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Best php developer of All Time

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    1
    Brad Templeton

    Brad Templeton

    Brad Templeton (born near Toronto on April 20, 1960) is a software architect, civil rights advocate and entrepreneur. He graduated from the University of Waterloo. Templeton is considered one of the early luminaries of Usenet, and in 1989 founded ClariNet Communications Corporation, which used Usenet protocols to distribute news articles, one of the first commercial examples of electronic publishing. In his "Net History in Brief" post, he coined the phrase Imminent death of net predicted. He also founded Looking Glass Software (not the same company as Looking Glass Studios), and was involved in the development of a number of software packages. He was the Chairman of the Board of the Electronic Frontier Foundation for ten years until February 2010, when he relinquished his tenure to John Buckman. Brad remains on the Board of the EFF. He created the Usenet newsgroup rec.humor.funny in 1987 and moderated it from 1987 to 1992. To Commodore users he's probably best known for Power and the assembler PAL. Templeton is widely known in the Internet and legal community for writing about political and social issues related to computing and networks. One of the most frequently-cited works on
    9.83
    6 votes
    2
    Marc Andreessen

    Marc Andreessen

    Marc Lowell Andreessen ( /ænˈdriːsɨn/ an-DREE-sən; born July 9, 1971) is an American entrepreneur, investor, software engineer, and multi-millionaire. He is best known as co-author of Mosaic, the first widely used Web browser; as co-founder of Netscape Communications Corporation; and as co-founder and general partner of Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. He founded and later sold the software company Opsware to Hewlett-Packard. Andreessen is also a co-founder of Ning, a company that provides a platform for social networking websites. An innovator and creator, he is one of the few people who has pioneered a software category (Web browsers) used by more than a billion people and established several billion-dollar companies. He sits on the board of directors of Facebook, eBay, and HP, among others. A frequent keynote speaker and guest at Silicon Valley conferences, Andreessen is one of only six inductees in the World Wide Web Hall of Fame announced at the first international conference on the World Wide Web in 1994. Andreessen was born in Cedar Falls, Iowa, and raised in New Lisbon, Wisconsin, the son of Patricia and Lowell Andreessen, who worked for a seed
    8.67
    6 votes
    3
    Donald Knuth

    Donald Knuth

    Donald Ervin Knuth ( /kəˈnuːθ/ kə-NOOTH; born January 10, 1938) is a computer scientist and Professor Emeritus at Stanford University. He is the author of the seminal multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming. Knuth has been called the "father" of the analysis of algorithms. He contributed to the development of the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms and systematized formal mathematical techniques for it. In the process he also popularized the asymptotic notation. In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces. As a writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB/CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures. Knuth was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where his father owned a small printing business and taught bookkeeping at Milwaukee Lutheran High School, where he enrolled, earning achievement awards. He applied his intelligence in
    7.50
    6 votes
    4
    Game programmer

    Game programmer

    A game programmer is a software engineer, programmer, or computer scientist who primarily develops codebase for video games or related software, such as game development tools. Game programming has many specialized disciplines all of which fall under the umbrella term of "game programmer". A game programmer should not be confused with a game designer, who works on game design. In the early days of video games (from the early 1970s to mid-1980s), a game programmer also took on the job of a designer and artist. This was generally because the abilities of early computers were so limited that having specialized personnel for each function was unnecessary. Game concepts were generally light and games were only meant to be played for a few minutes at a time, but more importantly, art content and variations in gameplay were constrained by computers' limited power. Later, as specialized arcade hardware and home systems became more powerful, game developers could develop deeper storylines and could include such features as high-resolution and full color graphics, physics, advanced artificial intelligence and digital sound. Technology has advanced to such a great degree that contemporary
    8.60
    5 votes
    5
    Lubna al Qasimi

    Lubna al Qasimi

    HE Sheikha Lubna bint Khalid bin Sultan Al Qasimi is the Minister for Foreign Trade and was previously Minister of Economic and Planning of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). She was appointed on 1 November 2004. Sheikha Lubna holds the distinction of being the first woman to hold a ministerial post in the United Arab Emirates. She is a member of the ruling family of Sharjah and the niece to His Highness Dr. Sheikh Sultan bin Mohamed Al-Qasimi. Lubna graduated from the California State University, Chico with a Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science, and has an Executive MBA from the American University of Sharjah. Lubna received an honorary doctorate of science from California State University, Chico. Sheikha Lubna bint Khalid bin Sultan al Qasimi, returned to the UAE to work as a programmer for software company Datamation in 1981. Lubna acted as the Dubai branch manager for the General Information Authority, the organization responsible for automating the federal government of the United Arab Emirates. After this posting, she took up the position of senior manager of the Information Systems department at the Dubai Ports Authority (DPA), the largest port in the Middle East, and worked
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    Ken Arnold

    Ken Arnold

    Kenneth Cutts Richard Cabot Arnold is an American computer programmer well known as one of the developers of the 1980s dungeon-crawling video game Rogue, for his contributions to the original Berkeley (BSD) distribution of Unix, for his books and articles about C and C++ (e.g. his 1980s–1990s Unix Review column, "The C Advisor"), and his high-profile work on the Java platform. He has two sons, Jareth and Cory. Arnold attended the University of California, Berkeley, after having worked at Lawrence Berkeley computer labs for a year, receiving his A.B. in computer science in 1985. At Berkeley, he was president of the Berkeley Computer Club and the Computer Science Undergraduates Association, and made many contributions to the 2BSD and 4BSD Berkeley Unix distributions, including: Additionally, Ken served as both a member of the student senate and its president. Ken was part of the Hewlett-Packard team that designed CORBA. He also worked for Apollo Computer; as a molecular graphics programmer in the Computer Graphics Lab at UC San Francisco; and as a member of the UNIX Review Software Review Board. Formerly a senior engineer at Sun Microsystems Laboratories, Arnold is an expert on
    7.00
    6 votes
    7
    Keith Bostic

    Keith Bostic

    Keith Bostic (born July 26, 1959) is a computer programmer from the United States. In 1986, Bostic joined the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) at the University of California, Berkeley. He was one of the principal architects of the Berkeley 4.4BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite releases. Among many other tasks, he led the effort at CSRG to create a free software version of BSD UNIX, which helped allow the creation of FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD. Bostic was also one of the founders of Berkeley Software Design Inc. (BSDi), which produced BSD/OS, a proprietary version of BSD. He and wife Margo Seltzer founded Sleepycat Software in 1996 to develop and support Berkeley DB, an open source database. In February 2006, the company was acquired by Oracle Corporation, where Bostic worked until February 2008. Bostic is the author of nvi, a re-implementation of the classic text editor vi.
    8.00
    5 votes
    8
    Charles Simonyi

    Charles Simonyi

    Charles Simonyi (Hungarian: Simonyi Károly [ˈʃimoɲi ˈkɑːroj]; born September 10, 1948, son of Károly Simonyi) is a Hungarian-American computer software executive who, as head of Microsoft's application software group, oversaw the creation of Microsoft's flagship Office suite of applications. He now heads his own company, Intentional Software, with the aim of developing and marketing his concept of intentional programming. In April 2007, aboard Soyuz TMA-10, he became the fifth space tourist and the second Hungarian in space. In March 2009, aboard Soyuz TMA-14, he made a second trip to the International Space Station. His estimated net worth is US$1 billion. Simonyi was born in Budapest, Hungary, the son of Simonyi Károly (the elder), a professor of electrical engineering at Technical University of Budapest. While in high school he worked part-time as a night watchman at a computer laboratory, overseeing a large Soviet Ural II mainframe. He took an interest in computing and learned to program from one of the laboratory's engineers. By the time he left school, he had learned to develop compilers and sold one of these to a government department. He presented a demonstration of his
    8.75
    4 votes
    9
    Larry Ewing

    Larry Ewing

    Larry Ewing is a U.S. computer programmer who is known as the creator of the Linux mascot, Tux. He also created the Ximian monkey logo and is involved in: He is living in Austin with his wife Kristy and his daughter Eva.
    8.50
    4 votes
    10
    Yanoff Scott

    Yanoff Scott

    Scott Yanoff (born October 20, 1969) is an IT manager and web developer who was a key person in the early days of the internet, most notably for creating and maintaining the Yanoff List, an alphabetical list of internet sites. Yanoff authored the Inter-Network Mail Guide, a text written in 1997 documenting the different methods of sending email from one network to another. He was also a co-author of The Web Site Administrator's Survival Guide with Jerry Ablan, a book that explains how to set up, administer, care for, and feed your own Web server. Most of this work was accomplished as an undergraduate student at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, while working as a mainframe/UNIX consultant for the university. He has worked for the now-defunct Strong Capital Management in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin and currently works for Northwestern Mutual in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In the early and mid-1990s, before the use of search engines, the Yanoff List became an essential tool for Internet users. The list consisted of Internet sites listed alphabetically and grouped by subject acting as a type of Internet Yellow Pages containing hundreds of FTP, gopher, and Web locations relevant to each
    8.50
    4 votes
    11
    Harald Welte

    Harald Welte

    Harald Welte (born 1979) is a programmer resident in Berlin, Germany. Within the free software community, Welte is well known as a hacker of the Linux kernel and for his activities in enforcing the GNU General Public License (GPL), the license that governs the use of much of free software. Welte is also involved in a number of free software projects, such as Openmoko, (a version of Linux for completely open, low-cost, high-volume phones) and the netfilter/iptables project (the core firewall mechanism in Linux-based firewall computers and routing devices). He is an active member of the Chaos Computer Club. Until 2007, Welte was the chairman of the core team responsible for the netfilter/iptables project. He is also credited with writing the UUCP over SSL how-to, and contributions to User-mode Linux and international encryption kernel projects, among others. Welte has become prominent for his work with gpl-violations.org - an organisation he set up in 2004 to track down and prosecute violators of the GPL, which had been untested in court until then. Welte was Lead System Architect for Openmoko, a project to create a smartphone platform using free software. It uses the Linux kernel,
    5.57
    7 votes
    12
    Leonard Adleman

    Leonard Adleman

    Leonard Max Adleman (born December 31, 1945) is an American theoretical computer scientist and professor of computer science and molecular biology at the University of Southern California. He is known for being a co-inventor of the RSA (Rivest–Shamir–Adleman) cryptosystem in 1977, and of DNA computing. RSA is in widespread use in security applications, including https. Born in California, Adleman grew up in San Francisco, and attended the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his BA degree in mathematics in 1968 and his Ph.D. degree in EECS in 1976. In 1994, his paper Molecular Computation of Solutions To Combinatorial Problems described the experimental use of DNA as a computational system. In it, he solved a seven-node instance of the Hamiltonian Graph problem, an NP-complete problem similar to the travelling salesman problem. While the solution to a seven-node instance is trivial, this paper is the first known instance of the successful use of DNA to compute an algorithm. DNA computing has been shown to have potential as a means to solve several other large-scale combinatorial search problems. In 2002, he and his research group managed to solve a 'nontrivial'
    6.33
    6 votes
    13
    Tom Christiansen

    Tom Christiansen

    Thomas S. Christiansen (born February 13, 1963), nicknamed "tchrist" or occasionally "thoth", is a Unix developer and user known for his work with the Perl programming language. Christiansen worked for several years at TSR Hobbies before attending the University of Wisconsin - Madison where he earned B.A.'s in Spanish and Computer Science, and an M.S. in Computer Science. He worked for five years at Convex Computer. In 1993, he established the Tom Christiansen Perl Consultancy, located in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. In 2010, he joined the Biomedical Text Mining Group at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Christiansen was one of the early contributors to Perl after its public release in 1987. He was the author of much of the core Perl documentation, including the manual pages perlfaq and perltoot. In 1996, Christiansen wrote "Csh Programming Considered Harmful" about the limitations inherent in C Shell Programming. Books he co-authored include the second (1996) and third (2000) editions of Programming Perl, the second (1997) edition of Learning Perl (and its spin-off Learning Perl on Win32 Systems) and The Perl Cookbook (1998). In 1999, he was one of the original recipients
    9.67
    3 votes
    14
    John Warnock

    John Warnock

    John Edward Warnock (born October 6, 1940) is an American computer scientist best known as the co-founder with Charles Geschke of Adobe Systems Inc., the graphics and publishing software company. Dr. Warnock was President of Adobe for his first two years and Chairman and CEO for his remaining sixteen years at the company. Although retired as CEO in 2001, he still co-chairs the board with Geschke. Warnock has pioneered the development of graphics, publishing, Web and electronic document technologies that have revolutionized the field of publishing and visual communications. Warnock was born in Salt Lake City, Utah and currently lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is married and has three children. Warnock has a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Philosophy, a Master of Science in Mathematics, a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering (Computer Science), and an honorary degree in Science, all from the University of Utah. At the University of Utah he was a member of the Gamma Beta Chapter of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. He also has an honorary degree from the American Film Institute. In 1976, while Warnock worked at Evans & Sutherland, a Salt Lake City-based computer graphics
    7.20
    5 votes
    15
    Alan Cox

    Alan Cox

    Alan Cox (born 22 July 1968 in Solihull, England) is a British computer programmer who formerly maintained the 2.2 branch of the Linux kernel and continues to be heavily involved in the development of the Linux kernel, an association that dates back to 1991. He lives in Swansea, Wales with his wife, Telsa Gwynne. While employed on the campus of Swansea University, Cox installed a very early version of Linux on one of the machines belonging to the university computer society. This was one of the first Linux installations on a busy network and revealed many bugs in the networking code. Cox fixed many of these bugs and went on to rewrite much of the networking subsystem. He then became one of the main developers and maintainers of the whole kernel. He maintained the 2.2 branch, and his own versions of the 2.4 branch (signified by an "ac" in the version, for example 2.4.13-ac1). This branch was very stable and contained bugfixes that went directly into the vendor kernels. He was once commonly regarded as being the "second in command" after Linus Torvalds himself, before reducing his involvement with Linux to study for an MBA. On 28 July 2009, Cox walked away from the TTY layer, which
    7.00
    5 votes
    16
    Benjamin Mako Hill

    Benjamin Mako Hill

    Benjamin Mako Hill (born December 2, 1980) is a Debian hacker, intellectual property researcher, activist and author. He is a contributor and free software developer as part of the Debian and Ubuntu projects as well as the author of two best-selling technical books on the subject, Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 Bible (ISBN 978-0-7645-7644-7) and The Official Ubuntu Book (ISBN 978-0-13-243594-9). He currently serves as a member of the Free Software Foundation board of directors. Hill has a Masters degree from the MIT Media Lab and is a PhD candidate at the MIT Sloan School of Management where he studies free software communities and business models. He is also a Fellow at the MIT Center for Civic Media where he coordinates the development of software for civic organizing. He has worked as an advisor and contractor for the One Laptop per Child project. He is a speaker for the GNU Project, and serves on the board of Software Freedom International (the organization that organizes Software Freedom Day). Since 2006 he is married to Mika Matsuzaki, having used mathematically constrained wedding vows at the marriage ceremony. Since 1999, Hill has been an active member of Debian. He has served as a
    7.00
    5 votes
    17
    Olivier Danvy

    Olivier Danvy

    Olivier Danvy is a French computer scientist specializing in programming languages, partial evaluation, and continuations at the University of Aarhus in Denmark. He is notable for the number of scientific papers which acknowledge his help. Writing in Nature, editor Declan Butler reports on an analysis of acknowledgments on nearly one third of a million scientific papers and reports that Danvy is "the most thanked person in computer science". Danvy himself is quoted as being "stunned to find my name at the top of the list", ascribing his position to a "series of coincidences": he is multidisciplinary, is well traveled, is part of an international PhD programme, is a networker, and belongs to a university department with a long tradition of having many international visitors.
    7.00
    5 votes
    18
    Rob Pike

    Rob Pike

    Robert C. Pike (born 1956) is a Canadian software engineer and author. He is best known for his work at Bell Labs, where he was a member of the Unix team and was involved in the creation of the Plan 9 from Bell Labs and Inferno operating systems, as well as the Limbo programming language. He also co-developed the Blit graphical terminal for Unix; before that he wrote the first window system for Unix in 1981. Pike is the sole inventor named in AT&T's US patent 4,555,775 or "backing store patent" that is part of the X graphic system protocol and one of the first software patents. Over the years Pike has written many text editors; sam and acme are the most well known and are still in active use and development. Pike, with Brian Kernighan, is the co-author of The Practice of Programming and The Unix Programming Environment. With Ken Thompson he is the co-creator of UTF-8. Pike also developed lesser systems such as the vismon program for displaying images of faces of email authors. Pike also appeared once on Late Night with David Letterman, as a technical assistant to the comedy duo Penn and Teller. As a joke Pike claims to have won the 1980 Olympic silver medal in Archery; however,
    7.00
    5 votes
    19
    Tim Riker

    Tim Riker

    Tim Riker is a software developer, most known for his contributions to the free software community as the maintainer of the BZFlag 3D multiplayer game project. Other open source projects he has led or maintained include the TuxScreen web phone, and the StrongARM Linux kernel for the Sharp Zaurus SL-5000D, the blootbot IRC bot. Riker is also a member of the Debian GNU/Linux development team.
    7.00
    5 votes
    20
    John Lansdown

    John Lansdown

    Robert John Lansdown (2 January 1929 Cardiff, Wales - 17 February 1999) was a British computer graphics pioneer, polymath and Professor Emeritus at Middlesex University Lansdown Centre for Electronic Arts, which was renamed in his honour in 2000. As early as 1960, Lansdown, a very successful architect with offices in Russell Square, central London, was a believer in the potential for computers for architecture and other creative activities. He pioneered the use of computers as an aid to planning; making perspective drawings on an Elliott 803 computer in 1963, modeling a building's lifts and services, plotting the annual fall of daylight across its site, as well as authoring his own computer aided design applications. Lansdown joined the ACM in 1972 and Eurographics in 1983. From the early 1970s to the 1990s, he had influential roles in several professional bodies, and chaired the Science Research Council's Computer Aided Building Design Panel, through which he implemented a world leading strategy for developing computer aided architectural design in British universities. He had enormous influence as one of the founders and as secretary of the Computer Arts Society (1968–1991). He
    9.33
    3 votes
    21
    Mike Hudack

    Mike Hudack

    Mike Hudack (25 years old) is a founder and the CEO of blip.tv, a video hosting and distribution service catering to creators of original shows. The company also provides a user-generated content platform for Turner Broadcasting (including CNN, Cartoon Network and SuperDeluxe), Conde Nast and Oxygen Television. Before founding blip.tv, Hudack worked as a software developer and systems administrator for the National Hockey League and as a consultant to Time Warner. Hudack also designed and developed a series of politically-oriented blogging platforms and projects in the years immediately following the September 11 terrorist attacks, including the Warblogs:CC metablog. In his capacity as CEO of blip.tv Hudack speaks frequently at conferences and is often quoted in the media on the subject of user-generated content and Internet video. He has been a featured speaker at Jeff Pulver's Video on the Net, Digital Hollywood, Vloggercon, SXSW, Streaming Media West and TelcoTV.
    6.00
    6 votes
    22
    Brian Behlendorf

    Brian Behlendorf

    Brian Behlendorf (born March 30, 1973) is a technologist, computer programmer, and an important figure in the open-source software movement. He was a primary developer of the Apache Web server, the most popular web server software on the Internet, and a founding member of the Apache Group, which later became the Apache Software Foundation. Behlendorf served as President of the Foundation for three years. Behlendorf has served on the board of the Mozilla Foundation since 2003. Behlendorf, raised in Southern California, became interested in the early development of the Internet while he was a student at the University of California, Berkeley in the early 1990s. One of his first projects was an electronic mailing list and online music resource, SFRaves, which a friend persuaded him to start in 1992. Behlendorf was an early participant and the chief technology guru for the Burning Man festival, and also founded a large online resource devoted to electronic music and related subcultures. In 1993, Behlendorf, Jonathan Nelson, Matthew Nelson and Cliff Skolnick co-founded Organic, Inc., the first business dedicated to building commercial web sites. While developing the first online,
    6.80
    5 votes
    23
    Paul Allen

    Paul Allen

    Paul Gardner Allen (born January 21, 1953) is an American investor and philanthropist best known as the co-founder of Microsoft Corporation along with Bill Gates, a leading developer of personal-computer software systems and applications. He is also the 48th richest person in the world along with Germán Larrea Mota-Velasco (and family) who ranks the same with an estimated wealth of $14.2 billion as of March 2012.. He is the founder and chairman of Vulcan Inc., which manages his business and philanthropic efforts. Allen also has a multi-billion dollar investment portfolio which includes technology companies, real estate holdings, and stakes in other technology, media, and content companies. Allen also owns two professional sports teams, the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League (NFL), and the Portland Trail Blazers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He is also part-owner of the Seattle Sounders FC, which joined Major League Soccer (MLS) in 2009. Allen's memoir Idea Man: A Memoir by the Cofounder of Microsoft was released on April 19, 2011. Paul Allen was born in Seattle, Washington, to parents Kenneth Samuel Allen, an associate director of the University of
    9.00
    3 votes
    24
    Steve Russell

    Steve Russell

    Steve "Slug" Russell is a programmer and computer scientist most famous for creating Spacewar!, one of the earliest videogames, in 1961 with the fellow members of the Tech Model Railroad Club at MIT working on a DEC Digital PDP-1. While there is some debate over priority regarding the concept of computer-based games in general, Spacewar! was unquestionably the first to gain widespread recognition, and is generally recognized as the first of the "shoot-'em' up" genre. Steve Russell wrote the first two implementations of Lisp for the IBM 704. It was Russell who realized that the concept of universal functions could be applied to the language; by implementing the Lisp universal evaluator in a lower-level language, it became possible to create the Lisp interpreter (previous development work on the language had focused on compiling the language). He invented the continuation to solve a double recursion problem for one of the users of his Lisp implementation. Steve Russell is an alumn of Dartmouth College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    9.00
    3 votes
    25
    Aaron Swartz

