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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Pinball Machine Designer of All Time

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Best Pinball Machine Designer of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Pinball Machine Designer of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Pinball Machine Designer of All Time has gotten 342 views and has gathered 133 votes from 133 voters. O O

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    1

    Larry DeMar

    • Pinball Machines Designed: FunHouse
    Lawrence E. DeMar (also known by his initials L.E.D.) is a video game and pinball designer and software programmer. He is known as one of the co-designers of the classic arcade game Defender (alongside with Eugene Jarvis). Currently, he is the founder of his design firm, Leading Edge Design (LED), which creates gaming concepts for the casino industry.
    7.38
    8 votes
    2
    7.00
    6 votes
    3
    8.20
    5 votes
    4
    Steve Ritchie

    Steve Ritchie

    • Pinball Machines Designed: Black Knight
    Steven Scott Ritchie (born February 13, 1950) is an acclaimed pinball and video game designer. He has been called "The Master of Flow" by pinball aficionados due to the emphasis in his designs on ball speed, loops, and the like. Ritchie recently left Incredible Technologies for Raw Thrills, a video game production house headed by former WMS employee Eugene Jarvis. He currently suffers from tinnitus and predicts that he will be deaf by 2013. Steve is the older brother of fellow pinball designer Mark Ritchie. After serving a stint in Vietnam and Alaska in the United States Coast Guard from 1968-1972, Ritchie joined Atari in 1976 and first worked on the assembly line as an electro-mechanical technician. Two years later, he was promoted to work at their fledgling pinball division, where he worked on his first game, Airborne Avenger. Ritchie earned the license to make a Superman-pinball based on the Superman comic book, but in the final stages of production of the table, he received an offer from Williams Electronics, a major pinball company, that Ritchie could not refuse. Ritchie moved to Chicago, Illinois, the home of Williams' headquarters. His first game for the company, Flash
    7.00
    5 votes
    5
    8.50
    4 votes
    6
    8.00
    4 votes
    7
    6.40
    5 votes
    8
    9.67
    3 votes
    9

    George Gomez

    • Pinball Machines Designed: Revenge From Mars
    George Gomez is an industrial designer, video game designer, and pinball designer who has worked for Bally, Williams, and Stern Pinball, among other companies. He worked on the team that created the Tron video game, and headed the team that created Spy Hunter. In 1984 after the 1983 video game crash, he left Midway to invent toys at the consulting firm Marvin Glass & Associates. After Glass he worked on numerous projects through the contract manufacturer Grand products, including the Battletech Centers and several Sega video games of the late 80's. In '93 he went to Williams Electronics and designed several pinball machines including Monster Bash and was one of the lead developers of the revolutionary Pinball 2000 system. As a consultant he designed several games for STERN pinball including The Lord of the Rings, and Batman. Along with his recent work in pinball, he was also one of key designers of the street basketball video game series NBA Ballers for Midway. Gomez enters his latest endeavor with a "second chance" to save pinball becoming the VP of game development at Stern Pinball on July 12th, 2011. (incomplete list)
    7.50
    4 votes
    10
    7.50
    4 votes
    11
    5.60
    5 votes
    12
    8.00
    3 votes
    13
    8.00
    3 votes
    14
    7.67
    3 votes
    15
    7.33
    3 votes
    16
    7.33
    3 votes
    17
    5.75
    4 votes
    18
    7.00
    3 votes
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    5.50
    4 votes
    20
    5.50
    4 votes
    21
    8.50
    2 votes
    22
    10.00
    1 votes
    23

    Python Anghelo

    • Pinball Machines Designed: Pin·Bot
    Python Vladimir Anghelo is an artist best known for his work on video games and pinball machines. Anghelo was born in Transylvania, Romania, and moved to the United States when he was 17. After studying art and animation both in Romania and the US, he worked as an animator for Disney until 1979 when he moved to Williams Electronics to create the artwork for Joust, taking a 50% pay-cut in the process because he believed that video games had more potential than traditional animation. He continued to work for Williams (and, later, Midway Games after they merged with Williams) for 15 years until 1994, when his most ambitious project, The Pinball Circus, was shelved. In 1994 he left Williams for Capcom, and designed one game for them entitled Flipper Football. He was in the process of designing his second Capcom game, an "erotic" pinball game entitled Zingy Bingy, when Capcom closed down their pinball division. Currently, Anghelo works at Bay Tek Games. (this list in incomplete)
    10.00
    1 votes
    24
    7.50
    2 votes
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    5.67
    3 votes
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    5.67
    3 votes
    27
    5.67
    3 votes
    28
    9.00
    1 votes
    29
    Ed Krynski

