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Best Studios and Companies of All Time

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Best Studios and Companies of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Studios and Companies of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Studios and Companies of All Time has gotten 205 views and has gathered 30 votes from 30 voters. O O

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    Encyclopædia Britannica

    Encyclopædia Britannica

    The Encyclopædia Britannica (Latin for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language encyclopaedia. It is written and continuously updated by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,400 contributors. It is regarded as one of the most scholarly of English language encyclopaedias. The Britannica is the oldest English-language encyclopaedia still being produced. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in Edinburgh, Scotland as three volumes. The encyclopaedia grew in size; the second edition was 10 volumes, and by its fourth edition (1801–1809) it had expanded to 20 volumes. Its rising stature helped recruit eminent contributors, and the 9th edition (1875–1889) and the 11th edition (1911) are landmark encyclopaedias for scholarship and literary style. Beginning with the 11th edition, the Britannica shortened and simplified articles to broaden its appeal in the North American market. In 1933, the Britannica became the first encyclopaedia to adopt "continuous revision", in which the encyclopaedia is continually reprinted and every article updated on a schedule. In March 2012, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. announced
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    Bell Labs

    Bell Labs

    Bell Laboratories (also known as Bell Labs and formerly known as AT&T Bell Laboratories and Bell Telephone Laboratories) is the research and development subsidiary of the French-owned Alcatel-Lucent in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey, United States. It previously was a division of the American Telephone & Telegraph Company (AT&T Corporation), half-owned through its Western Electric manufacturing subsidiary. Bell Laboratories operates its headquarters at Murray Hill, New Jersey, and has research and development facilities throughout the world. Researchers working at Bell Labs are credited with the development of radio astronomy, the transistor, the laser, information theory, the UNIX operating system, the C programming language and the C++ programming language. Seven Nobel Prizes have been awarded for work completed at Bell Laboratories. The Alexander Graham Bell Laboratory, also variously known as the Volta Bureau, the Bell Carriage House, the Bell Laboratory and the Volta Laboratory, was created in Washington, D.C. by Alexander Graham Bell. In 1880, the French government awarded Bell the Volta Prize of 50,000 francs (approximately US$10,000 at that time, about $250,000 in current
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    Sid Davis

    Sidney Davis (1 April 1916 - 16 October 2006) was an American director and producer who specialized in social guidance films. Davis was born to a housepainter father and a dressmaker mother. The family moved to Hollywood, California when Davis was four years old. He began working in the film industry as a child, obtaining bit parts. When he was older he often worked as a stand-in for Leif Erickson and John Wayne. In November 1949 Linda Joyce Glucoft, a six-year-old girl in Los Angeles, California, was molested and murdered by a man named Fred Stroble. The story was front-page news in the Los Angeles Times for a week as police and the FBI searched for Stroble. The story was picked up by Time Magazine and other national media, and led to a flurry of reported rapes and attempted rapes. Some media began to speculate that the supposed epidemic of rape was simply media manipulation of public perception. Davis stated that the tragedy particularly disturbed him because his then-six-year-old daughter Jill didn't seem to pay attention to his warnings about strangers. He borrowed $1,000 from John Wayne and used the money to make his first film, The Dangerous Stranger, a film he would remake
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    National Film Board of Canada

    The National Film Board of Canada (or simply National Film Board or NFB) (French: Office national du film du Canada, or ONF) is Canada's twelve-time Academy Award-winning public film producer and distributor. An agency of the Government of Canada, the NFB produces and distributes documentary, animation, alternative drama and digital media productions. In total, the NFB has produced over 13,000 productions which have won over 5,000 awards. The NFB reports to the Parliament of Canada through the Minister of Canadian Heritage. It has English language and French language production branches. The organization's purpose and mission have been re-defined numerous times throughout its history. Currently, the NFB's mandate is defined by the former Minister of Canadian Heritage: The overarching objective of the National Film Board is to produce and distribute audio-visual works which provoke discussion and debate on subjects of interest to Canadian audiences and foreign markets; which explore the creative potential of the audio-visual media; and which achieve recognition by Canadians and others for excellence, relevance and innovation. — Sheila Copps, Minister of Canadian Heritage (2000) The
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    The McGraw-Hill Companies

    The McGraw-Hill Companies

    The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., (NYSE: MHP) is an American publicly traded corporation headquartered in Rockefeller Center in New York City. Its primary areas of business are financial, education, publishing, and business services. It publishes numerous textbooks and magazines, including Architectural Record and Aviation Week, and is the parent company of Standard & Poor's, Platts, and J.D. Power and Associates. It is the majority owner of the Canadian publisher McGraw-Hill Ryerson (TSX). The company has its corporate headquarters in 1221 Avenue of the Americas, Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The McGraw-Hill Companies traces its history back to 1888 when James H. McGraw, co-founder of the company, purchased the American Journal of Railway Appliances. He continued to add further publications, eventually establishing The McGraw Publishing Company in 1899. His co-founder, John A. Hill, had also produced several technical and trade publications and in 1902 formed his own business, The Hill Publishing Company. In 1909 both men, having known each other's interests, agreed upon an alliance and combined the book departments of their publishing companies into The McGraw-Hill Book
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    Coronet Films

    Coronet Films

    • Important People: David A. Smart
    Coronet Films (also Coronet Instructional Media Inc.) was a producer and distributor of American short social guidance films from 1946 to the early 1970s founded by David A. Smart. The company, whose library is currently owned and distributed by The Phoenix Learning Group, Inc., produced instructional films aimed at young teenagers and high school students which were produced by dozens until the mid-1950s when production tapered off. Social guidance on topics such as dating, family life, courtesy and citizenship were typical themes of the films with occasional educational topics such as the solar system and the human body. Coronet was active during the 1973-4 school year when they placed over 60 titles for evaluation with Project METRO of the Capitol Region Education Council (CREC), in central Connecticut. Titles included A Is For Alphabet, Color, Color Everywhere, Dating Scene, and Understanding Shakespeare: His Stagecraft. Many of the titles in their catalog were produced early in the post-war film boom; they were typical of the quality, production values, and content of media of the period: no better, no worse, and often humorous in the context of the post mid-1960s sexual
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    Centron Corporation

    Centron Corporation

    • Location: Lawrence
    Centron Corporation was an industrial and educational film production company. Founded in 1947 in Lawrence, Kansas by Arthur H. Wolf and Russell A. Mosser, Centron would come to the forefront of the industrial and educational film companies in the United States. Centron competed with large companies on both coasts to become one of the top producers of industrial and educational films. The company was known for its high quality films, coming in on time and under budget. Centron won many awards for its films and claimed an Oscar nomination for the documentary Leo Beuerman. In 1981, Wolf and Mosser sold Centron to the Coronet division of Esquire, Inc. Harold "Herk" Harvey was the principal director at Centron. His 1962 feature Carnival of Souls was produced with several people associated with Centron. John Clifford, a Centron screenwriter wrote the script for Carnival of Souls.
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