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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Revision Control Software of All Time

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    1

    Telelogic SYNERGY

    Rational Synergy is a software tool that provides software configuration management (SCM) capabilities for all artifacts related to software development including source code, documents and images as well as the final built software executables and libraries. Rational Synergy also provides the repository for the Rational change management tool known as Rational Change. Together these two tools form an integrated configuration management and change management environment that is used in software development organizations that need controlled SCM processes and an understanding of what is in a build of their software. The name Synergy refers to its database level integration with Change Management that provides views into what is in a build in terms of defects Synergy began life in 1988 as a research project for computer-aided software engineering by software developer Pete Orelup at Computers West of Irvine, California. Computers West was supporting itself through contract software development and an application for finance and insurance at automobile dealerships on the Pick OS, and probably had fewer than 10 employees. In 1989, the company decided to pursue development of a software
    6.75
    8 votes
    2
    7.00
    6 votes
    3
    7.80
    5 votes
    4

    Microsoft Visual SourceSafe

    • Development status: Maintained
    • Repository model: Client-server
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    Microsoft Visual SourceSafe (VSS) is a source control software package oriented towards small software development projects. Like most source control systems, SourceSafe creates a virtual library of computer files. While most commonly used for source code, SourceSafe can actually handle any type of file in its database, but prior versions have been shown to be unstable when confronted with large amounts of non-textual data (images, binary executables, etc.). SourceSafe was originally created by a company called One Tree Software. One Tree SourceSafe had gone through several releases in their 1.x to 2.x cycles, supporting DOS, OS/2 (with a Presentation Manager GUI), Windows, Windows NT, Mac, and Unix. When Microsoft bought OneTree in 1994, they immediately ceased development on all versions except for Windows. Microsoft "Visual SourceSafe 3.1", a Windows 16-bit-only, rebranded One Tree 3.0 version, was briefly available before Microsoft released a Version 4.0. SourceSafe was initially not a client/server SCM, but rather a local only SCM. Architecturally, this serves as both a strength and weakness of design, depending on the environment it is used in. It allows a single user system
    7.60
    5 votes
    5

    AccuRev

    AccuRev is a commercial and proprietary Software Configuration Management (SCM) solution developed by AccuRev, Inc. Founded by current CTO and architect Damon Poole in 1998, the company is based in Lexington, MA, USA. The initial release of AccuRev 1.0 was made in 2002. The key AccuRev differentiator is that it focuses using the SCM solution to help manage development processes in an organization rather than on traditional revision control. AccuRev uses the concept of Streams instead of branches or labels. Source code files live in the streams and changes flow down through the hierarchy in which the streams are organized. Streams are first class objects that can be graphically visualized and manipulated to change the behavior of the system. It is also possible to crosslink the contents of a stream to another stream in support of component-based development. AccuRev allows users to see the state of a project at any point in the past by keeping an immutable record of all changes. In AccuRev, this is called "TimeSafe". AccuRev accomplishes this through atomic transactions, fine-grained time tracking, and global transaction numbers. Files retain their history after rename or move
    6.17
    6 votes
    6
    9.00
    4 votes
    7
    8.50
    4 votes
    8

    Perforce

    • Development status: Actively developed
    • Repository model: Client-server
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    Perforce is a commercial, proprietary revision control system developed by Perforce Software, Inc. The Perforce server manages a central database and a master repository of file versions. Users work on files in local workspaces and submit changed files together in changelists. Communication with the server is via any of a number of (user interfaces) (see below). Clients communicate with the server via TCP/IP using a proprietary RPC and streaming protocol. The Perforce database is proprietary, preconfigured, and self-installed. It stores system-related metadata (file state, file attributes, branching and merging history, changelists, change descriptions, users, groups, labels, etc.). Files are identified by namespace (i.e., by OS-neutral filenames). File content itself is not stored in the database. MD5 hashes of file content are stored in the database, however, and can be used to verify repository file integrity. Database tables are stored as binary files. Checkpoints and journals are written as text files that can be compressed and offloaded. A database that has been corrupted by hardware failure or other catastrophe can be recovered from the most recent journal and checkpoint.
    7.75
    4 votes
    9