    Aaron Swartz

    Aaron Swartz (born November 8, 1986) is an American programmer, writer, political organizer and Internet activist. He is best known in programming circles for co-authoring the RSS 1.0 specification. He received mainstream media attention after his federal indictment and arrest on 19 July 2011, for allegedly harvesting academic journal articles from JSTOR. Swartz is the co-founder of Demand Progress and the Progressive Change Campaign Committee. He currently lives in Brooklyn, New York. Swartz was active in discussions of Internet standards from an early age, and co-authored the specification for RSS by the time he was 14. Since then he has been a member of the W3C's RDF Core Working Group, co-designed the formatting language Markdown with John Gruber, and worked on many other projects. Swartz attended Stanford University for a year, leaving to start the software company Infogami, a startup that was funded by Y Combinator's first Summer Founders Program. Infogami was built around a wiki backend, a subject of interest for Swartz since his early effort to develop theinfo, a wiki-based encyclopedia, in 2000. Within a year, Infogami merged with Reddit to form not a bug, though the
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Andy Hunt

    Andy Hunt

    Andy Hunt (sometimes credited as Andrew Hunt) is a writer of books on software development. Hunt co-authored The Pragmatic Programmer, six other books and many articles, and was one of the 17 original authors of the Agile Manifesto and founders of the Agile Alliance. He and partner Dave Thomas founded the Pragmatic Bookshelf series of books for software developers.
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Damian Conway

    Damian Conway

    Damian Conway (born 5 October 1964) is a prominent member of the Perl community, a proponent of object-oriented programming, and the author of several books. He is also an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Faculty of Information Technology at Monash University. Damian completed his B.Sc. (with honours) and Ph.D. at Monash. He is perhaps best known for his contributions to CPAN and Perl 6 language design, his entertaining and erudite conference talks, and his Perl training courses. He has contributed the following modules (among others) to CPAN: He has won the Larry Wall Award three times for CPAN contributions. His involvement in Perl 6 language design has been as an interlocutor and explicator of Larry Wall. He is one of the authors of the Significantly Prettier and Easier C++ Syntax.
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Engineer

    Engineer

    An engineer is a professional practitioner of engineering, concerned with applying scientific knowledge, mathematics and ingenuity to develop solutions for technical, social and economic problems. Engineers design materials, structures and systems while considering the limitations imposed by practicality, safety and cost. The word engineer is derived from the Latin roots ingeniare ("to contrive, devise") and ingenium ("cleverness"). Engineers are grounded in applied sciences, and their work in research and development is distinct from the basic research focus of scientists. The work of engineers forms the link between scientific discoveries and their subsequent applications to human needs and quality of life. Engineers develop new technological solutions. During the engineering design process, the responsibilities of the engineer may include defining problems, conducting and narrowing research, analyzing criteria, finding and analyzing solutions, and making decisions. Much of an engineer's time is spent on researching, locating, applying, and transferring information. Indeed, research suggests engineers spend 56% of their time engaged in various different information behaviours,
    7.75
    4 votes
    29
    Justin Frankel

    Justin Frankel

    Justin Frankel (born 1978) is an American computer programmer best known for his work on the Winamp media player application and for inventing the gnutella peer-to-peer network. He's also the founder of Cockos Incorporated which creates music production and development software such as the REAPER digital audio workstation, the NINJAM collaborative music tool and the Jesusonic expandable effects processor. In 2002, he was named in the MIT Technology Review TR100 as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35. Justin Frankel was born in 1978 and grew up in Sedona, Arizona. His father, Charles, was a lawyer, and his mother, Kathleen, worked as a rural mail carrier and in a health food store. Justin had an aptitude for computers at an early age. His skill eventually led him to running the student computer network of Verde Valley School he attended, as well as writing an email application for the students. He also wrote a keystroke logging program that could record keystrokes of people using those computers, though he claims to have not actually used it. While in high school he started using the moniker Nullsoft for his software. After graduating high school with a
    7.75
    4 votes
    30
    Miguel de Icaza

    Miguel de Icaza

    Miguel de Icaza (born c. 1972) is a Mexican free software programmer, best known for starting the GNOME and Mono projects. Miguel de Icaza was born in Mexico City and studied at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México (UNAM) but never received a degree. He came from a family of scientists in which his father is a physicist and his mother a biologist. He started writing free software in 1992. One of the earliest pieces of software he wrote for Linux was the Midnight Commander file manager, a text-mode file manager. He was also one of the early contributors to the Wine project. He worked with David Miller on the Linux SPARC port and wrote several of the video and network drivers in the port, as well as the libc ports to the platform. They both later worked on extending Linux for MIPS to run on SGI's Indy computers and wrote the original X drivers for the system. With Ingo Molnar he wrote the original software implementation of RAID-1 and RAID-5 drivers of the Linux kernel. In summer of 1997, he was interviewed by Microsoft for a job in the Internet Explorer Unix team (to work on a SPARC port), but lacked the university degree required to obtain a work H-1B visa. He declared in an
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Mike Cowlishaw

    Mike Cowlishaw

    Mike Cowlishaw is a retired IBM Fellow, a Visiting Professor at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Warwick, and is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering (roughly the equivalent of the NAE in the USA), the Institute of Engineering and Technology (formerly IEE), and the British Computer Society. Cowlishaw joined IBM in 1974 as an electronic engineer but is best known as a programmer and writer. He is known for designing and implementing the REXX programming language (published in IBM Systems Journal in 1984) and the NetRexx programming language (1996–1997), his work on color perception and image processing (1982–1985), the STET folding editor (1977), the LEXX live parsing editor (1985, possibly the first editor with color highlighting) for the Oxford English Dictionary, electronic publishing, SGML applications, PMGlobe, the IBM Jargon file (IBMJARG) through 1990, Java-related languages, the Acorn System 1 simulator, MemoWiki, and decimal arithmetic. He has also contributed to and/or edited numerous computing standards, including ISO (SGML, COBOL, C, C++), BSI (SGML, C), ANSI (REXX), IETF (HTTP 1.0/RFC 1945), W3C (XML Schema), ECMA (ECMAScript, C#, CLI),
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Molly Holzschlag

    Molly Holzschlag

    Molly E. Holzschlag (born January 25, 1963) is a lecturer and author of over 35 books related to web design and markup. She has been named one of San Francisco Webgrrls' Top 25 Most Influential Women on the Web. She currently works as a self-employed consultant and trainer, serves as a member of the CSS Working Group and is an invited expert to the HTML working groups of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Formerly group lead of the Web Standards Project (WaSP), Holzschlag has worked for major organizations including Opera Software Microsoft, AOL, eBay and the BBC. Through these roles, Holzschlag promotes standards and best practices to create highly sustainable, maintainable, accessible, interactive and beautiful Web sites. Holzschlag is the co-author, with Dave Shea, of the book The Zen of CSS Design: Visual Enlightenment for the Web, published in 2005.
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Brendan Eich

    Brendan Eich

    Brendan Eich ( /ˈaɪk/; born 1961) is a computer programmer and creator of the JavaScript scripting language. He is the chief technology officer at the Mozilla Corporation. Brendan Eich received his bachelor's degree in mathematics and computer science at Santa Clara University. He received his master's degree in 1986 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Eich started his career at Silicon Graphics, working for seven years on operating system and network code. He then worked for three years at MicroUnity Systems Engineering writing microkernel and DSP code, and doing the first MIPS R4000 port of GCC. Eich is best known for his work on Netscape and Mozilla. He started work at Netscape Communications Corporation in April 1995, working on JavaScript (originally called Mocha, then called LiveScript) for the Netscape Navigator web browser. In 2010, he wrote about JavaScript: "JS had to 'look like Java' only less so, be Java’s dumb kid brother or boy-hostage sidekick. Plus, I had to be done in ten days or something worse than JS would have happened". He then helped found mozilla.org in early 1998, serving as chief architect. When AOL shut down the Netscape browser unit in
    6.60
    5 votes
    34
    Karl Lehenbauer

    Karl Lehenbauer

    Karl Lehenbauer (born April 5, 1958) was the founder of NeoSoft in the early 1990s, which was the first Internet Service Provider in the southern United States as well as the first to offer cable modem service in Houston, Texas, among other technological milestones. NeoSoft was later sold to Internet America in 1998. Lehenbauer also wrote the Internet (socket) capabilities of the Tcl programming language. Lehenbauer has been contributing to the development of Internet software and protocols since 1986. Lehenbauer is the co-creator of the TclX programming language, much of which has now been incorporated into Tcl. Lehenbauer now serves as the CTO of Superconnect, an enterprise cable/telecom monitoring software company and also as CTO of FlightAware, an aviation data and flight tracking company. Lehenbauer founded or is a major contributor to the following Internet software projects: Lehenbauer lives in Houston, Texas with his wife and two daughters. He is an avid philanthropist, cyclist, and private pilot.
    5.67
    6 votes
    35
    Gerald Jay Sussman

    Gerald Jay Sussman

    Gerald Jay Sussman (February 8, 1947) is the Panasonic Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received his S.B. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from MIT in 1968 and 1973 respectively. He has been involved in artificial intelligence research at MIT since 1964. His research has centered on understanding the problem-solving strategies used by scientists and engineers, with the goals of automating parts of the process and formalizing it to provide more effective methods of science and engineering education. Sussman has also worked in computer languages, in computer architecture and in VLSI design. Sussman is a coauthor (with Hal Abelson and Julie Sussman) of the former introductory computer science textbook used at MIT. This textbook, Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, has been translated into several languages. Sussman's contributions to artificial intelligence include problem solving by debugging almost-right plans, propagation of constraints applied to electrical circuit analysis and synthesis, dependency-based explanation and dependency-based backtracking, and various language structures for expressing
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Andrew Plotkin

    Andrew Plotkin

    Andrew Plotkin (born May 15, 1970), also known as Zarf, is a central figure in the modern interactive fiction community. Having both written a number of award-winning games and developed a range of new file formats, interpreters, and other utilities for the design, production, and running of IF games, Plotkin is widely recognised for both his creative and his technical contributions to the homebrew IF scene. Plotkin was one of the earliest writers to use Graham Nelson's Inform development system, and one of the first since Infocom's heyday to explore the boundaries of interactive fiction as an artistic medium. Many later authors cite him as a primary influence. He has won many awards within the community, and is frequently interviewed for magazine articles about interactive fiction. Plotkin has also made major technical contributions to the interactive fiction medium, designing the Blorb archive format, the Glk I/O platform, and the Glulx virtual machine, and implementing Glulx Inform and several interactive fiction interpreters for the Macintosh and X. The Glk API has made possible the creation of "universal translator" interpreters such as Gargoyle, a single program capable of
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Larry Wall

    Larry Wall

    Larry Wall (born September 27, 1954) is a computer programmer and author, most widely known for his creation of the Perl programming language in 1987. Wall grew up in south Los Angeles and then Bremerton, Washington before starting higher education at Seattle Pacific University in 1976, majoring in chemistry and music and later Pre-med with a hiatus of several years working in the university's computing center before being graduated with a self-styled bachelor's degree in Natural and Artificial Languages. While in graduate school at UC Berkeley, Wall and his wife were studying linguistics with the intention afterwards of finding an unwritten language, perhaps in Africa, and creating a writing system for it. They would then use this new writing system to translate various texts into the language, among them the Bible. Due to health reasons these plans were cancelled, and they remained in the U.S., where Larry instead joined the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory after he finished graduate school. Wall is the author of the rn Usenet client and the nearly universally used patch program. He has won the International Obfuscated C Code Contest twice and was the recipient of the first Free
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Martin Fierz

    Martin Fierz

    Martin Fierz (born July 18th, 1971) is an aerosol measurement expert, a chess player and a programmer. He is the inventor of the Diffusion Size Classifier (DiSC). Martin Fierz learned how to play chess when he was about five years old. About five years later, he joined a chess club.Fierz was fascinated with spaceships when he saw the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, which inspired him to become an engineer. Fierz became so interested in chess that he attempted to write a chess program, but failed. After several failed attempts, he decided to give up programming chess and try programming Connect Four instead. He decided to make a Connect Four program and compete it against his physics student, Andri Schaufelbᅢᄐhl who is also making a Connect Four program, at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. As he felt more comfortable in making a chess program, he tried but again failed. Therefore, he thought of making a checkers program, which he got the idea from reading Time magazine about Marion Tinsley, a checkers player competing against Chinook, a checkers program. Also, he found out that programming checkers is not as complex as programming chess. Then he became very
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Matthias Ettrich

    Matthias Ettrich

    Matthias Ettrich (born 14 June 1972 in Bietigheim-Bissingen, Baden-Württemberg) is a German computer scientist known for his contributions to the KDE and LyX projects. Matthias went to School in Beilstein, as he lived with his parents in Oberstenfeld, not too far away from the place he was born. He passed the Abitur in 1991. Ettrich studied for his MSc in Computer Science at the Wilhelm Schickard Institute for Computer Science at the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. He currently resides in Berlin, Germany. He works for Nokia on the Qt graphical widget toolkit and the Qt Creator IDE. Ettrich founded and furthered the LyX project in 1995, initially conceived as a university term project. LyX is a graphical frontend to LaTeX. Since LyX's main target platform was Linux, he started to explore different ways to improve the graphical user interface, which ultimately led him to the KDE project. Ettrich founded KDE in 1996, when he proposed on Usenet a "consistent, nice looking free desktop-environment" [sic] for Unix-like systems using Qt as its widget toolkit. On 6 Nov 2009, Ettrich was decorated with the Federal Cross of Merit for his contributions to Free Software.
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Robert Tappan Morris

    Robert Tappan Morris

    Robert Tappan Morris (born November 8, 1965) is an American computer scientist, best known for creating the Morris Worm in 1988, considered the first computer worm on the Internet - and subsequently becoming the first person convicted under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. He went on to co-found the online store Viaweb, one of the first web-based applications, and later the funding firm Y Combinator - both with Paul Graham. He is a tenured professor in the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His father was the late Robert Morris, a coauthor of UNIX and the former chief scientist at the National Computer Security Center, a division of the National Security Agency (NSA). Morris created the worm while he was a graduate student at Cornell University. The original intent, according to him, was to gauge the size of the Internet. He released the worm from MIT to conceal the fact that it actually originated from Cornell. The worm exploited several vulnerabilities to gain entry to targeted systems, including: However, the worm had a design flaw. The worm was programmed to check each computer it found to determine if the
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Dries Buytaert

    Dries Buytaert

    Dries Buytaert (born 19 November 1978 in Wilrijk, Antwerp, Belgium) is an open-source software programmer notable as founder and lead developer of the Drupal CMS. Buytaert defended his PhD dissertation in Computer Science on 27 January 2008 at Ghent University in Belgium. From 1999-2000 he was the maintainer of the Linux-WLAN FAQ. On 1 December 2007, Dries announced, together with co-founder Jay Batson the launch of a start-up called Acquia. Acquia is a commercial open-source software company providing products, services, and technical support for Drupal. Acquia wants to be to Drupal what Red Hat has been to Linux. In 2009, Acquia helped re-launch Whitehouse.gov on Drupal. On 31 March 2008, Dries launched Mollom, a service dedicated to stopping website spam: "Mollom's purpose is to dramatically reduce the effort of keeping your site clean and the quality of your content high. Currently, Mollom is a spam-killing one-two punch combination of a state-of-the-art spam filter and CAPTCHA server." Over 15,000 websites are protected by the Mollom service, including all of Netlog's messages. In 2008, Buytaert was elected "Young Entrepreneurs of Tech" by BusinessWeek. He was also named to
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Frédérick Raynal

    Frédérick Raynal

    Frédérick Raynal is a French video game designer and programmer, notable for his game developments in Infogrames, Adeline Software International and No Cliché. He is married to Yaël Barroz, a fellow game designer, with whom he has two children. He is perhaps best known for Alone in the Dark, a game that established many conventions of the survival horror genre. Raynal also has a cult following for his Little Big Adventure series. Raynal and other former Adeline members have repeatedly told fans that creating the third installment is made difficult by having to license or reacquire the rights to the franchise, which currently belong to Delphine Software International. However, Raynal has hinted that his current company, Ludoïd, which Raynal owns jointly with his wife, is attempting to negotiate the rights for a game to be called Little Big Adventure 3: Genesis of the Stellar Entity, and at least one sketch, by Didier Chanfray, related to development of the title has been leaked to the public, later to be confirmed as appurtenant by Raynal. Frederic Raynal was born in 1966 in Brive-la-Gaillarde, Corrèze (France). Beginning in his high school years, Raynal made early LED games
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Rusty Russell

    Rusty Russell

    Paul "Rusty" Russell is an Australian free software programmer and advocate. Russell wrote the packet filtering systems ipchains and netfilter/iptables in the Linux operating system kernel. Linus Torvalds referred to him as one of his "top deputies" in 2003. In 2002, Russell announced the creation of the Trivial Patch Monkey, an email address for kernel hackers to submit trivial patches such as spelling errors, one-liners, documentation tweaks and other minor amendments to the code base. Adrian Bunk took over the role in 2005. In 2006 Russell started work as the major developer of the "lguest" virtualisation system in the Linux Kernel. In October 2009, he was officially given a SAMBA Team T-shirt welcoming him to the Samba Team. Russell conceived and conducted the Conference of Australian Linux Users at Monash University in 1999, the forerunner of the annual linux.conf.au conference series. Russell is intellectual property advisor to Linux Australia and is active in advocating against and critiquing intellectual property elements of the Free Trade Agreement between Australia and the United States. He was also a member of the Linux Australia committee in 2004. Russell was the
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    William Chen

    William Chen

    William "Bill" Chen (born 1970 in Williamsburg, Virginia) is an American quantitative analyst, poker player, and software designer. Chen holds a Ph.D. in mathematics (1999) from the University of California, Berkeley. He was an undergraduate at Washington University in St. Louis triple-majoring in Physics, Math, and Computer Science, and was also a research intern in Washington University's Computer Science SURA Program where he co-wrote a technical report inventing an Argument Game. He heads the Statistical Arbitrage department at Susquehanna International Group. At the 2006 World Series of Poker Chen won two events, a $3,000 limit Texas Hold 'em event with a prize of $343,618, and a $2,500 no limit hold 'em short-handed event with a prize of $442,511. Prior to these events Chen's largest tournament win was for $41,600 at a no limit hold 'em event at the Bicycle Casino's Legends of Poker in 2000. Chen has been a longtime participant in the rec.gambling.poker newsgroup and its B.A.R.G.E offshoot. He is also a member of Team PokerStars. With Jerrod Ankenman, Chen coauthored The Mathematics of Poker, an introduction to quantitative techniques and game theory as applied to poker. In
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    D. Richard Hipp

    D. Richard Hipp

    Dwayne Richard Hipp (born April 9, 1961) is the architect and primary author of SQLite as well as Fossil SCM. He and his wife, Ginger G. Wyrick, currently live and work in Charlotte, North Carolina. He also authored the Lemon Parser Generator and CVSTrac. CVSTrac became the inspiration for Trac. He is also a member of the Tcl core team. Hipp uses Richard as his first name, or D. Richard Hipp when using his whole name. The name "Dwayne" appears in his dissertation at Duke University. Hipp was born in Charlotte on April 9, 1961 but grew up in the suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia. He graduated from Stone Mountain High School in 1979 and enrolled at Georgia Tech. He graduated from Georgia Tech in 1984 with Master of Science in Electrical Engineering. After graduating from Georgia Tech, Hipp worked at AT&T for three years before returning to graduate school at Duke University to study under Alan W. Biermann in the Department of Computer Science. He took the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Duke in 1992 and finding the academic market for Ph.D.s saturated with what he believed to be better qualified candidates, started his own software development consulting company. He married Ginger G.
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Joshua Bloch

    Joshua Bloch

    Joshua J. Bloch (born August 28, 1961) is a software engineer, formerly employed at Google, and a technology author. He led the design and implementation of numerous Java platform features, including the Java Collections Framework, the java.math package, and the assert mechanism. He is the author of the programming guide Effective Java, which won the 2001 Jolt Award, and is a co-author of two other Java books, Java Puzzlers (2005) and Java Concurrency In Practice (2006). Bloch holds a B.S. in Computer Science from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University. His 1990 thesis was titled A Practical Approach to Replication of Abstract Data Objects and was nominated for the ACM Distinguished Doctoral Dissertation Award. Bloch has worked as a Senior Systems Designer at Transarc, and later as a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems. In June 2004 he left Sun and became Chief Java Architect at Google. In December 2004, Java Developer's Journal included Bloch in its list of the "Top 40 Software People in the World". Bloch has proposed the extension of the Java programming language with two features: Concise Instance Creation Expressions (CICE)
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Ken Silverman

    Ken Silverman

    Ken Silverman (born November 1, 1975) is a game programmer, best known for writing the Build engine used in Duke Nukem 3D, Shadow Warrior, Blood, and more than a dozen other games in the mid- to late-1990s. Once considered the primary rival of John Carmack, Silverman started work on the Build engine sometime before his first semester at Brown University in 1993, under a contract with Apogee Software. Prior to this, Silverman created Ken's Labyrinth, which was later completed and published by Epic Games. Ken's Labyrinth is a first-person shooter game coded by Silverman. It was originally released in 1993 as shareware by Epic Megagames. The source code to the project and even older versions can now be found on Silverman's website. The Build engine is a first-person shooter engine created by Ken Silverman for 3D Realms from 1993–1996. The engine was used in a number of popular games of the era, and its source code is now released. Shortly after the Duke Nukem 3D source code was released, Silverman added the Polymost renderer to the Build engine. In 2000, Silverman started work on Voxlap, a voxel-driven graphics engine. In addition to the engine, a Voxlap-powered tech demo was
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Stuart Langridge

