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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best San Francisco neighborhood of All Time

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    1

    Presidio Terrace

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Presidio Terrace in San Francisco is a neighborhood that was created for wealthy residents after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, next to the newly wooded Presidio. Presidio Terrace originally was marketed to white residents only: "There is only one spot in San Francisco where only Caucasians are permitted to buy or lease real estate or where they may reside. That place is Presidio Terrace." (advertisement), a strategy which later was discontinued with the integration of the city's neighborhoods. Architectural styles in the area include Beaux-Arts, Mission Revival, and Tudor Revival.
    6.63
    8 votes
    2

    Theater District

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    The Theater District is a neighborhood in San Francisco named for the stage theaters that lie there. The area roughly covers the border between the Union Square shopping district and the Tenderloin neighborhood. See also List of theatres in San Francisco
    7.00
    6 votes
    3
    Hayes Valley

    Hayes Valley

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Hayes Valley is a fashionable neighborhood in San Francisco, California, between the historical districts of Alamo Square and Civic Center. Victorian, Queen Anne, and Edwardian townhouses rub shoulders with boutiques, restaurants, and public housing complexes. Although its boundaries are ill defined, Hayes Valley is generally considered to be the area north and south of Hayes Street between Webster (near Alamo Square) and Franklin (near Civic Center) streets. Hayes Valley's commercial center is made up of the section of Hayes Street running from approximately Laguna Street in the west to Franklin Street in the east, with extensions on perpendicular Gough and Laguna Streets. As of April 2012, after changes to the district boundaries used by the Board of Supervisors, the Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association considers the neighborhood as a whole to be bound by Webster Street in the west, Van Ness Avenue in the east, Fulton Street in the north, and Hermann Street and Market Street in the south, with extensions as far west as Fillmore, between Haight Street and Hermann Street, as far north as McAllister Street, between Franklin Street and Van Ness Avenue, and as far south as Market
    8.20
    5 votes
    4
    The Castro

    The Castro

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Castro District, commonly referenced as The Castro, is a neighborhood in Eureka Valley in San Francisco, California. The Castro is one of the United States' first and best-known gay neighborhoods, and it is currently the largest. Having transformed from a working-class neighborhood through the 1960s and 1970s, the Castro remains one of the most prominent symbols of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) activism and events. The local news media view the intersection of Market and Castro as ground zero location for interviews when prominent news impacting the gay community occurs. San Francisco's gay village is mostly concentrated in the business district that is located on Castro Street from Market Street to 19th Street. It extends down Market Street toward Church Street and on both sides of the Castro neighborhood from Church Street to Eureka Street. Although the greater gay community was, and is, concentrated in the Castro, many gay people live in the surrounding residential areas bordered by Corona Heights, the Mission District, Noe Valley, Twin Peaks, and Haight-Ashbury neighborhoods. Some consider it to include Duboce Triangle and Dolores Heights, which both have a
    7.80
    5 votes
    5
    Haight-Ashbury

    Haight-Ashbury

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Haight-Ashbury is a district of San Francisco, California, named for the intersection of Haight and Ashbury streets. It is also called The Haight and The Upper Haight. The district generally encompasses the neighborhood surrounding Haight Street, bounded by Stanyan Street and Golden Gate Park on the west, Oak Street and the Golden Gate Park Panhandle on the north, Baker Street and Buena Vista Park to the east and Frederick Street and Ashbury Heights and Cole Valley neighborhoods to the south. The street names commemorate two early San Francisco leaders: Pioneer and exchange banker Henry Haight and Munroe Ashbury, a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors from 1864 to 1870. Both Haight and his nephew as well as Ashbury had a hand in the planning of the neighborhood, and, more importantly, nearby Golden Gate Park at its inception. The name "Upper Haight", used by locals, is in contrast to the Haight-Fillmore or Lower Haight district; the latter being lower in elevation and part of what was previously the principal African-American and Japanese neighborhoods in San Francisco's early years. The Haight-Ashbury district is noted for its role as a center of the 1960s hippie
    7.40
    5 votes
    6
    Anza Vista

    Anza Vista

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Anza Vista is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, United States. It is located between Geary Boulevard to the north, Turk Street to the south, Masonic Avenue to the west and Divisadero Street to the east, although some of the surrounding areas between The Presidio, Golden Gate Park, the Panhandle, and the Western Addition may sometimes be referred to as part of the Anza Vista neighborhood. It sits atop the former location of the San Francisco Calvary Cemetery. Graves in this cemetery, along with all graves in San Francisco, were moved in the 1930s and 1940s to Colma after burials in San Francisco were banned in 1902 at all but two cemeteries to increase available real estate. A small shopping center, called The City Center, is located on Geary Boulevard and Masonic Avenue in the north-western corner of the neighborhood. Anza Vista is also the location of a Kaiser Permanente hospital at Geary Boulevard and St. Joseph's Avenue and Raoul Wallenberg Traditional High School on Nido Avenue. 37°46′51″N 122°26′35″W / 37.78087°N 122.44319°W / 37.78087; -122.44319
    6.60
    5 votes
    7
    Cole Valley

    Cole Valley

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Cole Valley is a small neighborhood in San Francisco. Its boundaries are usually considered to be Arguello Boulevard and Hillway Street to the west, Carmel Street to the south, Clayton Street to the east, and Golden Gate Park and Waller Street to the north. The main commercial strip is condensed into two blocks along Cole Street, between Parnassus Avenue to the south and Frederick Street to the north. It is very close to Haight-Ashbury, and is sometimes considered a sub-area of that district. It is also close to the Inner Sunset. Cole Valley grew up around the streetcar stop at the entrance to the Sunset Tunnel at the intersection of Carl and Cole Streets. That intersection is still the center of the neighborhood's small business district, and the N Judah light rail line still stops there. Cole Valley was popular with dot-commers during the late 1990s dot-com bubble. Craig Newmark, founder of Craigslist, is a recent former resident, and still an habitué of Cole Valley's cafes. Today the neighborhood is home to a mix of young professionals, some University of California, San Francisco residents and staff, and the African American and working-class families who have lived in the
    7.75
    4 votes
    8
    Mission District