    BitKeeper

    • Development status: Actively developed
    • Repository model: Distributed
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    BitKeeper is a software tool for distributed revision control (configuration management, SCM, etc.) of computer source code. A distributed system, BitKeeper competes largely against other systems such as Git and Mercurial. BitKeeper is produced by BitMover Inc., a privately held company based in Campbell, California and owned by CEO Larry McVoy, who had previously designed TeamWare. BitKeeper builds upon many of the TeamWare concepts. Its key selling point is the fact that it is a distributed version control tool, as opposed to CVS or SVN. One of the defining characteristics of any distributed version control tool is the ease with which distributed development teams can keep their own local source repositories and still work with the central repository. Its web site claims that "BitKeeper has been shown to double the pace of software development". BitKeeper uses history files that are based on the idea of the delta tables and interleaved deltas from SCCS but the BitKeeper history files are made intentionally incompatible by using a different magic number (0x01 0x48 instead of 0x01 0x68) at the beginning. BitKeeper is proprietary software and is normally sold or leased (as part of a
    7.25
    4 votes
    10

    Rational ClearCase

    • Repository model: Client-server
    The Rational ClearCase family consists of several software tools for supporting software configuration management (SCM) of source code and other software development assets. It is developed by the Rational Software division of IBM. ClearCase forms the base for configuration management for many large and medium sized businesses and can handle projects with hundreds or thousands of developers. A part of Rational ClearCase is revision control system, which is a feature for end users. ClearCase supports two kinds of use models, UCM (Unified Change Management), and base ClearCase. UCM provides an out-of-the-box model while base ClearCase provides a basic infrastructure (upon which UCM is built). Both can be configured to support a wide variety of needs. UCM is part of RUP (Rational Unified Process) and therefore all process templates and roles can be used from RUP. ClearCase can run on a number of platforms including AIX, z/OS, Linux, HP-UX, Solaris, and Windows. It can handle large binary files, large numbers of files, and large repository sizes. It handles branching, labeling, and versioning of directories. ClearCase was developed by Atria Software and first released in 1992 on Unix
    8.33
    3 votes
    12

    SourceHaven

    SourceHaven is software for Revision Control (RC) and/or Software Configuration Management (SCM). It is developed by Veterisoft, Inc. SourceHaven has a client/server architecture. The server manages collections of versioned files and metadata in one or more repositories. It uses an embedded Oracle Database to store all backing data. Users access the repositories on their workstations by using a client software package. Command line, graphical, and programming IDE plug-ins. As an alternative interface, a WebDAV interface is supported which allows users to access the repository without any specialized client software installed. Clients are available for Unix, Linux, Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows, and other platforms. SourceHaven was initially based on the open source Subversion project. The Subversion dump file format for repositories is fully supported. They can be loaded into the system and generated by the system. Also, the Subversion client interface is the officially endorsed client interface to SourceHaven. Any Subversion based client can use the SourceHaven server as if it were a regular Subversion server. SourceHaven also includes a web application for administration. It allows
    7.67
    3 votes
    13

    SVK

    SVK (also written svk) is a decentralized version control system written in Perl, with a hierarchical distributed design comparable to centralized deployment of BitKeeper and GNU arch. The primary author of svk is Kao Chia-liang (Chinese: 高嘉良). Like Perl, it is distributed under the Artistic License and the GNU General Public License, making svk free software. On June 5, 2006, Chia-liang Kao joined Best Practical Solutions, LLC, makers of Request Tracker (and also heavy users of SVK), and SVK became a Best Practical product. On May 28, 2009, Chia-liang Kao announced that Best Practical will no longer be actively developing SVK. Kao continued to develop SVK until the last release in March 2010, when development appears to have stopped. SVK uses the Subversion filesystem but provides additional features: [[hr:SVK (nadzor inačica)
    7.67
    3 votes
    14

    Vault

    Vault is a commercial, proprietary revision control system by SourceGear LLC which markets its product as a replacement for Microsoft's Visual Source Safe. The Vault revision control system uses Microsoft SQL Server as a back end database and provides atomic commits to the revision control system. The tool is built on top of Microsoft .NET, and offers a UNIX client based on Mono.
    10.00
    2 votes
    15