    Stuart Langridge

    Stuart Langridge (also known as 'Aq' or 'Zippy' ) is the author of two books for technical publisher SitePoint, DHTML Utopia, and Run Your Own Web Server Using Linux & Apache (with Tony Steidler-Dennison) as well as writing the Stylish Scripting weblog during 2005. Langridge is a member of the Web Standards Project's DOM Scripting Task Force, an invited expert on the W3C HTML Working Group and is an acknowledged commentator on DOM Scripting and JavaScript techniques. His current projects include Jokosher, a multi-track audio editor for GNOME, and Jackfield, a program to run Mac OS X Dashboard widgets under GNOME. In addition, he works on Desktop Couch in his role as Canonical Ltd. staffer. Despite this, Langridge is perhaps best known as a presenter of the now defunct LugRadio, which was a free software podcast in the UK. Along with Jono Bacon, he was the longest-serving member of the team and often served to incite discussion around issues that more directly related to software freedom. In LugRadio he frequently advocated freedom, yet despite this often attracted criticism for using proprietary software. Langridge has recently been involved in the Shot of Jaq podcast, in
    6.20
    5 votes
    49
    Dave Colclough

    Dave Colclough

    David E. Colclough (born 4 March 1964 in Carmarthen, Wales) is a Welsh professional poker player. Prior to becoming a poker professional, Colclough worked as a computer programmer. Amongst the companies he worked for were the Post Office and the National Health Service. He left computing after the 2000 World Series of Poker. Colclough has played in many poker variants. Between 2000 and 2008 he finished in the top ten overall in the European Rankings six times. His tournament accomplishments include a second at the 2000 World Series of Poker $2,000 pot limit hold'em event and a final table appearance at the World Poker Tour's third season Grand Prix de Paris event, where he won €84,890 ($103,507). In 2005, he reached the semi-finals of the World Heads-Up Poker Championship, earning €20,000. In 2003, he was voted European Poker Player of the Year. Colclough was inducted into the European Poker Players Hall of Fame during 2005, and at the age of 41 was the youngest inductee at that time. As of 2011 his total live poker tournament winnings exceed $2,600,000.
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Dave D. Taylor

    Dave D. Taylor

    Dave D. Taylor is an American game programmer, best known as a former id Software employee and noted for his work promoting Linux gaming. In 1993 he graduated from University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering. He worked for id Software between 1993 and 1996, and was during the time involved with the development of Doom and Quake. He created ports of both games to IRIX, AIX, Solaris and Linux, and helped program the Atari Jaguar ports of Doom and Wolfenstein 3D. He also considers himself to have been the "spackle coder" on Doom, for adding things such as the status bar, sound library integration, the automap, level transitions, cheat codes, and the network chat system. On Quake, he wrote the original sound engine, the DOS TCP/IP network library, and added VESA 2.0 support. One of the musical themes in Doom II, "Dave D. Taylor Blues", was named after him by Robert Prince. His work for id caused him to be mentioned several times in the book Masters of Doom: How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture. Specifically mentioned was his habit of passing out after prolonged playing of Doom, and how the other employees would, after
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Charles H. Moore

    Charles H. Moore

    Charles H. Moore (also known as Chuck Moore) (born 1938) is the inventor of the Forth programming language. In 1968, while employed at the United States National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Moore invented the initial version of the Forth language to help control radio telescopes. In 1971 he co-founded (with Elizabeth Rather) FORTH, Inc., the first, and still one of the leading, purveyors of Forth solutions. During the 1970s he ported Forth to dozens of computer architectures. In the 1980s, Moore turned his attention and Forth development techniques to CPU design, developing several stack machine microprocessors and gaining several microprocessor-related patents along the way. His designs have all emphasized high performance at low power usage. He also explored alternate Forth architectures such as cmForth and machine Forth, which more closely matched his chips' machine languages. These later evolved in 1996 into colorForth for the IBM PC. In 1983 Moore founded Novix, Inc., where he developed the NC4000 processor. This design was licensed to Harris Semiconductor which marketed it as the RTX2000, a radiation hardened stack processor which has been used in numerous NASA
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Rebecca Heineman

    Rebecca Heineman

    Rebecca Ann Heineman (born William Salvador Heineman) is an American video game programmer. A long-time veteran of the computer game industry (originally credited mostly as Bill Heineman), Heineman was a founding member of Interplay Productions, Logicware, Contraband Entertainment. She has also been affiliated at various times with Barking Lizards Technologies, Electronic Arts, Bloomberg, Microsoft, MacPlay and Ubisoft, among other game companies. She is currently working for Sony Computer Entertainment in the Foster City office. She won the National Space Invaders Championship, sponsored by Atari, in November, 1980, making her the first person to ever win a national video game contest. In the mid-1980s, Heineman programmed the cult classic graphic adventure games Tass Times in Tonetown and The Bard's Tale III: Thief of Fate. Heineman also programmed the Macintosh, Super Nintendo and Apple IIGS ports of Another World, as well as some other lesser-known games, such as Mindshadow, Borrowed Time, Battle Chess, and The Tracer Sanction. Due to her love of storing hamburgers in her desk drawers, her friends call her "Burger" (and when they would call for her, she would sometimes respond
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    David Kirsch

    David Kirsch

    David "Zoid" Kirsch is a computer game designer and programmer. His first notable project was Threewave CTF (Capture the flag) modification for Quake, in 1996. He was hired by id Software in 1997 to develop the CTF modes, which he over time implemented for Quake II and Quake III Arena. He was also one of the leading programmers of QuakeWorld. At id, he was also one of the people responsible for maintaining the Linux ports of id games. In 2000, Kirsch departed id to work in Retro Studios. There, he ultimately ended up as a senior programmer for Metroid Prime and Metroid Prime 2: Echoes. Kirsch is currently employed by Valve Corporation, working on Dota 2.
    6.00
    5 votes
    54
    Dustin Moskovitz

    Dustin Moskovitz

    Dustin Moskovitz (born May 22, 1984) is an American internet entrepreneur who co-founded the social networking website Facebook along with Mark Zuckerberg, Eduardo Saverin and Chris Hughes. In 2008, he left Facebook to co-found Asana with Justin Rosenstein. In March 2011 Forbes ranked Moskovitz as the world's youngest self-made billionaire on the basis of his 7.6% share in Facebook. Moskovitz was born in Gainesville, Florida and grew up in Ocala, Florida. He is eight days younger than Zuckerberg. He attended Vanguard High School, graduating from the IB Diploma Programme. Moskovitz attended Harvard University as an economics major for two years before he moved with Mark Zuckerberg to Palo Alto. He went to work full-time on Facebook. Four people, three of whom were roommates — Mark Zuckerberg, Eduardo Saverin, Chris Hughes, and Dustin Moskovitz — founded Facebook in their Harvard University dorm room in February 2004. Originally called thefacebook.com, it was intended as an online directory of all Harvard's students to help residential students identify members of other residences. In June 2004, Zuckerberg and Moskovitz took a year off from Harvard and moved Facebook's base of
    6.00
    5 votes
    55
    Anders Odden

    Anders Odden

    Anders Odden (born 20 December 1972), is a musician. He is the co-founder and guitarist of the Norwegian death metal band Cadaver (1988–1993; 1999–2004), and is the live bass player for Norwegian black metal band Satyricon (2009–present). He is also the guitarist of Doctor Midnight & The Mercy Cult and Magenta. He has also been with bands like Karaoke From Hell and played live guitar for Apoptygma Berzerk (1992–1999; 2003–2006) and Celtic Frost (2006–2007). He have also had guest appearances with bands such as The Young Gods and Ministry among others. Anders was born in Stavanger. He moved to Fredrikstad and then to Råde sometime during his childhood, where he grew up without any TV and listened to his father's collection of classical music. He was unaware of rock music until the age of 7 when he discovered Kiss and devoted his life to music. Anders Odden started out as a black metal musician and artist in the mid 80s, and went on to start one of Norway's first death metal bands, Cadaver, in 1988. He went on with bands like Apoptygma Berzerk and Magenta, and reunited Cadaver in the late 1990s. He released two more albums with Cadaver, and toured with Morbid Angel, Extreme Noise
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Avaya

    Avaya

    Avaya Inc. /əˈvaɪ.ə/ is a privately held global provider of business communications and collaboration systems. The international headquarters is in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, United States. The company provides contact centers, networking (routers, switches and other networking hardware), unified communications, and video products (integrated hardware and software) solutions and services. In July and August 2000 interviews reported that Avaya Communications would be created on October 1, 2000 when the unified communications and call center businesses left Lucent Technologies Inc. or Lucent enterprises. The spun off of Avaya with 34,000 employees also received $400 million in capital from Warburg Pincus. Henry Schacht became the board chairman and the first CEO was Don Peterson who was promoted from the CFO position of Lucent. Avaya had a stock symbol of "AV" and debuted at $20 a share. Since 2001, the company has sold, and acquired several companies to support its current product set – Vista, VPNet. Quintus, Routescience, Nimcat Networks, Spectel, Ubiquity Software, and Traverse Networks. Sales through channels have grown from 98% direct to 50% alternative channels. In 2003 Avaya
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Craig McClanahan

    Craig McClanahan

    Craig R. McClanahan is a programmer and original author of the Apache Struts framework for building web applications. He was part of the expert group that defined the servlet 2.2, 2.3 and JSP 1.1, 1.2 specifications. He is also the architect of Tomcat's servlet container Catalina.
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Flim

    Flim

    Martin Millar (born Martin Majella Sean Millar on 9 May 1979 in County Armagh, Northern Ireland) is an electronic musician, record producer and composer. Millar programs and produces soundtracks for the film and animation production company Syncretik, while continuing to release his solo material. His film credits include Room to Let and Murphy 771. He has composed music for commercials Sleep Right and Speed Junkie 4 and web, Interactive CDrom and radio soundtracks for the NHS, BAE Systems, Saville Audio Visual, Nestlé and EMAP publishing. Soundtracks/ambient/mix and studio albums
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Erick Wujcik

    Erick Wujcik

    Erick Wujcik (January 26, 1951 – June 7, 2008) was an American designer of both pen-and-paper and computer role-playing games, and co-founder of Palladium Books. Wujcik started off as head of the gaming society at Wayne State University, and then as a computer columnist for The Detroit News where he wrote their weekly Computer Column from 1979 to 1981. That served to be a springboard for him to co-found Palladium Books alongside Kevin Siembieda and work on developing numerous role-playing games and supplements for such settings as Palladium Fantasy Role-Playing Game, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles & Other Strangeness, After the Bomb, Rifts, and many others, including Amber Diceless Roleplaying Game and Paranoia. Wujcik was also the director of the Detroit Gaming Center, and founder of the gaming conventions known as Ambercon. In 1997 he went to work for Sierra Studios and was lead game designer on the game Return to Krondor. He also served as a game designer at Outrage Entertainment for the game Alter Echo. Wujcik served as chief editor of Amberzine, a fanzine for the Amber Diceless Roleplaying Game, publishing the work of such notables as Ray Bradbury, Henry Kuttner, and Roger
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Why the lucky stiff

    Why the lucky stiff

    Jonathan Gillette, better known as why the lucky stiff (often abbreviated to Why or _why), was until 2009 a prolific writer, cartoonist, artist, and computer programmer notable for his work with the Ruby programming language. He was known as "one of the most unusual, and beloved, computer programmers" in the world before he abruptly disappeared from public view. Along with Yukihiro Matsumoto and David Heinemeier Hansson, he was seen as a key figure in the Ruby community. _why was the keynote speaker at RailsConf in 2006. He also had a speaking session titled "A Starry Afternoon, a Sinking Symphony, and the Polo Champ Who Gave It All Up for No Reason Whatsoever" at the 2005 O'Reilly Open Source Convention held in Portland, Oregon. It explored how to teach programming and make it more appealing to adolescents. On 19 August 2009, his online presence was drastically truncated; his accounts on Twitter and GitHub were shut down, along with many of his personally maintained sites. His projects have since been collected and centralized on the whymirror GitHub account. His best known work is Why's (poignant) Guide to Ruby, which "teaches Ruby with stories." Paul Adams of Webmonkey describes
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    David A. Wheeler

    David A. Wheeler

    David A. Wheeler (born 1965) is a computer scientist. He is best known for his work on Open source software/Free-libre software (FLOSS or OSS/FS) and Computer security. In 2000, Wheeler self-published "Why Open Source Software / Free Software? Look at the Numbers!", a text where he argued that considering FLOSS is justified. This article has been cited in over 80 scholarly works and in the 2004 report of the California Performance Review. Wheeler was interviewed about his webpage by Linux.com. In 2001, Wheeler published a webpage where he measured the source lines of code of the Red Hat Linux distribution version 7.1. By applying conventional cost-estimating techniques, he concluded that it would cost more than a billion US Dollars to develop this distribution by conventional proprietary means. This work has inspired one person to measure other FLOSS systems, the Debian distribution. In 2006, Wheeler posted "Nearly all FLOSS is Commercial" on his webpage. This is a critical issue in U.S. federal government acquisitions, because the U.S. government has laws and policies that prefer the acquisition of commercial items. He argues that FLOSS is defined as commercial software by the
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Jim Buckmaster

    Jim Buckmaster

    Jim Buckmaster (born August 14, 1962), a native of Ann Arbor, Michigan, is an American computer programmer who has been the CEO of Craigslist since 2000. He was an undergraduate at Virginia Tech and studied medicine and classics at the University of Michigan in the 1990s. In late 1999, after posting his resume on craigslist, he was recruited by Craig Newmark, the founder of the website. As lead programmer, he contributed the site's multi-city architecture, search engine, discussion forums, flagging system, self-posting process, homepage design, personals categories, and best-of-craigslist. In November 2000, he was promoted to the post of CEO. A fan of Noam Chomsky, Buckmaster has been accused of being "anti-capitalistic", which Buckmaster claims is an inaccurate characterization: "Companies looking to maximize revenue need to throw as many revenue-generating opportunities at users as they will tolerate," Buckmaster says. "We have absolutely no interest in doing that, which I think has been instrumental to the success of craigslist." Buckmaster has been described by Martin Sorrell as a "socialistic anarchist" and was once denounced on Fox News by Reverend Jerry Falwell Buckmaster
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Robert Cailliau

    Robert Cailliau

    Robert Cailliau (French: [kaˈjo]), born 26 January 1947, is a Belgian informatics engineer and computer scientist who, together with Sir Tim Berners-Lee, developed the World Wide Web. Cailliau was born in Tongeren, Belgium. In 1958 he moved with his parents to Antwerp. After secondary school he graduated from Ghent University in 1969 as civil engineer in electrical and mechanical engineering (Flemish: Burgerlijk Werktuigkundig en Elektrotechnisch ingenieur). He also has an MSc from the University of Michigan in Computer, Information and Control Engineering, 1971. During his military service in the Belgian Army he maintained Fortran programs to simulate troop movements. In December 1974 he started working at CERN as a Fellow in the Proton Synchrotron (PS) division, working on the control system of the accelerator. In April 1987 he left the PS division to become group leader of Office Computing Systems in the Data Handling division. In 1989, Tim Berners-Lee proposed a hypertext system for access to the many forms of documentation at and related to CERN. Berners-Lee created the system, calling it World Wide Web, between September to December 1990. During this time, Cailliau and he
    5.80
    5 votes
    64
    Alan Kay

    Alan Kay

    Alan Curtis Kay (born May 17, 1940) is an American computer scientist, known for his early pioneering work on object-oriented programming and windowing graphical user interface design, and for coining the phrase, "The best way to predict the future is to invent it." He is the president of the Viewpoints Research Institute, and an Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also on the advisory board of TTI/Vanguard. Until mid 2005, he was a Senior Fellow at HP Labs, a Visiting Professor at Kyoto University, and an Adjunct Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Alan Kay showed remarkable ability at an early age, learning to read fluently at three years old. In an interview on education in America with the Davis Group Ltd. Alan Kay said, "I had the fortune or misfortune to learn how to read fluently starting at the age of three. So I had read maybe 150 books by the time I hit 1st grade. And I already knew that the teachers were lying to me." Originally from Springfield, Massachusetts, Kay attended the University of Colorado at Boulder, earning a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics and Molecular Biology. Before and
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Andrey "KranK" Kuzmin

    Andrey "KranK" Kuzmin

    Andrey "KranK" Kuzmin (born April 24, 1971, Kaliningrad, Russia) is a Russian Game designer, producer and the co-founder of the game production company, KranX Productions. He has developed first self-made game at school (graduated with honors) and graduated Kaliningrad State University as "theoretical physicist". Being a student Andrey developed successful business software for big regional enterprises. At the upper courses he put together a team of enthusiasts "K-Division" to develop computer games and real-time technologies. In 1995 together with adherents he has created one of first independent Russian companies "K-D Lab" which has borrowed especially in development of games. 2004-till now – establishment and management of the independent Russian game production company, KranX Productions, as CEO, designer and producer.
    10.00
    1 votes
    66
    Andy Gavin

    Andy Gavin

    Andy Gavin (born 1970) is an American video game programmer, designer, entrepreneur, and novelist. In the video game sphere he is notable for co-founding the video game company Naughty Dog with childhood friend Jason Rubin in 1986. Naughty Dog's games (most famously, Crash Bandicoot) are known for their combination of exceptional technology, sharp graphics, and polished gameplay. The sophistication of Naughty Dog technology is often credited to Gavin's background in LISP at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Gavin studied for his Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he did research for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on the Mars Rover Vision Project, under his advisor Rod Brooks. While still a student, Gavin learned the computer programming language LISP. Influences from M.I.T. and his own work lead him to develop a number of custom programming languages that improved the quality of graphics, controls, sounds and artificial intelligence in Naughty Dog video games. He also has a B.S. from Haverford College in Neuro Biological Science. Together, Gavin and Rubin sold their first video game called Math Jam in 1985. A few games later they sold Keef the Thief
    10.00
    1 votes
    67
    Anthony Towns

    Anthony Towns

    Anthony Towns (born 21 June 1978, Melbourne, Australia) is a computer programmer who was a long-time Debian release manager, ftpmaster team member and later the Debian Project Leader (from 17 April 2006 until 17 April 2007). He is also the secretary of Linux Australia and has been an active member of HUMBUG since the late 1990s in his home town of Brisbane, Queensland, where he has resided since 1990. Anthony Towns joined the Debian Project in early 1998. He made significant contributions to the Debian bug tracking system as well as to the network initialization scripts (as he wrote ifupdown). He also got involved in the package archive infrastructure and the release process. In 2000, he became the Debian release manager, replacing Richard Braakman, and going on to release Debian GNU/Linux 2.2 potato in August the same year. After James Troup implemented package pools, a new way of organizing packages in the Debian archive, later the same year, Anthony Towns implemented testing, a new method of propagating Debian packages from unstable to frozen (and then on to stable). Towns continued as the release manager through the release of Debian GNU/Linux 3.0 woody in 2002. He remained as
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    Betty Holberton

    Betty Holberton

    Frances Elizabeth "Betty" Holberton (March 7, 1917 – December 8, 2001) was one of the six original programmers of ENIAC, the first general-purpose electronic digital computer. Holberton was born Frances Elizabeth Snyder in Philadelphia in 1917. On her first day of classes at the University of Pennsylvania, Holberton's math professor asked her if she wouldn't be better off at home raising children. Instead, Holberton decided to study journalism, because its curriculum let her travel far a-field. Journalism was also one of the few fields open to women as a career in the 1940s. During World War II while the men were fighting, the Army needed the women to compute ballistics trajectories. Holberton was hired by the Moore School of Engineering to work as a "computor", and was soon chosen to be one of the six women to program the ENIAC. Classified as "subprofessionals", Holberton, along with Kay McNulty, Marlyn Wescoff, Ruth Lichterman, Betty Jean Jennings, and Fran Bilas, programmed the ENIAC to perform calculations for ballistics trajectories electronically for the Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL), US Army. Their work on ENIAC earned each of them a place in the Women in Technology
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Lotus Development Corporation

    Lotus Development Corporation

    Lotus Development, an IBM subsidiary that does business as Lotus Software, makes software that helps business people collaborate across corporate networks. Its main offering is communication and collaboration platform Lotus Notes. Other products include messaging applications (Domino), desktop office productivity tools (Organizer), and Web-based learning software (Virtual Classroom). The company also offers consulting, support, and training services. Lotus sells its products directly and through partners and distributors.

