as the two Pogues albums that preceded it", but felt that "it does make clear that MacGowan was hardly the only talented songwriter in the band". Robert Christgau, on the other hand, believed that "Shane MacGowan will remain the only Pogue in the down-and-out hall of fame".
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    If I Should Fall From Grace With God

    If I Should Fall from Grace with God is a 1988 album by The Pogues. It reached number 3 in the UK album charts. The album was a departure from previous Pogues albums, which had focused on an Irish folk/punk hybrid. On If I Should Fall from Grace with God several more genres were added to this mixture, including Jazz, Spanish folk and Middle Eastern folk. The adding of Spanish and Middle Eastern sounds was a sign of things to come; on later albums such as 1990's Hell's Ditch these would become the defining sound. On this album, however, it was very much Irish folk to the fore, especially on songs such as the title track, "Bottle of Smoke", "Lullaby of London", "Sit Down by the Fire", and the rendition of the traditional jig "The Lark in the Morning" as the coda to "Turkish Song of the Damned". These songs were more typical of the earlier Pogues albums, mostly fast and heavily textured. The album was also the first by the band to utilize a complete drum kit. The song makes a passing reference to the Loughgall Martyrs with the line "while over in Ireland eight more men lay dead, kicked down and shot in the back of the head". It marked the most substantial line-up change to date for
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    Hell's Ditch

    Hell's Ditch

    Hell's Ditch is the fifth full-length album by The Pogues, and the last to feature front man Shane MacGowan as a member. Released in 1990, the album continued the group's slow departure from Irish music, giving more emphasis to rock and straight folk rock, and forsaking their earlier staples of traditional compositions almost entirely. MacGowan parted with the band after the release of the album, due to problems with his abuse of alcohol and drugs, which had been leading to deterioration of his reliability as a performer. Several of the songs on the album have Asian themes, in sound or in content, notably "Summer in Siam", "The House of Gods", and "Sayonara", although only the latter has a noticeably far-eastern tune. The song "Lorca's Novena" draws on MacGowan's affinity for Spain (particularly Almería, which he discovered years earlier when filming Straight to Hell), and the famous Spanish poet Federico García Lorca. The song tells of the poet's murder by Francisco Franco's Nationalist supporters in the Spanish Civil War, and how his body, never having been recovered, was said to have walked away. "The Wake of the Medusa" is a first person narrative inspired by Théodore
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