    Mission District

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Mission District, also commonly called "The Mission", is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, USA, originally known as "the Mission lands" meaning the lands belonging to the sixth Alta California mission, Mission San Francisco de Asis. This mission, San Francisco's oldest standing building, is located in the neighborhood. The principal thoroughfare of the Mission District of San Francisco is Mission Street. Its borders are U.S. Route 101 to the east which forms the boundary between the eastern portion of the district, known as "Inner Mission" and its eastern neighbor, Potrero Hill, while Sanchez Street separates the neighborhoods from Eureka Valley (also known as "The Castro") and Noe Valley to the west. The part of the neighborhood from Valencia Street to Sanchez Street, north of 20th, is known as Mission Dolores. South of 20th towards 22nd, and between Valencia and Dolores Streets is a distinct sub-neighborhood known as Liberty Hill. Cesar Chavez Street (formerly Army Street) is the southern border which lies next to Bernal Heights, while to the north the neighborhood is separated from South of Market roughly by Duboce Avenue and the elevated highway of the Central
    6.20
    5 votes
    9
    9.33
    3 votes
    10
    Potrero Hill

    Potrero Hill

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Potrero Hill is a residential neighborhood in San Francisco, California. It is known for having views of the San Francisco bay/skyline, close proximity to many destination spots, sunny weather, and having two freeways and a Caltrain station nearby. It was initially a working-class neighborhood until gentrification arrived in the 1990s. It is now an upper-middle-class family oriented neighborhood. Potrero Hill is located on the eastern side of the city, east of the Mission District and south of SOMA (South of Market) and the newly designated district Showplace Square. It is roughly bordered by 16th Street to the north, Potrero Avenue (above 20th Street) and U.S. Route 101 (below 20th Street) to the west and Cesar Chavez Street to the south; although the city of San Francisco considers the area below 20th Street between Potrero Ave and Route 101 to be part of Potrero Hill as well, as outlined in the Eastern Neighborhood Plan. The area east of Highway 280 is Dogpatch. The Dogpatch was originally part of Potrero Neuvo and its history is closely tied to Potrero Hill, some considered Dogpatch to be its own neighborhood while others disagree. Dogpatch has its own neighborhood association
    7.00
    4 votes
    11

    Westwood Highlands

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Westwood Highlands is a neighborhood located south of San Francisco in the state of California and is one of sixteen neighbourhoods within the district. Also known as the Twin Peaks, District 4 is distinctive from other surrounding areas due its challenging topography and previously uninhabitable terrain. The Westwood Highlands is a small, private subdivision development comprising 283 homes built between 1925 and 1929. The subdivision is of a relatively small scale and is bound by five intersecting arterial roads. Westwood Highlands was a unique development as it was one of the first residential communities in the United States to agree to a set of covenants and restrictions (Brandi 2005). In 1906, San Francisco was shaken by one of the most damaging earthquakes in the history of America and followed by subsequent fires that enveloped the city causing further destruction. The inter-war period saw significant change as developers and planners alike used the aftermath of the earthquake and fires as the catalyst for redevelopment. This redevelopment saw previously barren farmland, such as the area around the Twin Peaks, being turned into low to medium density residential housing. The
    7.00
    4 votes
    12
    Financial District

    Financial District

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Financial District is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, that serves as its main central business district. The nickname "FiDi" is occasionally employed, analogous to nearby SoMa. The area is marked by the cluster of high-rise towers that lies between Grant Avenue east of the Union Square shopping district, Sacramento Street and Columbus Street, south of Chinatown and North Beach, and the Embarcadero that rings the waterfront. The city's tallest buildings, including 555 California Street and the Transamerica Pyramid, and some other tall buildings, such as 101 California Street and 345 California Street, are located there. Under Spanish and Mexican rule, the area was the site of a small civilian outpost named Yerba Buena that served to support the military population of the Presidio and the Mission Dolores. The sandy, marshy soils of the tip of the San Francisco Peninsula discouraged the Spanish, and later Mexican governments from establishing a preeminent town there, who focused their pueblo settlement efforts in the Pueblo of San José with its extremely fertile land. Yerba Buena's potential as a seaport made it the eventual center for European and American
    8.33
    3 votes
    13

    Lone Mountain

    • Contained by: California
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Lone Mountain is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, United States. It is the area immediately surrounding the University of San Francisco (USF) campus, to the south of Laurel Heights. It is bordered by Geary Boulevard to the north, Arguello Boulevard to the west, Masonic Avenue to the east, and Fulton Street to the south. Lone Mountain is one of San Francisco's historic hills. The neighborhood rests on the former location of the Odd Fellows Cemetery, Masonic Cemetery, and Greek Orthodox Cemetery. The graves in these cemeteries, along with most graves in San Francisco, were moved to Colma by the 1940s. Lone Mountain is also home to the Angelo J. Rossi Playground and Rossi Pool at Arguello Boulevard and Anza Street. Lone Mountain is also known as "University Terrace" because of the terraces that connect the two USF campuses.
    9.00
    2 votes
    14
    Hunters Point