    Lotus was founded in April 1982 by 32-year-old Mitchell D. Kapor, whose previous experience included writing two business programs for VisiCorp, an early personal computer software company: VisiTrend, which covered statistics, and VisiPlot, a program for creating business charts. Kapor made $500,000 on the spreadsheet before VisiCorp bought him out for $1.7 million. Setting his sights on a spreadsheet that translated numbers into graphs, Kapor joined forces with Jonathan Sachs, a programmer who had already envisioned a new spreadsheet and was looking for someone to help him market it. Sachs spent the next ten months writing Lotus 1-2-3 in assembly language for the IBM personal computer. Aside from the graphics, Kapor and Sachs concentrated on making 1-2-3 a fast recalculator. They took advantage of the new personal computers (PCs) with 256K of memory, which enabled the software to far exceed the spreadsheet capabilities of the similar VisiCalc.
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Chris Hughes

    Chris Hughes

    Chris Hughes (born (1983-11-26)November 26, 1983) is an American entrepreneur who co-founded and served as spokesman for the online social directory and networking site Facebook, with Harvard roommates Mark Zuckerberg, Dustin Moskovitz, and Eduardo Saverin. He is currently the publisher and editor-in-chief of The New Republic, after purchasing the magazine in 2012. Hughes grew up in Hickory, North Carolina, as the only child of Arlen "Ray" Hughes, a paper salesman, and Brenda Hughes, a public-school teacher. He was raised as an evangelical Lutheran. He is a graduate of Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. In 2006 he graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University with a Bachelor of Arts in history and literature. Hughes was the coordinator of online organizing for Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign on My.BarackObama.com, the campaign's online social networking website. He was the subject of an April 2009 cover story in Fast Company magazine under the headline, "The Kid Who Made Obama President; How Facebook Cofounder Chris Hughes Unleashed Barack's Base - and Changed Politics and Marketing Forever." In March 2009, Hughes was named Entrepreneur in Residence at
    6.50
    4 votes
    71
    Jason Jones

    Jason Jones

    Jason Jones (born June 1, 1971) is a game developer and programmer who co-founded video game studio Bungie with Alex Seropian in 1991. Jones began programming on Apple computers in high school, assembling a multiplayer game called Minotaur: The Labyrinths of Crete. While attending the University of Chicago Jones met Seropian and the two formed a partnership to publish Minotaur. Following the modest success of Minotaur, Jones programmed Bungie's next game, Pathways Into Darkness, and worked on code, level design and story development for Bungie's Marathon and Myth series. For Bungie's next projects, Halo: Combat Evolved and Halo 2, Jones took on a more managerial role as project lead. He is currently working on an unannounced video game series. Jones became interested in programming in high school, and learned Applesoft BASIC and 6502 Assembly on an Apple II series computer. When Apple released its Macintosh line, Jones' family purchased a Macintosh 128K, but Jones never programmed much for it. After high school Jones got a job programming for a computer-aided design company on PCs, before going to college the next year. In his off time Jones said that all he ever did on the Apple
    6.50
    4 votes
    72
    Steve Thompson

    Steve Thompson

    Steve Thompson (born February 5, 1984), is the founder of independent game development group S+F Software formed in 1998. Thompson grew up in Lititz, Pennsylvania attending University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown satellite campus. Thompson is credited on every S+F Software project as a designer/producer and often a programmer. From 1998 to 2000, Thompson was the sole staff member of S+F Software providing all resources for releases except for sound effects and music. Thompson also spent time as a DJ for Johnstown, Pennsylvania-based oldies station Cool 101.7. Thompson currently resides in Uniontown, Pennsylvania where he works for Parametric Technology Corporation. In early 2007, Thompson released his first album Allusions To A God via the internet. The album contained songs blending a style of progressive rock and psychedelic rock. Thompson quickly commenced work on a second album which remains unreleased. It was confirmed in early 2008 through the S+F Software forums, that Thompson has put the group on indefinite hiatus to focus more on his musical endeavors.
    5.60
    5 votes
    73
    Hal Abelson

    Hal Abelson

    Harold (Hal) Abelson is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, a fellow of the IEEE, and is a founding director of both Creative Commons and the Free Software Foundation. Abelson holds an A.B. degree from Princeton University and obtained a Ph.D. degree in mathematics from MIT under the tutelage of mathematician Dennis Sullivan. In 1992, Abelson was designated as one of MIT's six inaugural MacVicar Faculty Fellows, in recognition of his significant and sustained contributions to teaching and undergraduate education. Abelson was recipient in 1992 of the Bose Award (MIT's School of Engineering teaching award). Abelson is also the winner of the 1995 Taylor L. Booth Education Award given by IEEE Computer Society, cited for his continued contributions to the pedagogy and teaching of introductory computer science, and the winner of the 2012 ACM SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education. Abelson has a longstanding interest in using computation as a conceptual framework in teaching. He directed the first implementation of Logo for the Apple II, which made the language widely available on personal computers beginning in 1981; and
    8.50
    2 votes
    74
    R. Luke DuBois

    R. Luke DuBois

    Roger Luke DuBois (born September 10, 1975 in Morristown, New Jersey, U.S.) is an American composer, performer, conceptual new media artist, programmer, record producer and pedagogue based in New York City. DuBois was born in New Jersey, moving at age 11 to London, UK, where he attended the American School in London, before moving to New York in 1993 to attend Columbia University. DuBois holds both a master's (1999) and a doctorate (2003) in music composition from Columbia (studying primarily with Fred Lerdahl and Jonathan Kramer), and worked as a staff researcher at Columbia's Computer Music Center until 2008. He has taught interactive music and video performance at a number of institutions, including Columbia, Princeton University, the School of Visual Arts, and the music technology and interactive telecommunications programs at New York University. In Fall 2008 he began teaching as a full-time professor at the Brooklyn Experimental Media Center at the Polytechnic Institute of NYU, where he currently serves as director of the Integrated Digital Media program and the Brooklyn Experimental Media Center. As a graduate student at Columbia he was a contributor to Real-Time Cmix. Since
    8.50
    2 votes
    75
    Rael Dornfest

    Rael Dornfest

    Rael Dornfest is an American computer programmer and author. He is an engineer at Twitter. He was Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Values of N, creator of "I Want Sandy" and "Stikkit: Little Yellow Notes that Think." Previously, he was Chief Technology Officer at O'Reilly Media. He began working for Twitter after they bought the assets of his company Values of N. He led the RSS-DEV Working Group, which authored RSS 1.0 and is the author of Blosxom, a lightweight Perl-based publishing system. He was Series Editor of O’Reilly's Hacks series, and has co-authored a number of books including Google Hacks (ISBN 0-596-00447-8), Mac OS X Panther Hacks (ISBN 0-596-00718-3), and Google: The Missing Manual (ISBN 0-596-00613-6).
    8.50
    2 votes
    76
    Richard Garriott

    Richard Garriott

    Richard Garriott de Cayeux (born Richard Allen Garriott on July 4, 1961) is a video game developer and entrepreneur. He is also known as his alter egos Lord British in Ultima and General British in Tabula Rasa. A well-known figure in the video game industry, Garriott was originally a game designer and programmer and now engages in various aspects of computer game development and business. On October 12, 2008, Garriott launched aboard Soyuz TMA-13 to the International Space Station as a self-funded tourist, returning 12 days later aboard Soyuz TMA-12. Garriott founded a new video game development and publishing company in 2009, called Portalarium. In 2011 he was married and changed his name to Richard Garriott de Cayeux. Richard and wife Laetitia, had their first child, Kinga, on June 30 2012. Garriott was born in Cambridge, England to American parents, and was raised in Nassau Bay, Texas, United States. He is the son of scientist Owen K. Garriott, who became an astronaut and flew with Skylab 3 and Space Shuttle mission STS-9. At Clear Creek High School, he convinced the school to let him create a self-directed course in programming, in which he created fantasy computer games on
    8.50
    2 votes
    77
    Donald Becker

    Donald Becker

    Donald Becker is a developer, well known for writing many of the Ethernet drivers for the Linux operating system. Thousands of computers around the world routinely use his drivers to connect to the Internet. Becker, in collaboration with Thomas Sterling, created Beowulf clustering while at NASA, using software to connect many inexpensive PCs to solve complex math problems typically reserved for classic supercomputers. For this work, Becker received the Gordon Bell Prize in 1997. Becker is now the Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of Scyld Computer Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Penguin Computing, a major developer and supplier of Beowulf Clusters.
    7.33
    3 votes
    78
    Hans Reiser

    Hans Reiser

    Hans Thomas Reiser (born December 19, 1963) is an American computer programmer, entrepreneur, and convicted murderer. He is the creator and primary developer of the ReiserFS computer file system, which is contained within the Linux kernel, as well as its attempted successor, Reiser4. In 2004, he founded Namesys, a corporation meant to coordinate the development of both file systems. In April 2008, Reiser was convicted of the first degree murder of his wife, Nina Reiser, who disappeared in September 2006. He subsequently pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of second-degree murder, as part of a settlement agreement that included disclosing the location of his wife's body, revealed to be in a shallow grave near the couple's home. Hans Reiser was born to Ramon Reiser and Beverly Palmer on December 19, 1963. He grew up in California and dropped out of junior high school before he was 14. He was accepted at the University of California, Berkeley, at the age of 15, which he attended off and on until he received a BA in computer-science in 1992, aged 28. Reiser did not pursue a Ph.D. He worked part- to full-time in the computer field while founding the California-based software company
    7.33
    3 votes
    79
    John Gilmore

    John Gilmore

    John Gilmore (born 1955) is one of the founders of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Cypherpunks mailing list, and Cygnus Solutions. He created the alt.* hierarchy in Usenet and is a major contributor to the GNU project. An outspoken civil libertarian, Gilmore has sued the FAA, Department of Justice, and others. He argued the unconstitutionality of secret law regarding travel security policies in Gilmore v. Gonzales. Gilmore is also a philanthropist, and has given financial support to, among others, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Marijuana Policy Project, Erowid, MAPS, and various organizations seeking to end the war on drugs. As the fifth employee of Sun Microsystems and founder of Cygnus Support, he accumulated sufficient wealth to take an early retirement and pursue other interests. He is a frequent contributor to free software, and worked on several GNU projects, including maintaining the GNU Debugger in the early 90s, initiating GNU Radio in 1998, starting Gnash in December 2005 to create a free software player for Flash movies, and writing the pdtar program which became GNU tar. Outside of the GNU project he founded the FreeS/WAN project, an implementation of IPsec,
    7.33
    3 votes
    80
    Peter Molyneux

    Peter Molyneux

    Peter Douglas Molyneux OBE (born 5 May 1959) is an English video game designer and game programmer. He created the god games Dungeon Keeper, Populous, and Black & White, among others, as well as business simulation games such as Theme Park and more recently, helped publish Fable series which was created by Dene and Simon Carter of Big Blue Box. Despite the success of his games, both critical and financial, Molyneux has acquired a reputation for issuing over-enthusiastic descriptions of games under development, which are found to be somewhat less ambitious when released. The most well-known case of this was with Fable, released in 2004 without many of the features talked about by Molyneux in press interviews during development. After the release, Molyneux publicly apologized for overhyping the game. Molyneux was inducted into the AIAS Hall of Fame in 2004 and was honoured with an OBE in the New Year's Honours list announced on 31 December 2004. He was awarded the title of Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government in March 2007. In July 2007, he was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Science by the University of Southampton. In March 2011, he was
    7.33
    3 votes
    81
    Rich Skrenta

    Rich Skrenta

    Richard "Rich" Skrenta (b.1967 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is a computer programmer and Silicon Valley entrepreneur who created the search engine blekko. In 1982, as a high school student at Mt. Lebanon High School, Skrenta wrote the Elk Cloner virus that infected Apple II machines. It is widely believed to be the first large-scale self-spreading personal computer virus ever created. Skrenta graduated from Northwestern University. Between 1989 and 1991 he worked at Commodore Business Machines with Amiga Unix. Between 1991 and 1995 he worked at Unix System Labs and from 1996 to 1998 with IP-level encryption at Sun Microsystems. He later left Sun and became one of the founders of the Open Directory Project. He stayed onboard after the Netscape acquisition, and continued to work on the directory as well as Netscape Search, AOL Music and AOL Shopping. After his stint at AOL he went on to cofound Topix LLC, a Web 2.0 company in the news aggregation & forums market. In 2005, he and his fellow cofounders sold a 75% share of Topix to a newspaper consortium made up of Tribune, Gannett, and Knight Ridder. Currently, he heads the startup company Blekko Inc, an internet search engine, which
    7.33
    3 votes
    82
    Jim Jagielski

    Jim Jagielski

    Jim Jagielski (born March 11, 1961) is an American software engineer, who specialises in web and open source technologies. Jagielski graduated from the Johns Hopkins University in 1983 with a BES in Electrical/Computer Engineering. He was hired by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center immediately after graduation. In 1994, Jagielski founded jaguNET Access Services, a Web Host and ISP. He has served as CTO for Zend Technologies, CTO for Covalent Technologies, Chief Architect for SpringSource/VMware and currently under the Office of CTO at Red Hat, Inc. as a Consulting Software Engineer. In addition to speaking at various conferences and seminars (e.g.: ApacheCon, Forrester's IT Gigaworld and O'Reilly Open Source Convention) and writing on numerous topics, in the past Jagielski was also the editor of the Apache section on Slashdot. He is best known as co-founder, member and director of The Apache Software Foundation and a core developer on several ASF projects, including the Apache HTTP Server, Apache Portable Runtime and Apache Tomcat. His first recognition on the internet was as editor of the A/UX FAQ and administrator for jagubox, the primary repository for third-party A/UX
    6.25
    4 votes
    83
    Bill Joy

    Bill Joy

    William Nelson Joy (born November 8, 1954), commonly known as Bill Joy, is an American computer scientist. Joy co-founded Sun Microsystems in 1982 along with Vinod Khosla, Scott McNealy and Andy Bechtolsheim, and served as chief scientist at the company until 2003. He is widely known for having written the essay "Why the Future Doesn't Need Us", where he expresses deep concerns over the development of modern technologies. He played an integral role in the early development of BSD UNIX while a graduate student at Berkeley, and he is the original author of the vi text editor. Joy was born in the Detroit suburb Farmington Hills, Michigan to William Joy, a school vice-principal and counselor, and Ruth Joy. Joy received a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan and a Master of Science in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1979. Joy's graduate advisor was Bob Fabry. As a UC Berkeley graduate student, Joy worked for Fabry's Computer Systems Research Group CSRG in managing the BSD support and rollout where many claim he was largely responsible for managing the authorship of BSD UNIX, from which
    7.00
    3 votes
    84
    Bradley M. Kuhn

    Bradley M. Kuhn

    Bradley M. Kuhn (born 1973) is a free software activist from the United States. Kuhn is currently Executive Director of the Software Freedom Conservancy. Until 2010 he was the FLOSS Community Liaison and Technology Director of the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC). He previously served as the Executive Director of Free Software Foundation (FSF) from 2001 until March 2005. He was elected to the FSF's board of directors in March 2010. He is best known for his efforts in GPL enforcement, both at FSF and SFLC, as the creator of FSF's license list, and as original author of the Affero General Public License. He has long been a proponent for non-profit structures for FLOSS development, and leads efforts in this direction through the Software Freedom Conservancy. He is a recipient of the 2012 O'Reilly Open Source Award. Kuhn attended Loyola Blakefield, followed by Loyola College in Maryland, graduating in May 1995 with a summa cum laude Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. Kuhn attended graduate school in Computer Science at the University of Cincinnati. His graduate adviser was John Franco. Kuhn received a USENIX student grant scholarship for his thesis work., which focused on
    7.00
    3 votes
    85
    Jeff Waugh

    Jeff Waugh

    Jeff Waugh (also known as "jdub") is an Australian free software and open source software developer. He is a consultant for Waugh Partners and is known for his past prominence in the GNOME and Ubuntu projects and communities. In 2004, Waugh was hired by Mark Shuttleworth as an early employee of Canonical Ltd. and member of the Ubuntu project, where he worked in business development. At OSCON in 2005, Waugh won "Best Evangelist" in the Google-O'Reilly Open Source Awards for his evangelism of Ubuntu and GNOME. He announced his resignation from Canonical in July 2006 in order to focus more fully on his work in the GNOME project. From 2007 Waugh and then-wife Pia Waugh were co-directors of Waugh Partners, an Australian Open Source consultancy launched in 2006. Waugh Partners won the 2007 NSW State Pearcey Award for Young Achievers for their work promoting Free Software to the Australian ICT industry. In 2008 Waugh was a partner of the One Laptop Per Child Australia program. As of 2010 Waugh is the sole director of Waugh Partners, since Pia Waugh's move to a new career in 2009. Waugh has served in a number of formal and semi-formal positions in Free Software development and community
    7.00
    3 votes
    86
    Patrick Volkerding

    Patrick Volkerding

    Patrick Volkerding (born October 20, 1966) is the founder and maintainer of the Slackware Linux distribution. He is the "Slackware Benevolent Dictator for Life." Volkerding earned a Bachelor of Science in computer science from Minnesota State University Moorhead in 1993. For a short while, Chris Lumens and others assisted with his work on Slackware. Due to the lack of a continuing revenue stream following the sale of his publisher, Walnut Creek CDROM, to BSDi (which was ultimately sold to Wind River Systems), these people had to be let go. For the last several years Patrick Volkerding has managed Slackware with the help of many volunteers and testers. Volkerding brings out new releases of Slackware roughly once a year. Volkerding is a SubGenius affiliate/member. The use of the word Slack in "Slackware" is a homage to J. R. "Bob" Dobbs: "I'll admit that it was SubGenius inspired. In fact, back in the 2.0 through 3.0 days we used to print a dobbshead on each CD." Volkerding is an avid homebrewer and beer lover. Early versions of Slackware would entreat users to send him a bottle of local beer in appreciation for his work. Volkerding is a Deadhead. As of early April 1994 he had been
    7.00
    3 votes
    87
    Steve Wozniak

    Steve Wozniak

    Steve Wozniak or Stephen Wozniak (born August 11, 1950), known as Steve Wozniak or Woz, is an American computer engineer and programmer who founded Apple Computer (now Apple Inc.) with Steve Jobs and Ronald Wayne. Wozniak single-handedly invented the Apple I computer and the Apple II computer in the 1970s. These computers contributed significantly to the microcomputer revolution. The name on Wozniak's birth certificate is "Stephan Gary Wozniak", but Steve's mother said that she intended it to be spelled "Stephen", and "Stephen" is what he uses. Wozniak has been referred to frequently by the nickname "Woz" or "The Woz"; "WoZ" (short for "Wheels of Zeus") is also the name of a company Wozniak founded. Wozniak met Steve Jobs when a fellow Homestead High School student, Bill Fernandez, introduced them to each other. In 1970, they became friends when Jobs worked for the summer at Hewlett-Packard (HP), where Wozniak was working on a mainframe computer. According to Wozniak's autobiography, iWoz, Jobs had the idea to sell a computer as a fully assembled printed circuit board. Wozniak, at first skeptical, was later convinced by Jobs that even if they were not successful they could at least
    7.00
    3 votes
    88
    Greg Stein

    Greg Stein

    Greg Stein (born March 16, 1967 in Portland, Oregon), living in Fairfax, Virginia, USA, is a programmer, speaker, sometime standards architect, and open-source software advocate, appearing frequently at conferences and in interviews on the topic of open-source software development and use. He is a director of the Apache Software Foundation, and served as chairman from 21 August 2002 to 20 June 2007. He is also a member of the Python Software Foundation, was a director there from 2001–2002, and a maintainer of the Python programming language and libraries (active from 1999 to 2002). Stein has been especially active in version control systems development. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, he helped develop the WebDAV HTTP versioning specification, and is the main author of mod_dav, the first open-source implementation of WebDAV. He was one of the founding developers of the Subversion project, and is primarily responsible for Subversion's WebDav networking layer. Stein most recently worked as an engineering manager at Google, where he helped launch Google's open-source hosting platform. Stein publicly announced his departure from Google via his blog on July 29, 2008. Prior to Google,
    6.00
    4 votes
    89
    Jeff Sutherland

    Jeff Sutherland

    Dr. Jeff Sutherland is one of the inventors of the Scrum software development process. Together with Ken Schwaber, he created Scrum as a formal process at OOPSLA'95. They have extended and enhanced Scrum at many software companies and IT organizations. Jeff is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Military Academy, a Top Gun of his USAF RF-4C Aircraft Commander class and flew 100 missions over North Vietnam. Jeff has advanced degrees from Stanford University and Ph.D from University of Colorado School of Medicine. He is currently a Chief executive officer of Scrum, Inc in Boston, Massachusetts and Senior Advisor to OpenView Venture Partners .
    6.00
    4 votes
    90
    Kevin Marks

    Kevin Marks

    Kevin Marks is author of the weblog Epeus Epigone. He was Vice President of Web Services at BT. He became Principal Engineer for Technorati after working for both Apple and the BBC. At the TechCrunch event Realtime Stream Crunchup he announced that he would be joining BT to work together with JP Rangaswami. In May 2011 he began working at Salesforce.com. He is one of the founders of Microformats. At the first BloggerCon, Marks discussed the power curve as it applies to weblogs: The net changes the power law of the media curve. If you look at relative popularity on the web, using something like Technorati, you get a power curve that goes all the way down gradually, to the bottom where you see pages that got just a single click. If you look at popularity in the "real" world — best-selling books, or top music — the power curve drops like a stone from a very high level. That's because in order to get a book published, or a piece of music recorded, you have to convince somebody that you're going to sell a million copies. You end up in a zero-sum game, where people pour enormous resources into being the number one, because number two is only half as good. The promise of the net is that
    6.00
    4 votes
    91
    Apple Inc.

    Apple Inc.

