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Best Scottish Clan of All Time

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    1

    Clan Matheson

    Clan Matheson is a Highland Scottish clan. In regard to the clan, the surname Matheson has been attributed to the Gaelic Mac Mhathghamhuin, meaning "son of the bear". Traditionally the Clan Matheson descends from a 12th century man called Gilleoin, who is thought to have been from the ancient royal Cenél Loairn (House of Lorne), part of the Scottish Dál Riata kingdom which was established c. 470 by the sons of Erc of Dalriada who was King of Irish Dal Riata in Antrim. The clan has been undertaking DNA tests of male line Mathesons, and there are Matheson males who show the Dalriada DNA signature. The current chiefly line from Lochalsh, Ross-shire is of R1a Viking descent, while the chieftain line from Shiness, Sutherland is of R1b Celtic descent. Another significant group within the clan are the Isle of Lewis Mathesons which show another R1b Celtic DNA signature. According to tradition the Clan Matheson were among the followers of the King in his wars with the Picts, whom he finally overthrew at the great Battle of Cambuskenneth near Stirling in 838. The Clan Matheson settled around the area of Loch Alsh, Lochcarron and Kintail and gave their allegiance to the Clan MacDonald and the
    5.90
    10 votes
    2
    Clan Robertson

    Clan Robertson

    Clan Donnachaidh (Scottish Gaelic: Clann Dhonnchaidh), also known as Clan Robertson, is one of the oldest of all Scottish clans. There are two main theories as to the origins of the Clan Donnachaidh: The clan's first recognised chief, Donnchadh Reamhar, 'Stout Duncan', son of Andrew de Atholia (Latin 'Andrew of Atholl'), was a minor land-owner and leader of a kin-group around Dunkeld , Highland Perthshire, and as legend has it, an enthusiastic and faithful supporter of Robert I (king 1306–29) during the Wars of Scottish Independence; he is believed to have looked after King Robert after the Battle of Methven in 1306. The clan asserts that Stout Duncan's relatives and followers (not yet known as Robertsons) supported Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 (although this patriotic story is not supported by contemporary documentation). His descendants became known (in English or Scots) as the Duncansons, or Gaelic Clann Dhònnchaidh, 'Children of Duncan'. In 1394 a clan battle took place between Clann Dhonnchaidh, Clan Lindsay and involving Clan Ogilvy, who were the hereditary sheriffs of Angus, during a cattle raid on Angus. Sir Walter Ogilvy was slain at this battle.
    8.43
    7 votes
    3

    Clan Colville

    Clan Colville is a Lowland Scottish clan. The name Colville is believed to be of ancient Norman origin. It is believed to be derived from the town of Colleville-sur-Mer in Normandy, France. The word element Colle- represents the Scandinavian surname Koli meaning "the dark and swarthy one", and the appellative -ville meaning in Old French "farm" and later "village". (see Villein) The first Colville found in Scotland was William De Colville. He is noted as receiving the Baronies of Ochiltree and Oxnam. He also received baronies in Oxnam and Heton in Roxburghshire together with other lands in Ayrshire. William de Colville also received the barony of Kinnaird in Stirlingshire. In 1174, Phillip De Colville was sent to Scotland as a hostage for the release of William the Lion. He apparently took up residence in Scotland and established the two noble lineage’s of Culross and Ochiltree. Thomas Colville le Scot of Dalmellington & Carsphairn and sometime Sheriff of Dumfries was an important member of William's court as can be seen by the good number of William's charters to which he was a witness (along with many other notables of that time). He was obviously given the oversight of the
    6.50
    8 votes
    4
    Chattan Confederation

    Chattan Confederation

    Clan Chattan or the Chattan Confederation is a confederation of 16 Scottish clans who joined for mutual defence or blood bonds. Its leader was the chief of Clan Mackintosh. The origin of the name Chattan is disputed. There are two main theories One of the traditional accounts of the founding of the Macpherson clan, states that Gillicattan Mor Mac Gillespic settled in the Lochaber region of Scotland on the eastern side of Loch Ness, where he founded the Clan Chattan. It is said that three of Gillichattan Mor's sons founded branches of the Clan Chattan. Murriach, a younger son of Gillichattan Mor, founded Clann Mhuirich. His grandson Duncan was called the Parson, because he had the collection of parsonage tithes in the Parish of Laggan. It is from him that the name Macpherson, the 'Son of the Parson', became the surname the clan in the 15th century. Although the chief of the Mackintosh clan has most frequently been the leader of Clan Chattan, there has been a long rivalry with the chiefs of the Macpherson clan for that position. Together, as the principal chiefs of Clan Chattan, they were involved in a bloody feud with Clan Cameron that lasted 350 years. In 1396, a gladiatorial
    6.43
    7 votes
    5
    Clan Crawford

    Clan Crawford

    • Associated Titles: Chief of Clan Crawford
    Clan Crawford is a Scottish clan recognised by the Court of the Lord Lyon, which is the heraldic authority of Scotland. The clan does not a have a chief recognised by the Lord Lyon King of Arms, is considered an armigerous clan. Clan Crawford is considered armigerous because Crawfords are matriculated with the Lyon Court as armigers. The last internally recognised chief was Hugh Ronald George Craufurd, who sold his land (Auchenames, Crosbie and other estates) and moved to Canada in 1904. He died in Calgary in 1942, leaving no male heirs. Clan Crawford derives its clan-name from the barony of Crawford in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Because of this it has been claimed the clan is of Norman descent, however it has also been asserted that the clan is of Anglo-Danish descent. The most complete history of the House of Crawford was written by the historian George Crawfurd in the early 18th century. In line with George Crawfurd account, the House acknowledges as its progenitor the Anglo-Danish chief Thor Longus (Thor the tall) who is most closely identified with the Merse in Southern Scotland, a marshy area west of Berwick and north of the River Tweed. Thor Longus also held lands in
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    Clan Rollo

    Clan Rollo

    Clan Rollo is a Lowland Scottish clan. The Clan Rollo are of Norman origin. However they can trace their roots to the feared Norsemen who raided the coast of England and Scotland in the seventh and eighth centuries. Rognvald Eysteinsson was Jarl of Shetland and Orkney, and his son, Hrólfr Rögnvaldsson (Rollo or Gange-Rolf), was a renowned Viking who not only raided Scotland, but parts of his Norwegian homeland for good measure. He was harried by the Norwegian King Harald I of Norway, and eventually turned his attention to the northern coast of France where he was called Rollo. His descendants became established as Dukes of Normandy, and their spirit of conquest brought them to the shores of England in 1066. Erik Rollo accompanied his uncle, William the Conqueror, on the invasion, and it is believed that his son or grandson, Richard, followed King David I of Scotland when he left the English court to reclaim his Scottish throne. The name first appears on record in a charter of around 1141 granted by Robert de Brus. Black’s Surnames of Scotland lists numerous variants for the spelling of this name, and one Robert Rolloche obtained from King David II of Scotland lands near Perth in
    7.17
    6 votes
    7
    Clan MacDougall

    Clan MacDougall

    Clan MacDougall is a Highland Scottish clan consisting of the descendants of Dubgall mac Somairle, son of Somerled, who ruled Lorne and the Isle of Mull in Argyll in the 13th century. During the Wars of Scottish Independence the MacDougalls were supporters of William Wallace but later fought in civil war in support of the powerful Clan Comyn, who were rivals to the throne of Scotland, against Robert the Bruce. Clan MacDougall is a Scottish clan traditionally associated with the lands of Argyll and Lorne in Scotland. Like the Clan Donald or MacDonald and all of its MacDonald branches, the MacDougalls are also descended from Somerled ("Summer Wanderer"), also known as Lord of the Isles. Together they are referred to as the Clann Somhairle. Furthermore they are descended maternally from both the House of Godred Crovan and the Earls of Orkney, through Somerled's wife Ragnhildis Ólafsdóttir, daughter of Olaf I Godredsson, King of Mann and the Isles and Ingeborg Haakonsdottir daughter of Haakon Paulsson, Earl of Orkney. It remains uncertain if the Clann Somhairle are also descendants in some manner of the House of Ivar, but this is commonly argued. The Clan MacDougall takes its name from
    7.00
    6 votes
    8
    Clan MacLeod

    Clan MacLeod

    Clan MacLeod (/ˌklæn mɨˈklaʊd/; Scottish Gaelic: Clann Mhic Leòid; Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [ˈkʰl̪ˠan̪ˠ viʰkʲ ˈlɔːtʲ]) is a Highland Scottish clan associated with the Isle of Skye. There are two main branches of the clan: the Macleods of Harris and Dunvegan, whose chief is Macleod of Macleod, are known in Gaelic as Sìol Tormoid ("seed of Tormod"); the Macleods of Lewis, whose chief is Macleod of The Lewes, are known in Gaelic as Sìol Torcaill ("seed of Torcall"). Both branches claim descent from Leòd, who lived in the 13th century. The surname MacLeod means 'son of Leod'. The name Leod is an Anglicization of the Scottish Gaelic name Leòd, which is thought to have been derived from the Old Norse name Ljótr, meaning ugly. Clann means family, while mhic is the genitive of mac, the Gaelic for son, and Leòid is the genitive of Leòd. The whole phrase therefore means The family of the son of Leod. The Clan MacLeod of Lewis claims its descent from Leod, who according to MacLeod tradition was a younger son of Olaf the Black, King of Mann (r.1229–1237). However, articles have been published in the Clan MacLeod magazine which suggest an alternate genealogy for Leod, one in which he was
    7.00
    6 votes
    9

    Clan Durie

    Clan Durie is a Lowland Scottish Clan. There is a persistent myth that the origin of the name Durie is from the French 'Du Roi' but there is no evidence for this. Rather, a younger son of the Earl of Strathearn was granted the existing lands of Durie (from the Gaelic for a small or black stream) and took the name. Another discredited story is that the Duries rose to prominence as administrators to Princess Joan, sister of King Henry III of England and wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. The Duries had been in Fife from the 13th century, (their current clan chief is based on the Stirling/Dunbartonshire boundaries - Finnich Malise). The Duries briefly held Rossend Castle at Burntisland in the 16th century. Rossend was built in 1382 but has an armorial tablet bearing arms of a Durie and the date of 1554. In 1563 the castle was occupied by Mary, Queen of Scots. Rossend Castle and the surrounding estates were confiscated during the Reformation. The Duries were also granted the estate of Craigluscar near Dunfermline where a house was built in 1520. The lands were in the family until the early 20th century. The house had a stone shield bearing the Durie arms and initials of a George
    6.00
    7 votes
    10
    Clan MacLennan

    Clan MacLennan

    Clan MacLennan, also known as Siol Ghillinnein, is a Highland Scottish clan which historically populated lands in the north-west of Scotland. The surname MacLennan in Scottish Gaelic is Mac Gille Fhinnein meaning the son of the follower of St Finnan. According to tradition the clans MacLennan and Logan are related. In the fifteenth century a feud between the clans Logan and Fraser ended in a battle at North Kessock, in which the Clan Logan chief, Gilligorm, was killed. Gilligorm's pregnant widow was captured by the Frasers and soon gave birth to a child. The Frasers intentionally broke the child's back, who was named Crotair MacGilligorm because of his deformity. Crotair MacGilligorm was educated by the monks at Beauly Priory and later founded churches at Kilmor, Sleat and Kilchrinin, Glenelg. His son, called Gille Fhinnein, is the supposed progenitor of the Clan MacLennan. In the 1970s, research by the clan chief showed that the his ancestry could be traced back to the ancient royal Celtic families of Ireland and Scotland through Aengus Macgillafinan, Lord of Locherne around 1230. St. Adamans recorded they were occupying Glenshiel at an early date and were in residence at Eilean
    6.17
    6 votes
    11
    Clan Oliphant

    Clan Oliphant

    Clan Oliphant is a Highland Scottish clan. Considered the earliest traceable member of this house would be Roger Olifard, who witnessed a foundation charter to the Clunic priory of St. Andrew's, Northampton, by Earl Simon. The Charter was dated between 1093 and 1100 and Roger himself made a grant of 3 shillings yearly to this priory. In Domesday, Northamptonshire, there is a mention of "In Lilleford, Willelmus Olyfart", which land was held of the Countess Judith. Also in the Pipe Roll, 31 Hen. I is mention of a William Olifard of Northamptonshire as well as a Hugh Olifard of Huntingdonshire. William held five hides in Lilford (Lilleford) of the fee of the King of Scotland while Hugh Olifard of Stokes was a knight in the service of the Abbot of Petersborough before 1120; both appear in the pipe roll of 1130. The progenitor of the Olifard family was "David Holyfard", godson of King David I of Scotland and in 1141 his protector; who was also in possession of Lilleford in Northamptonshire, showing the Northamptonshire family connection to Scotland. David was a son of William Olifard, mentioned in the pipe rolls of Cambridgeshire (1158), Northamptonshire (1163) and Huntingdonshire (1168
    5.83
    6 votes
    12

    Clan Skene

    Clan Skene is a Lowland Scottish clan The Clan Skene is thought to have originally been an exceptionally early sept of the Clan Donnachaidh before it became known as the Clan Robertson. Clan Skene is known in Gaelic as Siol Sgeine or Clann Donnachaidh Mhar. The traditional origin of the name is found in an eleventh century legend of the Robertsons. It is said that a younger son of the Robertsons of Struan saved the life of the King by killing a wolf with just a small dagger known as a sgian. He was rewarded with lands named after the weapon that brought him such good fortune. This story is commemorated on the chief's shield which shows three wolves' heads impaled on daggers or Dirks. The Clan Skene are believed to have joined the army of King Alexander I of Scotland when he marched north to destroy rebells in the north in 1118. The first recorded person of the name Skene was John de Skeen who lived during the reign of King Malcolm III of Scotland. John and his son Patrick Skeen are on the Ragman Rolls of 1296. It is believed to be Patrick's son who received a charter of the family lands from King Robert the Bruce in 1318. In 1411 the Clan Skene fought at the Battle of Harlaw as did
    5.83
    6 votes
    13

    Clan Wemyss

    Clan Wemyss is a Lowland Scottish clan. The name "Wemyss" is derived from the Gaelic word ‘uaimh’, meaning ‘cave’, and is believed to be taken from the caves and cliffs of the Firth of Forth in that part of Fife where the family of Wemyss made its home. Wemyss in Fife has been the seat of the chiefs since the twelfth century. They are one of the few Lowland families directly descended from the Celtic nobility through the Macduff Earls of Fife. In 1290, Sir Michael Wemyss and his brother, Sir David, were sent with Scott of Balwearie to Norway to bring back the infant Queen Margaret, the ‘Maid of Norway’. In 1296, Sir Michael swore fealty to King Edward I of England. However during the Wars of Scottish Independence of the 14th century he changed his allegiance to King Robert the Bruce of Scotland. The clan seat, Wemyss Castle was later sacked by the English. In 1315 Wemyss witnessed the Act of Settlement of the Scottish Crown by Robert the Bruce at Ayr. His son, Sir David, was one of those who appended his seal to the famous Declaration of Arbroath in 1320. Sir David appeared again, as one of the guarantors for the release from English imprisonment of King David II of Scotland, and
    5.83
    6 votes
    14

    Clan Malcolm

    The Clan Malcolm, also known as the Clan MacCallum, is a Highland Scottish clan. The Clan MacCallum was originally a separate clan until the 18th Century, when the chief of the Clan MacCallum adopted the name Malcolm after inheriting the Malcolm estate, and the two clans were drawn together under the same chief. The name Malcolm derives from the gaelic 'Maol', meaning 'shaven-head', and was used generally as a term for a monk. Thus 'Maol Chalum' can be translated as 'monk' or 'disciple of Columba'. The connection between the names Malcolm and MacCallum is shrouded in mystery although they are sometimes shown as alternative names for the same clan. However, no definite link has been shown between the two - the name of Colm was common in many areas of Celtic settlement; the name Malcolm appears as a distinct surname in parts of Dunbartonshire and Stirlingshire in the fourteenth century; while the MacCallum family were known to possess lands in Lorne in Argyllshire. Some sources state that traditionally the clan are reported to be an offshoot of the MacGhille Challums or Clan MacLeod of Raasay. However this can not be substantiated. The Clan MacCallum took protection of the Clan
    5.00
    7 votes
    15

    Clan Marjoribanks

    Clan Marjoribanks is a Lowland Scottish clan. The story often told of the origins of the surname Marjoribanks, and even supported by respectable authorities, is that Marjorie, daughter of King Robert the Bruce, brought into her marriage with Walter Stewart in 1315 lands in Dumfriesshire which became known as "Marjorie's Banks"; unfortunately no such lands formed part of Marjorie's dowry. An alternative explanation is that lands in the area of Ratho (which undoubtedly were Marjorie's) were granted to an early Marjoribanks in the 16th century; this is true enough, but the surname had already been current for at least 50 years. This attractive myth was almost certainly invented by a junior branch of the Marjoribankses (represented now by Marjoribanks of Lees) in the 17th century to bolster their claim to gentility. The reality is perhaps more mysterious. The first known Marjoribanks, Philip "de Merioribankis de eodem," i.e. "Marjoribanks of that Ilk," appears in 1485 as the holder of the "five merklands of Merioribankis of ancient extent." He was probably a Johnstone who distinguished himself from the many other Johnstones of the area by adopting this patronymic. There have been many
    6.60
    5 votes
    16
    Clan Erskine

    Clan Erskine

    Clan Erskine is a Lowland Scottish clan. The surname Erskine is derived from the name of Erskine, an area to the south of the River Clyde and ten miles to the west of Glasgow. The name is believed to be ancient or Old British for green rising ground. In the 13th century during the reign of King Alexander II the first known person of the name Erskine was Henry Erskine who was also the owner of the Barony of Erskine. In modern Scottish Gaelic, the name is spelt Arascain. During the Wars of Scottish Independence the Clan Erskine were supporters of King Robert the Bruce. In 1435 Alexander Stewart, the Earl of Mar died and Sir Robert Erskine claimed the title. this also made him the chief of Clan Mar. However the King withdrew the earldom in 1457 stating that it could only belong to a Royal Stewart. Ten years later Sir Robert was created the first Lord Erskine. This unlawful succession was finally interrupted by Mary, Queen of Scots, who saw that the rightful heir John Erskine, 17th Earl of Mar was restored. During the Anglo-Scottish Wars the 4th 'Lord Erskine' led the Clan Erskine at the Battle of Flodden Field in 1513 where he was slain. Mary Queen of Scots had been in the care of the
    7.75
    4 votes
    17
    Clan Lindsay

    Clan Lindsay

    Clan Lindsay is a Lowland Scottish clan. Although certainly ancient, there remains debate to this day as to whether Clan Lindsay first arose from British, Saxon, Norman or Flemish family lines. While there is a long tradition of descent from Normans who arrived with William the Conqueror, the matter is complicated by evidence of a Saxon "Kingdom of Lindsay" that long predated the coming of the Normans. Several possible theories have been advanced over the years. First is the theory proposed in 1769 by biographer/historian, Richard Rolt, in which he claimed that the Lindsays were of Anglo-Saxon descent. In his “Lives of the Lindsays”, first published in 1840, the 25th Earl of Crawford (the Earls of Crawford all being Lindsays) discounted Rolt's Anglo-Saxon descent theory and stated that the Lindsays were "distinctly" of Norman descent. Then in 1985/1990, British historian, Beryl Platts established, via an analysis of heraldic devices, the Lindsays were of Flemish descent. Much work is yet to be done before the origin of the Lindsays can be stated as proven without any doubt. After the Norman conquest of 1066 Baldric de Lindsay became a tenant under the Earl of Chester in England. In
    5.50
    6 votes
    18

    Clan Bannerman

    Clan Bannerman is a Scottish clan which has, for centuries, been the Scottish standard bearers. The Bannerman name is said to have originated in the privilege of carrying the king's banner in wartime, an honour the Bannermans had from approximately the 11th through the 13th century. As a consequence of this role, the Bannermans held the rank of knights banneret, a title conferred on people of particular military prowess and/or merit. Although it's an unsubstantiated legend, the Bannermans supposedly ceased to be royal standard bearers after Sir Alexander Carron took up the royal standard at the crossing of the Spey, a battle around the time of either King Malcolm III or King Alexander I of Scotland. On 21 June 1367, King David II of Scotland granted the lands of Clyntrees, Waterton, and Weltown to Donald Bannerman, the king's doctor. Ellon is located in the northeast of Scotland. Its importance comes from being the first fording point on the river Ythan. In the 4th century B.C., there was a small Pictish settlement near there. By the early Middle Ages, the local Celtic chiefs (Mormaers) held court here for their province of Buchan as did the later feudal Norman lords. The area was
    6.40
    5 votes
    19