    LibreSource

    LibreSource is a server application suite that can serve as a collaborative software development management system for Free Software projects, groupware, community interaction, electronic archiving and Web publishing. Based on Java/Java EE LibreSource is a modular tool that users can customize online by combining resources and rights: wiki pages, forum, trackers, Synchronizers, Subversion repositories, files, download areas, drop boxes, forms, etc. LibreSource uses most of the advanced services provided by the ObjectWeb application server called JOnAS. LibreSource Enterprise Edition is the professional version of the LibreSource Community, a collaborative platform developed by LORIA-INRIA Lorraine, University Paris 7 et Artenum in the frame of a French initiative called RNTL (Réseau National des Technologies Logicielles). LibreSource was first released under the Q Public License since June 2005 and switched to GPLv2 in May 2008. The Enterprise Edition was developed by Artenum. LibreSource Express is a hosting facility for collaborative development projects on LibreSource Enterprise Edition servers. LibreSource Express is a professional service offered by Artenum since August 2006.
    7.33
    3 votes
    16
    9.00
    2 votes
    17
    6.67
    3 votes
    18

    GNU arch

    • Development status: Maintained
    • Repository model: Distributed
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    GNU arch software is a distributed revision control system that is part of the GNU Project and licensed under the GNU General Public License. It is used to keep track of the changes made to a source tree and to help programmers combine and otherwise manipulate changes made by multiple people or at different times. As of 2009, GNU arch's official status is deprecation, and only security fixes are applied. A fork of arch, named Bazaar (or 'bzr') has since also been made an official GNU project and can thus be considered the replacement for GNU arch. Being a distributed, decentralized versioning system, each revision stored using arch is uniquely globally identifiable; such identifier can be used in a distributed setting to easily merge or "cherry-pick" changes from completely disparate sources. Being decentralized means that there is no need for a central server for which developers have to be authorized in order to contribute. As with other systems, a full read-only copy of a project is made accessible in an "official" repository via HTTP, FTP, or SFTP; but then, contributors are encouraged to make modifications and publish them in a public archive (repository) of their own, so that
    6.00
    3 votes
    19

    CVSNT

    • Repository model: Client-server
    The CVSNT Versioning System implements a version control system: it keeps track of all changes in a set of files, typically the implementation of a software project, and allows several (potentially geographically separated) developers to collaborate. It is compatible with and originally based on Concurrent Versions System (CVS), which has become popular in the open-source world. CVSNT keeps track of the version history of a project (or set of files). CVSNT is based on the same client–server architecture as the Concurrent Versions System: a server stores the current version(s) of the project and its history, and clients connect to the server in order to check-out a complete copy of the project, work on this copy and then later check-in their changes. A server may be a caching or proxy server (a read only server that passes on write requests to another server) or a read and write (normal) server. Typically, client and server connect over a WAN or Internet, but client and server may both run on the same LAN or even the same machine. The server software runs equally well on Unix and Windows. It is compatible with CVS clients and supports a large number of configuration management
    10.00
    1 votes
    20

    Darcs

    Darcs is a distributed revision control system created by David Roundy; it was designed to replace traditional, centralized source control systems such as CVS and Subversion. Key features include the ability to choose which changes to accept from other repositories, interaction with either other local (on-disk) repositories or remote repositories via SSH, HTTP, or email, and an unusually interactive interface. The developers also emphasize the use of advanced software tools for verifying correctness: the expressive type system of the functional programming language Haskell enforces some properties, and randomized testing via QuickCheck verifies many others. The name is usually sentence-cased, and is a recursive acronym for Darcs Advanced Revision Control System. Unlike most SCM software, which allows the user to view a source tree history as series of snapshots going back in time, a darcs source tree is modelled as a set of patches, where each patch is not necessarily ordered with respect to other patches i.e. the set of patches is only a partially ordered set. A particular version of the source tree corresponds to a particular set of patches; this set of patches may or may not
    7.00
    2 votes
    21