    • Web Link(s): Apple Inc.
    Apple Inc., (NASDAQ: AAPL) formerly Apple Computer Inc., is an American multinational corporation which designs and manufactures consumer electronics and software products. The company's best-known hardware products include Macintosh computers, the iPod and the iPhone. Apple software includes the Mac OS X operating system, the iTunes media browser, the iLife suite of multimedia and creativity software, the iWork suite of productivity software, and Final Cut Studio, a suite of professional audio and film-industry software products. The company operates more than 250 retail stores in nine countries and an online store where hardware and software products are sold.
    8.00
    2 votes
    92
    Aubrey de Grey

    Aubrey de Grey

    Aubrey David Nicholas Jasper de Grey (/dəˈɡreɪ/; born 20 April 1963) is an English author and theoretician in the field of gerontology, and the Chief Science Officer of the SENS Foundation. He is editor-in-chief of the academic journal Rejuvenation Research, author of The Mitochondrial Free Radical Theory of Aging (1999) and co-author of Ending Aging (2007). He is perhaps best known for his view that human beings could, in theory, live to lifespans far in excess of that which any authenticated cases have lived to today. De Grey's research focuses on whether regenerative medicine can thwart the aging process. He works on the development of what he calls "Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence" (SENS), a tissue-repair strategy intended to rejuvenate the human body and allow negligible senescence. To this end, he has identified seven types of molecular and cellular damage caused by essential metabolic processes. SENS is a proposed panel of therapies designed to repair this damage. De Grey is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, the American Aging Association, the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, and an advisor to the Singularity Institute for
    8.00
    2 votes
    93
    Bram Moolenaar

    Bram Moolenaar

    Bram Moolenaar (born in 1961, in Lisse, province of Zuid-Holland, Netherlands) is an active member of the open source software community. He is the author of Vim, a text editor that is very popular among programmers and power users. The Vim editor started as "Vi IMitation" on the Amiga in 1988, but was later relabeled "Vi IMproved" and ported to many other platforms. As vi was a popular editor amongst programmers and system administrators, there initially was doubt whether Bram's 'improved' version could achieve the quality and fan following of the original. But since its first release for Unix systems in 1992, Vim has effectively eclipsed the original Vi, having won several awards and has been referred to as one of the most popular text editors. Bram promotes charity and encourages people to support orphans in Uganda. He pioneered a methodology called charityware through his Vim editor. The software itself is available for free, but it encourages the user to donate to the programmer's favorite charity. A number of other applications have been licensed this way since the inception of this concept. Other software tools that Moolenaar has developed include a software build tool
    8.00
    2 votes
    94
    Greg Kroah-Hartman

    Greg Kroah-Hartman

    Greg Kroah-Hartman is a Linux kernel developer. He is the current Linux kernel maintainer for the -stable branch with Chris Wright, the staging subsystem, USB, driver core, debugfs, kref, kobject, and the sysfs kernel subsystems, Userspace I/O (with Hans J. Koch) and TTY layer. He is also the maintainer of the linux-hotplug and created the udev projects. Additionally, he helps to maintain the Gentoo Linux packages for these programs, and helps with the kernel package. He worked for Novell in the SUSE Labs division and, as of 1 February 2012 (2012 -02-01), works at the Linux Foundation. He is currently working full time on the Linux Driver Project. He is a co-author of Linux Device Drivers (3rd Edition) and author of Linux Kernel in a Nutshell, and used to be a contributing editor for Linux Journal. He also contributes articles to LWN.net, the news computing site. Kroah-Hartman frequently helps in the documentation of the kernel and driver development through talks and tutorials. In 2006, he released a CD image of material to introduce a programmer to working on Linux device driver development.
    8.00
    2 votes
    95
    Paul Graham

    Paul Graham

    Paul Graham (born 1964) is a programmer, venture capitalist, and essayist. He is known for his work on Lisp, for co-founding Viaweb (which eventually became Yahoo! Store), and for co-founding the Y Combinator seed capital firm. He is the author of On Lisp (1993), ANSI Common Lisp (1995), and Hackers & Painters (2004). Graham has a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Cornell University (1986). He then attended Harvard University, earning Master of Science (1988) and Doctor of Philosophy (1990) degrees in Applied Sciences with a specialization in computer science. He has also studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence. In 1995, Graham and Robert Morris founded Viaweb, the first application service provider (ASP). Viaweb's software, originally written mostly in Common Lisp, allowed users to make their own Internet stores. In the summer of 1998 Viaweb was sold to Yahoo! for 455,000 shares of Yahoo! stock, valued at $49.6 million. At Yahoo! the product became Yahoo! Store. He has since begun writing essays for his popular website paulgraham.com. They range from "Beating the Averages", which compares Lisp to other programming
    8.00
    2 votes
    96
    Scott James Remnant

    Scott James Remnant

    Scott James Remnant (born 18 July 1980) is an open source software developer. Scott served as a long-time Debian developer until 2006, worked as "Ubuntu Developer Manager" on the Ubuntu Linux distribution at Canonical Ltd., and now works at Google. Scott is openly gay, and believes it important to be so to support others in the open source community.
    8.00
    2 votes
    97
    A. R. Rahman

    A. R. Rahman

    • Web Link(s): http://www.discogs.com/artist/A.R.+Rahman
    Allah Rakha Rahman (born 6 January 1966 as A. S. Dileep Kumar) is an Indian composer, singer-songwriter, music producer, musician, multi-instrumentalist and philanthropist. Described as the world's most prominent and prolific film composer by Time, his works are notable for integrating Eastern classical music with electronic music sounds, world music genres and traditional orchestral arrangements. He has won two Academy Awards, two Grammy Awards, a BAFTA Award, a Golden Globe, four National Film Awards, fifteen Filmfare Awards and thirteen Filmfare Awards South in addition to numerous other awards and nominations. His extensive body of work for film and the stage earned him the nickname “the Mozart of Madras” and several Tamil commentators and fans have coined him the nickname Isai Puyal (English: Music Storm). In 2009, Time placed Rahman in its list of World's Most Influential People. The UK based World Music magazine Songlines named him one of 'Tomorrow's World Music Icons' in August 2011. Having set up his own in-house studio called Panchathan Record Inn at Chennai, arguably one of Asia’s most sophisticated and high-tech studios, Rahman's film scoring career began in the early
    9.00
    1 votes
    98
    Alan Cooper

    Alan Cooper

    Alan Cooper (born June 3, 1952) is an American software designer and programmer. Widely recognized as the “Father of Visual Basic," Cooper is also known for his books on About Face 3: The Essentials of Interaction Design and The Inmates Are Running the Asylum: Why High-Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity. As founder of Cooper, a leading interaction design consultancy, he created the Goal-Directed design methodology and pioneered the use of personas as practical interaction design tools to create high-tech products. Alan Cooper grew up in Marin County, where he attended the College of Marin, studying architecture. He learned programming and took on contract programming jobs to pay for college. After he left college, he founded one of the first microcomputer software companies. In 1975, as the first microcomputers became available, Alan Cooper founded his first company, Structured Systems Group (SSG), in Oakland, California. SSG’s software accounting product, General Ledger, was sold through ads in popular magazines such as Byte and Interface Age. This software was, according to the historical account in Fire in the Valley (by Paul Freiberger and Michael
    9.00
    1 votes
    99
    Audrey Tang

    Audrey Tang

    Audrey Tang (born April 18, 1981; formerly known as Autrijus Tang) is a Taiwanese free software programmer, who has been described as one of the "ten greats of Taiwanese computing." Tang showed an early interest in computers, beginning to learn Perl at age 12. Two years later, she dropped out of high school, unable to adapt to student life. By the year 2000, at the age of 19, she had already held positions in software companies, and worked in California's Silicon Valley as an entrepreneur. In late 2005, Tang began to live life as a woman, changing both her English and Chinese names from male to female ones, and citing a need to "reconcile [her] outward appearance with [her] self-image". Taiwan's Eastern Television reports that she has an IQ of 180. She is a vocal proponent for autodidacticism and individualist anarchism. Tang is best known for initiating and leading the Pugs project, a joint effort from the Haskell and Perl communities to implement the Perl 6 language; she has also made contributions to internationalization and localization efforts for several Free Software programs, including SVK, Request Tracker (for which she also wrote a large portion of the code) and Slash, as
    9.00
    1 votes
    100
    Dave Lebling

    Dave Lebling

    P. David Lebling (born October 30, 1949) is an interactive fiction game designer (implementor) and programmer who has worked at various companies, including Infocom and Avid. He was born in Washington, D.C., grew up in Maryland, and attended MIT, where he obtained a degree in political science before becoming a member of its Laboratory for Computer Science. After encountering the original Adventure game (also called Colossal Cave), he was fascinated by the concept and—together with Marc Blank, Tim Anderson and Bruce Daniels—set out to write an adventure game with a better parser, which became Zork. In 1979, he became one of the founders of Infocom. His games include Zork I, II and III, Starcross, Suspect, Spellbreaker, The Lurking Horror and James Clavell's Shogun. After Infocom's end in 1989, Lebling worked on a GUI spreadsheet program, joined Avid (a company doing special effects for broadcast and film), and designed server applications at Ucentric. Lebling currently resides in Concord, Massachusetts with his wife and two daughters. He is a programmer for British defense contractor BAE Systems.
    9.00
    1 votes
    101
    Dick Hardt

    Dick Hardt

    Dick Clarence Hardt (May 28, 1963) is the founder and CEO of Sxip Identity. He is an advocate of Identity 2.0. Hardt has spoken at tech events such as Web 2.0, Supernova, Digital ID World, ETech, OSCON, PICNIC, International World Wide Web Conference (WWW2007), ISOC, Anti-Phishing Working Group, at New York University (NYU), Harvard and many other locales. He's been interviewed extensively and has been cited in numerous publications including Wired. Prior to Sxip, Hardt founded ActiveState in 1997. Under his leadership as CEO, ActiveState became a leader in tools for open source programming languages and anti-spam software and was acquired by UK-based security company, Sophos, in 2003 for $23 million. Hardt claims to have made the original port of the Perl programming language to Windows in the mid-1990s, which was highly controversial in the open source community. In 1999, ActiveState signed a contract to add features previously missing from Windows ports of Perl. On December 9, 2008 Hardt announced that he was joining Microsoft as a Partner Architect and will be working on consumer, enterprise and government identity problems. While at Microsoft he would continue to be on the
    9.00
    1 votes
    102
    Eric Allman

    Eric Allman

    Eric Paul Allman (born September 2, 1955) is an American computer programmer who developed sendmail and its precursor delivermail in the late 1970s and early 1980s at UC Berkeley. Born in El Cerrito, California, Allman knew from an early age that he wanted to work in computing, breaking into his high school's mainframe and later using the UC Berkeley computing center for his computing needs. In 1973, he entered UC Berkeley, just as the Unix operating system began to become popular in academic circles. He earned B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC Berkeley in 1977 and 1980 respectively. As the Unix source code was available at Berkeley, the local hackers quickly made many extensions to the AT&T code. One such extension was delivermail, which in 1981 turned into sendmail. As an MTA, it was designed to deliver e-mail over the still relatively small (as compared to today's Internet) ARPANET, which consisted of many smaller networks with vastly differing formats for e-mail headers. Sendmail soon became an important part of the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) and continues to be the most widely used MTA on Unix based systems today, despite its somewhat complex configuration syntax and
    9.00
    1 votes
    103
    John Carmack

    John Carmack

    John D. Carmack II (born August 20, 1970) is an American game programmer and the co-founder of id Software. Carmack was the lead programmer of the id computer games Commander Keen, Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, Quake, Rage and their sequels. Carmack is best known for his innovations in 3D graphics, and is also a rocketry enthusiast and the founder and lead engineer of Armadillo Aerospace. Carmack, son of local television news reporter Stan Carmack, grew up in the Kansas City Metropolitan Area where he became interested in computers at an early age. He attended Shawnee Mission East High School in Prairie Village, Kansas and Raytown South High School in nearby Raytown, Missouri. As reported in David Kushner's Masters of Doom, "when Carmack was 14, he broke into a school to help a group of kids steal Apple II computers, but during the attempted break-in one of the kids set off the silent alarm. John was arrested, and sent for psychiatric evaluation (the report mentions 'no empathy for other human beings'). Carmack was then sentenced to a year in a juvenile home." When he was asked "if you had not been caught, would you consider doing it again?" he answered "yes, probably." However, when the
    9.00
    1 votes
    104
    Ken Spreitzer

    Ken Spreitzer

    Kenneth J. Spreitzer wrote the original PC program called "UnInstaller", first licensed to MicroHelp and now (Feb 1998) sold by CyberMedia. After writing the program, Mr. Spreitzer went on to found Maximized Software. Mr. Spreitzer is a graduate of the UC Irvine in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences. He was also the radio personality "Captain Sensible" as heard on KUCI.
    9.00
    1 votes
    105
    Michael Tiemann

    Michael Tiemann

    Michael Tiemann is Vice President of Open Source Affairs at Red Hat Inc, and former President of the Open Source Initiative. He previously was the Chief Technical Officer of Red Hat. He serves on a number of boards, including the Embedded Linux Consortium, the XMPP Technical Advisory Board, the GNOME Foundation Advisory Board, the Sahana Board and the Board of Directors of ActiveState Tool Corp. He co-founded Cygnus Solutions in 1989. His programming contributions to free software include authorship of the GNU C++ compiler and work on the GNU C compiler and the GNU Debugger. Tiemann is featured in the 2001 documentary Revolution OS. He earned a bachelor's degree from the Moore School of Engineering in 1986 at the University of Pennsylvania.
    9.00
    1 votes
    106
    Open Source Applications Foundation

    Open Source Applications Foundation

    The Open Source Applications Foundation (OSAF) is a non-profit organization founded in 2002 by Mitch Kapor whose purpose is to effect widespread adoption of free software/open-source software. The mission of the OSAF is stated this way: Chandler Project is a note-to-self organiser designed for personal and small-group task management and calendaring. Chandler Desktop and Chandler Hub (an instance of Chandler Server (Cosmo)) are complementary. Chandler Desktop is written in Python and runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. Cosmo architecture diagrams present a Java web application executing within a Java EE servlet container or application server, providing Morse Code, CalDAV, Webcal and Atom services to a variety of clients. In January 2008 Mitch Kapor ended his involvement with the Foundation, stepped down from the Board, and provided transitional funding. In the restructure that followed, Katie Capps Parlante became acting President. There are currently eleven employees with Sheila Mooney as President. Since 2005, OSAF has participated in Google's Summer of Code programs by allowing several interns to work on OSAF projects during the summer. The following is a list of some major
    9.00
    1 votes
    107
    Sinclair Research Ltd

    Sinclair Research Ltd

    Sinclair Research Ltd is a British consumer electronics company founded by Sir Clive Sinclair in Cambridge. Originally incorporated in 1973 as Ablesdeal Ltd., it remained dormant until 1976, and did not adopt the name Sinclair Research until 1981. In 1980, Clive Sinclair entered the home computer market with the ZX80 at £99.95, at the time the cheapest personal computer for sale in the UK. In 1982 the ZX Spectrum was released, later becoming Britain's best selling computer, competing aggressively against Commodore and Amstrad. At the height of its success, and largely inspired by the Japanese Fifth Generation Computer programme, the company established the "MetaLab" research centre at Milton Hall (near Cambridge), in order to pursue artificial intelligence, wafer-scale integration, formal verification and other advanced projects. The combination of the failures of the Sinclair QL computer and the TV80 led to financial difficulties in 1985, and a year later Sinclair sold the rights to their computer products and brand name to Amstrad. Sinclair Research Ltd still exists today as a one man company, continuing to market Sir Clive Sinclair's newest inventions. On 25 July 1961, Clive
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    Steve Pavlina

    Steve Pavlina

    Steve Pavlina (born April 14, 1971) is an American self-help author, motivational speaker and entrepreneur. He is the author of the web site stevepavlina.com and the book Personal Development for Smart People. On February 4, 1991 Pavlina was arrested for grand theft in Sacramento, California and given 60 hours of community service. He claims that this was the impetus he needed to turn his life around, he also claims that he was let off a much worse sentence owing to a mistake in the legal process. Prior to starting his personal development site, Pavlina was the founder and CEO of Dexterity Software as well as a software developer at that company. He described in a blog post how he transitioned from one identity (as a game publisher, forum participant etc.) into a public speaker and self-help blogger, by removing shortcuts from his desktops and favorites, reducing his gamer-related contacts and obligations and e-mail and relationships so that he was surrounded by an environment that completely reinforced the new identity. Steve Pavlina served as Vice President of the Association of Software Professionals (ASP) in 1999 and President of the ASP in 2000. By this stage, Steve's writings
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Tony Guntharp

    Tony Guntharp

    Tony Guntharp (born May 16, 1969) was the team project manager and one of the four co-founders of SourceForge (along with Uriah Welcome, Tim Perdue and Drew Streib) which launched in November 1999. Prior to this he had co-founded Fresher Information Corp., an object oriented database management software firm. He eventually left VA Software (the owners of the SF property) after VA Software shut down the systems-hardware business. He also co-authored Practical Linux. Later, he founded Damage Studios with several former VA employees, including Greg Kucharo, Steve Westmoreland, Joseph Arruda, San Mehat, Chris DiBona and Craig Ross. The MMOG called Rekonstruction was supposed to be the final product, but the company folded after 18 months (and ironically after a feature article in Forbes Magazine). He has since held positions with several other Silicon Valley start ups and resides in Half Moon Bay, CA.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Applied Minds

    Applied Minds

    Applied Minds, Llc. is a company founded in 2000 by ex-Disney Imagineers Danny Hillis and Bran Ferren that provides technology, design, R&D, and consulting services to multiple firms, including General Motors, Intel, Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, Herman Miller, Harris Corporation, Sony, and Sun MicroSystems. The company's headquarters are in Glendale, California, and it maintains offices in New York and Washington DC. It supplies products and services in software, aerospace, entertainment, electronics, biotechnology and architectural design. It has spun out several companies including Metaweb Technologies (the creators of Freebase, which was acquired by Google), TouchTable, and Applied Proteomics.
    6.67
    3 votes
    111
    Bram Cohen

    Bram Cohen

    Bram Cohen (born October 12, 1975) is an American computer programmer, best known as the author of the peer-to-peer (P2P) BitTorrent protocol, as well as the first file sharing program to use the protocol, also known as BitTorrent. He is also the co-founder of CodeCon, organizer of the San Francisco Bay Area P2P-hackers meeting, and the co-author of Codeville. Cohen grew up in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City as the son of a teacher and computer scientist. He claimed he learned the BASIC programming language at age 5 on his family's Timex Sinclair computer. Cohen passed the American Invitational Mathematics Examination to qualify for the United States of America Mathematical Olympiad (USAMO) while he attended Stuyvesant High School in New York City. He graduated from Stuyvesant in 1993 and attended SUNY Buffalo. He later dropped out of college to work for several dot com companies throughout the mid to late 1990s, the last being MojoNation, an ambitious but ill-fated project he worked on with Jim McCoy. MojoNation allows people to break up confidential files into encrypted chunks and distribute those pieces on computers also running the software. If someone wanted to
    6.67
    3 votes
    112
    Eric S. Raymond

    Eric S. Raymond

    Eric Steven Raymond (born December 4, 1957), often referred to as ESR, is an American computer programmer, author and open source software advocate. After the 1997 publication of The Cathedral and the Bazaar, Raymond was for a number of years frequently quoted as an unofficial spokesman for the open source movement. He is also known for his 1990 edit and later updates of the Jargon File, currently in print as the The New Hacker's Dictionary. Born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1957, Raymond lived in Venezuela as a child. His family moved back to Pennsylvania in 1971. Raymond said in an interview that his cerebral palsy motivated him to go into computing. Raymond has spoken in more than fifteen countries on six continents, including a lecture at Microsoft. He wrote CML2, a source code configuration system; while originally intended for the Linux kernel, it was rejected by kernel developers. Raymond attributed this rejection to "kernel list politics". Linus Torvalds on the other hand said in a 2007 mailing list post that as a matter of policy, the development team preferred more incremental changes. In 2000–2002 Raymond wrote a number of HOWTOs still included in the Linux Documentation
    6.67
    3 votes
    113
    Frank Warmerdam

    Frank Warmerdam

    Norman Frank Warmerdam is a software developer with a focus on remote sensing, geographic information system, cartography, and development of geospatial data translators. He is best known in the GIS community as the author of the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library or GDAL. He is also a founding member, director and the treasurer of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo). Frank Warmerdam lives near Eganville, Ontario, Canada. He graduated in 1991 and worked for PCI (now PCI Geomatics) until 1998. Since then he works as a contract developer focusing on extending Geospatial Free and Open Source Software projects. He is the main author of the GDAL library and of the companion OGR Simple Features Library. He also participates in the development of an impressive number of FOSS projects like GRASS GIS, MapServer, Proj.4, libLAS, libtiff and many others. Many of the open source GIS programs and libraries are available in the FWTools bundle (named after his initials) for Linux and Microsoft Windows. In 2005, Frank received the Sol Katz GFOSS Award. Frank now works for Googlemaps team in California.
    6.67
    3 votes
    114
    Graeme Devine

    Graeme Devine

    Graeme Devine is a computer game designer and programmer who co-founded Trilobyte, created bestselling games The 7th Guest and The 11th Hour, and designed id Software's Quake III Arena. He was also Chairman of the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) from 2002-2003. One of Graeme's trademarks is his Scooby-Doo wardrobe. Devine was born in 1966 in Glasgow, Scotland and began his career working on the TRS-80 at age 14 in the late 1970s. He joined Atari at age 16 to port their classic game Pole Position to home computers, including the Commodore 64, Apple IIe and ZX Spectrum. He also worked for Lucasfilm's Games Division, Activision UK, and Virgin Interactive. Devine founded Trilobyte in December 1990 with Rob Landeros. Together, they designed the original concept of the 1992 horror game The 7th Guest. Graeme was the lead programmer on the game and on its sequel The 11th Hour. The 7th Guest was a phenomenon, selling 2 million copies, and is credited (along with the game Myst) with encouraging the use of CD-ROM drives for games. Devine was also one of the forefathers of file compression. The game The 7th Guest made extensive use of movie footage, which required a great deal
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    James Gosling