    Clan MacNaghten

    Clan Macnaghten is a Scottish clan who claim descent from the eighth century Pictish king, Nechtan. The earliest reference to the Clan Macnaghten is in connection with great Pictish rulers of Moray. The name 'Nechten' which means "pure" or "clear" was popular in the Pictish royal line. The originator of the clan is believed to have been "Nechtan Mor" who lived in the 10th Century. By the time of the Renaissance, Clan Macnaghten had developed four distinct branches, or "septs," each recognized by the Crown with its own coat of arms. The senior line, MacNauchtan of Argyll, is assumed to descend from Sir Gilchrist MacNauchtan, who was granted land in Argyll in the early 13th century by Alexander III, King of Scotland. Parchments from 1247 and 1267 bearing the seal of Sir Gilchrist MacNauchtan are among the oldest existing charters in Scotland. They took up residence on an island in Loch Awe called Fraoch Eilean, which name they used as a battle cry. Also in this century the sept MacNaught broke away from the main clan and moved to Galloway and Ayrshire although they kept a strong connection with the main clan for protection. During the 14th Century the MacNaghtens were opposed to
    6.40
    5 votes
    20
    Clan MacGregor

    Clan MacGregor

    Clan Gregor (also Griogair, MacGregor, Mac Gregor, McGregor, M'Gregor) is a Highland Scottish clan. It is considered the most senior clan of Siol Alpin, translated as 'Seed of Alpin', referring to King Kenneth I Mac Alpin), descending from the ancient Kings of the Picts and Dál Riata. Outlawed for nearly two hundred years after a long power struggle with the Clan Campbell, the Clan Gregor claims descent from Constantin and wife and cousin Malvina, first son of Doungallas and wife Spontana (daughter of a High King of Ireland) and grandson of Giric, the third son of Alpin II Mac Eochaidh, the father of Kenneth I Mac Alpin, the first King of Scotland, a descent which is proclaimed in the clan motto, 'S Rioghal Mo Dhream, translated as 'Royal is my Race'. The surname MacGregor is an Anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic Mac Griogair meaning "son of Griogar". The personal name Griogar is a Gaelic form of the personal name Gregory. Clan Gregor is believed to have originated in Scotland during the 9th century. The MacGregors suggest that they take their name from Gregor (derived from the Latin Gregorius and the Late Greek Grēgorios, meaning "alert, watchful, or vigilant"). One Gregor is
    5.33
    6 votes
    21
    Clan Shaw of Tordarroch

    Clan Shaw of Tordarroch

    Clan Shaw of Tordarroch is a Scottish clan. It is one of the member clans of the Chattan Confederation, who were led by the chiefs of Clan Mackintosh. The Bloodline of the ancient and honorable Highland Family and Name of Shaw reaches back beyond the turn of the first millennia. Entwined via the Chiefs of Mackintosh and the Mac Duff Earls of Fife to the Kings of Moray and Fife, it descends from the crown of Scotland back to the Kings of Dal Riada to the ancient High Kings of Eire and to the blood royale of the Northern and Southern Kingdoms of the Cruitne-tuath, or the Picts. At that time, Alba or Albany (later called Scotland) was divided into seven kingdoms: Moray, Ath-fhotla, or Atholl, Fife, Cirech, Ce, Fortrenn and Strath-Cluaidh. The Ard-Righ na Alba, or High Kingship of Alba alternately revolved between two of the strongest and most prestigious royal houses of these kingdoms, of Atholl and Moray. Although closely related, these two houses were also rivals for the throne. Our earliest ancestor was Aethelred, the first Earl of Fife. Aethelred, or in Gaelic: Aedh was the eldest son of Malcolm (III) Mac Duncan (also known as "Malcolm Ceann-Mhor"), High King of Alba. Aedh's
    6.20
    5 votes
    22
    Clan Sandilands

    Clan Sandilands

    Clan Sandilands is a Lowland Scottish clan. Sandilands is also considered a sept of Clan Douglas. The name Sandilands comes from lands by that name in Clydesdale. The family to bear the name may have originally fled to Scotland from Northumberland in the reign of King Malcolm III of Scotland. During the Wars of Scottish Independence Sir James de Sandilands distinguished himself in the wars against the English. For his services he was rewarded with a royal charter to his lands by King David II of Scotland. He married Eleanor, the only daughter of Sir Archibald Douglas, Regent of Scotland. James Sandilands received from his brother in law, William IV, Lord of Douglas the lands of Calder in Lothian. In 1384 Sir James' and Eleanor's son Sir James Sandilands of Calder (second feudal baron) married Princess Jean Stewart, daughter of King Robert II of Scotland and great granddaughter of Robert the Bruce. James Sandiland's son also called James was one of the hostages sent to England for King James I of Scotland. James Sandilands was only returned to Scotland two years before his death. He was the presumptive heir to the Douglas estates and should have inherited them on the death of the
    7.25
    4 votes
    23
    Clan MacKay

    Clan MacKay

    Clan Mackay (Gaelic: Mac Aoidh) is an ancient and once-powerful Scottish clan from the far North of the Scottish Highlands, but with roots in the old kingdom of Moray. They were a powerful force in politics beginning in the 14th century, supporting Robert the Bruce. In the centuries that followed they were anti-Jacobite. The Highland Clearances had dire consequences for the clan, but since then they have spread through many parts of the world and have provided it many famous and influential people. The territory of the Clan Mackay consisted of the parishes of Durness, Tongue and Farr in the north of the county of Sutherland, later it would extend and include the parish of Reay in the west of the neighboring county of Caithness. The chief of the clan is Lord Reay. The Mackays are believed to descend from the Picts, ancient tribes that lived in Scotland. The name Mackay is also found in Ireland from ancient times, when several tribes from the northern area of Ireland, which was once part of an ancient Scottish kingdom known as Dál Riata, moved across the sea to Scotland. The Mackays in Scotland were based in Strathnaver in modern Sutherland. Although the exact origin of Clan Mackay
    6.00
    5 votes
    24

    Clan MacLaren

    Clan MacLaren (Scottish Gaelic: Clann mhic Labhrainn) is a Highland Scottish clan. The origins of the clan are uncertain, but by tradition the MacLarens are descended from Loarn mac Eirc of Dál Riata, who landed in & settled Argyll in 503 A.D. The clan name is supposedly derived from Lorn (variations Loarn, Laurin, Laren); these variations are all ultimately pronounced Lawrin by the Gael. However there is no concrete evidence of Lorn being the progenitor of the family. A more likely origin of the clan is that they take their name from a 13th century abbot called Laurance of Achtow. This theory is also supported by the MacLaren rallying cry which in gaelic is: "Creag an Tuirc" which means "Boars Rock". The rock in question is near Achtow in Balquhidder. In 843 A.D., Kenneth MacAlpin, chief of the posterity of the above brothers & their followers, overthrew the southern Picts(this is debatable, evidence points to short period of power-struggle), took possession of their territories, & transferred the seat of Government to their capital, Abernethie, in Strathearn, country of Perthshire. MacAlpin was subsequently crowned King, but of what really? Tradition holds he was crowned King of
    6.00
    5 votes
    25
    Clan Sutherland

    Clan Sutherland

    Clan Sutherland is a Highland Scottish clan whose traditional territory is located in the region of Sutherland in northern highlands of Scotland and was one of the most powerful Scottish clans. The clan seat is at Dunrobin Castle, Sutherland. The chief of the clan was also the powerful Earl of Sutherland. The progenitor of the Clan Sutherland was also the progenitor of the Clan Murray who was a Flemish nobleman by the name of Freskin. Freskin's grandson was Hugh de Moravia who was granted lands in Sutherland and was known as Lord de Sudrland. Hugh's brother, William was progenitor of the Clan Murray. Hugh's eldest son (also called William) was William de Moravia, 1st Earl of Sutherland. The place name and clan name of "Sutherland" came from it being the land to the 'south' of the Norse Earldom of Orkney and Caithness. Although the senior line of chiefs who were Earls of Sutherland were known by the surname 'de Moravia', the younger sons of the family would take the surname 'Sutherland', creating the cadet branches of the Clan Sutherland. The Battle of Bannockburn took place in 1314. During the Wars of Scottish Independence, the Clan Sutherland under chief William de Moravia, 3rd
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    Clan Davidson

    Clan Davidson

    Clan Davidson is a Highland Scottish clan. The clan was also part of the Chattan Confederation. When the power of the Comyns began to wane in Badenoch, David Dubh of Invernahaven, Chief of Davidsons, having married the daughter of Angus, 6th of MacKintosh, sought the protection of William, 7th of MacKintosh, before 1350, and Clan Davidson became associated with the Chattan Confederation. Still another source relates that the Davidsons are descended directly from a son or grandson of Ghilliechattan Mor, founder of Clan Chattan. The manuscript by one MacLauchlan dating from the year 1467, which is generally held as the most authoritative source on the Davidsons' origins, states that David Dubh was one of two sons by Ghilliechattan Mor, Dhai (David) Dhu, the other being Muihrich, or Murdoch, Mhor who founded Clan MacPherson. In the 18th century we find important families like the Davidsons of Cantray and the Davidsons of Tulloch. The latter family came into possession of the lands and castle of Tulloch, near Dingwall, in 1762, when Henry Davidson purchased the estate from his cousin Kenneth Bayne. The Battle of Invernahoven 1370 or 1387. The Clan Cameron numbering approximately 400
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    Clan MacNeil of Barra

    The Clan MacNeil of Barra is one of the oldest Scottish clans: it can trace ancestry back to King Niall of the Nine Hostages in Ireland in 379 AD and King Lᅢᄈegaire mac Nᅢᄅill in Ireland in 428 AD. The seat of the clan is Kisimul Castle. Although the castle was at one time sold to raise money to pay off debts, and allowed to fall into disrepair, it was later re-purchased by the American-born Robert Lister MacNeil in 1937 and restored. Historic Scotland now leases the castle for one pound and one bottle of whiskey per year for a lease term of 1000 years, from their leasor, Ian Roderick MacNeill, currently the 46th Chief of Clan Neil. The MacNeil name comes up subtlely and sometimes inconspicuosly through Scottish history. From meeting quietly with the Norwegian King Haakon Haakonson on the island of Gigha just before the Battle of Largs, to being included in the Hy Niall dynasty from Ireland, this Viking/Gaelic Norse-Gaels hybrid of peoples have managed clan survival for almost 1700 years. The Norse-Gaels were a people who dominated much of the Irish Sea region and western Scotland for a large part of the Middle Ages, whose aristocracy were mainly of Scandinavian origin, but as
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    Clan Moffat

    Clan Moffat

    Clan Moffat is a Lowland Scottish clan. The Moffats are an ancient Borders family who were influential and powerful as far back as the time of Sir William Wallace. The ancestor of the Moffats most likely gave their name to the town of Moffat in Dumfriesshire. The origin of the name itself is thought to be Norse. William de Mont Alto, progenitor of the Movats, married the youngest daughter of Andlaw, who came to Scotland from Norway during the tenth century. Over the years the name softened to Montealt, then Movat, through Movest, eventually settling at Moffat in its modern form. In the twelfth century the family was of sufficient importance to be designated in deeds and records as ‘de Moffet’, showing the family were considered to be principal lairds, or landowners. In 1268, Nicholas de Moffet was Bishop of Glasgow, and the armorial bearings of the different branches of the family seemed to indicate a connection with the church. Robert the Bruce, as Lord of Annandale, granted four charters of land in the Barony of Westerkirk to the Moffats in 1300. One of these was to Adam Moffat of Knock who was granted ‘the same Barony in Eskdale’. Both he and his brother fought at the Battle of
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    Clan Ross

    Clan Ross

    Clan Ross is a Highland Scottish clan. The original chiefs of the clan were the original Earls of Ross. Clan Ross is a Highland Scottish clan first named as such by King Malcolm IV of Scotland in 1160. The first of the chiefs was Fearchar, Earl of Ross from the O'Beolain (Ó Beólláin, Boland, Bolan) family, also known as 'Fearchar Mac-an-t-sagairt' (meaning "son of the priest") of Applecross. Ferquhard Ross helped King Alexander II of Scotland (1214–1249) crush a rebellion in Moray and Ross-shire. When King Alexander II ascended to the throne, a rebellion broke out in Moray and western Ross-shire, whose Celtic population were opposed to the laws and customs of the south. The King marched northwards with his army but was unable to crush the insurgents from Ross and Moray. However, Fearchar, Earl of Ross, with a large body of men from his own clan and his allies, appeared on the scene and soon wiped out all opposition to the King's authority. Fearchar brought the King the heads of the rebel leaders and was knighted on 15 June 1215. He was created Earl of Ross in about 1234. The Clan Ross by tradition fought at the Battle of Largs in 1263 in support of Alexander III of Scotland against
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    Clan Crichton

    Clan Crichton is a Lowland Scottish clan. The lands of Kreitton formed one of the earliest baronies around Edinburgh and are mentioned in charters of the early 12th century. Thurstan de Cechtune was a witness to the foundation of the Holyrood Abbey by King David I of Scotland in 1128. Thomas de Crichton swore fealty to King Edward I of England in the Ragman Roll of 1296. Thomas had three sons each of whom extended the family holdings. His second son William Crichton married Isabel de Ross who was heiress to the barony of Sanquhar in Dumfrieshire. A descendant of his Robert de Crichton of Sanquhar was sheriff of Dumfries in 1464 and coroner of Nithsdale from 1468 to 1469. His eldest son Robert Crichton was created a peer with Lord Crichton of Sanquhar by King James III of Scotland in 1487. Another descendant of Thomas de Crichton was Sir William Crichton who was also the Chancellor of Scotland during the minority of King James II of Scotland. Following the death of his rival the William Douglas, 6th Earl of Douglas, Sir William Crichton organised the infamous Black Dinner at Edinburgh Castle which he was also governor of at the time. The young King James was in residence and the new
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    Clan Macpherson

    Clan Macpherson

    Clan Macpherson ( listen (help·info)) is a Highland Scottish clan from Badenoch, on the River Spey. It is a leading member of the Chattan Confederation. The name Macpherson -- or MacPherson or McPherson, according to different spellings -- comes from the Gaelic Mac a' Phearsain and means 'Son of the Parson'. The Parson in question was Muriach, a 12th century parson, or lay preacher, of Kingussie in Badenoch. Historically, the term 'parson' (in the Gaelic pearsain or pears-eaglais literally 'person of the church') had a different meaning. Before the Reformation in Highland Scotland, the religious leader of a parish was the priest and the parson was the steward of church property, responsible for the collection of tithes. The history of Clan Macpherson has been called "The Posterity of the Three Brethren" as the three grandsons of Muriach are the antecedents of the three main clan families, Cluny, Pitmain and Invereshie. For many centuries, the Macphersons have been a leading clan in the Clan Chattan Confederation along with Clan Mackintosh, Clan Shaw and others. Although the Macphersons have a strong claim to the Chattan lineage, they have been unsuccessful in wresting control of
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    Clan MacTavish

    Clan MacTavish is a Highland Scottish clan. The MacTavishes and Campbells are thought to share a common origin. Clan MacTavish claims to descend from Taus (Tavis) Coir, illegitimate son of Colin Mael Maith and a daughter of Suibhne Ruadh (Sween the Red of Castle Sween). Nothing certain is known of Taus Coir other than he is listed in traditional genealogies. According to the 17th century genealogy Ane Accompt of the Genealogie of the Campbells, which traces Colin Mael Maith back to the mythological King Arthur, Colin Mael Maith had one legitimate son and two illegitimate sons. The Accompt states the legitimate son as "Gillespic" or "Archibald", ancestor of Clan Campbell; and the two illegitimate sons are "Taius Coir" and "Iver", ancestors of the MacTavishes and MacIver Campbells. According to Alastair Campbell of Airds in 2000, a more probable candidate for the ancestor of the clan, rather than the possibly mythological Taus Coir, is the historical Sir Thomas Cambel. Earlier in the 1970s, W. D. H. Sellar was also of the same opinion about Thomas. In 1292 his name is recorded on a list of landowners in the sheriffdom of Kintyre. In 1296 he signed the Ragman Roll as 'Thomas Cambel
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    Clan Brodie

    Clan Brodie

    Clan Brodie is a Scottish clan whose origins are uncertain. The first known Brodie chiefs were the Thanes of Brodie and Dyke in Morayshire. The Brodies were present in several clan conflicts, and during the civil war were ardent covenanters. They resisted involvement in the Jacobite uprisings, and the chief's family later prospered under the British Empire in colonial India. Early references to Brodie were written as Brochy, Brothy, Brothie, Brothu, Brode. Various meanings to the name Brodie have been advanced, but given the Brodies uncertain origin, and the varying ways Brodie has been pronounced/written, these remain but suppositions. Some of the suggestions that have been advanced as to the meaning of the name Brodie are: The origins of the Brodie clan are mysterious. Much of the early Brodie records were destroyed when Clan Gordon pillaged and burnt Brodie Castle in 1645. It is known that the Brodies were always about since records began. From this it has been presumed that the Brodies are ancient, probably of Pict ancestry, referred to locally as the ancient Moravienses. The historian Dr. Ian Grimble suggested the Brodies were an important Pictish family and advanced the
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    Clan MacCallum

    Clan MacCallum is a West Highland Scottish clan, whose lands are traditionally in Argyll. The clan is part of the Clan Malcolm since the chief of Clan MacCallum adopted the name Malcolm instead of MacCallum in the 18th century. The two clans are now one. In Gaelic, Saint Columba’s name was Colm. MacCallum means 'son of Colm'. The ancient Kingdom of Dál Riata where the first Scots of Ireland settled was home to Columba and the ancestors of the MacCallums. Despite all this we should not see the two as relations in blood but interpret the name MacCallum as ‘follower of Columba’. Between Columba’s time and the earliest historical reference to the MacCallums is almost a thousand years and the lands of Lorn, Argyllshire are generally regarded as MacCallum country. A traditional story about the MacCallums is that, perhaps in the thirteenth century, the chief family at Colgin had three sons, all wishing to make their own lives away from home. Their father prepared them their horses and told them they should ride in their different directions and build their homes wherever their horses’ panniers should first fall off. When the panniers of the first son fell off before he’d left his father’s
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    Clan MacKenzie

    Clan MacKenzie

    Clan Mackenzie is a Highland Scottish clan, traditionally associated with Kintail and lands in Ross-shire. The Mackenzies, a powerful clan of Celtic stock, were not among the clans that originated from Norman ancestry. Descendants of the long defunct royal Cenél Loairn of Dál Riata, they are believed to be related to Clan Matheson and Clan Anrias. All three descend from the 12th century Gill'Eòin of the Aird. Based initially in Kintail, the clan was recorded at Eilean Donan on Loch Duich, a stronghold with which it was for many centuries associated. For generations, the constable of Eilean Donan was traditionally Macrae of Inverinate, with the result that the Clan Macrae became known as "Mackenzie's shirt of mail". There were also strongholds at Kilcoy Castle and Brahan Castle and the Mackenzies of Tarbat had their seat at Castle Leod, in Strathpeffer in the 17th century. There was a tradition - not borne out, however, by any tangible evidence or confirmation and quite possibly invented by the Earl of Cromartie - that the family deduced its descent from a member of the House of Geraldine, in Ireland (whence sprang the noble families of Leinster, Desmond, &c.), who, with a
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    Clan MacNeil

    Clan MacNeil

    Clan MacNeil, also known in Scotland as Clan Niall, is a highland Scottish clan, particularly associated with the Outer Hebridean island of Barra. The early history of Clan MacNeil is obscure, however despite this the clan claims to descend from the legendary Niall of the nine hostages. The clan itself takes its name from a Niall who lived in the 13th or early 14th century, and who belonged to the same dynastic family of Cowal and Knapdale as the ancestors of the Lamonts, MacEwens of Otter, Maclachlans, and the MacSweens. While the clan is centred in Barra in the Outer Hebrides, there is a branch of the clan in Argyll that some historians have speculated was more senior in line, or possibly even unrelated. However, according to Scots law the current chief of Clan Macneil is the chief of all MacNeil(l)s. The MacNeils of Barra claim descent from a prince of the O'Neill dynasty, Ánrothán Ua Néill, son of Áed, son of Flaithbertach Ua Néill, King of Ailech and Cenél nEógain, died 1036. Anrothan emigrated to Scotland in the 11th century. Through him the MacNeils of Barra also naturally claim descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Anrothan is claimed as ancestor of several
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    Clan Sempill

    Clan Sempill

    Clan Sempill is a Lowland Scottish clan. The name Sempill has been known in Renfrewshire since the 12th century. It is tradition that the name originates from someone who is humble or simple. An alternate, unlikely, etymology is that Sempill is a corruption of St Pauls. Robert de Semple witnessed a charter to Paisley Abbey in around 1246. Later as the chamberlain of Renfrew he witnessed a charter of the Earl of Lennox. During the 14th century Clan Sempill supported King Robert the Bruce. Robert de Semple's two sons were rewarded by the King for their services. The elder son, Robert, received all of the lands around Largs in Ayrshire which had been confiscated from the Clan Balliol. The younger son, Thomas, received a grant of half the lands of Longniddry. Sir Thomas Sempill fell leading the clan in support of King James III of Scotland at the Battle of Sauchieburn in June 1488. His only son, John Sempill, inherited his estates. John was made Lord Sempill during the reign of King James IV of Scotland. During the Anglo-Scottish Wars the Clan Sempill, led by Lord John Sempill, fought at the Battle of Flodden Field in 1513. The chief was killed in the battle and was succeeded by his
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    Clan Dewar