    Ed Krynski

    • Pinball Machines Designed: 2001
    Ed Krynski (died 16 November 2004) was a pinball designer who worked for D. Gottlieb & Co between the years of 1965 and 1987. During his time there, Krynski (who was recently inducted into the Pinball Hall of Fame) designed more than 200 games and brought to life such innovations as the vari-target, laneways to the flipper, carousel target, as well as the multiple drop targets. The first pinball machine he designed was "Dodge City", released in July 1965, and the last was "Amazon Hunt", in September 1983. The Internet Pinball Machine Database identifies 225 machines as designed by Krynski, including "300", 2001, 4 Square, El Dorado, Spirit of '76, Royal Flush and Sing Along.
    9.00
    1 votes
    30
    9.00
    1 votes
    31
    7.00
    2 votes
    32
    7.00
    2 votes
    33
    7.00
    2 votes
    34
    Eugene Jarvis

    Eugene Jarvis

    Eugene Peyton Jarvis (born 1955) is a game designer and programmer, known for producing pinball machines for Atari and video games for Williams Electronics. Most notable amongst his works are the seminal arcade video games Defender and Robotron: 2084 in the early 1980s, and the Cruis'n series of driving games for Midway Games in the 1990s. He co-founded Vid Kidz in the early 1980s and currently leads his own development studio, Raw Thrills Inc. In 2008 Eugene Jarvis was named the first Game Designer in Residence by DePaul University's Game Development program. Eugene Jarvis was born in Palo Alto, California in 1955. His first game was chess, which he played as a young child; he was one of the best players at Bellarmine College Preparatory in San Jose. Jarvis's first encounter with computers came while he was in high school attending a one-day course on FORTRAN programming given by IBM. Jarvis originally intended to become a biochemist but decided on studying computers instead. At the University of California, Berkeley, Jarvis did FORTRAN programming on mainframes. At Berkeley he got his first taste of computer gaming, playing Space War in the basement of the physics lab. He
    7.00
    2 votes
    35
    7.00
    2 votes
    36
    6.50
    2 votes
    37
    6.50
    2 votes
    38
    8.00
    1 votes
    39
    8.00
    1 votes
    40

    Brian Eddy

    • Pinball Machines Designed: Black Rose
    Brian R. Eddy is an American computer programmer and designer. He works at Midway Games, and his completed designs include several of the most popular and influential pinball machines of the 1990s, including Attack From Mars, Medieval Madness. FunHouse, The Machine: Bride of Pin*Bot, and Indiana Jones: The Pinball Adventure. After the closure of Midway's pinball division in 1999, Eddy moved to Midway's video game division, where he worked on Psi-Ops: The Mindgate Conspiracy, and several games in the Mortal Kombat franchise. Eddy's machine designs consistently rank in the top 10 of both popularity and in the highest price paid for a pinball machine. When pinball designer Steve Ritchie was asked about the design similarities between his Spider-Man pinball machine and Eddy's Attack From Mars, Ritchie admitted that he had designed Spider-Man's playfield as an homage to Eddy, and specifically to Attack From Mars.
    7.00
    1 votes
    41
    7.00
    1 votes
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    7.00
    1 votes
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    7.00
    1 votes
    44
    5.50
    2 votes
    45
    5.00
    2 votes
    46
    6.00
    1 votes
    47
    6.00
    1 votes
    48
    4.50
    2 votes
    49
    4.00
    2 votes
    50
    5.00
    1 votes
    51
    4.00
    1 votes
    52
    0.00
    0 votes
    53
    Pat Lawlor

    Pat Lawlor

    • Pinball Machines Designed: FunHouse
    Patrick M. Lawlor (born 1951) is a video game and pinball machine designer. Lawlor's pinball career began as an engineer for Williams in 1987, when he co-designed a dual-playfield machine called Banzai Run with Larry DeMar. Pat Lawlor had previously been a video game designer and had entered the coin-operated game design world in 1980, working for Dave Nutting Assoc. In 1988, he was given the reins of his first individual design project, a machine entitled Earthshaker, which was released in January 1989. Lawlor is a father to one daughter, Cassandra Jean Lawlor. She is an artist working in ceramics. Lawlor's first solo project, Earthshaker!, was noteworthy for its integration of a relatively obscure theme (earthquakes). The follow-up to Earthshaker! tackled a different form of natural disaster: tornados. The new game, Whirlwind, was released in early 1990 to similar praise. Both games demonstrated components of Lawlor's design methodology. Foremost, Lawlor exhibited his instinct for introducing elements that were thematically appropriate and altered gameplay. For instance, upon progressing toward the multiball mode in Earthshaker!, the playfield would begin to shake rapidly to
    0.00
    0 votes
    54
    0.00
    0 votes
    55
    0.00
    0 votes
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