    James Gosling

    Dr. James A. Gosling, OC (born May 19, 1955 near Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a computer scientist, best known as the father of the Java programming language. In 1977, Gosling received a B.Sc in Computer Science from the University of Calgary. In 1983, he earned a Ph.D in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, and his doctoral thesis was titled "Algebraic Constraints". His thesis advisor was Bob Sproull. While working towards his doctorate, he wrote a version of Emacs (gosmacs), and before joining Sun Microsystems he built a multi-processor version of Unix while at Carnegie Mellon University, as well as several compilers and mail systems. Between 1984 and 2010, Gosling was with Sun Microsystems. He is known as the father of the Java programming language. On April 2, 2010, Gosling left Sun Microsystems which had recently been acquired by the Oracle Corporation. Regarding why he left, Gosling cited reductions in pay, status, and decision-making ability; change of role; and ethical challenges. He has since taken a very critical stance towards Oracle in interviews, noting that "During the integration meetings between Sun and Oracle, where we were being grilled about the
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Joel Spolsky

    Joel Spolsky

    Avram Joel Spolsky (born 1965) is a software engineer and writer. He is the author of Joel on Software, a blog on software development. He was a Program Manager on the Microsoft Excel team between 1991 and 1994. He later founded Fog Creek Software in 2000 and launched the Joel on Software blog. In 2008 he launched the now successful Stack Overflow programmer Q&A site in collaboration with Jeff Atwood. Using the Stack Exchange software product which powers Stack Overflow, The Stack Exchange Network now hosts over 85 Q&A sites. Spolsky grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico and lived there until he was 15. He then moved with his family to Jerusalem, Israel, where he attended high school and did his military service as a paratrooper. He was one of the founders of Kibbutz Hanaton in Upper Galilee. In 1987, he returned to the United States to attend college. He studied at the University of Pennsylvania for a year before transferring to Yale University, where he was a member of Pierson College and graduated in 1991 with a BS summa cum laude in Computer Science. Spolsky started working at Microsoft in 1991 as a Program Manager on the Microsoft Excel team, where he designed Excel Basic and
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Ken Coar

    Ken Coar

    Born in 1960, Ken Coar is a software developer and open development evangelist. He is probably best known for his association with The Apache Software Foundation and the ApacheCon series of user conferences. He currently lives in Raleigh, North Carolina. Coar attended the University of Massachusetts Amherst, majoring in computer topics, but left before completing a degree. He worked for the University for several years, and has since been employed by General Dynamics, Digital Equipment Corporation, Process Software Corporation, and IBM. In April 2011 he joined Red Hat as a Principal Application Software Engineer. Coar has been active in open software projects, and lectures internationally about open development methodologies and distributed collaboration. He has addressed local groups, regional conferences, and government organisations. He is co-author of RFC 3875, the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) specification. Ken Coar is a member of The Apache Software Foundation and was a Director on its board from its incorporation in 1999 through June 2007. His involvement with the organisation dates back to late 1996, and his major code contributions have been to the Apache HTTP server
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Linus Torvalds

    Linus Torvalds

    Linus Benedict Torvalds (Swedish: [ˈliːn.ɵs ˈtuːr.valds] ( listen); born December 28, 1969) is a Finnish American software engineer and hacker, who was the principal force behind the development of the Linux kernel. He later became the chief architect of the Linux kernel, and now acts as the project's coordinator. He also created the revision control system Git. He was honored, along with Shinya Yamanaka, with the 2012 Millennium Technology Prize by the Technology Academy Finland "in recognition of his creation of a new open source operating system for computers leading to the widely used Linux kernel". Torvalds was born in Helsinki, Finland. He is the son of journalists Anna and Nils Torvalds, and the grandson of poet Ole Torvalds. Both of his parents were campus radicals at the University of Helsinki in the 1960s. His family belongs to the Swedish-speaking minority (5.5% of Finland's population). Torvalds was named after Linus Pauling, the Nobel Prize-winning American chemist, although in the book Rebel Code: Linux and the Open Source Revolution, Torvalds is quoted as saying, "I think I was named equally for Linus the Peanuts cartoon character", noting that this makes him half
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Sid Meier

    Sid Meier

    Sidney K. "Sid" Meier (born February 24, 1954) is a Canadian-American programmer and designer of several popular strategy video games and simulation video games, most notably Civilization. Meier co-founded MicroProse in 1982 and is a Director of Creative Development for computer game developer Firaxis Games, which he co-founded with Jeff Briggs and Brian Reynolds in 1996. He has won several prestigious accolades for his contributions to the computer games industry. Sid Meier was born in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. He graduated from the University of Michigan. Meier founded MicroProse together with Bill Stealey in 1982. MicroProse initially developed military and flight simulator video games, such as Silent Service and F-19 Stealth Fighter. In 1987, the company released Sid Meier's Pirates!, which also began a trend of placing Meier's name in the titles of his games. Meier later explained that the inclusion of his name was because of the dramatic departure in the design of Pirates! compared to the company's earlier games. Stealey decided that it would improve the company's branding, believing that it would make those who purchased the flight simulators more likely to play
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Tristan Louis

    Tristan Louis

    Tristan Louis (born February 28, 1971 in Digne-les-Bains, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence) is a French-born American author, entrepreneur and blogger. In 1994 and 1995, as publisher of iWorld (now known as Internet.com and part of Jupitermedia Corporation), part of the Mecklermedia group of Internet online media companies, Louis first became involved in online politics on Usenet, particularly the newsgroup alt.internet.media-coverage, during debate over the Communications Decency Act and activism against it. In a joint effort with the EFF and the Voters Telecommunications Watch, iWorld and Mecklermedia publicly endorsed a national day of protest , turning the background of web pages around the world to black. The protest received national news coverage and was a catalyst in the planning for a lawsuit (Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union) which went to the United States Supreme Court and reaffirmed First Amendment protection for Internet publishers. After leaving iWorld, Louis contributed to many publications as a freelance writer, including a popular line of introductions to the internet, and was also involved in several start-ups, including Earthweb and Net Quotient, a consulting
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Virgil Griffith

    Virgil Griffith

    Virgil Griffith (born March 6, 1983), also known as Romanpoet, is an American hacker, known for his involvement in a 2003 lawsuit with Blackboard Inc. and his creation of WikiScanner. He has published papers on artificial life and is currently a graduate student at the California Institute of Technology. A The New York Times bio dubbed him as the Internet Man of Mystery. Griffith was born in Birmingham, Alabama and grew up in nearby Tuscaloosa. He graduated from the Alabama School of Math and Science in 2002, and then attended the University of Alabama, studying cognitive science in New College. He was a member of the Mallet Assembly. He transferred to Indiana University in 2004, but returned to graduate cum laude from Alabama in August 2007. Griffith is now a graduate student studying computation and neural systems. He is affiliated with the Santa Fe Institute as a visiting researcher. Griffith has given talks at the hacker conferences Interz0ne, PhreakNIC, and HOPE. It was at Interz0ne 1 in 2002 that he met Billy Hoffman, a Georgia Tech student, who had discovered a security flaw in the campus magnetic ID card system called "BuzzCard". He and Hoffman proceeded over the next year
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    William A. Stein

    William A. Stein

    William Arthur Stein (born February 21, 1974 in Santa Barbara, California) is a professor of mathematics at the University of Washington. He is known as the lead developer of Sage. Stein is currently doing computational and theoretical research into the problem of computing with modular forms and the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture. He is considered "a leading expert in the field of computational arithmetic".
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Jeff Tunnell

    Jeff Tunnell

    Jeffrey Tunnell is a computer game producer, programmer and designer. In 1984 he founded Dynamix with Damon Slye in Eugene, Oregon. In 1990, Tunnell left Dynamix to start Jeff Tunnell Productions. Tunnell would go on to create famous brands such as The Incredible Machine, Trophy Bass, and the 3D Ultra product line while at Jeff Tunnell Productions. These products were some of the most successful retail products to be published by Dynamix. In 1993, Sid & Al's Incredible Toons earned Tunnell and Chris Cole a patent for the game concepts. In 1995, Tunnell returned to Dynamix in a leadership role. In 2001, after Dynamix was disbanded, Tunnell co-founded GarageGames, an independent video game publisher, which is also the developer of the Torque Game Engine. In 2007, GarageGames was acquired by InterActiveCorp, the media conglomerate founded by Barry Diller. Tunnell remained on as Chief Creative Officer of GarageGames. Tunnell was a contributor behind the vision of the original InstantAction distribution platform. In 2008, Tunnell left GarageGames to pursue other interests. In 2009, Tunnell founded PushButton Labs along with former partners and employees from GarageGames and Dynamix.
    5.75
    4 votes
    124
    Tarus Balog

    Tarus Balog

    Tarus Balog is the CEO of the OpenNMS Group. He is the current maintainer of the OpenNMS open source network management project.
    5.75
    4 votes
    125
    Barrett Lyon

    Barrett Lyon

    Barrett Gibson Lyon (born March 18, 1978) is an Internet entrepreneur. The son of a lawyer, Lyon was raised in Auburn, California. Although he initially struggled in school due to dyslexia, in middle school he became fascinated with computers. He soon found that the methods he used to overcome dyslexia allowed him to quickly gain an expert knowledge of computers. While in high school, he set up Linux servers to host webpages for friends and also managed his school's computer network. In 1995, while investigating a possible vulnerability in Network Solutions he accidentally caused AOL's website to go down for three days. After high school, Lyon enrolled at California State University, Sacramento and studied philosophy. Lyon is the creator of the Opte Project, which is an Internet mapping project that seeks to make an accurate representation of the extent of the Internet using visual graphics. The project was started in October 2003 in an effort to provide a useful Internet map with open source code. The project has gathered support worldwide and is part of the catalogs of the Boston Museum of Science and The Museum of Modern Art. While working part time in college for a for a small
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Dejan Ristanović

    Dejan Ristanović

    Dejan Ristanović (Serbian Cyrillic: Дејан Ристановић), is a well known Serbian writer and computer publicist. In January 1981 he wrote the first article on personal computers for the popular science magazine Galaksija (Galaxy). During the following years he wrote many articles about programmable calculators and home computers. In December 1983 he wrote a special edition of Galaksija called "Computers in Your Home" (Računari u vašoj kući), the first computer magazine in former Yugoslavia. This issue featured entire schematic diagrams guides on how to build computer Galaksija, created by Voja Antonić. The series of special editions was eventually developed into computer magazine Računari (Computers). Ristanović was the editor of Računari for 11 years. After that, in 1995 Ristanović founded the PC Press publishing company and magazine PC, the first privately owned computer magazine in Serbia. Ristanović has been the editor-in-chief of PC for more than 10 years. In 1989 he co-founded Sezam BBS, which eventually become a major BBS system and evolved to Internet provider Sezam Pro, which in 2009 merged in Orion Telecom. Dejan Ristanović is the author of about 20 books and more than 500
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Gervase Markham

    Gervase Markham

    Gervase Markham (born June 1978) is a British programmer for the Mozilla Foundation, and a lead developer of Bugzilla. He started contributing to the Mozilla project in 1999, and became the youngest paid employee of Mozilla.org at age 23 after he graduated from Oxford University. Markham is named after his paternal grandfather Canon Gervase Markham (1910-2007), the squire and vicar of Morland near Penrith; both are related to the 16th century poet and writer Gervase Markham. According to his Times obituary, the elder Gervase Markham was a descendant of William Markham, Archbishop of York (1710–1807). In 2006, he won a Google-O'Reilly Open Source Award as "Best Community Activist". He has also presented to the FOSDEM conference for several years about the Mozilla Foundation activities and Bugzilla. Markham is a born-again Christian, and has been undergoing treatment for metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma. He has written about both, and the relationship he sees between them.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Jeordie White

    Jeordie White

    • Web Link(s): http://www.discogs.com/artist/Twiggy+Ramirez
    Jeordie Osbourne White (born June 20, 1971), better known by his pseudonym Twiggy Ramirez (derived from Twiggy, a fashion icon, and Richard Ramirez, a convicted serial killer), is an American musician, who is best known for being the bassist and guitarist for Marilyn Manson. He was also the bassist for A Perfect Circle, and Nine Inch Nails (live only). He is also the vocalist and multi-instrumentalist for Goon Moon. He left Marilyn Manson in 2002, but rejoined the band in 2008. He has been a principal songwriter for the band and has also contributed to some of the Desert Sessions recordings. Though born in New Jersey, he moved to Florida sometime during his childhood where by his own admission he grew up on "Star Wars and heavy metal". He has three younger brothers, Westley, Dustin, and Aiden. His mother, Dana Brown, was formerly a cage dancer groupie for such bands as the Kinks, giving Jeordie famous musical contact. He is of Italian and Scottish descent. Influenced by the likes of Mötley Crüe, Van Halen and Iron Maiden, he first picked up a guitar at the age of 13. Although a New Jersey native, he spent the better portion of his youth in the Ft. Lauderdale area, where he quickly
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Jon Udell

    Jon Udell

    Jon Udell is an "Evangelist" at Microsoft. Previously he was lead analyst for the Infoworld Test Center. Udell is author of Practical Internet Groupware, published in 1999 by O'Reilly Media, and is an advisor to O'Reilly's Safari Tech Books Online. He wrote the column "Tangled in the Threads" for Byte.com from 1999–2002, and continues to be an active blogger. In this context he published a screencast illustrating how Wikipedia articles evolve, using Heavy metal umlaut as an example. A major focus of much of his writing is the question of how to enable non-experts to find data (often on the internet) and utilize in new ways. He created the LibraryLookup bookmarklet project, which makes it easier for people to discover if their local library has a copy of a given book.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Ken Williams

    Ken Williams

    Ken Williams (born October 1954) is an American game programmer originally from Simi Valley, California, who co-founded On-Line Systems, which later became Sierra On-Line, together with his wife Roberta Williams. Roberta and Ken married at the age of 19 and have two children. The couple were leading figures in the development of graphical adventure games. Sierra was a leader in adventure games, employing nearly 1,000 persons prior to their acquisition in 1996. Ken and Roberta's early contributions to the computer game industry were partially chronicled in the book Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution. In the early days of computing, Ken authored the textbook Apple II Computer Graphics. Sierra's notable online service, the ImagiNation Network, was purchased by AT&T in 1994. Ken was the president of Sierra until the company was sold to CUC in July 1996, but he remained with the company leading its strategic direction until November 1997. Vivendi (now Activision Blizzard after the Vivendi Games and Activision merger) currently holds the Sierra name. In his role as Sierra's CEO, Ken was always seeking to lead innovations in the computer game industry. In a 1999 interview with
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Malcolm Evans

    Malcolm Evans

    Malcolm Evans (born 10 April 1944) is a British computer game programmer, best known for his games 3D Monster Maze for the Sinclair ZX81 and Trashman for the ZX Spectrum, released in 1982 and 1984 respectively. He and his twin brother, Rod, were born in Romford, but his family soon moved to Portsmouth. He has a B.Sc. in electronics from Portsmouth Polytechnic and joined Marconi, where he worked on high-powered projects, such as satellite technology. Then in the mid-70s he moved to work for Smiths Aviation, where he designed hardware to implement computer control systems for jet engines. In 1979 he moved again, to Sperry Gyroscope in Bristol, where he joined its micro-processor applications group. There he found himself using Zilog Z80 and Intel 8088 machine code language for small applications of a classified nature for the Ministry of Defence. The Bristol factory was closed in 1981 but by then Malcolm had received a ZX81 from his wife, Linda, for his thirty-seventh birthday in April 1981. Malcolm developed 3D Monster Maze to test what the computer was capable of, and completed it by November. At a Bath Classical Guitar & Lute Society meeting in 1981 Evans met John K. Greye who had
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Mark Robbins

    Mark Robbins

    Mark Robbins (b. Grand Rapids, Michigan 1947) is a computer software author, inventor, visionary, entrepreneur, and reporter. Robbins received a Bachelors Degree from California State University at Northridge in 1975. In 1971, Robbins co-founded the original Dial-A-Joke telephone service. He designed and built the equipment which answered the phone and delivered the jokes. He also designed and built the answering machine used for the Superfone service run by the writer, producer and voiceover artist Joe Klein. He created the Apple-Cat II modem and Com-Ware II communications software in 1979 for Novation, Inc., a modem manufacturing company. In 1980, he co-authored ASCII Express "The Professional" (aka. AE-Pro), a software communications program for the Apple II computer (DOS and ProDOS versions), sold by Roger Wagner of Southwestern Data Systems and later by United Software Industries, Inc.. The Apple-Cat II modem and Com-Ware II software was the first modem and software combination on a personal computer that offered 1200 bit per second file transfer, up from 300 bits per second. AE-Pro held the title of number one selling communications program for the life of the Apple II
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Paco Nathan

    Paco Nathan

    Paco Nathan (born 1962) is a computer scientist, author, and performance art show producer from San Luis Obispo, California, who established much of his career in Austin, Texas. He studied mathematics and computer science at Stanford University, specializing in UI design and AI, with Doug Lenat as graduate advisor. He received a teaching fellowship during 1984-1986, under the direction of Stuart Reges, to create a course called CS1E, as a peer-teaching introduction to using the Internet, informally called "PCs for Poets". It has since grown to become the popular Residential Computing program on campus. Nathan collaborated with Robby Garner and the italian researcher Luigi Caputo, President of Alma Research Centre, on one of the first web chatterbots, named Barry DeFacto, in 1995. The three have worked together on several related projects, including the JFRED open source project for developing Java-based chat bots. They used JFRED in BBC Television's "Tomorrow's World MegaLab Experiment" and attained a 17% Turing percentage during what was the largest online Turing test at the time. He was a co-founder (with Jon Lebkowsky) and president of FringeWare, Inc., and the editor of
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Paul Voermans

    Paul Voermans

    Paul Voermans (born 4 June 1960) is a science fiction author from Australia. His novels And Disregards the Rest and The Weird Colonial Boy were shortlisted for the Australian Science Fiction Achievement Award, the Ditmar Award.
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Theodore Ts'o

    Theodore Ts'o

    Theodore Y. "Ted" Ts'o (born 1968) is a software developer mainly known for his contributions to the Linux kernel, in particular his contributions to file systems. He is the primary developer and maintainer of e2fsprogs, the userspace utilities for the ext2 and ext3 filesystems, and is a maintainer for the ext4 file system. He graduated in 1990 from MIT with a degree in computer science. After graduation he worked in the Information Systems (IS) department at MIT until 1999, where among other things he was project leader of the Kerberos V5 team. After MIT IS he went to work for VA Linux Systems for two years. Starting December 2001, he was employed by IBM, working to improve the performance and scalability of the Linux kernel. In December 2007, he went to work for the Linux Foundation. Ts'o initially served as Chief Platform Strategist at the foundation. In December 2008, he was appointed to Chief Technology Officer of the organization. Ts'o replaced Markus Rex, who has returned to Novell. As of January 2010, Ts'o is employed by Google. He stated "I’m going to be working on kernel, file system, and storage stuff." Ts'o served as Treasurer for USENIX until June 2008, and has chaired
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Yukihiro Matsumoto

    Yukihiro Matsumoto

    Yukihiro Matsumoto (松本行弘 (まつもとゆきひろ), Matsumoto Yukihiro, a.k.a. Matz, born 14 April 1965) is a Japanese computer scientist and software programmer best known as the chief designer of the Ruby programming language and its reference implementation, Matz's Ruby Interpreter (MRI). As of 2011, Matsumoto is the Chief Architect of Ruby at Heroku, an online cloud platform-as-a-service in San Francisco. He is a fellow of Rakuten Institute of Technology, a research and development organization in Rakuten Inc. Matsumoto's name can be written using kanji: 松本行弘, but is normally written using hiragana: まつもとゆきひろ. Born in Osaka Prefecture, he was raised in Tottori Prefecture from the age of four. According to an interview conducted by Japan Inc., he was a self-taught programmer until the end of high school. He graduated with an information science degree from University of Tsukuba, where he was a member of Ikuo Nakata's research lab on programming languages and compilers. Matsumoto is married and has four children. He is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, did standard service as a missionary and is now a counselor in his church ward. Matz released the first version of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Steve Gibson

    Steve Gibson

    Steve M. Gibson (born March 26, 1955, Dayton, Ohio) is a computer enthusiast, software engineer and security researcher who studied Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley. Gibson lives in Laguna Hills, California. In 1985, Gibson founded Gibson Research Corporation, which is best known for its SpinRite software. Gibson has had a very long career in the technology field; his resume lists jobs he had held back to the age of 13. He began in hardware projects but moved more toward software development in the 1980s. One of his early successes during this period was a light pen graphics system for the Apple II. Gibson is an advocate of assembly language programming, and prides himself on writing smaller applications mostly in Intel x86 assembly language, including much of the code of the SpinRite hard disk utility used from the beginning of the PC era. He is one of several advocates of optimizing computer programs and reducing the size of their executables. In the 1990s, Gibson began to move into the computer security field, developing and distributing a number of free security tools, including the ShieldsUp! port-scanner, and the LeakTest
    5.50
    4 votes
    138
    Dave Grossman

    Dave Grossman

    Dave Grossman is a game programmer and game designer, most known for his work at Telltale Games and early work at LucasArts. He has also written several children's books, and a book of "guy poetry" called Ode to the Stuff in the Sink. At LucasArts, Grossman wrote and programmed The Secret of Monkey Island and Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge together with Ron Gilbert and Tim Schafer. He later co-designed Day of the Tentacle. Grossman quit LucasArts in 1994 to begin a freelance career. For Humongous Entertainment, a company co-founded by Ron Gilbert, he helped create many critically acclaimed games aimed at children, such as the Pajama Sam series. Later he also wrote children's games for Hulabee Entertainment and Disney. Today he designs adventure games at Telltale Games, a company founded by LucasArts veterans. In 2009 he returned to his Monkey Island roots, as Design Director on Telltale Games' episodic Tales of Monkey Island. Lyrick Publishing published three books written by Grossman that were based on characters from Humongous Entertainment's games. They were Freddi Fish: The Big Froople Match, Pajama Sam: Mission to the Moon and Freddi Fish: The Missing Letters Mystery. For
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    David Mullich