    Hunters Point

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Bayview-Hunters Point or The Bayview, is a neighborhood in the southeastern corner of San Francisco, California, United States. The decommissioned Hunters Point Naval Shipyard is located within its boundaries and Candlestick Park is on the southern edge. Originally dominated by grassland and tidal marshland, Bayview-Hunters Point has a unique history for its transformation into an urban industrial neighborhood while segregated from the metropolitan area. Slaughterhouses and their associated industries in the 1800s and shipbuilding in the 1900s drove its urbanization. Subsequent extensive toxic pollution, loss of industry jobs and racial segregation in the 1960s and 1970s resulted in urban decay. Bayview-Hunters Point has been described as a marginalized community. Modern problems include high rates of unemployment, poverty, crime and disease. Redevelopment projects for the neighborhood became the dominant issue of the 1990s and 2000s. Efforts include the Bayview Redevelopment Plan for Area B, which includes approximately 1300 acres of existing residential, commercial and industrial lands. This plan identifies seven Economic Activity nodes within the area. The former Navy Shipyard
    7.00
    3 votes
    15
    Marina District

    Marina District

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Marina District is a neighborhood located in San Francisco, California. The neighborhood sits on the site of the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition, staged after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake to celebrate the reemergence of the city. Aside from the Palace of Fine Arts (POFA), all other buildings were demolished to make the current neighborhood. The area is bounded to the east by Van Ness Avenue and Fort Mason; on the west by Cow Hollow, Lyon Street and the Presidio National Park; on the south by Lombard St, which bisects the southern edge of the Marina District. The northern half of the Marina is a shoreline of the San Francisco Bay, and features the Marina Green, a picturesque park adjacent to the municipal boat marina from which the neighborhood takes its name. Much of the Marina is built on former landfill, and is susceptible to soil liquefaction during strong earthquakes. This phenomenon caused extensive damage to the entire neighborhood during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The area in the 19th century prior to the 1906 Earthquake consisted of bay shallows, tidal pools, sand dunes, and marshland similar to nearby Crissy Field. Human habitation and
    7.00
    3 votes
    16
    St. Francis Wood

    St. Francis Wood

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    St. Francis Wood is an affluent residential neighborhood located in southwestern San Francisco, California, south of the West Portal neighborhood and west of Mount Davidson. St. Francis Wood has a population of 1,354 and a median household income of $201,399. Characterized by family homes on spacious lots (by San Francisco standards), St. Francis Wood has no visible businesses and has a correspondingly low profile compared to similar wealthy neighborhoods such as the Marina District and Pacific Heights.
    7.00
    3 votes
    17
    West Portal

    West Portal

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    West Portal is a small neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Similar to adjacent Forest Hill and St. Francis Wood, West Portal is an affluent, primarily residential area of the City. The neighborhood's main corridor, West Portal Avenue, serves as a principal shopping district of southwestern San Francisco. West Portal is located at the southern edge of the hills in central San Francisco. The neighborhood is named for the western terminus of the Muni tunnel beneath Twin Peaks that opened in 1918. The ride in the subway from West Portal to Union Square is about fifteen minutes. Because of its small size and mom and pop stores, restaurants, and saloons, the neighborhood is often described as having a village atmosphere. The neighborhood is served by a branch of the San Francisco Public Library. Like Glen Park, the neighborhood is one of San Francisco's metro-centered communities. The frequent fog helps keep the area green in the usually rainless summer months, and on a clear day, the park above the tunnel provides a view of the Marin Headlands and the Farallon Islands in the Pacific.
    7.00
    3 votes
    18
    Western Addition

    Western Addition

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Western Addition is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, United States. The Western Addition is sandwiched between Van Ness Avenue, Golden Gate Park, the Upper and Lower Haight neighborhoods, and Pacific Heights. Historically, it was an addition to the city west of Van Ness Avenue (hence, "Western Addition"). The area was first developed around the turn of the 20th century as a middle-class suburb served by cable cars. It survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake with its Victorian-style buildings largely intact. Today, the term Western Addition is generally used in two ways: to denote the development's original geographic area, or to denote the eastern portion of the neighborhood (also called the Fillmore District) that was redeveloped in the 1950s. Those who use the term in the former sense generally consider its boundaries to be Van Ness Avenue on the east, Masonic on the west, California Street on the north, and Fell or Oak Street on the south. From there, it is usually divided into smaller neighborhoods such as Lower Pacific Heights, Cathedral Hill, Japantown, the Fillmore, Hayes Valley, Alamo Square, Anza Vista, and North Panhandle. The San Francisco Association
    7.00
    3 votes
    19
    Chinatown

    Chinatown

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Chinatown, in San Francisco, California, (Chinese: 唐人街; Mandarin Pinyin: tángrénjiē; Jyutping: tong4 jan4 gaai1) is the oldest Chinatown in North America and one of the largest Chinese communities outside Asia. Since its establishment in 1848, it has been highly important and influential in the history and culture of ethnic Chinese immigrants in North America. Chinatown is an enclave that continues to retain its own customs, languages, places of worship, social clubs, and identity. There are two hospitals, numerous parks and squares, a post office, and other infrastructure. Visitors can easily become immersed in a microcosmic Asian world, filled with herbal shops, temples, pagoda roofs and dragon parades. In addition to being a starting point and home for thousands of Chinese immigrants, it is also a major tourist attraction, drawing more visitors annually than the Golden Gate Bridge. Chinatown has been traditionally defined by the neighborhoods of North Beach, and Telegraph Hill areas as bound by Bush Street, Taylor Street, Bay Street, and the water. Officially, Chinatown is located in downtown San Francisco, covers 24 square blocks, and overlaps five Postal ZIP Codes. It is
    6.67
    3 votes
    20
    6.67
    3 votes
    21
    6.33
    3 votes
    22
    Fisherman's Wharf