    Clan Dewar

    Clan Dewar is a Lowland Scottish clan who settled near Edinburgh. Legend has it that they won their lands after killing a wolf which had terrorised the area. Dewars were also recorded as Septs of Clan Menzies and Clan MacNab. The Ragman Rolls include the record of the first known people by the name Dewar where Thomas and Piers de Deware both having swore fealty to King Edward I of England. The name is an anglicisation of "Deòrach" which originally means "pilgrim". Nowadays it is rendered "Mac an Deòir" in Scottish Gaelic. During the Wars of Scottish Independence the Clan Dewar are known to have supported King Robert the Bruce. The Clan Dewar were carriers of and custodians of the Staff of St Fillan. St Fillan was a Celtic saint who died in 777 AD. This famous relic was carried by the Dewars at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. Despite changing hands over the centuries the relic has been tracked down and is now in the Museum of Antiques in Edinburgh. Later in 1497 a charter of lands was granted to William Dewar. There were also mentions of Dewars in Stirling around 1483. From this branch rose the Dewar of Cambuskenneth line. In 1710 John Dewar the son of Patrick Dewar of
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    Clan Hamilton

    Clan Hamilton

    The House of Hamilton, occasionally referred to as Clan Hamilton, is a Scottish family who historically held broad territories throughout central and southern Scotland, particularly Ayrshire, Lanarkshire and the Lothians. The Hamiltons' main areas of influence were in the Scottish Lowlands, excepting the Isle of Arran, from which territory, the chief of Hamilton bears the Lymphad of the Isles on his arms. The family is descended from Walter fitz Gilbert of Cadzow, a Scoto-Norman comrade of Robert the Bruce, and rose in power to be the leading noble family in Scotland, second only to the royal House of Stewart, to whom they were closely related. Members of the family have held a number of titles in the peerages of both Scotland and Great Britain, the principal title being Duke of Hamilton, the duke himself being the senior representative of the family. Chief among the legends still clinging to this important family is that which gives a descent from the House of Beaumont, a branch of which is stated to have held the manor of Hamilton, Leicestershire; and it is argued that the three cinquefoils of the Hamilton shield bear some resemblance to the single cinquefoils of the Beaumonts.
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    Clan Cameron

    Clan Cameron

    Clan Cameron is a West Highland Scottish clan, with one main branch Lochiel, and numerous cadet branches. The Clan Cameron lands are in Lochaber and within their lands is the mountain Ben Nevis which is the highest mountain in the British Isles. The chief of the clan is customarily referred to as simply "Lochiel". The origins of Clan Cameron are uncertain; there are several theories. A manuscript of the clan says that it is old tradition that the Camerons were originally descended from the son of the royal family of Denmark who assisted the restoration of King Fergus II of Scotland, and that their progenitor was called Cameron from his crooked nose (Scottish Gaelic: cam-shròn, Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [ˈkʰaməhɾoːn̪ˠ]) – such nicknames were and are common in Gaelic culture, and that his dependants then adopted the name. According to John Mair, the Clan Cameron and the Chattan Confederation shared a common origin and together followed one chief, but this statement has no foundation or evidence to support it. Allen surnamed MacOrchtry the son of Uchtred is mentioned by tradition as the chief of Camerons during the reign of King Robert II of Scotland and, according to the same
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    Clan Carmichael

    The name Carmichael originally comes from lands in Lanarkshire which were granted to Sir James Douglas of Clan Douglas in 1321, and let by his nephew William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas to Sir John Carmichael between 1374 and 1384.d The name is also used to anglicise MacIlleMhicheil The Carmichaels were strong supporters of the Clan Douglas during their struggles for ascendancy, and were with them, fighting the English at the Battle of Otterburn in 1388 when the Scots defeated Henry 'Hotspur', Earl of Northumberland. The Carmichaels were part of the Scottish Army sent to aid the French against English invasion, and at the Battle of Beauge in 1421 which was part of the Hundred Years' War. Tradition relates, Sir John Carmichael unseated the English commander, Clarence, in so doing broke his spear. This event, according to tradition, gained the Carmichaels their crest of a broken spear. Katherine, daughter of Carmichael of Meadowflat, became a mistress of James V of Scotland and bore him a son who thus became half-brother to the ill-fated Mary, Queen of Scots. In 1546 Peter Carmichael of Balmedie was one of the murderers of the infamous Cardinal Beaton, and for his crime was sent to
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    Clan Charteris

    Clan Charteris is a Lowland Scottish clan. Chartres, the French city famed for its cathedral, is claimed as the origin of this name. William, a son of the Lord of Chartres, is said to have come to England with the Norman Conquest, and his son or grandson came north to Scotland with the retinue of David I. One of the earliest references to the name is found in a charter to the Abbey of Kelso around 1174, where the name appears in its Latin version, de Carnoto. One of the earliest references to the name Charteris is found in a charter to the Abbey of Kelso around 1174, where the name appears in its Latin version, de Carnoto. In 1266 a charter of confirmation provides evidence of four generations: Robert de Carnoto, knight, is said to be the son of Thomas, who was himself son of Thomas, son of Walther. Sir Thomas de Charteris was appointed Lord High Chancellor of Scotland by Alexander III of Scotland in 1280, the first person to hold this office who was not also a clergyman. Andrew de Charteris rendered homage to Edward I of England in the Ragman Rolls of 1296, but soon took up arms to fight for Scotland’s independence, for which later his estates were forfeited to Balliol, the
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    Clan Home

    The Homes (pronounced and sometimes spelt Hume) are a Scottish family. They were a powerful force in medieval Lothian and the Borders. The origins of the clan are a matter of historical debate. Some sources maintain that William of Home (alive 1214) was son of Patrick, son of Gospatric II, Earl of Lothian. The Scots Peerage conversely indicates that this William, was the son of John de Home, son of Aldan de Home (alive 1172). In 1266 a William de Home is recorded at Coldstream Monastery with grants of land. Geoffrey de Home's name is on the Ragman Roll as submitting to King Edward I of England. However, surviving records do not clarify the relationship of these individuals. The confirmed ancestry of the Homes starts with Sir John Home of Home. His son, Sir Thomas Home of that Ilk (alive 1385), married Nichola Pepdie, heiress of the Dunglass lands. Chief Sir Alexander Home of Dunglass was captured fighting at the Battle of Humbleton Hill in 1402. He later followed the Earl of Douglas to France, where he was killed in 1424 fighting against the English at the Battle of Verneuil, part of the Hundred Years' War. He left three sons, from whom most of the principal branches of the family
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    Clan Hope

    Clan Hope is a Lowland Scottish clan. Hope is a native Scottish name. However, in middle English it means 'small valley'. Another suggestion is that it derives from 'oublon', which is French for 'hop' and could be from the family de H'oublons of Picardy. The Clan Hope was a Scottish border family and their name is among those found on the Ragman Rolls giving the oath of fealty to King Edward I of England in 1296. The principal line can be traced back to John de Hope, who travelled from France with Magdalen the first wife of King James V of Scotland. John settled in Edinburgh and became commissioner for Edinburgh to the first General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1560. John de Hope's grandson Sir Thomas Hope was Lord Advocate as appointed by King Charles I. The family became 'Hope of Craighall' after acquiring the estates of the same name in the parish of Ceres in Fife. Sir Thomas Hope's contribution to the Scottish legal profession was immense and his works are still referred to by Scottish lawyers today. He saw two sons raised to the Supreme Court Bench and was created Baron of Nova Scotia in 1638. He also drafted the National Covenant. After his death in 1646 his eldest
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    Clan MacNeacail

    Clan MacNeacail

    Clan MacNeacail, sometimes known as Clan MacNicol, is a Scottish clan long associated with the Isle of Skye. Traditions states that, early in its history, the clan held the Isle of Lewis, as well as mainland lands. Further traditions, however, state that the clan lost its lands to the MacLeods of Lewis through the marriage of a MacNeacail heiress. The earliest member of the clan on record is one 14th century John "mak Nakyl", who is recorded amongst Edward I of England's powerful West Highland supporters during the Scottish Wars of Independence. The next record of the clan appears hundreds of years later, in the 16th century, when the clan was seated on Skye. In the 17th century, members of the clan began to Anglicise their surname from the Scottish Gaelic MacNeacail to various forms, such as Nicolson. Today the English variants of the Gaelic surname are borne by members of the clan as well as members of unrelated Scottish families, including the Lowland Clan Nicolson. The heartland of the clan has been for centuries in Trotternish, on Skye. The earliest record of a MacNeacail in Trotternish occurs in 1507. Hugh MacDonald's 17th century History of the MacDonalds shows that the clan
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    Clan Guthrie

    Clan Guthrie is a Lowland Scottish clan. Although the surname Guthrie has several independent origins, the surname borne by the clan is almost certainly derives from the barony of the same name near Forfar. The place name is derived from a Gaelic word, meaning "windy place". The first of the name Guthrie on record in Scotland was one Squire Guthrie in 1303 during the Wars of Scottish Independence. He had been sent to France to request the return of William Wallace, who had retired there having resigned the guardianship of Scotland. The mission was evidently successful, as William Wallace did indeed return to Scotland. However, Wallace was later captured and executed by the English. The Guthries of Guthrie received their estates by a charter from King David II of Scotland between the years 1329 and 1371. In 1457, Sir David Guthrie of Guthrie was Armour-Bearer to King James III of Scotland and the Sheriff of Forfar; he became Lord Treasurer of Scotland in 1461 and continued in this office until 1467, when he was appointed Comptroller of the Exchequer. In 1468, he obtained a warrant under the Great Seal to build Guthrie Castle near Friockheim in Angus, which remains standing to this
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    Clan Murray

    Clan Murray

    Clan Murray ( listen (help·info)) is a Highland Scottish clan. The Murrays have played a major role in Scottish history, with lands and cadet houses throughout Scotland. The Murrays (Moireach in Scottish Gaelic) are descended from the Flemish nobleman Freskin de Moravia (also progenitor of Clan Sutherland and possibly Clan Douglas). Flemish and Norman lords crossed the North Sea and established themselves in the Scottish realm at the invitation of the Kings of Scots from the early 12th century. Freskin and his son were granted extensive lands in Moray and intermarried with the old line of Celtic Mormaers from Moray. They took the name 'de Moravia', i.e. 'of Moray' in Latin. The descendants of Freskin's grandson William de Moravia became Lords of Bothwell. The name became more generally written simply as 'Moray' or variants, deriving from the great province of Moray, once a local kingdom, by the end of the 13th century. From him descend the principal houses of Murray: Tullibardine, Atholl, Abercairney and Polmaise. The name Murray is believed to derive from Pictish *Moritreb, meaning 'seaward settlement', referring to the ancient province, the Mormaerdom of Moray. Much larger than
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    Clan Gayre

    Clan Gayre or Clan Gair is a Highland Scottish clan. The name Gayre has several possible origins. The chiefly line apparently originated in Cornwall in the south of England, where the de Kayres were lords of many manors. The name as it arises in Orkney and Shetland may have a separate origin deriving from the Norse word 'geirr', which means 'spear'. Elsewhere, it is probably a descriptive surname derived from the Celtic word 'gearr', meaning 'short'. There are current records in London City at St Katharine Cree Church of the name being spelt Gayer in the mid 17th Century. A cadet of the line of Otys Gayre settled in Rossshire in around 1649. The MacCullochs had until this time held the lands of Nigg but these lands passed to the Gayres through marriage to Katherine MacCulloch. Alexander Gayre of Nigg and his son Thomas Gayre extended the family's holdings when in 1679 Thomas became a notary public. Thomas fourth Laird of Nigg was a notary public at Fort Rose and chancellor of the diocese of Ross. He became a prosperous merchant and councillor for Cromarty which was at this time a prominent sea port. The Gayres became embroiled in the eighteenth-century ecclesiastical disputes which
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    Clan Strange

    Clan Strange is a Lowland Scottish clan. This name Strange is often found more commonly as Strang, and is probably derived from the Norman or French word ‘étrange’, meaning ‘foreign’. When rendered as ‘Strang’, its etymology was believed in the past to derive from the Scots dialect word for ‘strong’. Home le Estraunge was in the service of the Scottish king around 1255. Thomas de Strang held land around Aberdeen in 1340. John Strang married, sometime around 1362, Cecilia, sister of Richard Anstruther of that Ilk, and received as part of the marriage settlement some of the lands of Balcaskie. The origins of the name Strange or Strangeman was a nickname meaning 'the strange', from a person who was new to the community. This name is also found to be of English descent and is found in many ancient manuscripts in the above country. Examples of such are a Stephen le Strange, County Yorkshire, who was recorded in the 'Hundred Rolls', England, in the year 1273 and a John le Straunge, County Cambridgeshire, was also recorded in the same year in this ancient document. Names were recorded in these ancient documents to make it easier for their overlords to collect taxes and to keep records of
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    Clan Borthwick

    Clan Borthwick is a Scottish clan. The origins of the name "Borthwick" are territorial. The name seems likely to have been assumed from Borthwick Water in Roxburghshire. It is traditionally held that the first of the noble house was Andreas, who accompanied the Saxon Edgar Ætheling and his sister, Saint Margaret of Scotland, to Scotland in 1067. Around 1410 Sir William Borthwick 'the elder' obtained a charter confirming his possession of the lands around Borthwick and it was during the 15th century that the family gained great wealth and influence, (it was probably his grandson) becoming Lords of the Parliament of Scotland. The First Lord Borthwick (born c1412, dc 1458) was one of the child nobles sent to England as substitute hostages for the ransom of James I of Scotland in 1425. He was responsible for the construction of what is now one of the most impressive fortified dwellings in Scotland. The Battle of Flodden Field During the Anglo-Scottish Wars the Borthwicks fought on the side of King James IV of Scotland at the Battle of Flodden Field in 1513 and suffered badly in the defeat. William, 4th Lord Borthwick, whose father had died in the previous decade, succeeded to obtain
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    51

    Clan Boyle

    Clan Boyle is a Scottish clan from Ayrshire in Scotland. There is also an Irish sept of the O'Neill Clan of the name O'Boyle or in Irish Ó Baoighill. The O'Boyles are one of three clans who shared the leadership of the North West of Ireland, specifically Co. Donegal. There is little doubt that the de Beauvilles (or de Boyville) came to Britain following the Norman conquest of 1066. They settled in Wales and Cumberland initially, though some of the Welsh line later travelled to Ireland and are the ancestors of the Earls of Cork and Shannon. In 1124 Hugh de Morvile was granted the lands of Cunningham and Largs from King David, part of which was subdivided and gifted to his relatives. The de Boyvilles thus gained the lands of Kelburn. The male line failed in 1196 and the family property passed to the Lords of Galloway. However, in 1234 that male line also failed and the land passed to the Crown. The family aided Alexander III in repelling Viking invaders in 1263 at the Battle of Largs. and the lands of Kelburn were returned to the family. In 1291 Henry de Boyville was keeper of the Castles of Dumfries, Wigton and Kirkcudbright. Richard and Robert de Boyvil appear on the Ragman Rolls
    6.25
    4 votes
    52
    Clan Fergusson

    Clan Fergusson

    Clan Fergusson is a Scottish clan which has multiple geographic origins across Scotland. Consequently the Fergussons may be viewed as both a Highland and a Lowland clan. "Sons of Fergus" the world over have gained distinction in nonmilitary activities, e.g. in the law, the church, government, the arts and sciences, medicine, education, agriculture and in business and industry. Mention can only be made of Adam Ferguson the philosopher (1724–1816) and Robert Fergusson (1750–1774) the poet and mentor of Robert Burns. And in the realm of romance, the heroine of the song Annie Laurie was married to Alexander Ferguson of Craigdarroch. Before the 18th century, at least five groups of Fergusons possessed lands and lived in the style of a clan under their respective chiefs in Argyll, Perthshire, Aberdeenshire, Galloway, and Carrick. Today, the Kilkerran Fergusons in Ayrshire and the family of Fergusson of Baledmund and the Fergusons of Balquhidder, both in Perthshire, are still owners of extensive lands. Fergussons from both Galloway and Carrick alike claim descent from Fergus of Galloway. The grandfather of Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick and in turn great-great-grandfather to Robert Bruce,
    6.25
    4 votes
    53

    Clan Jardine

    Clan Jardine is a Lowland Scottish clan. The Clan Jardine is believed to be of French origin. The French word jardin means garden or orchard and it is presumed that the Jardine family originally came from France. Members of the Jardine family travelled with William during the Norman conquest of England in 1066. However records of the name Jardine do not appear in Scotland until 1153 with the name Wmfredus de Jardine appearing on several charters. The first mention of the name Jardine is contained in Hollingshead's Chronicles of England as one of the Normandic knights that fought for William at the Battle of Hastings (AD 1066). There is also evidence that may suggest that the Jardines were of Norse extraction that migrated to Normandy with a warrior named Rollo prior to 1066. At some point in time the name or its meaning appears to have been translated into English. Patrick de Gardinus was chaplain to the Bishop of Glasgow and there is a signature on a document from 1245 of Sir Humphrey de Gardino. To add to the confusion Jorden del Orchard's signature appears on the Ragman Rolls of 1296. Later Humphery de Jardine's name appears on a charter drawn up by Robert the Bruce. Unlike many
    7.33
    3 votes
    54
    Clan Wallace

    Clan Wallace

    The Clan Wallace is a Lowland family. The Wallace family first came to Scotland with a Norman family in the 11th century. King David was eager to extend the benefits of Norman influence and gave grants to the nobles of the south. Among them was Walter Fitzallan, who the Scottish king appointed his Steward in 1136. One of Fitzallan's followers was Richard Wallace from Oswestry who came north to try and improve his fortunes. Oswestry is on the Welsh border so it is possible that the name Wallace may be a corruption of Le Waleis meaning the "Welshman". Lord Fitzallan received from King David lands in Ayrshire and so it was here that his follower Richard Wallace settled. Richard Wallace was granted his own estate in Kyle, where it is claimed that his name Richard is still remembered in the placename of the village of Riccarton. While tradition claims Sir Malcolm Wallace of Elderslie as the father of three sons, Malcolm, John, and William Wallace, the seal of William Wallace, rediscovered in 1999, identifies William as the son of Alan Wallace of Ayrshire, who appears in the Ragman Roll of 1296 as "crown tenant of Ayrshire". Dr. Fiona Watson in "A Report into Sir William Wallace's
    7.33
    3 votes
    55
    Clan Agnew

    Clan Agnew

    Clan Agnew is a Lowland Scottish clan from Wigtownshire and Galloway in the southwest of Scotland. There are two theories as to the origins of the name Agnew. The most widely accepted is that the name is French and derives from the Barony d'Agneaux in Normandy. Emigrants from the region first settled in England before moving north in the 12th century to Liddlesdale, Scotland. The other theory is that the Clan Agnew was connected to one of the tribes in Ulster, Ireland, perhaps a sept of O'Gnive — pronounced O'New. Other versions of the name include Egnew, Aganew, Vans Agnew, O'Gnive, O'Gnyw, O Gniomha, and MacGnive. The Agnews may be related to King Somerled from whom the Clan MacDonald descends. The Italian family AGNELLI (of FIAT fame) may be related. In 1318 the Agnew Lord of Larne accompanied Edward Bruce, younger brother of King Robert I of Scotland, to Ireland. Edward had been invited by the Irish Lords to expel the English and to rule as High King of Ireland. Agnew stayed in Ireland for three years while Edward attempted to establish himself. Andrew Agnew of Lochnaw was granted the lands and constableship of Lochnaw Castle in 1426. In 1451 he was appointed Sheriff of
    10.00
    1 votes
    56
    Clan Keith

    Clan Keith

    Clan Keith is a Scottish clan associated with Aberdeenshire and Caithness. It is said that a Scottish warrior slew the Danish General Camus at the legendary Battle of Barrie in 1010. For this, King Máel Coluim II of Scotland dipped three fingers into the blood of the slain and drew them down the shield of the warrior. Thereafter the warrior was named Marbhachir Chamius or Camus Slayer. It has been claimed that, ever since this event, that the Chief of the Clan Keith has borne the same mark of three red lines on his arms. Máel Coluim's victory at the Battle of Carham in 1018 brought him into outright possession of the lands of the Lothians and the Merse. The Keiths derive their name from the Barony of Keith, Humbie, East Lothian, said to have been granted by the king to Marbhachir Chamius for his valour. The first Keith on record as Marischal of Scotland is Hervey de Keith (d.c. 1196) described as Marscallus Regis Scotie in correspondence between the monks of Kelso Abbey and Jocelin, the Bishop of Glasgow. He was Marischal during the reigns of Malcolm the Maiden and William the Lyon. The office of Earl Marischal and later Knight Marischal of Scotland was hereditary in the Keith
    10.00
    1 votes
    57