    David Mullich

    David Mullich (born 1958, in Burbank, California) is an American game producer and designer best known for creating the cult classic 1980 adventure game The Prisoner, producing the 1995 adaptation I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream, and developing many games in the Heroes of Might and Magic franchise. And with a career spanning more than twenty-five years, Mullich worked not only for some of the first video game publishers, but went on to work for some of the biggest game companies of today. The hero, Sir Mullich in Heroes of Might and Magic III: Armageddon's Blade, is named after him. Sir Mullich has one of the best specialities in the game that makes the units under him gained improved speed. Mullich's work in video games began at the birth of the video game industry in 1978 when his COBOL professor at California State University, Northridge hired him to work as a clerk and programmer at Rainbow Computing, one of the first computer stores to open in the Los Angeles area. Sherwin Steffin, who was a frequent customer at the store, recruited Mullich to develop games for his new start-up game publishing company, Edu-Ware Services. Upon graduating in 1980 with a degree in computer
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Herb Sutter

    Herb Sutter

    Herb Sutter is a prominent C++ expert. He is also a book author and a columnist for Dr. Dobb's Journal. He joined Microsoft in 2002 as a platform evangelist for Visual C++ .NET, rising to lead software architect for C++/CLI. Sutter served as secretary and convener of the ISO C++ standards committee for over 10 years. In September 2008 he was replaced by P.J. Plauger. He then re-assumed the convener position, after Plauger resigned in October 2009. From 1997 to 2003, Sutter regularly created C++ programming problems and posted them on the Usenet newsgroup comp.lang.c++.moderated, under the title Guru of the Week. The problems generally addressed common misconceptions or poorly understood concepts in C++. Sutter later published expanded versions of many of the problems in his first two books, Exceptional C++ and More Exceptional C++. New articles, mostly related to C++11, were published since November 2011.
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Ken Thompson

    Ken Thompson

    Kenneth Lane Thompson (born February 4, 1943), commonly referred to as ken in hacker circles, is an American pioneer of computer science. Having worked at Bell Labs for most of his career, Thompson is notable for his work with the B programming language (basing it mainly on the BCPL language he had used to write Unix while in the MULTICS project), the C programming language, and as one of the creators and early developers of the Unix and Plan 9 operating systems. Other notable contributions included his work on regular expressions and early computer text editors QED and ed, his work on computer chess that included creation of endgame tablebases and the chess machine Belle, and most recently the co-creation of Google's programming language Go. Thompson was born in New Orleans. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1965 and a master's degree in 1966, both in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, from the University of California, Berkeley, where his master's thesis advisor was Elwyn Berlekamp. In the 1960s, Thompson and Dennis Ritchie worked on the Multics operating system. While writing Multics, Thompson created the Bon programming language. The two left the Multics project
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Nat Friedman

    Nat Friedman

    Nathaniel Dourif Friedman (born August 6, 1977), known as Nat, is a programmer who co-founded Ximian along with Miguel de Icaza in 1999, a company that was later bought by Novell in 2003. Friedman held the post of CEO of Ximian from 1999 to 2001 when Ximian brought in David Patrick as an external CEO after the company raised fifteen million dollars of venture capital. Before Ximian, Friedman worked on the GNU ROPE project, and interned at Silicon Graphics and Microsoft. In 1999, he received a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. At Novell, Friedman was the Chief Technology and Strategy Officer for Open Source until January 2010, when he began an extensive world trip with his wife for more than a year. Friedman is the nephew of actor Brad Dourif. In May 2011, Friedman became the CEO of Xamarin, a new company founded by Miguel de Icaza.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Ryan North

    Ryan North

    Ryan M. North (born October 20, 1980) is a Canadian writer, computer programmer, and occasional songwriter who is the creator and author of Dinosaur Comics, and co-creator of Whispered Apologies and Happy Dog the Happy Dog. North grew up in Ottawa, Ontario, where he studied computer science (minor in film) at Carleton University before moving to Toronto for his master's degree in computer science at the University of Toronto, specializing in computational linguistics; he graduated in 2005. He is a humorist, programmer and longboarding enthusiast and also designs t-shirts as a day job. His parents are Anna and Randall North. He has a younger brother, Victor North. He is married to Jennifer Klug. Dinosaur Comics, a fixed-art webcomic, has run for more than 2,000 issues and has been published by Quack!Media as The Best of Dinosaur Comics: 2003-2005 AD: Your Whole Family Is Made of Meat, among other compilations. In addition to his comics, North has created three tools to aid webcomic authors: Oh No Robot, a webcomic transcription tool that creates searchable text databases for comics; RSSpect, a method of creating RSS feeds for websites; and Project Wonderful, a pay-per-day
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Fred Fish

    Fred Fish

    Fred Fish (November 4, 1952 – April 20, 2007) was a computer programmer notable for work on the GNU Debugger and his series of Fish disks of freeware for the Amiga. He was a pioneering spirit pervasive in the Amiga community. The Fish Disks (term coined by Perry Kivolowitz at a Jersey Amiga User Group meeting) became the first national rallying point, a sort of early postal system. Fish would get his disks off around the world in time for regional and local user group meetings who in turn duplicated them for local consumption. Typically, only the cost of materials changed hands. The Fish Disk series ran from 1986 to 1994. In it, one can chart the growing sophistication of Amiga software and see the emergence of many software trends. The Fish Disks were distributed at computer stores and Commodore Amiga enthusiast clubs. Contributors submitted applications and source code and the best of these each month were assembled and released as a diskette. Since the Internet was not yet in popular usage outside military and university circles, this was a primary way for enthusiasts to share work and ideas. He also initiated the "GeekGadgets" project, a GNU standard environment for AmigaOS and
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Georg C. F. Greve

    Georg C. F. Greve

    Georg C. F. Greve (born 10 March 1973 in Helgoland, Germany) is a self-taught software developer, academically trained physicist and author. He has been working on technology politics since 2001 when he founded the Free Software Foundation Europe. Greve has been working full-time as president for FSFE since early 2001. In June 2009 he handed over the presidentship of the FSFE to Karsten Gerloff. His responsibilities for FSFE included coordination of the General Assembly, supporting local representatives in their work, working on political and legal issues as well as projects and giving speeches or informing journalists to spread knowledge about free software. In addition, Georg Greve also worked as a consultant, representing Google in the OOXML standardisation process at ISO and as a project reviewer for the European Commission. Greve is married and currently lives in Switzerland. In 2010 Greve was awarded the Cross of Merit on ribbon of the Federal Republic of Germany (Verdienstkreuz am Bande). Greve has a degree of Physics in biophysics, with physical oceanography and astronomy as minor fields of study from the computer science department of the University of Hamburg. His
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Michael Widenius

    Michael Widenius

    Ulf Michael Widenius (often called Monty), born 3 March 1962, in Helsinki, Finland, is the main author of the original version of the open-source MySQL database and a founding member of the MySQL AB company. After studying at (although not graduating from) the Helsinki University of Technology, Widenius started working for Tapio Laakso Oy in 1981. In 1985 he founded TCX DataKonsult AB (a Swedish data warehousing company) with Allan Larsson. In 1995 he began writing the first version of the MySQL database with David Axmark, released in 1996. He is the co-author of the MySQL Reference Manual, published by O'Reilly in June 2002; and in 2003 he was awarded the Finnish Software Entrepreneur of The Year prize. Until MySQL AB's sale to Sun Microsystems in January 2008, he was the chief technical officer of MySQL AB and still one of the primary forces behind the ongoing development of MySQL. Due to selling MySQL to Sun, Widenius earned about 16.6 million € in capital gains in 2008 (16.8 million € total income), making the top 10 of highest earners in Finland that year. On 5 February 2009, he announced that he was leaving Sun in order to create his own company. He lives in Helsinki with his
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Rasmus Lerdorf

    Rasmus Lerdorf

    Rasmus Lerdorf (born 22 November 1968 in Qeqertarsuaq, Greenland) is a Danish programmer with Canadian citizenship and is most notable as the creator of the PHP scripting language. He authored the first two versions. Lerdorf has also participated in the development of later versions of PHP led by a group of developers including Jim Winstead (who later created blo.gs), Stig Bakken, Shane Caraveo, Andi Gutmans and Zeev Suraski, and is still a contributor. He graduated from King City Secondary School in 1988, and in 1993 he graduated from the University of Waterloo with a Bachelor of Applied Science in Systems Design Engineering. He contributed to the Apache HTTP Server and he added the LIMIT clause to the MSQL DBMS. The LIMIT clause was later adapted by several other DBMS, including MySQL. From September 2002 to November 6, 2009, he was employed by Yahoo! Inc. as an Infrastructure Architecture Engineer. In 2010, he joined WePay in order to develop their API. Throughout 2011 he was a roving consultant for startups. On February 22nd, 2012, he announced on Twitter that he had joined Etsy. Lerdorf is a frequent speaker at Open Source conferences around the world. During his keynote
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Bill Gates

    Bill Gates

    William Henry "Bill" Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is an American business magnate and philanthropist. Gates is the former chief executive and current chairman of Microsoft, the world’s largest personal-computer software company, which he co-founded with Paul Allen. He is consistently ranked among the world's wealthiest people and was the wealthiest overall from 1995 to 2009, excluding 2008, when he was ranked third; in 2011 he was the wealthiest American and the second wealthiest person. During his career at Microsoft, Gates held the positions of CEO and chief software architect, and remains the largest individual shareholder, with 6.4 percent of the common stock. He has also authored or co-authored several books. Gates is one of the best-known entrepreneurs of the personal computer revolution. Gates has been criticized for his business tactics, which have been considered anti-competitive, an opinion which has in some cases been upheld by the courts. In the later stages of his career, Gates has pursued a number of philanthropic endeavors, donating large amounts of money to various charitable organizations and scientific research programs through the Bill & Melinda Gates
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Dave Cutler

    Dave Cutler

    David Neil Cutler, Sr. (born March 13, 1942) is an American software engineer, designer and developer of several operating systems including RSX-11M, VMS and VAXELN at Digital Equipment Corporation and Windows NT at Microsoft. David Cutler was born in Lansing, Michigan and grew up in DeWitt, Michigan. After graduating from Olivet College in 1965, Cutler went to work for DuPont. One of his tasks was developing and running computer simulations on Digital machines. He developed an interest in operating systems and left DuPont to pursue that interest. Cutler's software career started at a small company he founded called Agrippa-Ord, located in Monument Square, Concord, Massachusetts (or possibly in Acton, Massachusetts), marketing software for the LINC and PDP-8 computers. Cutler holds over 20 patents and is an affiliate professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Washington. David Cutler summarised his own career in the foreword to Inside Windows NT. In addition to his engineering skills, Cutler is known for his sardonic humor. Sometimes even his error messages turn out to have a double meaning. David is also an avid auto racing driver. He has previously competed
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    David Braben

    David Braben

    David John Braben (born 1964, Basford, Nottingham) is a British computer programmer, best known for co-writing Elite, a hugely popular and influential space trading computer game, in the early 1980s, and for his work as a trustee for the Raspberry Pi Foundation who in 2012 launched a low-cost computer for education. Braben attended Buckhurst Hill County High School in Chigwell in Essex. He studied Natural Sciences at Jesus College, Cambridge. He married Katharin Dickinson in May 1993 in Cambridge. Elite was written in conjunction with Ian Bell while both were undergraduate students at Cambridge University. Another seminal game written by Braben was Zarch for the Acorn Archimedes (later released on some other platforms as Virus), which was one of the first true "solid" 3D games. After Zarch, Braben went on to found Frontier Developments, a games development company whose first project was a sequel to Elite named Frontier. Braben is still the Chairman and part owner of the company, whose recent projects have included Kinectimals, RollerCoaster Tycoon 3, games based on the Wallace & Gromit franchise and the platformer LostWinds, which was a launch title on Nintendo's WiiWare download
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Guido van Rossum

    Guido van Rossum

    Guido van Rossum (born 31 January 1956) is a Dutch computer programmer who is best known as the author of the Python programming language. In the Python community, Van Rossum is known as a "Benevolent Dictator For Life" (BDFL), meaning that he continues to oversee the Python development process, making decisions where necessary. He is currently employed by Google, where he spends half his time developing the Python language. Van Rossum was born and grew up in the Netherlands, where he received a masters degree in mathematics and computer science from the University of Amsterdam in 1982. He later worked for various research institutes, including the Dutch Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam, the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, Maryland, and the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), Reston, Virginia. In December 2005, Van Rossum was hired by Google. He wrote a web-based code-review tool for Google in Python. Guido van Rossum is the brother of Just van Rossum, a type designer and also a programmer. Just van Rossum designed the typeface that is used in the "Python Powered" logo. Guido lives in California
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Habib

    Habib

    Habib Wahid (Bengali: হাবিব ওয়াহিদ; born October 15, 1979), better known as Habib (for short), is a Bangladeshi composer and [[ Habib was born and brought up in Dhaka, Bangladesh. He attended South Breeze School in Dhanmondi. His father is Ferdous Wahid, who was a Bangladeshi pop singer during the 1970s and 1980s. During his early years, Habib picked up the keyboard and approached by playing popular tunes. Later in teen age, he was recommended by one of his teachers to play in a band as a keyboardist, and so he did. A few years later, he went to the United Kingdom in pursuit of higher education and studied music and audio engineering at the School of Audio Engineering in London. Later he started to work with other Asian music producers such as Nitin Sawhney. He had already produced and planned his music, however he needed a vocalist to develop his new album. While living in London, he was searching for the vocalist Kaya, who was a Sylheti restaurant owner. In 2003, Habib released his first album Krishno, which proved to be a success in Britain and Bangladesh. The album Krishno had a unique mix of folk and modern electronica music, introducing a new sound to the Dhaka music arena.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Infosys

    Infosys

    Infosys Limited, formerly Infosys Technologies Limited (BSE: 500209, NSE: INFY, NASDAQ: INFY) is an Indian multinational provider of business consulting, technology, engineering and outsourcing services company. It is headquartered in Bangalore, Karnataka. Infosys was co-founded in 1981 by N. R. Narayana Murthy, Nandan Nilekani, N. S. Raghavan, S. Gopalakrishnan, S. D. Shibulal, K.Dinesh and Ashok Arora after they resigned from Patni Computer Systems. Infosys ranked among the most innovative companies in a Forbes survey, leading technology companies in a report by The Boston Consulting Group and top ten green companies in Newsweek's Green Rankings Infosys was voted India's most admired company in The Wall Street Journal Asia 200 every year since 2000. The corporate governance practices were recognized by The Asset Platinum award and the IR Global Rankings. Infosys was also ranked as the 15th most trusted brand in India by The Brand Trust Report Life Insurance Corporation of India has 6.28%. Oppenheimer Developing Markets Fund, Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, a sovereign wealth fund owned by Abu Dhabi, and the Government of Singapore also hold significant shareholdings as on
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Jim Gettys

    Jim Gettys

    Jim Gettys is an American computer programmer at Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs, USA. Until January 2009, he was the Vice President of Software at the One Laptop per Child project, working on the software for the OLPC XO-1. He is one of the original developers of the X Window System at MIT and worked on it again with X.Org, where he served on the board of directors. He previously served on the GNOME foundation board of directors. He worked at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and was the editor of the HTTP/1.1 specification in the Internet Engineering Task Force through draft standard. Gettys helped establish the handhelds.org community, from which the development of Linux on handheld devices can be traced. Gettys worked at HP Labs' Cambridge Research Laboratory. He won the 1997 Internet Plumber of the Year award on behalf of the group who worked on HTTP/1.1. Gettys is one of the keepers of the Flame (USENIX's 1999 Lifetime Achievement Award) on behalf of The X Window System Community at Large. One of his main goals at OLPC was to review and overhaul much of standard Linux software, in order to make it run faster and consume less memory and power. In this context, he has pointed out a
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    John Graham-Cumming

    John Graham-Cumming

    John Graham-Cumming is a British programmer and writer best known for having originated a successful petition to the British Government asking for an apology for its persecution of Alan Turing for his homosexuality. He wrote the open source POPFile email filtering program and was one of the founding speakers at the annual MIT Spam Conference (with Paul Graham). He is the co-founder of California-based Electric Cloud, a company specialized in high-performance software build tools. He is listed as an inventor on six US patents. He studied at the University of Oxford gaining a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics and Computation and a Doctor of Philosophy in computer security. He is the author of a travel book called The Geek Atlas and a book on GNU make called GNU Make Unleashed. In February 2010, The Times named his blog as one of its "top 30 science blogs". After the release of data by the Met Office following the Climatic Research Unit hacking incident he found errors in the data and code which were subsequently confirmed by the Met Office. In October 2010, he started an organization whose aim is to build Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine known as Plan 28 and has also campaigned
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    John Romero

    John Romero

    Alfonso John Romero (born October 28, 1967, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S.) is a director, designer, programmer, and developer in the video game industry. He is best known as a co-founder of id Software and was a designer for many of their games, including Wolfenstein 3D, Dangerous Dave, Doom and Quake. His game designs and development tools, along with new programming techniques created and implemented by id Software's lead programmer John D. Carmack, led to a mass popularization of the first person shooter, or FPS, in the 1990s. He is credited with coining the FPS multiplayer term "deathmatch". John Romero's first published game, Scout Search, appeared in the June 1984 issue of inCider magazine, a popular Apple II magazine during the 1980s. Romero's first company, Capitol Ideas Software, was listed as the developer for at least 12 of his earliest published games. Romero captured the December cover of the Apple II magazine Nibble for three years in a row starting in 1987. He won a programming contest in A+ magazine during its first year of publishing with his game Cavern Crusader. Romero's first industry job was at Origin Systems in 1987 after programming games for 8 years.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Metaweb Technologies, Inc.

    Metaweb Technologies, Inc.

    • Web Link(s): metaweb.com
    Metaweb Technologies, Inc. was a United States company based in San Francisco that developed Freebase, described as an "open, shared database of the world's knowledge". The company was founded by Danny Hillis in July, 2005, and operated in stealth mode until 2007. Metaweb was acquired by Google in July, 2010. Although Metaweb no longer exists as a separate corporate entity, Freebase and its associated website freebase.com continue to be provided as an open database under Metaweb's original CC-BY licensing terms. On March 14, 2006, Metaweb received $15 million in funding. Investors included: Benchmark Capital, Millennium Technology Ventures, and Omidyar Network. Kevin Harvey of Benchmark Capital is a member of Metaweb's board of directors. On January 15, 2008, Metaweb announced a $42.5 million Series B round led by Goldman Sachs and Benchmark Capital. On July 16, 2010, Google acquired Metaweb for an undisclosed sum.
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Scott A. Jones

    Scott A. Jones

    Scott A. Jones (born in 1960) is an American inventor. Scott graduated with honors from Indiana University in 1984, receiving a bachelor of science degree in computer science. He is known for his work in the early days of voicemail and co-founded Boston Technology, a voice-mail technology company, with Greg Carr. In 1996, Scott and three other entrepreneurs formed Escient, LLC, best known for "science between entertainment and technology." The motivation for this endeavor was said to make technology behave. In 2006, he founded the mobile question-answering service ChaCha. Jones lives in Carmel, Indiana. His 16 year old son, Andrew, was featured on MTV's Teen Cribs. As owner of seven dogs, Scott was featured as a "Dog-loving CEO" in USA Today. In 2007, Galaxia, Inc. was founded, which developed a magical artistic display of LED lights that can be controlled individually to create video animations that are state-of-the-art lighting displays. Scott has displayed this talent in New York City at the Tavern on the Green in Central Park, and at Herald Square & Greeley Square located at 34th Broadway and 6th Ave, Manhattan.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Andrew Tridgell

    Andrew Tridgell

    Andrew "Tridge" Tridgell (born 28 February 1967) is an Australian computer programmer best known as the author of and contributor to the Samba file server, and co-inventor of the rsync algorithm. He is known for his analysis of complex proprietary protocols and algorithms, to allow compatible free and open source software implementations. Tridgell was a major developer of the Samba software, analysing the Server Message Block protocol used for workgroup and network file sharing by Microsoft Windows products. He developed the talloc hierarchical memory allocator, originally as part of Samba. For his PhD thesis, he co-developed rsync, including the rsync algorithm, a highly efficient file transfer and synchronization tool. He also was the original author of rzip, which uses a similar algorithm to rsync. He is the author of KnightCap, a reinforcement-learning based chess engine. Tridgell was also a leader in hacking the TiVo to make it work in Australia, which uses the PAL video format. In April 2005, Tridgell tried to produce free software (now known as SourcePuller) that interoperated with the BitKeeper source code repository. This was cited as the reason that BitMover revoked a
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Brad Fitzpatrick

    Brad Fitzpatrick

    Bradley Joseph "Brad" Fitzpatrick (born February 5, 1980 in Iowa), is an American programmer. He is best known as the creator of LiveJournal and is the author of a variety of free software projects such as memcached and OpenID. Born in Iowa, Fitzpatrick grew up in Beaverton, Oregon and majored in computer science at the University of Washington in Seattle. LiveJournal eventually became a full-time job and then a company, which he called Danga Interactive. In January 2005, Fitzpatrick sold Danga to Six Apart, for an undisclosed sum of cash and stock. He was named chief architect of Six Apart. He left Six Apart in August 2007 and joined the LiveJournal Advisory Board in 2008. He now works for Google where he has contributed to Android, created PubSubHubbub and is now part of the Go programming language team.
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Randal L. Schwartz