    Fisherman's Wharf

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Fisherman's Wharf is a neighborhood and popular tourist attraction in San Francisco, California. It roughly encompasses the northern waterfront area of San Francisco from Ghirardelli Square or Van Ness Avenue east to Pier 35 or Kearny Street. The F Market streetcar runs through the area, the Powell-Hyde cable car lines runs to Aquatic Park, at the edge of Fisherman's Wharf, and the Powell-Mason cable car line runs a few blocks away. Fisherman's Wharf gets its name and neighborhood characteristics from the city's early days during the Gold Rush when Italian immigrant fishermen settled in the area and fished for the Dungeness crab. From then until the present day it remained the home base of San Francisco's fishing fleet. Despite its redevelopment into a tourist attraction during the 1970s and 1980s, the area is still home to many active fishermen and their fleets. In 2010, a $15,000,000 development plan was proposed by city officials hoping to revitalize its appearance for tourists, and to reverse the area's downward trend in popularity among San Francisco residents, who have shunned the locale over the years. One of the busiest and well known tourist attractions in the western
    8.00
    2 votes
    23
    8.00
    2 votes
    24
    South of Market

    South of Market

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    South of Market (or SoMa) is a relatively large neighborhood in San Francisco, California, United States located just south of Market Street and contains several sub-neighborhoods including South Beach, Mission Bay and Rincon Hill. Its boundaries are Market Street to the northwest, San Francisco Bay to the northeast, Mission Creek to the southeast, and Division Street, 13th Street and U.S. Route 101 (Central Freeway) to the southwest. It is the part of the city in which the street grid runs parallel and perpendicular to Market Street. The neighborhood contains many smaller neighborhoods such as South Park, Yerba Buena, South Beach, and Financial District South (part of the Financial District), and overlaps with several others, notably Mission Bay, and the Mission District. As with many neighborhoods, the precise boundaries of the South of Market area are fuzzy and can vary widely depending on the authority cited. From 1848 until the construction of the Central Freeway in the 1950s, 9th Street (formerly known as Johnston Street) was the official (and generally recognized) boundary between SoMa and the Mission District. Since the 1950s, the boundary has been either 10th Street, 11th
    8.00
    2 votes
    25
    Lower Haight

    Lower Haight

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Lower Haight is a neighborhood, sometimes referred to as Haight-Fillmore, in San Francisco, California. Referred to as "Pine Valley" in the 70s because of all the pine trees, the Lower Haight lies generally along Haight Street east of Divisadero Street, and between Oak Street (or Fell Street) on the north, and Duboce Avenue on south. The eastern boundary is variously placed at Webster Street, Laguna Street, or even Market Street. It is east of the more famous Haight-Ashbury, which is also known as the Upper Haight. The name derives from the significant elevation change as Haight Street climbs steeply from Scott Street to Buena Vista Park. The area straddles a shallow valley between Mint Hill and Upper Haight, sloping down from Oak Street (north) toward Duboce (south). Duboce Park, toward the corner of Duboce and Scott, is a grassy park containing a children's playground and the Harvey Milk Recreational Arts Building. Adjacent neighborhoods include the Western Addition/Alamo Square to the north; Duboce Triangle to the south; Hayes Valley to the east; and the Upper Haight to the west. The San Francisco Association of Realtors defines the area more narrowly as the
    10.00
    1 votes
    26

    Crocker-Amazon

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Crocker-Amazon is a neighborhood in San Francisco. Crocker-Amazon borders the Excelsior District. Crocker-Amazon covers the area south of Mission Street and Geneva Avenue, extending toward suburban Daly City. The neighborhood is adjacent to Crocker-Amazon Park, named after the Charles Crocker land holdings that once made up the area, and Amazon Street in the Excelsior. The winding streets of the neighborhood straddle the border between San Francisco and Daly City and largely blend in with the adjacent Daly City neighborhoods of Crocker and Southern Hills. Crocker-Amazon neighborhood is slightly more affluent than the Excelsior, but retains much of the same racial diversity, including a large Filipino community. The majority of the neighborhood consists of single family homes. McLaren Park, San Francisco's second largest park after Golden Gate, borders Crocker-Amazon to the north. It has four playgrounds, recently renovated and lighted soccer and baseball fields, a golf course, two lakes, jogging and hiking trails, a public pool, an old reservoir that is used as a dog swimming area, and the Jerry Garcia Amphitheater which houses concerts and festivals. The neighborhood benefits from
    6.00
    3 votes
    27
    Mission Bay

    Mission Bay

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Mission Bay is a 303-acre (1.23 km) neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Mission Bay is roughly bounded by Townsend Street on the north, Third Street and San Francisco Bay on the east, Mariposa Street on the south, and 7th Street and Interstate 280 on the west. It was created in 1998 by the Board of Supervisors as a redevelopment project. Much of the land was long a railyard of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, and transferred to Catellus Development Corporation when it was spun off as part of the aborted merger of Southern Pacific and the Santa Fe Railway. Catellus subsequently sold or sub-contracted several parcels to other developers. It has rapidly evolved in to a wealthy neighborhood of luxury condominiums, high-end restaurants and retail, and biotechnology research and development. Mission Bay is currently the headquarters of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. It is also the headquarters, at 550 Terry Francois Blvd, of the Old Navy brand of The Gap clothing retailer. It is the location of a new research campus of the University of California, San Francisco, UCSF Mission Bay Mission Bay is served by the N Judah and T Third Street lines of San
    6.00
    3 votes
    28
    Nob Hill