    Bazaar

    • Development status: Actively developed
    • Repository model: Distributed
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    GNU Bazaar (formerly Bazaar-NG, command line tool bzr) is a distributed revision control system sponsored by Canonical. Bazaar can be used by a single developer working on multiple branches of local content, or by teams collaborating across a network. Bazaar is written in the Python programming language, with packages for major GNU/Linux distributions, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. Bazaar is free software and part of the GNU Project. Bazaar commands are quite similar to those found in CVS or Subversion. A new project can be started and maintained without a remote repository server by invoking the bzr init command in a directory which a person wishes to version. In contrast to purely distributed version control systems which don't use a central server, Bazaar supports working with or without a central server. It is possible to use both methods at the same time with the same project. The websites Launchpad and Sourceforge provide free hosting service for projects managed with Bazaar. Bazaar has support for working with some other revision control systems. This allows users to branch from another system (such as Subversion), make local changes and commit them into a Bazaar branch,
    9.00
    1 votes
    22

    MKS Source

    MKS Integrity for Software Configuration Management (formerly known as MKS Source and MKS Source Integrity) is a commercial, proprietary revision control system developed by MKS Inc.. The MKS Integrity system is based on a client/server model with the server managing the collection of source versions in one or more projects. The servers operate in a Federated Server Architecture and run on Linux, Unix or Microsoft Windows operating systems. The client side provides graphical and command line tools for a number of operating systems. Also available is a suite of plugins that integrate with various programming IDEs (Visual Studio, Eclipse, etc.) and third party applications. It integrates with such applications as as Rational Rose, Powerbuilder IBM Websphere. Other features of the system include support for reporting (i.e., notifying users when a file has changed), branching and merging, database checkpoints, and defect tracking through MKS Integrity.
    8.00
    1 votes
    23
    Plastic SCM

    Plastic SCM

    Plastic SCM is a commercial, proprietary revision control tool developed by Codice Software, Inc. Plastic can work in centralized mode (with a central server) and as a distributed revision control system. Plastic is a client/server system although in current terms of version control it can also be defined as a distributed revision control system, due to its ability to have very lightweight servers on the developer computer and push and pull branches between servers (similar to what Git and Mercurial do). The Plastic server stores data and metadata on a relational database. The database can be one of the following: Developers work on files in their client workspaces, and check in changed files together in changesets. Communication from client to server is done through a customized .NET remoting channel. The default Plastic database on a regular installation is a SQLServer CE embedded database on Windows systems and a SQLite embedded database on Linux and MacOS X (since Plastic 3.0). The database can be configured by tweaking the db.conf file located on the server directory and can be set up to use any of the other alternatives. The database can be queried to extract extended
    8.00
    1 votes
    24
    8.00
    1 votes
    25
    Git

    Git

    • Development status: Actively developed
    • Repository model: Distributed
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    In software development, Git (/ɡɪt/) is a distributed revision control and source code management (SCM) system with an emphasis on speed. Git was initially designed and developed by Linus Torvalds for Linux kernel development; it has since been adopted by many other projects. Every Git working directory is a full-fledged repository with complete history and full revision tracking capabilities, not dependent on network access or a central server. Git is free software distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2. Linus Torvalds has quipped about the name "git", which is English slang for a stupid or unpleasant person. Torvalds said: "I'm an egotistical bastard, and I name all my projects after myself. First 'Linux', now 'git'." The man page describes git as "the stupid content tracker". Git development began after many Linux kernel developers chose to give up access to BitKeeper, a proprietary SCM system that had previously been used to maintain the project. The copyright holder of BitKeeper, Larry McVoy, had withdrawn free use of the product after he claimed that Andrew Tridgell had reverse-engineered the BitKeeper protocols. Torvalds wanted a distributed
    6.00
    2 votes
    26
    Subversion