    Clan Spens

    Clan Spens or Spence is a Lowland Scottish clan and is also a sept of Clan MacDuff. The name Spens or Spence means 'custodian' or 'dispenser' of the larder, possibly derived from Old French. The principal Scottish family of Clan Spens descend from one of the ancient Earls of Fife. John "Dispensator or Le Dispenser" appeared in a list of the tenants and vassals of Walter fitz Alan High Steward of Scotland on the period 1161–1171. Roger ‘Dispensator’ witnessed a charter by Bricius de Douglas, the bishop of Moray granting the church of Deveth to Spynie between 1202 and 1222 . His son Thomas 'Dispensator' witnessed a charter in 1232 of Andreas de Moravia, later bishop of Moray. John Spens is listed as baillie of Irvine in 1260. In the year 1296 Henry de Spens, feudal baron, swore fealty to Edward I of England, and his name appears on the Ragman Rolls of 1296. He died around 1300, when his son, Thomas, succeeded. He is mentioned in two charters of King Robert the Bruce. His heir Thomas de Spens witnessed several charters of Trinity college of Edinburgh between 1296 and 1324 and of the monastory of Soltray. One of his sons William de Spens was laird of Gylgyrstoun, Glespany and gets the
    10.00
    1 votes
    58

    Clan Broun

    Clan Broun also known as Brown is a common Scottish clan name, it was located primarily in Lowland Scotland. As well as the name being Scottish, Broun or Brown is also common name in Old English charters (as Brun) from an adjective meaning brown or dark red. It also occurs in Old High German as Brunn and is the source of the French surname le Brun. A family of this name were superiors of land in Cumberland shortly after the Norman conquest. In all cases it seems to be a name describing the appearance of the original ancestor. It is also found as an Anglicisation of Mac a' Bhriuthainn (pron. "mac a vroon"), meaning "son of the brehon (judge)", which is usually Anglicised as MacBrayne, or a direct translation of MacIlledhuinn. The Brouns of Colstoun, the Chiefs of Clan Broun, claim descent from the Royal House of France. They bear on their shield the three fleur-de-lys of the French Monarchy. The Brouns of Colstoun also claim descent from George Broun who in 1543 married Jean Hay second daughter of Lord Yester, ancestor of the Marquess of Tweeddale. The dowry consisted of the "Colstoun Pear" which was said to have been invested with wondrous powers by the 13th century wizard and
    7.00
    3 votes
    59

    Clan Dunbar

    Clan Dunbar is a Lowland Scottish clan. The Clan Dunbar descends from Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria, grandson of Crínán of Dunkeld and Seneschal of the Isles and nephew to King Duncan I of Scotland, who became Earl of Northumberland after his father’s death. William the Conqueror deprived Gospatric of the title in 1072, and he fled back to Scotland. King Malcolm III of Scotland granted Gospatric lands in Dunbar, thus creating him Earl of Dunbar. Patrick, the 8th Earl of Dunbar was also called the Earl of March. Patrick was one of the competitors for the crown of Scotland. However he withdrew his claim and swore allegiance to King Edward I of England. Patrick's son also swore fealty to King Edward II of England. However he later signed the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320 for Scottish Independence. During the Wars of Scottish Independence Patrick's son married the daughter of Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray, the famous Black Agnes. It was she who successfully defended Dunbar Castle against the English in 1338. However the Dunbars were not supporters of Robert the Bruce. The Dunbars also fought against the English at the Battle of Otterburn in 1388 with the Earl of Douglas. Patrick
    7.00
    3 votes
    60
    Clan Lennox

    Clan Lennox

    Clan Lennox is a Lowland Scottish clan. The name Lennox in gaelic comes from the place of the same name. The clan name comes from the title of Earl of Lennox which commanded the vale of Leven between the 12th and 15th centuries. In 1424 the Clan Lennox was decimated and Iain Colquhoun of Luss of Clan Colquhoun took advatage of this to win the King's favour by capturing Dumbarton Castle from Lennox. Sir John Stuart of Darnley was created 1st Earl of Lennox of the new line by King James III of Scotland in 1473. Malcolm the fifth Earl of Lennox led Clan Lennox into England and besieged Carlisle Castle. A clan battle took place between the Clan Kincaid and the Clan Lennox of Woodhead in 1570. Henry Stuart (1545-1567) Lord Darnley and the eldest son of the 4th Earl of Lennox was the second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots. He was also the father of King James VI of Scotland. The King promoted the 8th Earl of Lennox to Duke of Lennox in 1581.
    7.00
    3 votes
    61

    Clan Leslie

    Clan Leslie is a Lowland Scottish clan. The family name comes from the Leslie lands of Aberdeenshire and was to become famous in Germany, Poland, France and Russia. According to tradition, a Hungarian (or more likely by onomastics and typical of the times as well as later Leslie history, a Kievan of Varangian origins) nobleman, named Bartholomew arrived in the retinue of Agatha, wife of Edward the Exile. Bartholomew became Chamberlain to Saint Margaret of Scotland. Bartholomew later married Malcolm III sister, Princess Beatrix of Scotland. His brother inlaw Malcolm III made him Governor of Edinburgh Castle.No trace can be found in the Ragman Rolls of any members of the Leslie family-despite their strong connection to a number of claimants to the Scots crown.We can only surmise that they viewed the slaughter by Edward I at Berwick upon Tweed with disdain. The family sided with Robert the Bruce against firstly The Comyn in the Buchan and secondly Edward I and as a result were awarded large tracts of Aberdeenshire. They fought at the Battle of Bannockburn. Sir Andrew de Lesly was one of the signatories when a letter, the Declaration of Arbroath, was sent to the Pope in 1320 asserting
    7.00
    3 votes
    62

    Clan Riddell

    Clan Riddell is a Lowland Scottish clan One theory for the origin of the name "Riddell" suggests that a family from Gascony, France may have come to Scotland via Ryedale in Yorkshire. It is much more likely, however, that the name is of Norman origin. The first record of the name Riddell was found in Northumberland where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Gervase Ridale was a witness to a charter of King David I of Scotland in 1116, and his son, Walter, received a charter of the lands of Lilliesleaf in Roxburghshire. One of his nephews was hostage for William the Lion who had been taken prisoner by the English at the Battle of Alnwick in 1174. Riddells also acquired the lands of Swinburn in Northumberland. The lands were subsequently erected into a barony of Riddell. Sir William Riddell of Riddell swore fealty to King Edward I of England for his lands in the Ragman Rolls of 1296. Eighty Years' War Sir John Riddell was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia on 14 May 1628, and his lands were erected into the barony and regality of New Riddell. Sir
    7.00
    3 votes
    63
    Clan Rose

    Clan Rose

    Clan Rose is a Highland Scottish clan. The origins of the Clan Rose, as with many northern Scottish clans are uncertain and there is more than one theory as to the origin of the clan. One traditional theory is that Hugh Rose of Geddes came over from Ireland to Scotland in the 12th century. The Clan Rose were vassels of the old Earls of Ross who were chiefs of the Clan Ross. However the Clan Rose were quite separate in origin from the Clan Ross. Another theory as to the origin of the Roses was that they were English in origin as believed by Mr Hugh Rose of the Rose of Kilravock family. Whatever the origin of the clan, the Roses of Kilravock appear to have settled in Nairn in the north of Scotland, in about 1219 during the reign of David I of Scotland. Hugh Rose of Geddes was witness to the foundation of Beauly Priory and the name Rose of Geddes changed to Rose of Kilravock when Hugh Rose of Geddes' son acquired the lands of Kilravock through marriage. In 1390 the Rose family records and charters were destroyed when Elgin Cathedral, where they were kept was burned down by the notorious Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan who was known as the Wolf of Badenoch. All records relating to
    7.00
    3 votes
    64
    Clan Chisholm

    Clan Chisholm

    Clan Chisholm ( listen (help·info)) is a Scottish clan. The clan had its origin outside Scotland. The first Chisholm to appear in the records of Scotland was Alexander de Chesholme, who witnessed a charter in 1248/49. According to a 19th century historian, Alexander Mackenzie, the Clan Chisholm is of Norman and Saxon origin. Tradition stating that the Chisholms were a Norman family who arrived in England after the Norman conquest of 1066. The original Norman name being De Chese to which the Saxon term "Holme" was added upon the marriage of a Norman ancestor to a Saxon heiress. In early records the name is written as "de Cheseholme", eventually later becoming Chisholm. In Scotland the earliest recorded person of the family is on the Ragman Rolls as "Richard de Chisholm del Counte de Rokesburgh", referring to the Clan Chisholm's seat in Roxburghshire. Sir John de Chesholme led the clan at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 against the English. Robert Chisholm fought against the English at the Battle of Neville's Cross in 1346, was taken prisoner with King David II and probably not released until eleven years later when his royal master returned to Scotland. In 1359 Robert Chisholm
    5.75
    4 votes
    65

    Clan Cranstoun

    Clan Cranstoun is a Lowland Scottish clan. The name Cranstoun comes from the Barony of Cranstoun in Midlothian. The family owned lands in the counties of Edinburgh and Roxburgh. The first known person of the Cranstoun family was Elfric de Cranstoun who was a witness to a charter by William the Lion in Holyrood in about 1170. Around that time he also appears in a deed between Robert de Quincy and the Abbot of Newbattle. The Cranstouns of that Ilk prospered until they became mixed up in the unstable political situation of 1592. Thomas and John Cranston were amongst those accused of treason for assisting the Earl of Bothwell in his attack on the palace of Holyrood House. The Cranstoun family are known to have lived up to their motto ""thou shalt want before I want" as they are known to have often taken part in the border clan raids of England. The Clan Cranstoun took the side of the Royalists during the Civil War. The clan was led by chief, third Lord Cranston at the Battle of Worcester in 1651 where he was captured. He languished in the Tower of London. All of his estates were forfeited apart from a small amount that were left for his family and children. Two governors of Rhode
    8.00
    2 votes
    66
    Clan Kennedy

    Clan Kennedy

    Clan Kennedy is a Scottish clan. The Kennedys had their home territory in Carrick in Ayrshire, in southwestern Scotland. Originally they were of Pictish/Norse stock from the Western Isles. In the fifteenth century, one Ulric Kennedy fled Ayrshire to Lochaber in the Highlands for refuge, where he was granted protection under the Chief of Clan Cameron. From this Highland branch, Kennedys settled on the Isle of Skye. A branch also was established in northeast Scotland, at Aberdeen. The clan was one branch of the Celtic Lords of Galloway. The Kennedys of nine-county Ulster, in the north of Ireland, are mostly of Scottish origin from the territories of Galloway and Ayr just across the Irish Sea 20 miles away. Many Scottish Kennedys were planters in Ulster, and many Scots went south to Dublin and mingled with the Irish clan. The Clan Kennedy supported King Robert I of Scotland before and through the Wars of Scottish Independence and were rewarded. Around 1360 John Kennedy became owner of lands at Cassillis and in 1457 his descendant, Gilbert, was created Lord Kennedy. Gilbert's younger brother James was Bishop of St Andrews and founder of Scotland's first university, the University of St
    8.00
    2 votes
    67
    Clan Lockhart

    Clan Lockhart

    Clan Lockhart is a Lowland Scottish clan. The Clan Lockhart arrived in Scotland among the waves of Normans who arrived after the Norman conquest of England in 1066. The Lockharts settled in Lanark and Ayrshire where the towns of Symington, South Ayrshire, Symington, South Lanarkshire and Stevenson remain to mark the past influence of Simon and Steven Locard. The exact date when the lands of Lee came into the family is not known, but 1272 is traditionally accepted. Symon Locard, 2nd of Lee, won fame for himself and his family in the wars against the English when he fought alongside King Robert the Bruce and was knighted for his loyal service. Sir Symon accompanied 'Good Sir James Douglas' of the Clan Douglas when he took the heart of Robert the Bruce on the crusades in 1330. It was Sir Symon who carried the key to the casket in which the heart was carried. Symon rescued the casket and heart and returned it to Scotland after James Douglas had been killed in Spain. It is said, the arms of a 'heart within a fetterlock', and the name in its present form came into use. During the crusades of the 14th century the Lockharts brought back a precious heirloom, a touch piece which has been
    8.00
    2 votes
    68

    Clan Stuart of Bute

    Clan Stuart of Bute is a highland Scottish clan. The Stuarts or Stewarts descend from Norman seneschals of Dol, Brittany who settled in England around the time of the Norman Invasion. The current chief of Clan Stuart of Bute is John Crichton-Stuart, 7th Marquess of Bute. The clan chief of the clan is a member of the Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs. A modern clan member's crest badge contains the heraldic motto: Nobilis Est Ira Leonis.
    8.00
    2 votes
    69

    Clan Campbell

    Clan Campbell is a Highland Scottish clan. Historically one of the larger of the Highland clans, their lands were in Argyll and the chief of the clan became the Earl and later Duke of Argyll. The earliest attested Campbell is Gilleasbaig of Menstrie (floruit 1260s), father of Cailean Mór, from whom the chiefs of the clan are thought to have taken their style MacCailean Mór. The byname kambel is recorded at this time. Fanciful reconstructions derive it from the Spanish de Campo Bello, but the likely source is the caimbeul, an Early Modern Irish or Gaelic by name meaning wry mouth, crooked mouth or twisted mouth, which refers to "the man whose mouth inclined a little on one side" . Regarding the earlier ancestors of Clan Campbell, there is good evidence that the Campbells themselves traced their descent from an earlier kindred known as the Mac Duibne, or perhaps the Uí Duibne, possibly relating to the Gaelic mythological figure of Diarmuid Ua Duibhne. It has been suggested that the family's early landholdings, around Menstrie, and in Cowal, were related to the partition of the Earldom of Menteith in 1213, and that Gilleasbuig may have been a kinsman of Muireadhach I, Earl of
    6.67
    3 votes
    70
    Clan Gordon

    Clan Gordon

    Clan Gordon, also known as the House of Gordon, is a Scottish clan. The chief of the clan was the powerful Earl of Huntly, and now also the Marquess of Huntly. The first Gordon on record is Richard of Gordon, previously of Swinton, said to have been the grandson of a famous knight who slew some monstrous animal in the Merse during the time of King Malcolm III of Scotland. This Richard was Lord of the Barony of Gordon in the Merse. Between 1150 and 1160 he granted from his estate a piece of land to the Monks of St. Mary at Kelso, a grant which was confirmed by his son Thomas Gordon. Other notable Gordons from this time include Bertram de Gordon who wounded King Richard of England with an arrow at Châlons. Alicia Gordon, IV of the Gordon family was the heiress who married her cousin, Adam Gordon. Adam Gordon was a soldier who King Alexander III of Scotland sent with King Louis of France to Palestine. One tradition is that from Adam's grandson, Sir Adam all of the Gordons in Scotland are descended from.* This Adam Gordon supported Sir William Wallace in 1297 to recapture the Castle of Wigtown from the English and Adam was made the Governor. During the Wars of Scottish Independence Sir
    6.67
    3 votes
    71
    Clan Grant

    Clan Grant

    Clan Grant is a Highland Scottish clan. The Grants are one of the clans of Siol Alpin, and descend from the 9th century Kenneth MacAlpin, King of Scots; and also of Norse origin, from settlers who are the descents of Haakon inn Riki Sigurdarsson, Jarl of Hladr, Protector of Norway ( Hakon Sigurdsson ),(c. 937 – 995), sometimes known as "the Great ", who was the defacto ruler of Norway from about 975 to 995. The first recorded Grant was Sir Laurence le Grant who was Sherriff of Inverness in 1260. His son, John Grant was captured by the English during the Wars of Scottish Independence. Members of Clan Grant have owned land in Strathspey at least since 1316, prior to that, most likely in Stratherrick, to the east of Loch Ness. In 1316, John Grant of Inverallan sold his land to John le Grant, who was father of Patrick le Grant, Lord of Stratherrick. The clan's lands in Stratherrick would later come to be controlled by Clan Fraser. During the Wars of Scottish Independence Clan Grant were supporters of William Wallace and fought at the Battle of Dunbar (1296) where both Randolph and John de Grant were captured and imprisoned for a time. The Clan Grant later supported King Robert the
    6.67
    3 votes
    72

    Clan Haig

    Clan Haig is a Lowland Scottish clan. The name 'Haig' comes from the Norman name 'de Haga'. There were theories that the Haigs were of Pictish descent but this has been discounted. A charter signed in 1162 to Dryburgh Abbey bears the name 'Petrus de Haga, proprietor of the lands and barony of Bemersyde'. He was later charged by Alexander II of Scotland with the murder of the Earl of Atholl at Haddington in 1192. The Barons of Bemersyde rapidly gained a position of some influence in the area and it's not surprising to see their signature among the other Scottish nobles on the Ragman Rolls in 1296. Like so many others who signed this document swearing fealty to Edward I of England they were soon to join the cause of Scottish Independence. In the late 13th century and early 14th century during the Wars of Scottish Independence the Clan Haig fought alongside William Wallace against the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1296. The sixth Laird continued this loyalty to the Scottish cause by fighting alongside Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn at the age of only seventeen. He continued to support Scottish independence, falling at the Battle of Halidon Hill in
    6.67
    3 votes
    73
    Clan Hay

    Clan Hay

    Clan Hay is a Scottish clan that has played an important part in the history and politics of Scotland. Members of the clan are to be found in most parts of Scotland and in many other parts of the world. However, the North East of Scotland, i.e. Aberdeenshire Aberdeenshire (historic), Banffshire, Morayshire and Nairnshire Nairn (boundaries), is the heart of Hay country with other significant concentrations of Hays being found in Perthshire, especially around Perth, in the Scottish Borders, and in Shetland. The family name is derived from that of several villages called La Haye in the Cotentin peninsula of Normandy, France. The word, haye comes from haia, a hedge, which in modern French is haie. It can also mean "stockade", but it may have been used here because this part of Normandy is characterized by centuries-old interlocking hedgerows (bocage). The French, de la Haye, appears in Latin documents as de Haya The name has evolved into English as Hay and rendered into Gaelic as Garadh. According to George Fraser Black, the Gaelic form of Hay, MacGaradh, was merely an invention of John Hay Allan, also known as John Sobieski Stuart, author of the dubious Vestiarium Scoticum. There are
    6.67
    3 votes
    74

    Clan Henderson

    The Clan Henderson (Clann Eanruig) is a Scottish clan with members living throughout the world. The clan rose to prominence in Glen Coe with branches in Fife, the Borders, Caithness and the Shetland Islands. The clan chief is Alistair Donald Henderson of Fordell. The Hendersons claim descent from the Pictish prince Big Henry, son of King Nechtan (Eanruig Mor mac Righ Nechtan), who in 1011 came to Kinlochleven in Lochaber, just north of Glen Coe. His male descendants took the name mac Eanruig, ("son of Henry"), which would later be anglicised as McHenry, Henryson, Henderson and so on. Over time, the descendants of other prominent Henrys took the same name, and eventually these families coalesced into a single clan identity. They lived at Callert, on the north shore of Loch Leven, until they were evicted by Clan Cameron in the fifteenth century. In 1511 the lands of Fordell in Fife were given to Clan Henderson by King James IV. In Caithness, another group of Hendersons were septs of the Clan Gunn. Another family grouping arose in Liddesdale and Ewesdale, being one of the smaller families of Border Reivers. The Scots makar, Robert Henryson, one of the earliest historical figures
    6.67
    3 votes
    75

    Clan Mar

    Clan Mar is a Scottish clan from the Grampian Highlands, sometimes referred to as the Tribe of Mar. The chiefs of the clan held the position of Mormaer of Mar from the 1130s to the early 15th century as the original Earls of Mar. The position was later taken over by chiefs of the Clan Erskine in the 15th century who held the title as Earl of Mar and became chiefs of Clan Mar. One of the seven ancient kingdoms (or tribes) of Scotland, the rulers of this kingdom were known as 'Mormaer' which was an ancient Pictish equivalent of an Earl. The Earldom of Mar lies in Aberdeenshire between the rivers Dee and Don. It is because Mar was one of the ancient tribes of Scotland, that it is referred to a the "Tribe of Mar." Donald Mormaer of Mar fought alongside the Irish High King Brian Boru against the Norse Viking invaders in 1014. Rothri (Ruadrí), a later Mormaer is named in the charter erecting the Abbey of Scone in 1114. Uilleam, Earl of Mar (William), the 5th Earl of Mar, was also a regent of Scotland and Great Chamberlain of the Realm in 1264. He was a witness to the marriage of Princess Margaret and King Eric II of Norway, 1280–99, whose daughter Margaret the "Maid of Norway" died in
    6.67
    3 votes
    76
    Clan Boyd