    Nob Hill

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Nob Hill refers to a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, centered on the intersection of California and Powell streets. It is one of San Francisco's 44 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills." The actual peak of Nob Hill lies slightly to the northwest, approximately at the intersection of Jones and Sacramento Streets. South of Nob Hill is the shopping district of Union Square, the Tenderloin neighborhood, and Market Street. To the east is San Francisco's Chinatown and a little farther, the city's financial district. Northeast of Nob Hill is North Beach and Telegraph Hill. North of Nob Hill is Russian Hill, and eventually, the tourist-centered areas of the waterfront such as Pier 39 and Fisherman's Wharf. The area was settled in the rapid urbanization happening in the city in the late 19th century. Because of the views and its central position, it became an exclusive enclave of the rich and famous on the west coast who built large mansions in the neighborhood. This included prominent tycoons such as Leland Stanford, founder of Stanford University and other members of The Big Four. The neighborhood was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake and fire, except for the granite
    6.00
    3 votes
    29
    9.00
    1 votes
    30

    Lower Pacific Heights

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Lower Pacific Heights, also known as the Upper Fillmore is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. It is located in the area between Pacific Heights, the Fillmore District, Laurel Heights, and Japantown. The neighborhood is centered on the commercial corridor of Fillmore Street between California and Post streets. The San Francisco Association of Realtors defines Lower Pacific Heights as "District 6C", the area between California Street to the north, Geary Street to the south, Presidio Avenue to the west, and Van Ness Avenue to the east. This definition includes Japantown within Lower Pacific Heights. Historically, the area was considered part of the Western Addition. Long a middle-class neighborhood geographically and socially intermediate between Pacific Heights and the Lower Fillmore, the area became wealthier and more upscale with the escalation of San Francisco property values in the 1980s and 1990s. It was during this time that the designation "Upper Fillmore" fell out of favor and "Lower Pacific Heights" came into increased use.
    9.00
    1 votes
    31
    Bernal Heights

    Bernal Heights

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Bernal Heights is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Bernal Heights lies to the south of San Francisco's Mission District. Its most prominent feature is the open parkland and radio tower on its large rocky hill, Bernal Heights Summit. Bernal is bounded by Cesar Chavez Street to the north, Mission Street to the west, US 101 to the east, and I-280 to the south. Bernal had its origin with the 1839 Rancho Rincon de las Salinas y Potrero Viejo Mexican land grant to José Cornelio Bernal (1796–1842). By 1860, the land belonged to San Francisco financier, Frenchman François Louis Alfred Pioche (1818–1872), who subdivided it into smaller lots. Bernal remained undeveloped, though, until the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Built atop bedrock, the hill's structures survived the tremor, and the sparseness of the development saved much of Bernal from the ravages of the firestorm that followed. The commercial corridor of Cortland Avenue filled in with shops as the pastureland on the hilltop was developed for workers' homes during the rapid rebuilding of the city. Some of the tiny earthquake cottages—that the city built to house quake refugees—survive to this day, including three which
    7.00
    2 votes
    32
    Noe Valley

    Noe Valley

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Noe Valley (/ˈnoʊ.iː/NOH-ee) is a neighborhood in the central part of San Francisco, California. Its borders are generally considered to be 22nd Street to the north, Randall Street to the south, Dolores Street to the east, and Grand View Avenue to the west. These borders are informal, nothing more, and continue to expand, thanks to real estate agents. The Castro (Eureka Valley) is directly to Noe Valley's north, although the border is not well defined and can stretch into Noe Valley, and The Mission is to its east. The neighborhood is named after José de Jesús Noé, the last Mexican alcalde (mayor) of Yerba Buena (present day San Francisco), who owned this land as part of his Rancho San Miguel. Noé sold the land, later to be known as Noe Valley, to John Meirs Horner in 1854, and at this time the land was called Horner's Addition. The original Noé adobe house was located in the vicinity of the present day intersection of 23rd Street and Douglass Street. Noe Valley was primarily developed at the end of the 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century, especially in the years just after the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. As a result, the neighborhood contains many examples of
    7.00
    2 votes
    33
    Fillmore District

    Fillmore District

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Fillmore District, also called The Fillmore, The Fill, The Moe, or Fillmoe, is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Though its boundaries are not well-defined, it is usually considered to be the subset of the Western Addition neighborhood and is roughly bordered by Van Ness Avenue on the east, Divisadero Street on the west, Geary Boulevard on the north, and Grove Street on the south. These delineations are approximate and there are certain irregularities in the geographic shape of the neighborhood; for instance, the Westside Housing Projects are generally considered to be part of the Fillmore District, even though they are located a block west of Divisadero and a block north of Geary. The community also extends south of Grove St. at several points. Fillmore Street, from which the district gets its name, is the main north-south thoroughfare running through the center of the district. The area east of Fillmore St. is locally referred to as Downtown Fillmore, while the area to the west of Fillmore is known by many locals as Uptown Fillmore. Some definitions, particularly older ones, include Hayes Valley, Japantown, and what is now known as North of Panhandle as part of the
    5.33
    3 votes
    34
    Park Merced

    Park Merced

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Parkmerced is the second-largest single-owner neighborhood of apartment blocks west of the Mississippi River after Park La Brea in Los Angeles. It was a planned neighborhood of high-rise apartment towers and low-rise garden apartments in southwestern San Francisco, California, for middle-income tenants. It contains 3,221 residences (after sale of five blocks to SFSU) and over 9,000 residents, and is one of four remaining privately-owned large scale garden apartment complexes in the United States. The complex is located south of San Francisco State University (SFSU), west of 19th Avenue, and east of Lake Merced and the Harding Park Golf Club. The far western boundary of the neighborhood extends to Lake Merced Boulevard, and the neighborhood is popular with students and faculty at San Francisco State University because of its close proximity. The property was purchased in October 2005 for approximately $687,000,000 by a joint venture between Stellar Management and Rockpoint Group from a JP Morgan Chase and Carmel Partners joint venture entity. The apartment towers were designed by Leonard Schultze and Associates, the post-War successor firm to Schultze and Weaver, in partnership with
    6.50
    2 votes
    35
    Presidio of San Francisco