    Subversion

    • Development status: Actively developed
    • Repository model: Client-server
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    Apache Subversion (often abbreviated SVN, after the command name svn) is a software versioning and revision control system distributed under an open source license. Developers use Subversion to maintain current and historical versions of files such as source code, web pages, and documentation. Its goal is to be a mostly compatible successor to the widely used Concurrent Versions System (CVS). The open source community has used Subversion widely: for example in projects such as Apache Software Foundation, Free Pascal, FreeBSD, GCC, Django, Ruby, Mono and SourceForge. Google Code also provides Subversion hosting for their open source projects. BountySource systems use it exclusively. CodePlex offers access to Subversion as well as to other types of clients. The corporate world has also started to adopt Subversion. A 2007 report by Forrester Research recognized Subversion as the sole leader in the Standalone Software Configuration Management (SCM) category and as a strong performer in the Software Configuration and Change Management (SCCM) category. Subversion was created by CollabNet Inc. in 2000 and is now a top-level Apache project being built and used by a global community of
    6.00
    2 votes
    27

    Team Foundation Server

    Team Foundation Server (commonly abbreviated to TFS) is a Microsoft product offering source control, data collection, reporting, and project tracking, and is intended for collaborative software development projects. It is available either as stand-alone software, or as the server side back end platform for Visual Studio Team System (VSTS). Team Foundation Server works in a three-tier architecture: the client tier, the application tier and the data tier. The client tier is used for creating and managing projects and accessing the items that are stored and managed for a project. TFS does not include any user interface for this tier, rather it exposes web services which client applications can use to integrate TFS functionality with themselves. These web services are used by applications like Visual Studio Team System to use TFS as data storage back end or dedicated TFS management applications like the included Team Foundation Client. The web services are in the application layer. The application layer also includes a web portal and a document repository facilitated by Windows SharePoint Services. The web portal, called the Team Project Portal, acts as the central point of
    6.00
    2 votes
    28
    Monotone

    Monotone

    Monotone is an open source software tool for distributed revision control. Monotone tracks revisions to files, groups sets of revisions into changesets, and tracks history across renames. The focus of the project is on integrity over performance. Monotone is designed for distributed operation, and makes heavy use of cryptographic primitives to track file revisions (via the SHA-1 secure hash) and to authenticate user actions (via RSA cryptographic signatures). Like GNU arch, and unlike Subversion, Monotone takes a distributed approach to version control. Monotone uses SHA-1 hashes to identify specific files or groups of files, as with Git and Mercurial, in place of linear revision numbers. Each participant maintains their own revision history, stored in a local SQLite database. Prior to some heavy optimisation in revision 0.27, Monotone's emphasis on correctness over optimisation was often blamed for poor initial experiences. The first action of a new user is often to synchronize (clone) a large existing Monotone database, an action which often took hours for large databases, due to the extensive validation and integrity checking which Monotone performs when revisions are moved
    4.33
    3 votes
    29

    AllFusion Harvest Change Manager

    CA Software Change Manager (originally known as CCC/Harvest) is a software tool for the configuration management (revision control, SCM, etc.) of source code and other software development assets. The first CCC (acronym for 'Change and Configuration Control') product was released in the early 70s and was designed as a project for a Defense Department contractor in Santa Barbara CA. (The company at the time was Hughes Aircraft, now Santa Barbara Research Center for Raytheon.) It became the first commercially available CM tool. CCC was designed to manage all the components that went into an aircraft engine, and seeing as the same engine was used by both the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy (for the F-14 Tomcat and F-15 Eagle) it required robust and reliable parallel development. The first version of CCC/Harvest was commercially developed by Softool Corporation, a CM-focused software company founded in 1977 in Goleta, CA. Other CCC tools included CCC/Manager, CCC/DM Turnkey and CCC/QuickTrak. Softool was acquired in late 1995 by Platinum Technology, which was later acquired in May 1999 by Computer Associates (now known as CA Technologies) who added CCC/Harvest to their AllFusion suite. In
    5.50
    2 votes
    30
    Mercurial