    Clan Boyd

    Clan Boyd is a Lowland Scottish clan from Kilmarnock in Ayrshire, Scotland. The origin of the Boyd family name may be either from the Gaelic language or from the Normans, but in both cases translates as 'fair', 'blonde', 'yellow or fair,' etcetera. If the origin is Gaelic, historians argue the family name "Boyd" may have originated from the Gaelic 'buidhe', meaning 'fair' or 'blonde'. The 'fair' man in question is said to have been Robert, whose descendant is Stephen, nephew of Walter Fitzalan, 1st High Steward of Scotland. The fess-chequey supports this theory. If the origin be Norman, the name may have originated from the lands in Largs and Irvine, held by the de Morvilles. The earliest occurrence of the name is found in an Inquisition formed by King David I of Scotland into the lands of the bishopric of Glasgow. The Boyds were vassals of the de Morville family, who received lands from King David. The family name Boyd has roots in nobility rather than as a clan, however, the Lord Lyon Court recognizes the Boyds as a Clan. The 14th century saw the Wars of Scottish Independence. (1297–1328, 1332–1357) An early patriot of the clan was Duncan Boyd, who was hanged in 1306 for aiding
    9.00
    1 votes
    77

    Clan Buchan

    Clan Buchan is a Scottish clan from Aberdeenshire in Scotland. The Clan Buchan are of no relation to the Clan Buchanan despite their similar name. The name Buchan is also considered a sept of the Clan Cumming (Comyn). The Clan names derives from the district of Buchan. This in turn may have taken its name from ‘bwch’, a word meaning cow in the Brythonic language. The first recorded Buchan was Ricardus de Buchan, clerk of the bishopric of Aberdeen around 1207 and in 1281 William de Buchan is recorded as holding land. Sir Thomas of Boghan of Edinburgh is documented in the Ragman Rolls as rendering homage to Edward I of England in 1296. His seal depicted an eight-rayed figure from which the current crest may have derived. It is not certain when the lands of Auchmacoy were gained, but Andrew Buchan of Auchmacwy (now generally considered the first chief of the clan) was one of the assize appointed to settle the lands of St Peter’s Hospital in 1446. The lands of Auchmacoy and Oykthorn were granted by charter to Andrew’s eldest son, also Andrew, by James IV of Scotland in 1503 but it seems the land may have been in the family’s hands since the beginning of the 14th century. In 1598 the
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    78
    Clan Fraser

    Clan Fraser

    Clan Fraser (Scottish Gaelic: Clann Frisealach, French: Clan Fraiser) is a Scottish clan of French origin. The Clan has been strongly associated with Inverness and the surrounding area since the Clan's founder gained lands there in the 13th century. Since its founding, the Clan has dominated local politics and been active in every major military conflict involving Scotland. It has also played a considerable role in most major political turmoils. 'Fraser' remains the most prominent family name within the Inverness area. The Clan's current chief is Simon Fraser, the 16th Lord Lovat, and 26th Chief of Clan Fraser. The arms of Clan Fraser are Quarterly: 1st and 4th Azure, three fraises Argent, 2nd and 3rd Gules, three antique crowns Or, or in layman's terms, the traditional three cinquefoils, or fraises (strawberry flowers), as they have come to be known, in the first and fourth positions and three crowns in the second and third positions. Only the Lord Lovat is allowed use of these arms plain and undifferenced. The exact origins of the surname 'Fraser' can not be determined with any great certainty, although there is little doubt that it came from France. The first reputed record is
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    79

    Clan Hunter

    Clan Hunter (Gaelic: "Clann an t-Sealgair") is a Scottish clan which has its seat at Hunterston in Ayrshire. It has historical connections with both the 'Highlands' and 'Lowlands' of Scotland due to several centuries of operation in some of the formerly Gaelic speaking Scottish Islands including Arran, Bute and the Cumbraes where the Hunters also long held land. The present Chief is Madam Pauline Hunter of Hunterson The first Hunters arrived in Ayrshire in the last years of the 11th century. They were experts in hunting and fieldcraft with generations of experience in the forests of their land of origin, Normandy, northern France. William Hunter was invited to Scotland by David I, who was himself brought up in the Norman Court. He must have had considerable skills to have been so honoured; he was responsible for providing the Scottish Court with meat and game, a position that the Hunters held throughout the Middle Ages and beyond. In papers relating to the King's Inquisition in 1116, we find mention of Williemo Venator (William the Hunter, 1st Laird) who was appointed as Royal Huntsman while his wife had the honour of serving Queen Matilda as lady-in-waiting. William put his
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    80
    Clan MacLachlan

    Clan MacLachlan

    Clan Maclachlan, also known as Clan Lachlan, is a Highland Scottish clan that historically centred on the lands of Strathlachlan on Loch Fyne, Argyll on the west coast of Scotland. The clan claims descent from Lachlan Mor, who lived on Loch Fyne in the 13th century, and who has left his name upon the countryside he once controlled: places such as Strathlachlan, Lachlan Castle and Lachlan Bay. Tradition gives Lachlan Mor a descent from an Irish prince of the O'Neill dynasty, Ánrothán Ua Néill, son of Áed, son of Flaithbertach Ua Néill, King of Ailech and Cenél nEógain, died 1036. Clan Maclachlan has been associated with other clans, such as Clan Lamont, Clan MacEwen of Otter, Clan MacNeil of Barra, and the MacSweens: as all claim descent from Anrothan O'Neill who left Ireland for Kintyre in the 11th century. From this descent the clan claims a further descent from the legendary Niall Noigíallach, High King of Ireland, who lived from the mid 4th century to early 5th century. The clan took part in the Jacobite Risings as loyal supporters of the Stuart kings of Scotland. The seventeenth chief of the clan was killed in the Battle of Culloden in 1746. Following the Jacobite defeat, a
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    81
    Clan Macnab

    Clan Macnab

    Clan Macnab is a Highland Scottish clan. The founder of the Clan Macnab is said to have belonged to the clerical profession. In Gaelic, Mac an Aba means "the son of abbot". He is said to have been Abbot of Glendochart. The title Mac an Aba eventually became one of four variations used today: "MacNabb", "McNabb", "Macnab" or "McNab". Clan Macnab is often said to have been a branch of the Clan MacDonald. However a bond of manrent exists to say that the Clan Macnab was an ally of the Clan Mackinnon and the Clan Gregor. The current village of Killin, on the shores of Loch Tay, is the traditional homeland of the Clan Macnab. The Macnabs were a considerable clan before the reign of Alexander III of Scotland. When King Robert the Bruce commenced his struggle for the crown of Scotland the Clan Macnab along with the Clan MacDougall fought against Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Dalrigh. After this when the cause of Robert the Bruce had prevailed his victorious troops ravaged the lands of Macnab. All of Macnab's family writs were destroyed. Of the Macnab's possessions only the Barony of Bowain or Bovain remained with them when Gilbert Macnab received a charter from King David II of
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    82

    Clan Colquhoun

    Clan Colquhoun is a Highland Scottish clan. The clan motto shown above in the crest best translates to "if I can." In the 13th century Maol Domhnaich, Earl of Lennox granted the lands of Colquhoun, located in Dunbartonshire, to Humphry de Kilpatrick. Humphry’s son, Ingelram de Colquhoun, who lived in the reign of Alexander III, was the first person recorded as taking Colquhoun as a surname. Around 1368, Luss, on Loch Lomond, was acquired by Sir Robert Colquhoun through marriage. From then on the chiefship has been described as of Colquhoun and Luss. His grandson Iain Colquhoun of Luss married Margaret, the daughter of the Earl of Lennox. When James I returned from English imprisonment a few years later in 1424, one of the people he took his vengeance upon was the unsupportive Lennox. Lennox's position was devastated, and Iain of Luss took advantage of this to win the King’s favour by capturing Dumbarton Castle from Lennox. By 1427 he was Sheriff of Dumbarton and by 1439 he was dead, like his King, killed by those he had treated so badly. By way of compensation, James II made Luss a free barony for Colquhoun’s grandson Sir Iain. It remained this way until the 1745 Jacobite
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    83
    Clan Cumming

    Clan Cumming

    Clan Cumming, also known as Clan Comyn, is a Scottish clan from the central Highlands that played a major role in the history of 13th century Scotland and in the Wars of Scottish Independence and were instrumental in defeating the English at the Battle of Roslin in 1303. The Clan Comyn were once the most powerful family in Scotland until they were defeated in civil war by their rival to the Scottish throne, Robert the Bruce. Like many of the families that came to power under King David I of Scotland, the Comyn clan is of Norman origin. The surname is either a place-name possibly derived from Comines, near Lille, in France, or possibly derived from Bosc-Bénard-Commin, near Rouen in the Duchy of Normandy. Richard Comyn, the nephew of William Comyn, chancellor to King David, is the one that established this family in Scotland. His son was William Comyn, who married Marjory, Countess of Buchan. William's mother was Hextilda, the granddaughter of King Donald III). His son was Walter Comyn, the man who acquired the lordship of Badenoch. The seat of power was Ruthven Castle. Ruthven Castle commanded the northern end of two passes over the Mounth, the Drumochter and Minigaig passes. This
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    84
    Clan Graham

    Clan Graham

    Clan Graham (Clann Greumach) is a Scottish clan who had territories in both the Scottish Highlands and Lowlands. There is a tradition that the first Graham was one Gramus who forced a breach in the Roman Antonine Wall known as Graeme's Dyke in 420 A.D. However, historians generally believe that the Grahams were of Norman descent. The surname Graham is derived from the English place-name Grantham, Lincolnshire, which appears in the Domesday Book both as Grantham and Graham. The first Graham in Scotland was Sir William de Graham (or De Graeme), a Norman knight who accompanied David I, on his journey north to claim the Scottish crown in 1128. William De Graeme witnessed the signing of the charter founding the Abbey of Holyrood in the same year 1128. From this line descended the Montrose line of Grahams, one of the most distinguished families of Scotland. The Clan Graham fought at the Battle of Dunbar in 1296 where Sir Patrick Graham of Kincardine was the only man of all the Scots not to retreat and instead fought to the death. Sir John de Graham, was a friend and follower of William Wallace. Sir John de Graham is regarded as hero for rescuing Wallace at Queensbury. Sir John de Graham
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    85
    Clan Lyon

    Clan Lyon

    Clan Lyon is a Scottish clan, but is not associated with the lands of Glen Lyon in Perthshire, Scotland. Although Sir Iain Moncreiffe, perhaps the greatest herald genealogist, believed his family were of Celtic origin and descended from a younger son of the Lamonts, the generally accepted view is that they descended from a French family called de Leon, who came north with Edgar, son of Malcolm III, at the end of the eleventh century to fight against his uncle, Donald Bane, the usurper of the throne. Edgar was triumphant, and de Leon received lands in Perthshire. (These lands should NOT be confused with Glen Lyon. In this context, Lyon is thought to be a corruption of the word "lithe", meaning "flood", to describe the frequent state of the river through the glen. From all available records, there has never been any Lyon as owner or occupier of land in Glen Lyon.) Roger de Leonne witnessed a charter of Edgar to the Abbey at Dunfermline in 1105. In 1372 Robert II granted to Sir John Lyon (called the White Lyon because of his fair complexion) the thanage of Glamis. Five years later, he became Chamberlain of Scotland, and his prominence was such he was considered fit to marry the king¹s
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    86
    Clan Scott

    Clan Scott

    Clan Scott is a Scottish clan. Clan Scott is not a Highland clan but Lowland, from the Borders region of Scotland. Families and clans from this area prefer to be known as Borderers instead of Lowlanders. One of the most powerful of the Border families, the name was derived from the Scots who invaded Dalriada (Argyll) from Ireland and the surname is found in all parts of Scotland. However in the Borders, an area that was never fully Gaelic speaking, it may have meant a Scottish Gaelic speaker. The first record of the name Scott is when Uchtred filius Scot witnessed the foundation charter of Selkirk in 1120. Henricus le Scotte witnessed a charter by David Earl of Strathearn around 1195. Michael Scott "the wizard" was a real-life scholar and philosopher, whom Walter Scott described in The Lay of the Last Minstrel as "addicted to the abstruse studies of judicial astrology, alchemy, physiognomy, and chiromancy. Hence he passed among his contemporaries for a skilful magician". In the last quarter of the 13th century the Scotts appear in Fife when Michael Lescot agreed to serve King Edward I of England overseas. (In the 17th century author Sir John Scott would rebuild Scotstarvit Tower
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    87

    Clan Stirling

    Clan Stirling is a Lowland Scottish clan. The originator of the Clan Stirling is believed to be a man by the name of Thoraldus de Strivelyn vicecomes de Strivelyn who was granted a charter of lands in Cadder by King David I of Scotland in 1147. His descendant Sir Alexander de Strivelyn, the fifth Laird of Cadder, died in 1304. During the Wars of Scottish Independence Alexander's heir, Chief John de Strivelyn led the clan against the English at the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333 where he was killed. His grandson, Sir William had two sons. The succession of chieftenship passed through his first son, William for four generations and then passed to the grandson of his second son John. John was the governor of the Royal Dumbarton Castle and was sheriff of Dumbartonshire. He was appointed armour bearer by King James I of Scotland and Comptroller of the Royal Household. He was knighted in 1430. His son, William acquired the lands of Glorat from the Earl of Lennox. He also held Dumbarton Castle for the King. The Stirlings obtained the lands of Keir in Perthshire in the mid 15th century. In the 16th century during the Anglo-Scottish Wars William's son George who was now the chief also held
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    88

    Clan Leask

    Clan Leask is a Lowland Scottish clan. There is more than one theory as to the origin of the name Leask. One is from the Anglo-Saxon word lisse which means happy. Another is that it comes from the Norse meaning of stirring fellow. Another is that it comes from Liscus which was the name of the chief of a tribe called the Haedui. The Haedui were a tribe of Gauls as described by Julius Caesar in his Gallic Wars. Another theory concerns the Castle of Boulogne, once the possession of Charlemagne, at one time belonged to a family called de Lesque. William de Laskereske's signature appears on the Ragman Roll of 1296. Later William Leask was granted the lands of Leskgoroune by King David II of Scotland, son of Robert the Bruce. William was also the first known chief of the Clan Leask. The second chief was baillie of the barony of Findon. He inherited lands from Henry de Brogan, Lord of Achlowne, in 1390; later, in the 15th century, another branch of the family sprung up on Orkney after Jamis of Lask, younger son of Thomas de Lask of that Ilk settled there. During the Anglo-Scottish Wars the clan suffered when they fought against the English at the Battle of Flodden Field in 1513. Both
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    89
    Clan MacKintosh

    Clan MacKintosh

    Clan Mackintosh (Clann Mhic an Tòisich) is a Scottish clan from Inverness with strong Jacobite ties. The Mackintoshes were also chiefs of the Chattan Confederation. Seathach, son of Donnchadh Mac Duibh, accompanied King Malcolm IV of Scotland to Morayshire to suppress rebellion in 1160. In 1163 he was granted land in the Findhorn valley and made constable of Inverness Castle. Upon Seathach's death in 1179, his son, Shaw the second became chief and was confirmed by William I of Scotland the Lion. Probably the earliest authentic history of Mackintosh is traceable to Shaw or Search Macduff, a cadet son of the third Earl of Fife. The son of Macduff, for his support of King Malcolm IV, was awarded the lands of Petty and Breachley in Invernesshire and was appointed Constable of the Castle thereto. Assuming the name Mac an Toisich which means "son of the toisech ['thane']" or "son of the Chief", he became the progenitor of his own clan. In 1263 the Clan Mackintosh fought at the Battle of Largs in support of King Alexander III of Scotland against King Haakon IV of Norway. The fifth Chief of the Clan Mackintosh, Fearchar Mac an Toisich, was killed during the battle. In 1291, Aonghas, sixth
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    90
    Clan MacLean

    Clan MacLean

    Clan Maclean (/mækˈleɪn/; Scottish Gaelic: Mac Gill-Eain) is a Highland Scottish clan. They are one of the oldest clans in the Highlands and owned large tracts of land in Argyll as well as the Inner Hebrides. Many early MacLeans became famous for their honour, strength and courage in battle. They were involved in many clan skirmishes with the MacKinnons, Camerons, MacDonalds and Campbells. They were fierce Jacobites fighting in all of the Jacobite risings. There are several different origins for the surname Maclean, however, the clan surname is an Anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic MacGilleEathain. This was the patronymic form of the personal name meaning "servant of (Saint) John". They are descendents of Loarn mac Eirc, a 5th century king of Dál Riata. The family grew very powerful throughout the Hebrides and Highlands through allegiances with the Catholic Church in the 9th century, the MacDonalds in the 13th century, the MacKays and MacLeods in the 16th century. The early kings of Scotland also befriended the clan for their knowledge of the sea and their large numbers of sea-going vessels, which were useful against the Viking raids in the 9th century. The founder of the clan
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    91

    Clan Drummond

    Clan Drummond is a Scottish clan deriving its name from the parish of Drymen, in what was western Stirlingshire. Legend gives Maurice of Hungary as founder of the clan. The name is rendered "Druimeanach" in modern Scottish Gaelic. Clan traditions credit the founder of the clan as Maurice of Hungary, a Hungarian prince descended from Árpád, who is said to have accompanied Edgar Ætheling, heir to the English throne, and his sister Saint Margaret of Scotland, when they sailed there in 1066 to escape the Norman conquest of England. This disregards accepted history that Edgar and Margaret were brought to England in 1057 by their father, Edward the Exile: Edward died immediately (some say he may have been murdered), and his children lived at the Court of England's King Edward 'the Confessor' with their mother Agatha. Edgar, about thirteen in 1066, was elected king of England after the battle of Hastings and the death of his cousin King Harold II, but together with the rest of the English government submitted to Guillaume (William) of Normandy, afterwards King of England, at Berkhamsted two months later (16 December 1066). He later sailed to Scotland, accompanied by his mother Agatha and
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    92
    Clan MacKinnon

    Clan MacKinnon

    Clan Mackinnon or Clan Fingon is a Highland Scottish clan associated with the islands of Mull and Skye, in the Inner Hebrides. Popular tradition gives the clan a Dalriadic Gaelic origin. The 19th century historian W. F. Skene named the clan as one of the seven clans of Siol Alpin - who according to Skene could all trace their ancestry back to Alpin, father of Cináed mac Ailpín. Popular tradition has been until recently to consider Cináed mac Ailpín the first King of Scots and a Gael, however recent research speculates Cináed was a Pictish king and possibly even a Pict himself. Sir Iain Moncreiffe of that Ilk speculated that Clan Mackinnon belonged to the kindred of Saint Columba, noting the Mackinnon Arms bore the hand of the saint holding the Cross, and the several Mackinnon abbots of Iona. The Mackinnon clan took part in the thirty years war with neighbouring clans such as MacKay, Love and McFarlane. Early history states that the Mackinnon clan was one of the most powerful clan in highland Scotland. Though little is known of the early history of the clan, it is likely to have served under the Lords of the Isles. After the forfeiture of the Lordship of the Isles in 1493 the clan
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    93
    Clan Menzies

    Clan Menzies

    For Menzies as a personal name, including its pronunciation and a list of famous people of that name, see Menzies. Clan Menzies ( listen (help·info)); Scottish Gaelic: Clann Mèinnear, a member is a Mèinnearach) is a Highland Scottish clan. Mesnières in Normandy was the original home of the Norman family whose name was transformed to Manners, which was the surname of the Dukes of Rutland. A branch of this family moved into Lothian in Scotland and gradually into the Scottish Highlands, where they first became known by the name Meyneris and eventually as Menzies. It is believed that the Menzies were granted lands in Lothian in the 12th Century, almost certainly in exchange for military service. The first Chief of Menzies was Sir Robert de Meyneris who became Chamberlain to King Alexander II of Scotland in 1249. The Menzies clan also became allies with the Earl of Atholl and Clan Murray. Sir Robert de Meyneris son, called Alexander, was granted lands and property in Strathtay. He was later also granted lands in and property in Weem. However the Castle Weem was built there two centuries later. In the 14th century during the Wars of Scottish Independence Clan Menzies supported Robert the
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    94
    Frasers of Lovat

    Frasers of Lovat

    Clan Fraser of Lovat is a Highland Scottish clan and is a branch of the Clan Fraser. The Frasers of Lovat are descendants from a younger brother of Sir Alexander Fraser. It is Sir Alexander Fraser descendants whom are the chief line of the Fraser clan. The current chief of the clan is Simon Fraser, 16th Lord Lovat. For the history of the Clan before the Scottish Wars of Independence, see Clan Fraser Clan Fraser of Lovat traces its heritage from Sir Simon Fraser, brother of Sir Alexander Fraser, Robert the Bruce's Chamberlain, whom Clan Fraser traces from. Sir Simon acquired the Bisset Lands around Beauly when he won the hand of its heiress, and these lands became the family home. A record from 1367 describes Hugh Fraser as ‘Lord of Lovat and portioner of Ard’, the first known connection the Frasers had with Lovat land. By 1422 the Frasers of Lovat had extended their lands to include Stratherrick by Loch Ness, together with part of Glenelg. Although the exact date of creation is uncertain, some time between 1456 and 1464, Hugh Fraser was raised to the peerage as Lord Lovat or Lord Fraser of Lovat. Around 1511, the 5th Lord Hugh Fraser of Lovat established his seat at Castle Fraser,
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    95
    Clan Farquharson