    Presidio of San Francisco

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Presidio of San Francisco (originally, El Presidio Real de San Francisco or Royal Presidio of San Francisco) is a park and former military base on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula in San Francisco, California, and is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. It had been a fortified location since September 17, 1776, when New Spain established it to gain a foothold on Alta California and the San Francisco Bay. It passed to Mexico, which in turn passed it to the United States in 1848. As part of a 1989 military reduction program, Congress voted to end the Presidio's status as an active military installation. On October 1, 1994, it was transferred to the National Park Service, ending 219 years of military use and beginning its next phase of mixed commercial and public use. In 1996, the United States Congress created the Presidio Trust to oversee and manage the interior 80% of the park's lands, with the National Park Service managing the coastal 20%. In a first-of-its-kind structure, Congress mandated that the Presidio Trust make the Presidio financially self-sufficient by 2013, which it achieved 8 years earlier. The park is characterized by many wooded
    6.50
    2 votes
    36
    Diamond Heights

    Diamond Heights

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Diamond Heights is a neighborhood in the middle part of San Francisco, California, roughly bordered by Diamond Heights Boulevard and Noe Valley on the east side and Glen Canyon Park on the west side. Diamond Heights was the first project of the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association, intended to use redevelopment powers to use land on the hills in the center of the city to be developed with, rather than against, the topography. Few existing residents needed to be relocated for the redevelopment program, which included housing for a range of incomes, churches, schools, parks, and a commercial center. This type of redevelopment came under the California Redevelopment Law, passed in 1951, a codified version of the California Redevelopment Act which had passed in 1941. More than half a million dollars was appropriated by the Water Department just for a water system for the redevelopment. The "Diamond Heights Redevelopment Project Area B-1" plan was debated between the Board of Supervisors and the Diamond Heights Property Owners' Association. In 1955 alternative proposals to the Supervisors' plan were presented in an effort to protect the property rights of existing
    8.00
    1 votes
    37

    Portola

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Portola is a neighborhood in the southeastern part of San Francisco, northeast of McLaren Park. It is roughly bordered by San Bruno Avenue and U.S. Route 101 to the east, Mansell Street to the south, University Street to the west and Interstate 280 to the north. Phillip and Sala Burton Academic High School is located on Mansell Street, and the Portola Library is at Silman Avenue and San Bruno Avenue (2450 San Bruno Ave.), at the 101 Silver Ave. Exit. The Library is to move into a new building in 2009 across the street from the E.R. Taylor Elementary School
    8.00
    1 votes
    38
    Russian Hill

    Russian Hill

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Russian Hill is a neighborhood of San Francisco, California, in the United States. It is one of San Francisco's 44 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills." Russian Hill is directly to the north (and slightly downhill) from Nob Hill, to the south (uphill) from Fisherman's Wharf, and to the west of the North Beach neighborhood. The Hill is bordered on its west side by parts of the neighborhoods of Pacific Heights, Cow Hollow, and the Marina District. Downhill to the north is Ghirardelli Square, which sits on the waterfront of the San Francisco Bay, Aquatic Park, and Fisherman's Wharf, an extremely popular tourist area. Down the turns of Lombard Street and across Columbus Avenue to the east is the neighborhood of North Beach. Down the hill to the west, past Van Ness Avenue, are Cow Hollow and the Marina districts. The neighborhood's name goes back to the Gold Rush era, when settlers discovered a small Russian cemetery at the top of the hill. Russian naval and merchant ships frequently visited San Francisco throughout the 19th century beginning in 1806, and there are several mentions of burials of crew members in the Russian Hill cemetery in the first half of the century. The
    8.00
    1 votes
    39
    Visitacion Valley

    Visitacion Valley

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Visitacion Valley is a neighborhood located in the south eastern quadrant of San Francisco, California. Visitacion Valley is roughly defined by McLaren Park and Gleneagles Golf Course to the West, Mansell Blvd to the North, Bayview Hill and Candlestick Cove to the East, and the San Francisco / San Mateo County line to the South. The streets of this neighborhood straddle the border between San Francisco and Daly City, hence Visitacion Valley partially blends in with the adjacent Daly City neighborhood of Bayshore. The grounds of the Cow Palace, straddling the San Francisco/Daly City border, are partially within Visitacion Valley. Visitacion Valley takes its name from Rancho Cañada de Guadalupe la Visitación y Rodeo Viejo, a large tract of land that also included the Bayshore district of Daly City, the city of Brisbane, and San Bruno Mountain. The area is a largely family-oriented working-class neighborhood. Average Adjusted Gross Incomes for the area are at $38,802, much lower than the citywide average of $73,798. Median rents in 2007 for the neighborhood at $896 a month are also far below the citywide average at $1,141. The area was originally settled by Irish and Italian
    8.00
    1 votes
    40

    Westwood Park

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Westwood Park is an affluent residential neighborhood located in southwestern San Francisco, California, near St. Francis Wood and City College of San Francisco. Westwood Park was built as an upperclass neighborhood for downtown merchants. Most streets in this neighborhood have a suffix of "wood," such as Eastwood, Northwood, Rollingwood, and so forth. It is bordered by: Monterey Boulevard (to the north), Ocean Avenue (to the south), Faxon Avenue (to the west) and Phelan Avenue (to the east).
    6.00
    2 votes
    41
    7.00
    1 votes
    42
    Union Square