    Mercurial

    • Development status: Actively developed
    • Repository model: Distributed
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    Mercurial is a cross-platform, distributed revision control tool for software developers. It is mainly implemented using the Python programming language, but includes a binary diff implementation written in C. It is supported on Windows and Unix-like systems, such as FreeBSD, Mac OS X and Linux. Mercurial is primarily a command line program but graphical user interface extensions are available. All of Mercurial's operations are invoked as arguments to its driver program hg, a reference to the chemical symbol of the element mercury. Mercurial's major design goals include high performance and scalability, decentralized, fully distributed collaborative development, robust handling of both plain text and binary files, and advanced branching and merging capabilities, while remaining conceptually simple. It includes an integrated web interface. Mercurial has also taken steps to ease the transition for SVN users. The creator and lead developer of Mercurial is Matt Mackall. Mercurial is released as free software under the terms of the GNU GPL v2. Mercurial uses SHA-1 hashes to identify revisions. For repository access via a network, Mercurial uses an HTTP-based protocol that seeks to
    7.00
    1 votes
    31
    5.00
    2 votes
    32
    6.00
    1 votes
    33

    Concurrent Versions System

    • Development status: Maintained
    • Repository model: Client-server
    • Concurrency model: Merge
    The Concurrent Versions System (CVS), also known as the Concurrent Versioning System, is a client-server free software revision control system in the field of software development. Version control system software keeps track of all work and all changes in a set of files, and allows several developers (potentially widely separated in space and time) to collaborate. Dick Grune developed CVS as a series of shell scripts in July 1986. There was a similar system available earlier in the mid-'70s developed by John Humbert. In addition to commercial software developers, CVS has become popular with the open source software world and is released under the GNU General Public License. There is regular development to add features and fix bugs, regular builds and test results. The product is mature: new releases are not produced until there are requests for new features or bug reports. CVS uses a client–server architecture: a server stores the current version(s) of a project and its history, and clients connect to the server in order to "check out" a complete copy of the project, work on this copy and then later "check in" their changes. Typically, the client and server connect over a LAN or
    5.00
    1 votes
    34
    4.00
    1 votes
    35
    0.00
    0 votes
    36

    Code Co-op

    Code Co-op is the peer-to-peer revision control system made by Reliable Software. Code Co-op is a distributed revision control system of the replicated type. It uses peer-to-peer architecture to share projects among developers and to control changes to files. Instead of using a centralized database (the repository), it replicates its own database on each computer involved in the project. The replicas are synchronized by the exchange of (differential) scripts. The exchange of scripts may proceed using different transports, including e-mail (support for SMTP and POP3, integration with MAPI clients, Gmail) and LAN. Code Co-op has a built-in peer-to-peer wiki system, which can be used to integrate documentation with a software project. It is also possible to create text-based Wiki databases, which can be queried using simplified SQL directly from wiki pages. Code Co-op was the first distributed version control system. It debuted at the 7th Workshop on System Configuration Management in May 1997. The development of Code Co-op started in 1996, when Reliable Software, the distributed software company that makes it, was established. Reliable Software needed a collaboration tool that would
    0.00
    0 votes
    37

    Codeville

    Codeville is a distributed revision control system. It was written by Ross Cohen using Python, with some design work done by Bram Cohen. It uses an innovative merging algorithm called the "Codeville merge". A new merge algorithm called "Precise Codeville" or "pcvd" merge was under development. The project has now been abandoned. Codeville is self hosted and also used by BitTorrent, Inc and Mosuki.
    0.00
    0 votes
    38

    StarTeam

    StarTeam is a software change and configuration management system used in software development, especially when a project involves multiple teams in different locations. StarTeam provides local and distributed software delivery teams with the means to manage change throughout the software development lifecycle. StarTeam combines traditional SCM and Change Management capabilities into a single tool, making it possible for development teams to access a rich unified repository of version controlled files, change requests, tasks, topical discussions, requirements and any number of custom defined asset types. With the addition of StarTeam Agile, it is now possible to also combine agile team management support with the rich change management environment of StarTeam. The combined solution provides support for the integration, interoperability and co-existence of several ALM and IDE tools, in order to create a valuable “single source of the truth” for any development team, regardless of size, distribution or methodology. StarTeam was originally created by Starbase Corporation, acquired by Borland in January 2003 which was acquired in turn by Micro Focus in August 2009. The application is
    0.00
    0 votes
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