    Clan Farquharson

    Clan Farquharson(/ˈfɑrkərsən/) of Invercauld is a Highland Scottish clan. The clan hails from Aberdeenshire and is a member of the Chattan Confederation. Farquhar - from the Gaelic 'fear' and 'char' meaning 'dear one'. In modern Scottish Gaelic, the surname is written "MacFhearchair". The clan derives its name from Farquhar Shaw, 4th son of Alexander "Ciar" Mackintosh of Rothiemurchus, 5th Chief of the Clan Shaw, who settled in the Braes of Mar, the source of the River Dee. His descendants took the name Farquharson. Farquhar Shaw's son married Isobel Stewart, heiress of Invercauld, however, it was their son, Finlay Mor who has become known as the first real Farquharson. He was killed during the Battle of Pinkie in 1547, aged 60, while performing the duty of the King's Standard Bearer. This was part of the Anglo-Scottish Wars. His nine sons ensured that the clan became numerous and influential. In 1595 the clan entered a bond of manrent with the Clan MacKintosh, so also associating themselves with the Chattan Confederation. At the end of the sixteenth century the Erskines attempted to reclaim the Earldom of Mar. Jon Erskine, who styled himself Earl of Mar, built Braemar Castle in
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    96

    Clan Lumsden

    Clan Lumsden is a Lowland Scottish clan. The name Lumsden derives from the old manor of Lumsden in the parish of Coldingham in Berwickshire. The earliest known recordings of the name appear between 1166 and 1182 when the brothers Gillem (William) and Cren de Lumsden witnessed a charter by Waldeve Earl of Dunbar to Coldingham Priory. The lands of Lumsden are first mentioned in a charter dated 1098 of King Edgar of Scotland and his son Malcolm Canmore. Gillem and his brother Cren are the first recorded owners of the land. In 1296 Adam Lumsden and Roger de Lumsden were among the Scottish clan leaders who were forced to do homage to King Edward I of England with both of their names appearing on the Ragman Rolls. Around 1328 Gillbert de Lumsden married an heiress of Blanerne and by 1329 had received a charter for the Blanerne lands by the Earl of Angus. By the mid fourteenth century offshoots of the Lumsden clan had charters and lands confirmed to them in Conlan in Fife and Medlar and Cushnie in Aberdeenshire. In the early seventeenth century during the Thirty Years' War the Clan Lumsden fought for the Swedish King Gustavus Adolphus in a famous unit called "Lumsden's Musketeers". One of
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    97

    Clan MacBain

    Clan MacBain also known as Clan MacBean is a highland Scottish clan and is also a part of the Chattan Confederation. There are several possible Gaelic origins for this name. One suggestion is that it originated from beinn which means 'hill' an oblique form of Beann, which means 'peak', as in mountain peak. Another is Bàn, which means 'white' (or fair) and appears in the name of Scottish King Donald Bàn (i.e. Donald the fairheared). Lastly, and more probable is the derivation given by Alexander MacBain in his respected An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, as follows: MAC-BEAN, G (i.e. Gaelic). McBheathain, from Beathan, Englished as Bean (1490, Beane, 1481) or Benjamin: *Bitâtagno-s, life's son, from beatha, life, with the termination -agno-s, meaning "descendant of," Eng. -ing, now used like the Eng. to form diminutives. Also Mac-bain, Mac-vean. If one pronounces the name McBeathain without use of the usual English "th", but lightly skip over it, as one would do in Gaelic, one can easily see how the name was then written as MacBean, McBain etc. Some have taken a leap of imagination to propose that the etymologically connected name of McBheatha (i.e. MacBeth, which
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    98
    Clan Macintyre

    Clan Macintyre

    Clan MacIntyre is a Scottish clan. The name MacIntyre (from Scottish Gaelic Mac an t-Saoir), means "son of the carpenter." Although no documented history of the clan exists, it is most commonly said to descend from Maurice Mac Neil a nephew of Somerled, the great 12th century leader of the Scottish Gaels. Through an ingenious strategy, Maurice secured the marriage of Somerled to the daughter of the King of Mann and the Isles, thus greatly increasing Somerled’s territories. At an unknown date the clan journeyed from the Hebrides to the Scottish mainland where the chiefs established their home at Glen Noe on Loch Etive. The earliest recorded clan chiefs do not emerge until the 17th century. According to tradition, they had held the land at Glen Noe for centuries, although subject to a feudal tenure converted to money rent in later years. In 1806, however, the chief was forced to relinquish the tenancy of Glen Noe due to inability to meet the payments. He and his family subsequently emigrated to the United States. MacIntyres participated in military campaigns during the civil war in Scotland and the Jacobite rising of 1745–46 but they did not operate as an independent body. Clan
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    99
    Clan Ogilvy

    Clan Ogilvy

    Clan Ogilvy / Ogilvie is a Highland Scottish clan. The Ogilvys are one of the most distinguished families in Scotland, and take their name from the like-named place near Glamis. This placename is first recorded in about 1205 as Ogilvin, and is likely derived from an early form of the Welsh uchel ("high") and either ma ("plain", "place") or ban ("hill"). Patrick de Olgilvy appears on the Ragman Roll swearing fealty to King Edward I of England in 1296. However Patrick's two sons supported King Robert I of Scotland during the Wars of Scottish Independence. The Ogilvy lands are found in Angus where the Ogilvy family were made hereditary sheriffs in the 14th and 15th centuries. In the 15th century the Tower of Airlie was built as the castle of the Chief of the Ogilvies. In 1394 a clan battle took place between Clan Robertson and the Clan Ogilvy, during a cattle raid on Angus. Sir Walter Ogilvy was slain at this battle, though his son became the Earl of Mar who commanded the Duke of Albany's forces at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. The Clan Ogilvy, supported by men from the Clan Oliphant, Clan Seton, Clan Gordon and by the Clan Forbes of Pitsligo fought at the Battle of Arbroath on 24
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    100

    Clan Moncreiffe

    Clan Moncreiffe is a Highland Scottish clan. The Moncreiffes are of great antiquity, and possibly descend through a female stem of the Celtic Royal Dynasty. The name Moncreiffe is derived from the Barony of Moncreiffe in Perthshire. Their lands take their name from the Gaelic name Monadh Croibhe meaning hill of the sacred bough. This is represented on the clan crest which features the sacred tree. Although the name is certainly older, the first official record appears when Mathew Moncrieff (brother in law of a co-Regent of Scotland during the minority of Alexander III) was granted a charter for the lands in 1248 A.D. The lands of Moncreiffe then grew with the addition of Culdares and Duneaves in the Highlands and were incorporated into the Barony of Moncreiffe in 1455 According to some accounts the progenitor of the Clan Moncreiffe was of Anglo-Norman lineage and that a man called Mortimer assumed the name of Moncreiffe after obtaining the lands of that name in the parish of Dunbarney, Perthshire. However, this is disputed. Another theory by other historians are that the origins of the clan are linked to the ancient Royal House of Ireland of the great King Niall of the Nine
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    101
    Clan Nicolson

    Clan Nicolson

    Clan Nicolson is a Lowland Scottish clan. The clan claims descent from an Edinburgh lawyer who lived in the 16th century and from a disinguished line of Aberdeen merchants who preceded him. During the mid-1980s David Nicolson, 4th Baron Carnock was recognised by the Lord Lyon King of Arms as the chief of Clan Nicolson. Around the same time, a Nicolson who claimed descent from the Highland clan of "Nicolsons" historically centred on Skye, petitioned the Lord Lyon King of Arms to be recognised as chief of his own clan. The Lord Lyon King of Arms accepted this man's petition on the condition he took the surname MacNeacail. In consequence there are two Scottish clans with similar names—the lowland Clan Nicolson and the highland Clan MacNeacail. The surname Nicolson means "son of Nicol". The personal name Nicol is a diminutive of Nicholas, derived from the Greek Νικόλαος meaning "victory people". The personal name Nicol was first brought to the British Isles by the Normans. Nicholas was a very common mediaeval name and is found in many different forms as a surname. The surname is shared by two Scottish clans—the lowland Clan Nicolson and the unrelated Clan MacNeacail of Skye. This is
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    102

    Clan Rattray

    Clan Rattray is a Highland Scottish clan. The name Rattray is derived from the barony of Rattray in Perthshire, Scotland. Legend has it that their land there was acquired from King Malcolm III of Scotland (Malcolm Cean Mór) in the 11th century. Unfortunately there is no extant written record of this. The Rattray estate includes a ruined Pictish fort which lies on a serpent shaped feature. This may explain why two serpants support the Chief's coat of arms. There are various renditions of the name in early written records; Rathtreff in 1160, Rotref in 1291, Ratref in 1296, Rothtref in 1205, there are also various other renditions of the name including Rattra. (Nicolaisen, W.F.H 1976). The name is composed of two parts the first part is derived from the word rath, from both Gaelic and Cymric (modern Welsh or ancient British) meaning fortification; the second part Tref or Treb, Tray, from the Cymric (British) meaning settlement (Nicolaisen, W.F.H, 1976). The first recorded Rattray was the laird Alan Rattray who is recorded as a witness on charters of King Alexander II of Scotland. During the Wars of Scottish Independence Alan Rattray's grandson, Eustace Rattray led the clan, as chief
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    103
    Clan Johnstone

    Clan Johnstone

    Clan Johnstone is a Lowland Scottish clan. They were involved in many battles on the Scottish borders. Johnstone comes from "John's toun", not "John's stone" or "John's son." Historically, "Johnston" has been an alternate spelling of the surname. The first known person of this name was John of Johnstone, who in 1174 gave his name to the lands of Annandale in Dumfrieshire which he had been granted. His son, called Gilbert Johnstone ("Gillibertus de Johnistoun") appears on records between 1194–1214 and onwards, presumably taking his surname from the town his father had established - "Johnstone" or "John's toun". Gilbert's Grandson called Sir John Johnstone was a Knight of the county of Dumfries. Sir John Johnstone signed the Ragman Roll of King Edward I of England in 1296. At this time Perth was known as St Johnston and Johnstonburn in East Lothian was then called Jonystoun. These two areas have records of the Johnstone Clan. A third area of Johnstones which came from Stephen the Clerk and Margaret the heiress of Sir Andrew Garioch used the family name of Johnston. In roughly 1280, William Wallace gave the Lochmaben castle to Johnstone of Eskdale, who apparently was his kinsman. Sir
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    104

    Ruthven

    The Clan Ruthven is a Lowland Scottish clan. The family traces its descent from Thor, who settled in Scotland during the reign of David I of Scotland. Thor was, by tradition son of Sweyn the Viking chief, who was the founder of the Clan Ruthven. The name Ruthven comes from the lands north of Loch Rannoch in Perthshire. In Gaelic these lands are called Ruadhainn. This name may be further related to its Viking roots, since there is an island on an inland fiord in Norway, called 'Roedven' (inland from the town of "Molde). The island has a stave church from around 1200 and the area has long had links to Scotland. The name of the island derives from the main farm on the island and refers to a river outlet from a ravine or gorge. The local pronunciation of the name of the island approximates with the Scottish pronunciation of "Ruthven" ("Rivven"). In 1488, Sir William Ruthven, 1st Lord Ruthven was created Lord Ruthven by summons to Parliament. During the Anglo-Scottish Wars Sir William Ruthven, 1st Lord Ruthven's eldest son William was killed at the Battle of Flodden Field in 1513, and so the title passed to his grandson: William Ruthven, 2nd Lord Ruthven served as am Extraordinary Lord
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    105

    Clan Cochrane

    Clan Cochrane is a Lowland Scottish clan. Traditionally the original ancestor of the Clan Cochrane in Scotland was a Scandinavian Viking who settled in what is now known as Renfrewshire. It is evident that the name is of territorial origin and that the Cochranes took the name of the lands in the ancient Barony of Cochrane. The origin of the name itself is believed to be derived from two Gaelic words which jointly mean The Roar of the Battle or Battle Cry. The Cochranes do not appear on any written record until 1262 when the name of Waldenus de Coveran occurs on an ancient charter for a grant of land to Walter Stewart the Earl of Menteith. Other early bearers of the name are William de Coughran in 1296; and Robert de Cochrane in about 1360. In 1456 Robert Cochrane of Cochrane resigned the lands of Cochrane to his successor Allen Cochrane who received a charter from King James II of Scotland. Edward Cochrane was accused but cleared of having anything to do with the detention of King James III of Scotland at Edinburgh Castle in 1482. In 1556 William Cochrane, chief of Clan Cochrane obtained a charter of confirmation for the lands of Cochrane from Mary, Queen of Scots. In 1584 chief
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    106

    Clan Elliot

    Clan Eliott is a border Scottish clan. The Elliotts, with the Armstrongs, were the most troublesome of the great Scottish Border families in the Middle Ages. The principal family in the early days was the Elliots of Redheugh, who often held the captaincy of Hermitage Castle — still to be seen, squat and impregnable, on the moors south of Hawick. One of the Elliots of Redheugh, forefather of the Elliots of Arkleton, fell at Flodden (the beautiful lament for that disaster, The Flowers of the Forest, was written by Jane Elliot, sister of Sir Gilbert Elliot, first Baronet of Minto in the 18th century). The Elliots were one of the great riding clans of the western Scottish borders. There were different banches of the clan over time. But leadership resided initially with the Redheugh Ellots (Robert Ellot who fell at Flodden in 1513 had been their 12th chief). This clan built strong towers around their base in Liddesdale and held Hermitage castle south of Hawick at times as well. After the pacification of the Borders in the early 1600s, many Elliots were hanged, outlawed and banished, with a number heading to Ulster in the 1609 plantation. The Redheughs became Stobs and then Minto. The
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    107
    Clan MacLaine of Lochbuie

    Clan MacLaine of Lochbuie

    Clan Maclaine of Lochbuie is a Scottish Clan that inhabited lands on the southern end of the Isle of Mull in the Inner Hebrides of the western Scottish Highlands. "Maclaine" is an alternate spelling for "MacLean." Clan Maclaine of Lochbuie and Clan MacLean of Duart are two separate clans. However, since the two clans share a strong family connection, the Maclaines of Lochbuie are widely considered a "branch clan" of the much larger Clan MacLean. The 26th (and current) clan chief is Lorne Gillean Ian Maclaine of Lochbuie. The clan is recognized by both the Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs and the Lord Lyon. Clan Maclaine of Lochbuie is translated in Gaelic as Mac'ill-Eathain Locchabuide, but their history can be traced back farther than the Gaels to Tuscany in Italy. A Tuscan follower of William the Conqueror had a grandson named Maurice Fitzgerald, who moved to Ireland with the famous Earl of Surrey, known as "Strongbow." The Fitzgeralds of Ireland sent offshoots to Scotland in the thirteenth century. Two Fitzgerald cousins are said to have started both Clan MacLean and Clan Mackenzie, with the name MacLean being coined by Gillean-na-Taughe (Gillean of the Battle-Axe), a fierce
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    108
    Clan MacLea

    Clan MacLea

    The Clan MacLea is a Highland Scottish clan, which was traditionally located in the district of Lorn in Argyll, Scotland, and is seated on the Isle of Lismore. There is a tradition of some MacLeas Anglicising their names to Livingstone, thus the Clan Livingstone Society's website also refers to clan as the Highland Livingstones. The current chief of Clan MacLea was recognised by Lord Lyon as the "Coarb of Saint Moluag" and the "Hereditable Keeper of the Great Staff of Saint Moluag." There are conflicting theories of the etymology of MacLea, MacLay and similar surnames, and they could have multiple origins. The name may be an Anglicisation of Mac an Léigh (Scottish Gaelic), meaning son of the physician. The leading theory today, however, is that the name is derived from the patronymic Mac Dhunnshleibhe, meaning son of Donn Sléibhe (son of + the brown haired, or chieftain + of the mountain). In 1910 Niall Campbell, 10th Duke of Argyll maintained that the surname MacLea evolved from the name Maconlea, which was originally Mac Dhunnshleibhe. By the eighteenth century the standard form of the name had become MacLea or other forms with similar spellings (MacLeay, McClay, etc.). The
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    109
    Clan Munro

    Clan Munro

    Clan Munro ( listen (help·info)) is a Highland Scottish clan. The clan lands were on the north side of the Cromarty Firth and also contained the mountain Ben Wyvis and the Black Rock Gorge. Traditionally the Munros came from Ireland and settled in Scotland in the 11th century and fought as mercenary soldiers under the Earl of Ross who defeated Viking invaders in Ross-shire. The clan under chief Donald Munro, son of O'Ceann, were granted lands in Ross-shire and a seat at Foulis Castle as a reward for helping King Malcolm II of Scotland to defeat Viking invaders from Scandinavia. Traditionally, Donald Munro's grandson Hugh Munro was the first Munro recorded to be authentically designated Baron of Foulis; he died in 1126. A reliable scholar, Alexander Nisbet, stated that George Munro, 5th Baron of Foulis received a charter from the Earl of Sutherland during the reign of Alexander II of Scotland, but this charter cannot be traced. The clan name Munro, which in Gaelic is Rothach, Roich, or Mac an Rothaich, means Ro - Man or Man from Ro, and supports the traditional origin of the clan in the River Roe area in Ireland. However this tradition only exists in writing from the late 17th
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    110

    Clan Cathcart

    Clan Cathcart is a Lowland Scottish clan. As well as being a surname Cathcart is a Scottish town just south of Glasgow. There is some speculation as to the origin of the name Cathcart. Some believe it is ancient Celtic meaning, "Fort on the River Cart", as that river flows right past the ancient castle. Others believe it means, "The straight or confined part of the Cart River". Be that as it may, the name is ancient, but originally spelled Kerkert or Kethkert, probably because of pronunciation. The Peerage refers to the Clan Cathcart. The first known mention of the Kethcarts, is a man named Rainaldus de Kethcart, who witnessed a charter by Walter Fitzalan to the Church of Kethcart for the monastery of Paisley in 1178. Notable Cathcarts include Sir Alan Cathcart, who was a companion of King Robert I when he mounted the Scottish throne in 1307, and was engaged on his side at the Battle of Loudoun Hill that same year, when the Scots defeated the English. The following year, he was made one of Edward Bruce's party of 50 horsemen who attacked and dispersed 1,500 cavalry under John de St. John in Galloway. The Peerage quotes John Barbour's description of Sir Alan's bravery and good humor
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    111
    Clan Douglas

    Clan Douglas

    Clan Douglas is an ancient Scottish kindred from the Scottish Lowlands taking its name from Douglas, South Lanarkshire, and thence spreading through the Scottish Borderland, Angus, Lothian and beyond. The clan does not currently have a chief, therefore it is considered an armigerous clan. The Douglases were once the most powerful family in Scotland. The powerful Douglas chiefs held the titles of the Earl of Douglas (Black Douglas), Earl of Angus (Red Douglas) and at one point the Earl of Morton. Many Douglases married into Scottish and other European royal and noble houses, thereby ensuring Douglas power within Scotland, as a result of their accumulated wealth. The family's original seat was Douglas Castle in Lanarkshire, but they spread to many properties throughout Scotland. There are many Douglases buried throughout the world, such as the Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés in Paris, Vreta Abbey in Östergötland, and at Melrose Abbey. Perhaps most notable of all is at St Bride's Kirk in Douglas. Dedicated to St Bride, the patron saint of the Douglas, it holds the mausolea of many distinguished Douglases, including that of the Good Sir James Douglas. According to tradition, the
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    112
    Clan Dundas

    Clan Dundas

    Clan Dundas (English pronunciation: /ˌdʌnˈdæs/) is a Scottish clan. It is one of Scotland's historically most important families and once widely regarded as one of the most noble families in the British Empire. The words ‘dùn deas’ in Scottish Gaelic mean ‘south fort’. The Dundas family occupied lands on the southern shores of the Firth of Forth. The family is believed to descend from Helias, a son of Hutred, who was a younger son of Gospatrick, Prince of Northumberland. Also the Clan Dunbar and the Clan Moncreiffe descend from this stock. Records from the reign of William I, King of Scots mention Serle de Dundas. Both Serle and a man named Robert de Dundas signed Edward I’s Ragman Roll. However, Sir Hugh Dundas fought together with William Wallace. During the Wars of Scottish Independence, the family fought alongside William Wallace against the English and later alongside King Robert I of Scotland. Sir George Dundas was on the committee that tried the Marquess of Montrose and one of the eight lairds who fought together with Robert the Bruce, and he was killed at the Battle of Dupplin Moor in 1332. James Dundas built Dundas Castle in 1424. Sir James Dundas was Governor of Berwick
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    113
    Clan MacMillan