    Union Square

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Union Square is a plaza of 2.6 acres (11,000 m) bordered by Geary, Powell, Post and Stockton Streets in San Francisco, California. "Union Square" also refers to the central shopping, hotel, and theater district that surrounds the plaza for several blocks. The area got its name because it was once used for rallies and support for the Union Army during the American Civil War, earning its designation as a California Historical Landmark. Today, this one-block plaza and surrounding area is one of the largest collections of department stores, upscale boutiques, gift shops, art galleries, and beauty salons in the United States, making Union Square a major tourist destination, a vital, cosmopolitan gathering place in downtown San Francisco, and one of the world's premier shopping districts. Grand hotels and small inns, as well as repertory, off-Broadway, and single-act theaters also contribute to the area's dynamic, 24-hour character. Union Square was originally a tall sand dune, and the square was later set aside to be made into a public park in 1850. Union Square got its name from the pro-Union rallies held there on the eve of the Civil War. The monument itself is also a tribute to the
    7.00
    1 votes
    43
    4.00
    3 votes
    44
    Pacific Heights

    Pacific Heights

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Pacific Heights is a neighborhood of San Francisco, California. It is located in one of the most scenic and park-like settings in Northern California, offering panoramic views of the Golden Gate Bridge, the San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz and the Presidio. Its idyllic location provides a temperate micro-climate that is clearer, but not always warmer, than many other areas in San Francisco. The Pacific Heights Residents Association defines the neighborhood as inside Bush Street, Presidio Avenue, Union Street, and Van Ness Avenue. Pacific Heights is situated on a primarily east-west oriented ridge that rises sharply from the Marina District and Cow Hollow neighborhoods, to the north, to a maximum height of 370 feet above sea level. The streets of Jackson, Pacific, and Broadway extend along some of the most scenic areas along the hill's crest. The section of Broadway Street extending from Divisadero to Lyon Street is known as the "Gold Coast." Pacific Heights features two parks, Lafayette and Alta Plaza, each with spectacular views of the city and the bay. Easily visible to the north, for example, are the Golden Gate Bridge, the Marin Headlands, and Alcatraz Island. Lower Pacific Heights
    5.00
    2 votes
    45
    Sunset District

    Sunset District

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Sunset District is a large neighborhood in the west-central part of San Francisco, California, United States. The Sunset District is the largest district within the city of San Francisco, and with a population of over 85,000 it is also the most populated. Golden Gate Park forms the neighborhood's northern border, and the Pacific Ocean (or, more specifically, the long, flat strand of beach known as Ocean Beach) forms its western border. The Sunset District's southern and eastern borders are not as clearly defined, but there is a general consensus that the neighborhood extends no further than Sigmund Stern Grove and Sloat Boulevard in the south and no further east than Stanyan Street (just east of the Parnassus campus of the University of California, San Francisco) and Laguna Honda Hospital. Prior to the residential and commercial development of the Sunset District, much of the area was covered by sand dunes and was originally referred to by 19th century San Franciscans as "the Outside Lands". The Sunset District and the neighboring Richmond District (on the north side of Golden Gate Park) are often collectively known as The Avenues, because the majority of both neighborhoods are
    5.00
    2 votes
    46
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    1 votes
    47

    Laurel Heights

    • Contained by: San Francisco District 2
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Laurel Heights is a neighborhood to the south of the Presidio of San Francisco and east of the Richmond District. It is bordered by Geary Boulevard or the University of San Francisco campus to the south, Arguello Boulevard to the west, California Street to the north and Presidio Avenue to the east. The Laurel Village shopping center is located on California between Laurel and Spruce, the California Pacific Medical Center is on California between Arguello and Maple, and a UCSF campus is located in the north eastern corner of the neighborhood.
    5.00
    1 votes
    48
    Richmond District

    Richmond District

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Richmond District is a neighborhood in the northwest corner of San Francisco, California. It is a family-oriented residential neighborhood known for its quieter pace and the cold/fog that initiates from the Pacific Ocean. The entire Richmond District is sandwiched between Presidio of San Francisco (north) and Golden Gate Park (south), allowing its residents ample park accessibility. Some people confuse the Richmond District with Richmond - a city 20 miles north of San Francisco. Lying directly north of Golden Gate Park, "the Richmond" is bounded roughly by Fulton Street to the south, Arguello Boulevard and Laurel Heights to the east, The Presidio National Park and Lincoln Park to the north, and Ocean Beach and the Pacific Ocean to the west. Park Presidio Boulevard, a major thoroughfare, divides the Richmond into the western "Outer Richmond" and the eastern portion, called the "Inner Richmond." Geary Boulevard is a major east-west thoroughfare that runs through the Richmond and to downtown. The district was given its name by Australian immigrant and Japanese fine art dealer George Turner Marsh, one of the neighborhood's earliest residents, who called his home "the Richmond
    5.00
    1 votes
    49

    Parkside

    • Contained by: California
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Parkside is a neighborhood in San Francisco. It originally began as a distinct district, but today it is generally considered to be the southern part of the Outer Sunset District. The exact border of the district is well-defined according to long time locals. Parkside is a distinct neighborhood of San Francisco and has been since its inception. Old timers of the city will always let you know about the Parkside District. Parkside Elementary School (located at 24th Avenue and Vicente Street) was torn down and in its place today stands Diane Feinstein Elementary School. Parkside Library is located at 22nd Avenue and Taraval. As quoted from Outside Lands "The Parkside as a neighborhood started in July 1905 when a syndicate led by William Crocker announced they had quietly bought land from the estate of Adolph Sutro and others to create a new million-dollar development. The "park" of Parkside was not Golden Gate Park, but rather the stand of trees and plants around Laguna Puerca (now called Pine Lake, and often called "Mud Lake" by old-timers)." The area is mostly residential, except for the commercial corridor on Taraval Street. The L Taraval of the Muni Metro serves the neighborhood
    4.00
    1 votes
    50