    Clan MacMillan

    Clan MacMillan is a Highland Scottish clan. The MacMillans are one of a number of clans - including the MacKinnons, the MacQuarries, and the MacPhees - descended from Airbertach, a Hebridean prince of the old royal house of Moray who according to one account was the great-grandson of King Macbeth. The kin of Airbertach were closely associated with the Clann Somerhairle Ri Innse Gall ("Kings of the Hebrides"), the ancestors of the MacDougalls and the MacDonald "Lords of the Isles"; and like their allies their interests in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries ranged throughout the Hebrides and the western coastal regions of the Scottish mainland, and into Ireland. Though most of the clans certainly descended from Airbertach were associated with the Inner Hebrides (Tiree, Iona, Mull, Ulva and Colonsay) some others claiming the same descent were later settled inland along the strategic corridor that connects Lorn - the mainland region opposite those islands - to Dunkeld in Perthshire, where Airbertach's son Cormac was Bishop in the early twelfth century Celtic Church. Tradition connects the MacMillans with a number of different places in the areas associated with Airbertach's kindred:
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    114

    Clan Carnegie

    Clan Carnegie is a Lowland Scottish clan The Carnegies took their name from the area around Carmyllie, Angus. The family who adopted this name however, were originally known under an earlier adopted placename of Balinhard which is also in Angus. The Balinhards can be found in records from 1230. In 1358 John of Balinhard was granted the lands and barony of Carnegie by Walter de Maule. He became John the 1st of Carnegie and lived until 1370. John Carnegie of that Ilk was his successor and a direct family line ran from him until 1530. It was in 1409 that Duthac of Carnegie acquired part of the lands of Kinnaird and an important Carnegie line developed in this area. In the 16th century during the Anglo Scottish Wars with England the Clan Chief John Carnegie of Kinnaird led the clan against the English at the Battle of Flodden Field in 1513 where he was slain. The son of John Carnegie was called Robert who fought against the English at the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh in 1547 where he was captured and taken prisoner. When Robert was released he was knighted and made Scotland's ambassador to France in 1556. Robert was also the first of the Carnegies to claim that his ancestors were the cup
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    115

    Clan Kincaid

    Clan Kincaid is a modern Scottish clan. The Kincaid surname is of territorial origin being taken from the former lands of Kincaid in the Parish of Campsie, Stirlingshire, Scotland. The lands are located just north of Kirkintilloch, in the north-west angle formed by the River Kelvin and its tributary the Glazert. The topography of the area is hilly, being on the northern edges of the Scottish Lowlands. Prominent hills in the area are called the Campsie Fells. The nearest city of some size is Glasgow. It had been thought that the placename is Gaelic in origin with suggested meanings of ceann càidhe, meaning "at the head of the quagmire", ceann cadha, meaning "at the head of the pass," and ceann cath meaning "head of the battle." However, it is now believed that the placename is P Celtic in origin. It may have originally been Neo-Brittonic Pen ced. In 1238/9, it appeared in Latin charters in 1238/9 as Kyncaith and soon thereafter took on one of its current form. The origins of the family is obscure. Kincaids were in Scotland at the time of the Wars of Scottish Independence. In a 1646 birth brieve in the Register of the Great Seal of Scotland, it is recorded that the head of the
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    116
    Clan Arbuthnott

    Clan Arbuthnott

    Clan Arbuthnott is a Scottish clan or family from the area of Kincardineshire in the lowland northeast of Scotland. From the place name Aberbothenoth, which lies on a narrow peninsula on the north side of the river Bervie. On the north east side the land falls steeply down to the burn, once called Buthenot, and on the south side it slopes more gradually down to the river Bervie. "Aber" means the influx of a small stream into a greater stream. "Aber" can also mean "mouth of" as in Aberdeen. "Both" or "Bothena" is a baronial residence. "Nethea" has been described as the stream that descends or is lower than something else in the neighbourhood. The lands of Arbuthnott are believed to have come into the possession of the Swinton family during the reign of William I of Scotland through the marriage of Hugh, to the daughter of Osbert Olifard (or Oliphant) 'The Crusader'. The first recorded instance of the family acquiring the name Arbuthnott is in 1355 with Philip de Arbuthnott described as 'of that ilk'. Murder of John Melville of Glenbervie Around 1420 Philip's son, Hugh, was implicated in the murder of John Melville of Glenbervie, sheriff of Kincardineshire (The Mearns). Melville was
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    117

    Clan Elphinstone

    Clan Elphinstone is a Lowland Scottish clan The Clan Elphinstone is believed to have originated from Airth in Stirlingshire. The surname Elphinstone derives from the territory of Elphinstone in the parish of Tranent, East Lothian. The original name is thought to have been 'de Erth', which later became 'Elfinstun', and finally 'Elphinstone'. The de Erths inherited lands near Tranent through marriage and built a castle there. Deeds dating from 1235 bear the name ‘de Elfinstun’, and grants dating from 1250 record the name John de Elphinstone as a witness. Sir John Elfinstun married Margaret Seton of Clan Seton, the niece of King Robert I of Scotland. Some people believe that John de Elphinstone was previously named John de Swinton of Clan Swinton. Supporters of this theory claim that Clan Elphinstone, in common with many Borders clans, was founded from the Swinton Family. A descendant, William Elphinstone, became rector of Kirkmichael at the age of twenty-five. He studied Civil and Canon Law in Paris, eventually becoming Professor of Law in that university. In 1484 he was appointed Bishop of Aberdeen and later Lord Chancellor of Scotland, a post he held until the death of King James
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    118
    Clan MacThomas

    Clan MacThomas

    Clan MacThomas is a Highland Scottish clan from the Glens of Eastern Perthshire. The clan takes its name from Thomaidh Mor (Big Tommy), who was the great-grandson of the William Mackintosh, 8th chief of the Clan Chattan. The seat of the Clan MacThomas was at Finegand (Scottish Gaelic: Feith nan Ceann, meaning "burn of the heads") in Glenshee. Tomaidh Mor lived in the 15th Century in the Badenoch Region of Scotland, south of Inverness. It was an inhospitable place and with the Clan Chattan becoming large and unmanageable (and not being heir to the Chattan Chiefship) Tomaidh Mor took his family and followers in an easterly direction across the Grampian Mountains before settling in Glenshee. There they flourished becoming an independent Clan in their own right, albeit retaining close ties with the Clan Chattan Confederation for defence reasons. The 4th Chief, Robert MacThomaidh, lived at the Thom in Upper Glenshee. In 1587, the Clan MacThomas was mentioned in the Acts of the (Scottish) Parliament as one of the " Clannis that the Capitannes,Cheffis and Chiftanes quhom on they depend". Robert was killed by a band of highland marauders at the end of the 16C and as he only had a daughter,
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    119

    Clan Maitland

    Clan Maitland is a Lowland Scottish clan The name Maitland is of Norman origin and was originally spelt Mautalent, Matulant or Matalan, it translates as "evil genius". The Mautalents come from the village of Les Moitiers d'Allonne near Carteret in Normandy. The name is found to occur frequently in Northumberland during the 12th and 13th centuries. The first time it is found in Scotland was Thomas de Matulant who was of Anglo-Norman origin. He was the ancestor to this noble family in Lauderdale. Thomas flourished in the reign of William the Lion and died in 1288. During the reign of King Alexander III of Scotland, Thomas's grandson, Sir Richard Matulant was one of the most powerful Lowland magnates, owning the lands of Thirlestane, Blythe, Tollus and Hedderwick. Sir Richard Matulant's son joined King Robert the Bruce on his ascension to the crown. He supported the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, however he died in 1315. Sir Richard Maitland whose distinguished exploits during the Wars of Independence earned him a place in Gavin Douglas's The Palis of Honour. Two of his sons died when the Clan Maitland fought at the Battle of Durham also known as the Battle of Neville's
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    120
    Clan Nesbitt

    Clan Nesbitt

    Clan Nesbitt (or Clan Nisbet) is a Scottish clan recognised by the Lord Lyon King of Arms and first mentioned in a Scottish charter of 1139. It is a lowland family centred in Berwickshire, East Lothian, Edinburgh and Ayrshire, with a significant historical presence in Northumberland and Durham. The clan has a chief, Mark Nesbitt of that Ilk, and active clan associations in the British Isles, North America and Australasia. The surname of the Berwickshire line derives from the hamlets of East Nisbet and West Nisbet, Berwickshire. Interestingly, until the 16th century, the lands are most often spelt Nesbit, which has a claim to be the original spelling. Some bearers of Nisbet/Nesbitt (and variant) names may originate from the village of Nisbet in Roxburghshire. The lowland family of Nesbitt or Nisbet has its roots in the county of Berwickshire, in the Scottish Borders. Like the families of Home and Swinton, its descent can be traced from Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria (d. 1073). In 1139 King David I confirmed a charter (now in the archives of Durham Cathedral) granting the lands of Nisbet to Aldan de Nisbet, the founder of the line of Nisbet of Nisbet (i.e. Nisbet of that Ilk). In the
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    121

    Clan Primrose

    Clan Primrose is a Lowland Scottish clan. This name Primrose is taken from the lands of Primrose in the parish of Dunfermline, in Scotland. It has been suggested that it originally came from the old British, "prenn rhos": meaning "tree of the moor". The Primroses were well settled in Fife by the fifteenth century, particularly around the Abbey of Culross. Henry Primrose, who was believed to be born sometime prior to 1490, had four sons and one daughter. Gilbert,his grandson, was one of the Ministers of the reformed church at Bordeaux,and afterwards of the French church in London. He was appointed Chaplain to King James VI of Scotland and Charles I, and became Dean of Windsor in 1628. During the Civil War the Clan Primrose were Royalists. Archibald Primrose rallied to the banner of James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose. They joined him after his victory at the Battle of Kilsyth. Archibald Primrose was the king's lieutenant at the Battle of Philiphaugh, where he was captured when the royal army was surprised by a strong force of cavalry. He was tried and found guilty of treason, and although his life was spared on the orders of Argyll, he was held in prison until Montrose was
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    122
    Clan Forbes

    Clan Forbes

    Clan Forbes is a Lowland Scottish clan from Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The name Forbes is most probably a location name assumed from the lands of Forbes in Aberdeenshire, in possession of this family reputedly since the time of King William the Lion. While there are many legends surrounding the origins of this clan the first person on record was Duncan Forbes who in 1271-2 received a grant of lands from Alexander III of Scotland. Cited by William Forbes Skene the charter exists in the Forbes charter chest in tattered but quite legible condition. The next mention is a John Forbes, whose name dates from a 1306 roll containing a list of demands by English and Scottish loyalists to Edward I of England for the forfeited lands of Scotsmen, the lands of John Forbes being demanded or requested by both a William Comyn and a Robert Chival. The next name may be that of his son, Chritian, who received a grant of one-third of the lands of Skeith and Ardach by King Robert the Bruce in 1326, but doubt still remains he was a Forbes or of this family, even though in the charter he is named Christian Forbes. The next name found in records is that of John Forbes dominus ejusdem or Lord of Forbes. He he
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    123
    Clan Kerr

    Clan Kerr

    Clan Kerr (/kɛr/) is a Scottish clan whose origins lie in the Scottish Borders. During the Middle Ages it was one of the prominent border reiver clans along the present-day Anglo-Scottish border and has played an important role in the history of the Border country of Scotland. The origins of the name Kerr are disputed as being either: The great Clan Kerr/Carr is well remembered in Scotland as one of the most loyal but warlike Clans of the turbulent Border territories. They are by tradition believed to be of Anglo-Norman origin. Ralph Kerr and John Kerr settled in Jedburgh in the 14th century and the clan is said to descend from them. The chiefs who were the Kerrs of Ferinhurst were descended from the older brother Ralph, while the cadet branch, the Kerrs of Cessford were descended from the younger brother John. Asked how to say his name, Admiral Mark Kerr told The Literary Digest "In Scotland the name rhymes with care. Since many of the family have come to England the pronunciation in this country rhymes with car, which we have entirely submitted to". The two main branches of the Clan Kerr, the Kerrs of Ferinhurst and the Kerrs of Cessford often feuded with each other. However both
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    124
    Clan MacAulay

    Clan MacAulay

    • Tartans: MacAulay or Comyn/Cumming Tartan
    • Associated Region: Dunbartonshire
    • Associated Titles: Chief of Clan MacAulay
    Clan MacAulay is a Scottish clan. The clan was historically centred around the lands of Ardincaple, which are today consumed by the little village of Rhu and burgh of Helensburgh in Argyll and Bute. The MacAulays of Ardincaple were located mainly in the traditional county of Dunbartonshire, which straddles the "Highland Line" between the Scottish Highlands and Lowlands. Clan MacAulay has been considered a "Highland clan" by writers and has been linked by various historians to the original Earls of Lennox and in later times to Clan Gregor. The MacAulays of Ardincaple, like Clan Gregor and several other clans, have traditionally been considered one of the seven clans which make up Siol Alpin. This group of clans were said to have claimed descent from Cináed mac Ailpín, King of the Picts, from whom later kings of Scotland traced their descent. The chiefs of Clan MacAulay were styled Laird of Ardincaple. Clan MacAulay dates, with certainty, to the 16th century. The clan was engaged in several feuds with neighbouring clans. However, the clan's fortunes declined in the 17th and 18th centuries. After the decline and fall of Clan MacAulay, which ended with the death of Aulay MacAulay in
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    125

    Clan Macdowall

    Clan Macdowall is a Scottish clan. The clan claims to descend from the senior descendants in the male line of the princely house of Fergus, first of the ancient Lords of Galloway. The main branches of the family include the MacDowalls of Garthland, the Makdougals of Makerston, the MacDoualls of Logan, the MacDoualls of Freugh, and the MacDowalls of Machrimore. The name MacDowall is a name connected with the ancient history of Galloway, a district in the south west of Scotland which took its name from the Gall-Gaidhel settlers of the seventh and eighth centuries. The area was settled by the Scoti or Irish Gaels during the invasions of the fourth century (Scotus was the Roman word for Irishman) pushing the native Picts further East. The area was then settled by Norwegian Vikings in the seventh century who merged with the Irish Gaelic Clans. Many legends exist in Galloway including the legend that Dovall of Galloway killed Nothatus the Tyrant in 230 BC. It is also said that the Royal House of Galloway resisted the Romans. The name MacDowall is generally accepted to mean "Son of Dougal" due to the transliteration of the "ug" in Dougall to "w" in Dowall, introduced under Edward I of
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    126

    Clan Scrymgeour

    The name Scrymgeour is believed to derive from the Old English word 'skrymsher' which means 'swordsman'. The clan appears to have been well established in Fife long before their connection with the city of Dundee where the chiefs of the clan would later become the Earls of Dundee and the hereditary royal standard bearers. According to the herald, Sir Iain Moncreiffe the Scrymgeours are probably descendants of the great MacDuff Earl of Fife and that they may have claimed their office as standard bearer from their early Celtic origins. It was customary for Celtic armies to be accompanied by sacred holy relics usually borne by a hereditary keeper. It is believed that the Scrymgeours may have carried the pastoral staff of St Columba which was later replaced by a consecrated heraldic banner. In 1107 Sir Alexander Carron, nicknamed Schyrmeschur ("The Swordsman") for his deeds against the northern rebels, was granted the arms and name of Schyrmeschur by King Alexander I. He was also granted the office of Hereditary Royal Standard-Bearer of Scotland. This gave him the right to bear the Royal Standard in front of the monarch in procession or before the Army of Scotland in times of war. In
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    Clan Swinton

    Clan Swinton

    Clan Swinton is a Lowland Scottish clan and founder of Clan Gordon, Clan Elphinstone, Clan Arbuthnott, Clan Nisbet and the Greystoke Family. The Swinton family are widely acknowledged as being one of the oldest landed families in Britain. They are the direct descendants of the Anglo-Saxon royal House of Bamburgh, Kings of Northumbria from 547 to 867 AD. This family later became Lords of Bamburgh and Earls of Northumbria. It was Eadulf Rus of Bamburgh who was first granted the Barony of Swinton around 1060 by his cousin King Malcolm III of Scotland, as reward for the military support he had given the King.This grant was echoed by a charter from King Edgar, son of King Malcolm, to Liulf of Bamburgh at Coldingham Priory in 1098 for the village of Swinewood. His grandson, Ernulf, is thought to be the first example of a Scottish Knight. Later, Edulph de Swinton received a charter, one of the first recorded in Scotland, confirming his property at Swinton from David I around 1140. Sir Alan de Swinton, 6th of Swinton, then obtained a charter from Bertram, Prior of Coldingham for the Barony of Swinton during the reign of King William the Lion. The tomb in Swinton Church is believed to be
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    128

    Clan Trotter

    Clan Trotter is a Lowland Scottish clan. Several distinguished families of this name include the Trotters of Charterhall, of Catchelraw, of Prentannan and of Mortonhall. The name of Trotter is said to derive from the French, ‘trotier’, a ‘runner’ or ‘messenger’. One legend says that this name was given to a brother of Lord Gifford for delivering a message to King James III of Scotland with great speed. The Borders clan bearing this name was headed by the Trotters of Prentannan in Berwickshire, who followed the Clan Home on their many forays across the border. The name Trotter Trottman, or Trottier are also found to be of English descent. As an occupational name, 'the trotter' i.e. a messenger, one who trotted back and forth with messages. This name is found in many ancient manuscripts of England from the 16th century onwards. These may have been Trotters who left Scotland and settled in England. The name is also common in Northumberland and Durham. The Trotters of Mortonhall, which lies on the outskirts of Edinburgh, claim to have held their lands as far back as the reign of King Robert II of Scotland. William Trotter of Catchelraw was one of the knights charged with keeping the
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    129

    Clan Anstruther

    Clan Anstruther is a Scottish clan from Anstruther in Fife, in the east of Scotland. From the town of Anstruther, which was adopted as a familial name. Alexander I of Scotland granted the lands of Anstruther to William de Candela in the early 12th century. There are a number of suggested origins for William but research points to the Normans in Italy. It is known that William I of England sought assistance from William, Count of Candela, who sent his son. It is likely that this son was William de Candela, who received the grant of land from Alexander. William de Candela's son, also William, was a benefactor to the monks of Balmerino Abbey. The site now occupied by the Scottish Fisheries Museum in Anstruther was a gift from William. The next generation of the family, Henry, no longer styled himself, de Candela, being described as 'Henricus de Aynstrother dominus ejusdem' in a charter confirming grants of land to Balmerino Abbey. Henry Anstruther accompanied Lois IX to the crusades and swore fealty to King Edward I of England in 1292 and again in 1296. In 1483, Andrew Anstruther of Anstruther confirmed the right to a barony and fought against the English at the Battle of Flodden
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    Clan Grierson

    The 'name' Grierson originates from the Scottish lowlands. The ancient seat of the Griersons' is Lag, where Lag Tower was built in 1460 A.D. by Vedast Grierson. There was a Baronetcy, in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia, held by the Grierson of Lag family from 1685 A.D. until 2008 A.D. with the death of Sir Michael John Bewes Grierson, 12th Baronet of Lag. The surname Grierson is a modern spelling of the medieval (circa 1408) surname Grerson. Ancestry.com states that it is a patronymic form of the medieval Scottish personal name Grier which is a form of the personal name Gregory, but provides no source for this. The principal seat of the Grierson family was Lag, which was obtained in about 1408. George Dunbar, Earl of March resigned the lands of Dalgarnock in Dumfriesshire to Gilbert Grierson of Lag sometime before 1418. The earliest known family tree produced by James Campbell Gracie, (aka the "Gracie Tree" held in the Ewart Library, Dumfries), claimed a descent of the family of Lag from Malcolm II of Scotland. The current Chief of the Name and Arms of the Grierson family, and a member of the Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs is Madam Sarah Grierson of Lag, the first female to hold
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    131

    Clan Makgill

    Clan Makgill is a Lowland Scottish clan. For some time people have quoted Dr. George F. Black's The Surnames of Scotland ( Edinburgh: Birlinn, 1999, first published by the New York Public Library, 1946). He said that MacGill was a name that meant "son of the stranger," rendered in Gaelic as "mac an ghòill." The McGills were not Highlanders, but rather a Lowland clan and family. Thus they were not living in the Gaelic circle in Argyll and the Isles for very long. The McGills descend from Gilli, a Gael who held sway in the Western Isles for his Viking inlaws 1000 years ago. Thus "MacGill," etc., son of Gilli. Since early spelling was not standardized, there are many spellings of the name in the records. Not one appears in this Gaelic form"mac an ghòill" in documents found so far. There would have to be a person or a family line early on with this spelling. Some of the ways of spelling the name found by Mr. J. M. McGill (1899–1975), a family historian, of Edinburgh, Scotland (private manuscript), are: MAKGILL (the clan name), McGill, MacGill, Magill, M'Gill, MacGilli, MacGyle, MacGyll, MacGeil, Micghell,Miggill, McGile, Miggel, Miggill, Megil, Mygghil, Kigghil, MacGhil, MacGall,
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    132
    Clan Montgomery