    Balboa Park

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Balboa Park is a neighborhood and public park in San Francisco, California. It was created in 1909 and parts of it were built over time. The neighborhood (sometimes referred to as Mission Terrace, Cayuga, or Ingleside) is located between Mission Street and Interstate 280 north of Geneva Avenue and the park is located on San Jose Avenue, north of Ocean Avenue. Inside of the park there is a public swimming pool, a children's playground, a stadium, baseball diamonds, tennis courts and the Ingleside police station. Balboa High School is situated on Cayuga Avenue, and City College of San Francisco is on the other side of Interstate 280. Public transportation in Balboa Park is centered around Balboa Park Station in the southwest corner of the neighborhood, a Bay Area Rapid Transit Station that also serves as the terminal of the J, K and M Muni Metro lines.
    0.00
    0 votes
    51
    Cathedral Hill

    Cathedral Hill

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    Cathedral Hill is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Its northern border is Post Street, the eastern border is Van Ness Avenue, the southern border is Eddy Street and the western border is Laguna Street. The neighborhood is centered around St. Mary's Cathedral on the corner of Geary Street and Gough Street. It is home to large condominium and apartment towers with numerous churches built atop the hill; St. Mary's Cathedral, St. Mark's Lutheran Church, The First Unitarian Church of San Francisco, and Hamilton Baptist Church. Sacred Heart Cathedral Prep is inside the neighborhood.
    0.00
    0 votes
    52
    Forest Hill

    Forest Hill

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Forest Hill is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Forest Hill is located near the middle of the city, south of the Inner Sunset and northeast of West Portal. Boundaries are roughly Seventh Avenue/Laguna Honda Boulevard to the east, Taraval Street to the south, and 14th Avenue to the west. Construction on the neighborhood began in 1912, on land originally owned by Adolph Sutro was purchased from his heirs by a private firm. Streets in Forest Hill were not built to San Francisco's specific standards regarding width, grade, etc., and therefore were not accepted nor maintained by the City until 1978. (Many of the streets are extravagantly landscaped curving lanes.) Forest Hill is one of the only non-condominium developments in the San Francisco that has an active homeowners' association, requiring membership of all property owners and payment of an annual fee for maintenance of the planted common areas owned by the association The association also governs remodeling and new construction. The area south of Dewey Boulevard is known as Laguna Honda or Forest Hill Extension. The extension is another section of Forest Hill, except with smaller homes and more moderate pricing. The
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    0 votes
    53
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    0 votes
    54
    North Beach

    North Beach

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    North Beach is a neighborhood in the northeast of San Francisco adjacent to Chinatown, Fisherman's Wharf and Russian Hill. The neighborhood is San Francisco's Little Italy, and has historically been home to a large Italian American population. It still holds many Italian restaurants today, though many other ethnic groups currently live in the neighborhood. It was also the historic center of the beatnik subculture. Today, North Beach is one of San Francisco's main red light and nightlife districts as well as a residential neighborhood populated by a mix of young urban professionals, families and Chinese immigrants connected to the adjacent Chinatown. The American Planning Association (APA) has named North Beach as one of ten 'Great Neighborhoods in America'. North Beach is bounded by the former Barbary Coast, now Jackson Square, the Financial District south of Broadway, Chinatown to the southwest of Columbus below Green Street, Russian Hill to the west, Telegraph Hill to the east and Fisherman's Wharf at Bay Street to the north. Main intersections are Union and Columbus, the southwest corner of Washington Square, Grant Avenue and Vallejo Street. The somewhat compact layout of the
    0.00
    0 votes
    55
    Sea Cliff

    Sea Cliff

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    Sea Cliff (sometimes spelled Seacliff) is a neighborhood located in northwestern San Francisco, California. It is known for its large houses and ocean views. It is adjacent to the Pacific Ocean and Baker Beach, southwest of the Presidio of San Francisco and east of Lincoln Park. Houses in the Sea Cliff neighborhood are large, and many offer impressive views of the Pacific Ocean, the Golden Gate Bridge and the Marin Headlands. A small public beach named China Beach is located in the neighborhood. Some of the neighborhood's more famous current and past residents include Jefferson Airplane guitarist Paul Kantner, photographer Ansel Adams, comic actor Robin Williams, actress Sharon Stone, actor Eugene Levy, actor Cheech Marin, Gap founder Donald Fisher, Twitter founder Jack Dorsey and Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett.
    0.00
    0 votes
    56
    Tenderloin

    Tenderloin

    • Contained by: San Francisco
    • Neighborhood of: San Francisco
    The Tenderloin is a neighborhood in downtown San Francisco, California, in the flatlands on the southern slope of Nob Hill, situated between the Union Square shopping district to the northeast and the Civic Center office district to the southwest. It encompasses about 50 square blocks and a conservative description has it bounded on the north by Geary Street, on the east by Mason Street, on the south by Market Street and on the west by Van Ness Avenue. The northern boundary with Lower Nob Hill historically has been set at Geary Street. The terms Tenderloin Heights or The Tendernob refer to the area around the indefinite boundary between the Upper Tenderloin and Lower Nob Hill. The eastern extent, near Union Square, overlaps with the Theater District. Part of the western extent of the Tenderloin, Larkin and Hyde Streets between Turk and O'Farrell, was officially named "Little Saigon" by the City of San Francisco. There are a number of stories about how the Tenderloin got its name. One says it is a reference to an older neighborhood in New York with the same name and similar characteristics. Another is a reference to the neighborhood as the "soft underbelly" (analogous to the cut of
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