    Clan Montgomery

    Clan Montgomery is a Lowland Scottish clan. Clan Montgomery originated in Wales, and emigrated to Scotland in the 12th century as vassals of the FitzAlans. The family derives its surname from lands in Wales, likely from the Honour of Montgomery which was located near the Shropshire lands of the FitzAlans. There is no evidence of any familial connection between Clan Montgomery and the family of the Earls of Shrewsbury, who derived their own surname from lands in Calvados, Normandy. The earliest member of the clan in Scotland was Robert of Montgomery, and the earliest possessions of the clan (in Scotland) was Eaglesham, in Renfrewshire. Members of the clan are recorded in the late 13th century Ragman Rolls, but it is not until the 14th century when the family rose in prominence, through a dynastic marriage with the Eglington family. Through this marriage the clan acquired the Eglington estates; the clan also acquired the lands of the Ardrossan family (which was possibly a branch of the Barclay family). A descendant of Robert was Sir John Montgomery who led the Clan Montgomery at the Battle of Otterburn in 1388 where the English were defeated. He was one of the heroes of the day as he
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    133
    Clan Napier

    Clan Napier

    Clan Napier is a Scottish clan originally from lands around Loch Lomond, but with presence in Stirlingshire, Edinburgh, Aberdeenshire and Kincardineshire. There is some debate about the origin of the name Napier. One theory holds that a “naperer” is "a person in charge of table linen in a royal or manor house” and that the original Napiers must have been “naperers” from England or France. The other theory is that the name Napier is a derivative spelling of “Nae Peer.” In 1625, Sir Archibald Napier of Merchiston, the first Lord Napier, presented an affidavit to the College of Heralds, in which he described this origin of the name Napier, as having been bestowed by the king (probably Alexander II) on one Donald Lennox in recognition for acts of bravery. He states: The earliest reference to Napiers in Scotland is in the charter of Malcolm, Earl of Lennox, granting lands at Kilmahew in Dumbartonshire to John de Naper, sometime around 1290. During the Wars of Scottish Independence this John Napier was probably one of the few defenders of Stirling Castle during the Siege of Stirling Castle who were forced to surrender to the English led by King Edward I of England in 1304. Another branch
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    134
    Clan Ramsay

    Clan Ramsay

    Clan Ramsay is a Lowland Scottish clan of Anglo-Norman origin. The clan can be traced to the 12th century in Scotland. A ram in the sea is said to have been an emblem on the seal of Ramsay Abbey in Huntingdon in the 11th century. When David, Earl of Huntingdon, travelled north to claim the throne of Scotland in 1124, he was accompanied by many young Norman noblemen keen to share in their overlord's heritage. These may have included Sir Symon de Ramesie (Sir Simon of Ramsey) who received a grant of land in Midlothian from David and who witnessed important charters, including one to the monks of Holyrood in 1140. Actually the Ramsays of Nordic countries have another explanation to the origin of "Ramsay". In the Icelandic language and in Old Norse (hraems-ay) Rams-ay means ravens island. This means that the black bird in Ramsay arms comes from a raven. If we look at an old coat of arms from the 13th century (Adam Ramsay 1290) the "eagle" looks more like a "raven". The origin of Ramsays may be Viking from "Ravens Island" who settled in Normandy. In a Ramsay chronicle by Anders Ramsay (Finland) mentions that one Ramsay participated in the First Crusade to Jerusalem. At that time many
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    135

    Clan Wedderburn

    Clan Wedderburn is a Lowland Scottish clan. The first person by the name of Wedderburn to appear on record in Scotland is Wautier de Wederburn, who rendered homage to King Edward I of England on the Ragman Rolls in 1296. The lands of the Clan Wederburn lay in Berwickshire. References can also be found to John de Wedderburn living in 1364, and William de Wedderburn living between 1426 and 1452. However, the lands of Clan Wedderburn passed at an early date to the head family of Clan Home. Later the Wedderburn family seems to have settled in Forfarshire. By the year 1400, four distinct yet closely related Wedderburn families could be found in Dundee and at Kingennie in Forfar. One of the Dundee families was that of James Wedderburn, whose three sons, James, John and Robert, were among the earliest Scottish Protestant reformers. They united to round the famous Guide and Godlie Ballads, otherwise known as the Wedderburn Psalms. From the eldest of these brothers descended James Wedderburn, Bishop of Dunblane in 1636, who, as the friend of Archbishop Laud and those responsible for introducing a new liturgy to the Church, was driven from Scotland in 1638. He retired to Canterbury, where he
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    136
    Clan Barclay

    Clan Barclay

    Clan Barclay ( listen (help·info)) is a Lowland Scottish clan. Since the eighteenth century, Barclay historians, noted for their low level in medieval scholarship, have assumed the Scottish family Barclay (de Berchelai) is a branch of one of the Anglo-Norman Berkeley family of Berkeley in Gloucestershire. However, the link between the Scottish and English families is disputed. An old family tradition is that the Scottish family is descended from John de Berkeley, who was the son of Roger de Berkeley, provost of Berkeley, and went to Scotland in 1069 with St Margaret. Another theory is that the clan is descended from a John de Berkeley who went north in 1124 with Maud, queen of David I. Another theory of the Barclay origin, put forth by the historian G. W. S. Barrow, points to the small village of Berkley in Somerset (in 1086 Berchelei). In 1086 the overlordship of Berkley belonged to Robert Arundel, whose main tenant was a Robert. Arundel's manors included Cary Fitzpaine (in Charlton Mackerell), near Castle Cary. And Cary Fitzpaine seems to have been held by the tenant Robert as well. At the same time as Henry Lovel of Castle Cary first appears in Scotland, there appear the names
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    Clan Bruce

    Clan Bruce

    • Associated Region: Kincardine
    • Associated Titles: Earl of Kincardine
    Clan Bruce (Scottish Gaelic: Clann Brus) is a Scottish clan from Kincardine in Scotland. It was a Royal House in the 14th century, producing two kings of Scotland. The surname Bruce comes from the French de Brus or de Bruis, derived from the lands now called Brix, situated between Cherbourg and Valognes in Normandy, France. The first of this family on record, in Great Britain, was Robert de Brus, 1st Lord of Annandale who came to England with King Henry I after his victory at Tinchebray in 1106. He was given 80 manors in Yorkshire, and later 13 manors around Skelton. He received the Lordship of Annandale from King David I of Scotland shortly after his accession in 1124. Robert founded a priory at Gysburn. Both the English and Scots lines descend from this Robert. It has long been written that the ancestor of the family was Robert de Brus, a knight of Normandy who came to England with William the Conqueror. But this was an invention taken from totally unreliable medieval lists of those who fought at Hastings. Soon after the accession of David I of Scotland to the throne, Robert visited the monarch and obtained from him the lordship of Annandale. Robert de Brus (known as Robert le
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    138

    Clan Burnett

    Clan Burnett, also referred to as the House of Burnett, is a Lowland Scottish family. There is still debate over the origin of the name Burnett. The Saxon Burford family held lands in Bedfordshire prior to 1066. This name derives from the Saxon 'beornheard' meaning 'bear hand' often translated as 'brave warrior'. Alternatively, it has been suggested that the name derives from Burnet, a French name recorded in France prior to William the Conqueror invading England. The de Bernard family first came to Scotland, settling in Roxburghshire, when David I of Scotland returned from England. During the Wars of Scottish Independence Alexander Burnard was a supporter of Robert the Bruce, and following the Battle of Bannockburn was rewarded with a grant of land in the Forest of Drum. Burnard was presented with an ivory horn in 1323 as a symbol of the barony and title of Forester of the Forest of Drum. The horn remains on display at Crathes Castle. Throughout the 15th century the family gained a reputation as a benefactor of the church by granting lands and other gifts. However, the relationship between the family and church was not free from dispute. Burnett and the Laird of Drum disputed a
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    139
    Clan Darroch

    Clan Darroch

    Clan Darroch is a Lowland Scottish clan. They were islanders who lived on the Isle of Islay and the Isle of Jura under MacDonald, Lord of the Isles. There are several origins for the surname Darroch in Scotland. In some cases it is an Anglicised form of the Irish Ó Dhubhdarach and Mac Dhubhdarach, which mean "descendant of Dubhdarach" and "son of Dubhdarach". The personal name Dubhdarach means "black one of the oak tree". The surname borne by the earliest Darrochs on record, however, is thought to have originated as a habitational name, derived from Darroch, located near Falkirk, in Stirlingshire, Scotland. There is a tradition in the West Highlands that the surname borne there is derived from the Gaelic Dath riabhach, which is said to be a short form of Mac 'Ille riabhach; although etymologist George Fraser Black thought such a derivation doubtful. The present line of chiefs, recognised as such by the Lord Lyon King of Arms since the late 18th century, claimed to descend from a "McIlliriech" from Jura. John Darroch was baille of Stirling in 1406. John Darach de Cruce is mentioned in 1445 and may be the same person as John Darraugh who was the commissioner to Parliament for the
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    140
    Clan Donald

    Clan Donald

    • Tartans: MacDonald of the Isles Tartan
    • Associated Region: Western Isles
    • Associated Titles: Lord Macdonald
    Clan Donald is one of the largest Scottish clans. There are numerous branches to the clan. Several of these have chiefs recognised by the Lord Lyon King of Arms; these are: Clan Macdonald of Sleat, Clan Macdonald of Clanranald, Clan MacDonell of Glengarry, Clan MacDonald of Keppoch, and Clan MacAlister. Notable branches without chiefs so-recognised are: the MacDonalds of Dunnyveg, MacDonalds of Lochalsh, the MacDonalds of Glencoe, and the MacDonalds of Ardnamurchan. The MacDonnells of Antrim are related but do not belong to the Scottish associations and have a chief officially recognised in Ireland. The Norse-Gaelic Clan Donald traces its descent from Dòmhnall Mac Raghnuill (d. circa 1250), whose father Reginald or Ranald was styled "King of the Isles" and "Lord of Argyll and Kintyre". Ranald's father, Somerled was styled "King of the Hebrides", and was killed campaigning against Malcolm IV of Scotland at the Battle of Renfrew in 1164. Clan Donald shares a descent from Somerled with Clan MacDougall, who trace their lineage from his elder son, Dugall mac Somhairle. Their dynasties are together commonly referred to as the Clann Somhairle. Furthermore they are descended maternally
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    Clan Forsyth

    Clan Forsyth

    Clan Forsyth (Scottish Gaelic: Clann Fearsithe) is one of Scotland's wealthiest clans. The name Forsyth (sometimes spelled Forsythe, with an "e") derives from the Gaelic 'man of peace'. Members of the clan can now be found all over the United Kingdom, in Canada, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, U.S.A, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, in fact there are now more Forsyths living in the Scottish Diaspora than those remaining in Scotland. In early history the Forsyths of Scotland were a royal Scandinavian family that bore the Griffin as their symbol. Thus the ancient history of the Forsyths can not only be traced through the Clan's name, but also its symbol - the Griffin Sergeant. An alternative history is that the Forsyths were much later arrivals in the British Isles, arriving only in 1236. This tradition places the Forsyths as the descendants of Forsach, one of the Norsemen who settled on lands on the River Dordogne in Aquitaine. From here the Viscomte de Fronsoc accompanied Eleanor of Provence to London to marry Henry III and lived at the English court from 1236 to 1246. It is believed that his family obtained lands in Northumberland, and thence to the Borders of Scotland. The
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    142

    Clan Haldane

    Clan Haldane is a Lowland Scottish clan. [The following text is copied verbatim from The Haldanes of Gleneagles, General Sir J. Aylmer L. Haldane, 1929, William Blackwood & Sons, Ltd., London and Edinburgh, which book is in the Public Domain since 2004. While this text may appear on some message boards, it is NOT a copyright violation. Contact John Haldane for more information.] Historians and genealogists have ascribed various origins to the family Haldane. Sir James Dalrymple, Nisbet, and others have suggested its descent from a Danish chief called Haldanus, or from an Anglo-Norman, Brien by name, whose son Bernard came to Scotland during the reign of King William the Lion (1165-1214), and was given by him a manor on the Border. The legend of Danish descent, which probably arose from the resemblance of the family name to that of this chief, is not borne out by the Kelso charters. In one of these, which is dated between 1165 and 1171, Bernard son of Brien is recorded, with some circumlocution, as granting to the monks of Kelso Abbey a carucate of land, ' which they have in the town of Hauden, and which they had before I came to Hauden in perpetual alms by the same boun¬daries by
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    143
    Clan Hannay

    Clan Hannay

    Clan Hannay is a Lowland Scottish clan. Although the modern surname Hannay is likely derived from the place name Hannethe, the precise identity of the place is unknown. The family can be traced back to Galloway in South-West Scotland. The name 'Gillbert de Hannethe' appears on the Ragman Rolls of 1296, submitting to King Edward I of England. The Hannay's lands of Sorbie in Wigtownshire were reportedly acquired by the same Gillbert de Hannethe. Unlike many Scottish nobles and clans the Clan Hannay did not support Robert the Bruce but instead supported John Balliol because he was more local to them. In 1488 the Clan Hannay fought at the Battle of Sauchieburn. Later in 1513 the Clan Hannay fought at the Battle of Flodden Field which was part of the Anglo-Scottish Wars. In 1532 Patrick Hannay was acquitted of the murder of Patrick McClellen as he had killed him in self defense. James Hannay, the Master Gunner in the reign of James V led the clan at the Battle of Solway Moss in 1542 and the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh in 1547 which were part of the Anglo-Scottish Wars. The family began to spread and a tower built at Sorbie in 1550 which commanded views their ever increasing
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    Clan Irvine

    Clan Irvine

    Clan Irvine is a Lowland Scottish clan. As a surname Irvine is of territorial origins from one of two places of the same name. Firstly from Irving, an old parish in Dumfriesshire and from Irvine in Ayrshire. The first person recorded of the name was Robert de Herwine who was witness to a charter in 1226. William de Irwyne, Clerk of the Register, obtained the Forest of Drum in Aberdeenshire from King Robert the Bruce in 1324 and is therefore the ancestor to the Irvines of Drum. Robert the Bruce is also said to have bestowed upon William the crest and motto used by himself. The Clan Irvine were often at feud with the neighbouring Clan Keith. Both clans invaded each others' lands. In 1402 the Clan Irvine are said to have slaughtered an invading war party of the Clan Keith at the Battle of Drumoak. William's son Sir Alexander Irvine of Drum as chief led the clan at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. This is commemorated in a ballad about the battle as "Gude Sir Alexander Irvine the much renounit Laird of Drum". Sir Alexander de Irwine engaged in single combat or a duel with the chief of Clan MacLean of Duart who was known as "Hector of the Battles". After a legendary struggle both died of
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    145
    Clan Lamont

    Clan Lamont

    Clan Lamont ( listen (help·info)) is a Highland Scottish clan. The clan is said to descend from Ánrothán Ua Néill, an Irish prince of the O'Neill dynasty. As a part of this lineage, the clan claims descent from the legendary Niall Noigíallach, High King of Ireland. Clan MacEwen of Otter, Clan MacNeil of Barra, Clan MacLachlan, and Clan Sweeney are also descendants of Anrothan, and thus are distant kin to Clan Lamont. Clan Lamont's historical domain was a prominent one; for centuries, they powerfully ruled almost all of the rugged lands of the Cowal peninsula in Argyll. However, Clan Lamont was severely crippled by the Dunoon Massacre in 1646, when Campbell clansmen brutally murdered around 200 Lamont clan members. As a result of this and other events, Clan Lamont was repressed into smaller areas of Cowal. Many Lamonts moved to different parts of Scotland, particularly to the lowland areas. Today, Lamonts are widespread across the globe. The 26th and current chief of Clan Lamont is Rev. Fr. Peter Noel Lamont, Chief of the Name and Arms of Lamont. The surname Lamont has several origins, but the clan's name is derived from the medieval personal name Lagman (Lawspeaker) which is from
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    Clan MacAlister

    Clan MacAlister

    Clan MacAlister is a Scottish Clan and a branch of Clan Donald. The clan is the earliest branch to have split off from Clan Donald, claiming descent from Alasdair Mòr, son of Domhnall founder of Clan Donald. From Alasdair Mòr the clans takes its surname MacAlister; this surname is an Anglicisation of the Gaelic MacAlasdair meaning "son of Alasdair". In the 15th century the chief of the clan was seated in Kintyre, and the clan was centred there until the 18th century, when a chief sold the family estate in preference to a lowland estate. The current chief of the clan lives in England. Clan MacAlister is a branch of Clan Donald—one of the largest Scottish clans. The eponymous ancestor of Clan Donald is Domhnall, son of Raghnall, son of Somhairle. Traditional Clan Donald genealogies, created in the later Middle Ages, give the clan a descent from various legendary Irish figures. Modern historians, however, distrust these traditional genealogies, and consider Somhairle, son of Gille Brighde to be earliest ancestor for whom there is secure historical evidence. Somhairle, himself, was a 12th century leader, styled "king of the isles" and "king of Argyll"; yet there is no reliable account
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    Clan MacLeod of Lewis

    Clan MacLeod of Lewis

    Clan Macleod of The Lewes, commonly known as Clan MacLeod of Lewis, is a Highland Scottish clan, which at its height held extensive lands in the Western Isles and west coast of Scotland. From the 14th century up until the beginning of the 17th century there were two branches of Macleods: the MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris; and the Macleods of Lewis. In Gaelic the Macleods of Lewis were known as Sìol Thorcaill ("Seed of Torquil"), and the MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris were known as Sìol Thormoid ("Seed of Tormod"). The traditional progenitor of the Macleods was Leod, whom tradition made a son of Olaf the Black, King of Mann and the Isles. Tradition gave Leod two sons, Tormod - progenitor of the Macleods of Harris and Dunvegan (Sìol Thormoid); and Torquil - progenitor of the Macleods of Lewis (Sìol Thorcaill). In the 16th and early seventeenth centuries the chiefly line of the Clan Macleod of The Lewes was extinguished due to family infighting. This feuding directly led to the fall of the clan, and loss of its lands to the Clan Mackenzie. The modern line of chiefs of Clan Macleod of The Lewes are represented by the leading family of a cadet branch of the clan - the Macleods of
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    148

    Clan Morrison

    Clan Morrison is a Scottish clan. There are numerous Scottish clans, both Highland and Lowland, which use the surname Morrison. In 1965, the Lord Lyon King of Arms decided to recognise one man as chief of all Morrisons, whether their clans were related or not. The surname Morrison is derived from the patronymic form of the personal name Morris. This personal name is a variant of Maurice, and was quite popular in the Middle Ages. Many of the mainland and lowland Morrisons derived their name this way. The Morrisons of Perth and Lennox derive their surname in this way. Within the north-east of Scotland, the Morisons of Bognie, in Aberdeenshire, are the principal 'Morrison' family. They are thought to be unrelated to the west coast (and Hebridean) Morrisons. The first laird of Bognie was Alexander, whose son married Christian Urquhart, Viscountess Frendraught. The current representative of the family is Alexander Gordon Morison of Bogie, 13th Baron of Bognie. Until the last century, this family was the principal armigerous 'Morrison' family. The family first gained the Bognie estate in the first part of the 17th century. The coats of arms of the Morisons of Dersay (or Darcie), in Fife;
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    Clan Sinclair

    Clan Sinclair

    Clan Sinclair is a Highland Scottish clan of Norman origin who held lands in the north of Scotland, the Orkney Islands, and the Lothians which they received from the Kings of Scots. The chiefs of the clan were the Barons of Roslin and later became the Earls of Orkney and later the Earls of Caithness. The Sinclairs were a noble family which had its origins in Saint-Clair-sur-Epte, in Normandy, France. They first came to England (before they came to Scotland) with William the Conqueror during his invasion of England. The name was originally "Saint-Clair" which was a place name. Richard of Saint-Clair and Brittel of Saint-Clair are both mentioned in the Domesday Book. William of Saint-Clair accompanied Saint Margaret of Scotland, daughter of Edward the Exile to Scotland in 1068, where she eventually married Malcolm III of Scotland. In return for his efforts, the king supposedly granted Sinclair the barony of Roslin, Scotland "in free heritage". Chief Sir Henry Sinclair, 2nd Baron of Roslin (1060–1110) led a successful attack on England at the Battle of Alnwick (1093). One of the earliest recorded Sinclairs in Scotland was Chief Henry of Saint-Clair/Sinclair, 3rd Baron of Roslin who
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    150
    Clan Urquhart

    Clan Urquhart

    Urquhart ( listen (help·info)) is a Highland Scottish clan. They traditionally occupied the lands in the district and town of Cromarty, a former Royal Burgh with an excellent natural harbour on the tip of The Black Isle. Chiefs of the Clan were Barons and hereditary Sheriffs of the county for hundreds of years. Today the Clan is an international body organized in part by the Clan Urquhart Association, with Clan members in Scotland, England, Wales, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and America. The current and 27th Chief of Clan Urquhart, Kenneth Trist Urquhart of Urquhart, is one of four Scottish Highland Chiefs that are American citizens. The name Urquhart is of ancient Gaelic origin, believed to be derived from Airchartdan. This has been variously translated as "upon a rowan wood" (copses of rowan trees are common in Glen Urquhart, the Clan's place of origin according to oral tradition) and the "fort on the knoll," perhaps alluding to Castle Urquhart and/or the previous neolithic forts upon which it was built. Some suggest the Urquhart family derive their name from the district of Urquhart on the Black Isle, located on the north side of the Great Glen. Earlier phonetic spellings
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