    Randal L. Schwartz

    Randal L. Schwartz (born November 22, 1961), also known as merlyn, is an American author, system administrator and programming consultant. Schwartz is the co-author of several widely used books about Perl, a programming language, and has written regular columns about Perl for several computer magazines, including UNIX Review, Web Techniques, and the Perl Journal. He popularized the Just another Perl hacker signature programs. He is a founding board member of the Perl Mongers, the worldwide Perl grassroots advocacy organization. He is currently a member of the Squeak Oversight Board, which oversees the Squeak programming language. He has owned and operated Stonehenge Consulting Services, Inc. since 1985. After joining as co-host of FLOSS Weekly, a free software/open source (FLOSS) themed podcast in 2007, he assumed the role of host in 2010. He has done voice work for StarShipSofa, a science-fiction podcast. Schwartz's name is also associated with the Schwartzian transform, an algorithm to efficiently sort a list according to a computation, without repeating the computation many times for each element of the list. Schwartz is an influential member of the F/OSS community, and has been
    5.00
    4 votes
    162
    Mark I. Himelstein

    Mark I. Himelstein

    Mark I. Himelstein (b. February 12, 1960) is an American computer scientist and management consultant in Silicon Valley, California. He is best known for his work on the Solaris Operating Environment and later, his own company, Heavenstone, Inc. He is also the author of ¬タワ100 Questions to Ask Your Software Organization¬タン, a leading industry tool for software development. Himelstein was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania in 1960. He studied Mathematics and Computer Science at Wilkes-College in Pennsylvania graduating in 1980. He was granted his Masters of Computer Science from the University of California at Davis Livermore in 1982. His first major job in the computer industry was with MIPS Computer System (now MIPS Technologies) where he was part of a team that helped change how compilers and CPUs were developed. During the next twenty years, he held programming and management positions at several technology companies including Apple, Sun Microsystems, Digeo and Infoblox where he led development teams for groundbreaking industry software. Himelstein soon made his mark in technology with pioneering work in the field of compiler development. He was issued two patents for
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    Scott Draves

    Scott Draves

    Scott Draves is the inventor of Fractal Flames and the leader of the distributed computing project Electric Sheep. He also invented patch-based texture synthesis and published the first implementation of this class of algorithms. He is also a video artist and accomplished VJ. In summer 2010, Draves' work was exhibited at Google's New York City office, including his video piece "Generation 243" which was generated by the collaborative influences of 350,000 people and computers worldwide. Stephen Hawking's 2010 book The Grand Design used an image generated by Draves' "flame" algorithm on its cover. Known as "Spot," Draves currently resides in New York City. Draves earned a Bachelor's in mathematics at Brown University before continuing on to earn a PhD in computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. At CMU he studied under Andy Witkin, Dana Scott, and Peter Lee.
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Ward Cunningham

    Ward Cunningham

    Howard G. "Ward" Cunningham (born May 26, 1949) is an American computer programmer who developed the first wiki. A pioneer in both design patterns and Extreme Programming, he started programming the software WikiWikiWeb in 1994 and installed it on the website of his software consultancy, Cunningham & Cunningham (commonly known by its domain name, c2.com), on March 25, 1995, as an add-on to the Portland Pattern Repository. He currently lives in Beaverton, Oregon, and is the Co-Creation Czar for CitizenGlobal. He is Nike's first Code for a Better World Fellow. He has authored a book about wikis, titled The Wiki Way, and also invented Framework for Integrated Tests. He was a keynote speaker at the first three instances of the WikiSym conference series on wiki research and practice. Cunningham received his Bachelor's degree in interdisciplinary engineering (electrical engineering and computer science) and his master's degree in computer science from Purdue University. He is a founder of Cunningham & Cunningham, Inc. He has also served as Director of R&D at Wyatt Software and as Principal Engineer in the Tektronix Computer Research Laboratory. He is founder of the Hillside Group and has
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    Alan Kotok

    Alan Kotok

    Alan Kotok (November 9, 1941 – May 26, 2006) was an American computer scientist known for his work at Digital Equipment Corporation (Digital, or DEC) and at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Steven Levy, in his book Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, describes Kotok and his classmates at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as the first true hackers. Kotok was a precocious child who skipped two grades before college. At MIT he became a member of the Tech Model Railroad Club, and after enrolling in MIT's first freshman programming class, he helped develop some of the earliest computer software including a digital audio program and what is sometimes called the first video game (Spacewar!). Together with his teacher John McCarthy and other classmates, he was part of the team that wrote the Kotok-McCarthy program which took part in the first chess match between computers. After leaving MIT, Kotok joined the computer manufacturer DEC, where he worked for over 30 years. He was the chief architect of the PDP-10 family of computers, and created the company's Internet Business Group, responsible for several forms of Web-based technology. Kotok is known for his
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Anders Hejlsberg

    Anders Hejlsberg

    Anders Hejlsberg (born December 1960) is a prominent Danish software engineer who co-designed several popular and commercially successful programming languages and development tools. He was the original author of Turbo Pascal and the chief architect of Delphi. He currently works for Microsoft as the lead architect of C# and core developer on TypeScript. Hejlsberg was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, and studied engineering at the Technical University of Denmark but did not graduate. While at the university in 1980, he began writing programs for the Nascom microcomputer, including a Pascal compiler which was initially marketed as the Blue Label Software Pascal for the Nascom-2. However, he soon rewrote it for CP/M and DOS, marketing it first as Compas Pascal and later as PolyPascal. Later the product was licensed to Borland, and integrated into an IDE to become the Turbo Pascal system. Turbo Pascal competed with PolyPascal. The compiler itself was largely inspired by the "Tiny Pascal" compiler in Niklaus Wirth's "Algorithms + Data Structures = Programs", one of the most influential computer science books of the time. Anders and his partners ran a computer store in Copenhagen and
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Dave Thomas

    Dave Thomas

    Dave Thomas is a computer programmer and author/editor. He has written about Ruby. Dave and partner Andy Hunt wrote The Pragmatic Programmer and run The Pragmatic Bookshelf publishing company. Dave Thomas lives in Flower Mound, Texas. He moved to the United States from England in 1994. Dave has also coined the phrase 'Code Kata'. He studied computer science at Imperial College London.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Dr. Cat

    Dr. Cat

    Dr. Cat (born David Shapiro) is known for creating the 2003 Independent Games Festival finalist MMORPG Furcadia. He has worked (in various capacities) for Origin, and Microprose, among others. Notable titles he has significantly contributed to include games in the Ultima series.
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Jim Kent

    Jim Kent

    William James (Jim) Kent (born February 10, 1960) is an American research scientist and computer programmer. He has been a contributor to genome database projects and the 2003 winner of the Benjamin Franklin Award (Bioinformatics). Kent was born in Hawaii and grew up in San Francisco, California, United States. Kent began his programming career in 1983 with Island Graphics Inc. where he wrote the Aegis Animator program for the Amiga home computer. This program combined polygon tweening in 3D with simple 2D cel-based animation. In 1985 he founded and ran a software company, Dancing Flame, which adapted the Aegis Animator to the Atari ST, and created Cyber Paint for that machine. Cyber Paint was a 2D animation program that brought together a wide variety of animation and paint functionality and the delta-compressed animation format developed for CAD-3D. The user could move freely between animation frames and paint arbitrarily, or utilize various animation tools for automatic tweening movement across frames. Cyber Paint was one of the first, if not the first, consumer program that enabled the user to paint across time in a compressed digital video format. Later he developed a similar
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Jon "maddog" Hall

    Jon "maddog" Hall

    Jon "maddog" Hall (7 August 1950) is the Executive Director of Linux International, a non-profit organization of computer professionals who wish to support and promote Linux-based operating systems. The nickname "maddog" was given to him by his students at Hartford State Technical College, where he was the Department Head of Computer Science. He now prefers to be called by this name. According to Hall, his nickname "came from a time when I had less control over my temper". He has worked for Western Electric Corporation, Aetna Life and Casualty, Bell Laboratories, Digital Equipment Corporation, VA Linux Systems, and SGI. He was the CTO and ambassador of the now defunct computer appliance company Koolu. It was during his time with Digital that he initially became interested in Linux, and was instrumental in obtaining equipment and resources for Linus Torvalds to accomplish his first port, to Digital's Alpha platform. It was also in this general timeframe that Hall, who lives in New Hampshire, started the Greater New Hampshire Linux Users' Group. Hall has UNIX as his New Hampshire vanity license plate. Hall serves on the boards of several companies, and several non-profit
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Krishna Bharat

    Krishna Bharat

    Krishna Bharat is an Indian research scientist at Google Inc, and leads a team developing Google's news product. Among other projects, he opened the Research & Development center at Bangalore. He is the creator of Google News, a service that automatically indexes over 25,000 news websites in more than 25 languages to provide a summary of the News resources. Krishna Bharat created Google News in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks to keep himself abreast of the developments. Since then, it has been a popular offering from Google's services. Google News was one of Google's first endeavors beyond offering just plain text searches on its page. Bharat grew up in Bangalore, now an IT hub in South India. He completed his schooling from St. Joseph's Boys' High School in Bangalore, and received an undergraduate degree in computer science from the prestigious Indian Institute of Technology, Madras. He subsequently received a Ph.D from Georgia Tech in Human Computer Interaction. Before joining Google in 1999, he worked at the DEC Systems Research Center where, with George Mihaila, he developed the Hilltop algorithm. At Google he developed so-called LocalRank, which can be
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Matthew Haughey

    Matthew Haughey

    Matthew Haughey (born October 10, 1972) is an American programmer, web designer, and blogger best known as the founder of the community weblog MetaFilter, where he is known as mathowie. Haughey grew up in Placentia, California. He graduated from the University of California, Riverside with a B.S. and M.S. in environmental science. Haughey designed his first website in 1995. From 1997 to 2000, Haughey was a webmaster and programmer for Social Sciences Computing at UCLA. In 2000, he moved to the San Francisco Bay area where, as an employee of Pyra Labs, he participated in the development of early versions of Blogger. In 2001, he worked briefly for KnowNow and Bitzi. Haughey then relocated to Portland, Oregon, and from 2002 to 2005 served as creative director at Creative Commons. In 1999, Haughey launched MetaFilter, a prominent community weblog and internet forum, which he programmed himself using Macromedia ColdFusion and Microsoft SQL Server, and which he manages with co-moderators Jessamyn West (2005-), Josh Millard (2007- ), and Ricardo Vacapinta (2008- ). Haughey was featured on the front cover of the May 2001 issue of Brill's Content, illustrating the cover story "Human
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Paul Buchheit

    Paul Buchheit

    Paul Buchheit is an American computer programmer and entrepreneur. He was the creator and lead developer of Gmail. He developed the original prototype of Google AdSense as part of his work on Gmail. He also suggested the company's now-famous motto "Don't be evil" in a 2000 meeting on company values. Buchheit grew up in Webster, New York and went to college at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. He worked at Intel and later became the 23rd employee at Google. Buchheit was a founder of the startup FriendFeed, which was launched in 2007 and was acquired by Facebook in 2009, in a private transaction. In 2010, Buchheit left Facebook to become a partner at the investment firm Y Combinator. From 2006 (when he started investing) until 2008, Paul invested about $1.21 million in 32 different companies. He also continues to oversee angel investments of his own, in (by his own estimate) "about 40" startups. He won the 2011 The Economist Innovation Awards for the Computing and telecommunications field.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Poul-Henning Kamp

    Poul-Henning Kamp

    Poul-Henning Kamp (born 1966) is a developer known for work on various projects. He currently resides in Slagelse, Denmark. Poul-Henning Kamp has been committing to the FreeBSD project for most of its duration. He is responsible for the widely used MD5 password hash algorithm, a vast quantity of systems code, including the FreeBSD GEOM storage layer, GBDE cryptographic storage transform, part of the UFS2 file system implementation, FreeBSD Jails, malloc library and the NTP timecounters code. He is the lead architect and developer for the open source Varnish cache project, an HTTP accelerator. His dispute with electronics manufacturer D-Link in which he claimed they were committing NTP vandalism by embedding the IP address of his NTP servers in their routers was resolved on 27 April 2006. A post by Poul-Henning is responsible for the widespread use of the term bikeshed colour to describe contentious but otherwise meaningless technical debates over trivialities in open source projects. This term is in use in, among others, the FreeBSD Project, the Perl Project, and the Subversion Project. Poul-Henning Kamp is known for his preference of a Beerware license to the GPL. Poul-Henning
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Rob Levin

    Rob Levin

    Robert Levin (December 16, 1955 – September 16, 2006), also known as lilo, was the founder of the freenode IRC network and Executive Director of the PDPC charity that helped fund freenode. A computer programmer since 1968, he worked as an administrator and an applications programmer from 1978 until his death. From 1994 onwards, he worked to encourage the use of IRC for Free Software and Open Source projects. He was one of the founders of the OpenProjects Network (OPN), which quickly grew to become the largest IRC network used by the free software community. The OpenProjects.net domain was later put up for sale, but did not sell. It also came to light that he mismanaged funds intended for the OPN, even going so far as to use them to pay his cell phone bill, his rent, buying food, and paying off student loans. After courting The Free Software Foundation, Levin renamed The OpenProjects Network to "Freenode" in an effort to make the IRC network more palatable to the GNU project. As the leader of freenode and later the Executive Director of the PDPC, a 501(c)(3) charity founded in Texas, Levin was responsible for fundraising activity for the PDPC. On September 12, 2006, he was struck by
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Robby Garner

    Robby Garner

    Robby Garner (born 1963) is a natural language programmer and software developer. He won the 1998 and 1999 Loebner Prize Contests with the program called Albert One. He is listed in the 2001 Guinness Book of World Records as having written the "most human" computer program. A native of Cedartown, Georgia, Robby attended Cedartown High School. He worked in his father's television repair shop and began programming for his family's business at age 15. Forming a software company called Robitron Software Research, Inc. in 1987 with his father, Robert J. Garner, and his sister Pam, he worked as a software developer until 1997 when his father retired and the company was disbanded. One of the first web chatterbots, named Max Headcold, was written by Garner in 1995. Max served two purposes, to collect data about web chat behavior and to entertain customers of the FringeWare online bookstore. This program was eventually implemented as a Java package called JFRED, written by Paco Nathan based on the C++ FRED CGI program, and his own influences from Stanford and various corporations. Garner and Nathan took part in the world's largest online Turing test in 1998. Their JFRED program was
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Andrew Morton

    Andrew Morton

    Andrew Keith Paul Morton (born 1959 in England) is an Australian software engineer, best known as one of the lead developers of the Linux kernel. He is currently a co-maintainer of the Ext3 file system and the journaling layer for block devices (JBD). In the late 1980s, he was one of the partners of a company in Sydney, Australia that produced a kit computer called the Applix 1616, as well as a hardware engineer for the (now-defunct) Australian gaming equipment manufacturer Keno Computer Systems. He holds an honours degree in electrical engineering from the University of New South Wales in Australia. Morton maintains a Linux kernel patchset known as the mm tree, which contains work-in-progress patches that might later be accepted into the official Linux tree maintained by Linus Torvalds. "mm" as a primary testing ground became unmanageably large and busy, and in 2008 the "linux-next" tree was created to fill much of this role. In 2001, Andrew Morton and his family moved from Wollongong, New South Wales to Palo Alto, California. In July 2003, Morton joined the Open Source Development Labs under an agreement with his then-employer Digeo Inc. (makers of the Moxi home entertainment
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Chuck Lamb

    Chuck Lamb

    Chuck Lamb is a programmer from Columbus, Ohio also known as the Dead Body Guy. He has gained fame playing dead people in film and television. With the claim of "I can lay around with the best of them," Lamb decided to fulfill his dreams of being on TV or in a movie by taking pictures of himself as a dead body having been "killed" through various comedic methods. Anne Howard, publicist at RushPRNews.com wrote the initial press article that got him noticed by the media and worked as his publicist, obtaining coverage for Lamb around the globe. His website was noticed by Mike Harden of The Columbus Dispatch, and his was the first among multiple global press coverage. The following week he was on the front page of the National section of The New York Times. He has been called a global phenomenon by the Associated Press. One ironic aspect of Mr. Lamb's "dead body" fame is that he works for an insurance company. His hometown magazine, Columbus Monthly named him "Best Dead Guy" in the "Best Of Columbus" issue. A collectible set of trading cards were also issued and sold out quickly. Lamb has appeared on NBC's Today Show, CBS's Early Show, MSNBC's Rita Cosby Show, and CNN's Paula Zahn Now
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Dave Winer

    Dave Winer

    Dave Winer (born May 2, 1955 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an American software developer, entrepreneur and writer in New York City. Winer is noted for his contributions to outliners, scripting, content management, and web services, as well as blogging and podcasting. He is the founder of the software companies Living Videotext and Userland Software, a former contributing editor for the Web magazine HotWired, the author of the Scripting News weblog, a former research fellow at Harvard Law School, and current visiting scholar at New York University's Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. Winer was born on May 2, 1955, in Brooklyn, New York City, the son of Eve Winer, Ph.D., a school psychologist, and Leon Winer, Ph.D., a former professor of the Columbia University Graduate School of Business who died October 3, 2009. Winer is also the grandnephew of German novelist Arno Schmidt and a relative of Hedy Lamarr. He graduated from the Bronx High School of Science in 1972. Winer received a BA in Mathematics from Tulane University in New Orleans in 1976. In 1978 he received an MS in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In 1979 Dave Winer became an employee of
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    David Axmark

    David Axmark

    David Axmark is one of the founders of MySQL AB and a developer of the free database server, MySQL. He has been involved with MySQL development from its beginning along with the fellow co-founder Michael Widenius. David has been involved with free software since 1980 and has said he is committed to developing a successful business model using free open source software. During early 2010 David made a Series A financing for OrangeHRM, "The World's Most Popular Open Source Human Resource Management Software." David is a director at OrangeHRM.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Gary Drescher

    Gary Drescher

    Gary L. Drescher is a scientist in the field of artificial intelligence (AI), author of the book Made-Up Minds: A Constructivist Approach to Artificial Intelligence. His book describes a theory of how a computer program might be implemented to learn and use new concepts that have not been programmed into it. It introduces the Schema Mechanism, a general learning and concept-building mechanism inspired by Jean Piaget's account of human cognitive development. The Schema Mechanism is intended to replicate key aspects of cognitive development during infancy. It takes Piaget's theory of human development as source of inspiration for an artificial learning mechanism; and it extends and tests Piaget's theory by seeing whether a specific mechanism that works according to Piagetian themes actually exhibits Piagetian abilities. He was a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University, which is directed by the American philosopher Daniel Dennett. As a result of his studies there, he has written a book, Good and Real: Demystifying Paradoxes from Physics to Ethics, in which he defends a rigorously mechanistic materialism. In this book, he discusses quantum mechanics,
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Ron Gilbert

    Ron Gilbert

    Ron Gilbert (born January 1, 1964) is an American computer game designer, programmer, and producer, best known for his work on several classic LucasArts adventure games, including Maniac Mansion and the first two Monkey Island games. Gilbert was also co-founder of Humongous Entertainment and its sister company Cavedog Entertainment. His games are generally focused on interactive storytelling. Additionally, Ron founded Hulabee Entertainment with Shelley Day after leaving Humongous Entertainment. He was Creative Director at Vancouver-based Hothead Games development studio. He is currently working at Double Fine Productions, with former LucasArts writer/programmer/designer Tim Schafer. Ron Gilbert was born in La Grande, Oregon, United States, as the son of David E. Gilbert, a physics professor and former president of Eastern Oregon University (then Eastern Oregon State College). He became interested in games when he was 13 years old thanks to a Texas Instruments TI-59 programmable calculator his father used to bring home. That calculator included a simple game in which the player had to guess the location of a battleship by entering the coordinates and the calculator would answer if
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Mark Zuckerberg

    Mark Zuckerberg

    Mark Elliot Zuckerberg (born May 14, 1984) is an American computer programmer and Internet entrepreneur. He is best known as one of five co-founders of the social networking site Facebook. Zuckerberg is the chairman and chief executive of Facebook, Inc. Born and raised in New York state, he took up writing software programs as a hobby in middle school, beginning with BASIC, with help from his father and a tutor (who called him a "prodigy"). In high school, he excelled in classic literature and fencing while studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. He later attended Harvard University, majoring in computer science and psychology. In his sophomore year, he wrote a program called Facemash as a "fun" project, letting students on the college's network vote on other students' photo attractiveness. It was shut down within days, but would become a template for his writing Facebook, a program he launched from his dormitory room. With the help of friends, he took Facebook to other campuses nationwide and soon after moved to Palo Alto, California. By 2007, Zuckerberg was a billionaire at the age of 23. By 2010, Facebook had an estimated 500 million users worldwide. Zuckerberg has since been
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Richard Stallman

    Richard Stallman

    Richard Matthew Stallman (born March 16, 1953), often shortened to rms, is an American software freedom activist and computer programmer. In September 1983, he launched the GNU Project to create a free Unix-like operating system, and he has been the project's lead architect and organizer. With the launch of the GNU Project, he initiated the free software movement; in October 1985 he founded the Free Software Foundation. Stallman pioneered the concept of copyleft, and he is the main author of several copyleft licenses including the GNU General Public License, the most widely used free software license. Since the mid-1990s, Stallman has spent most of his time advocating for free software, as well as campaigning against software patents, digital rights management, and what he sees as excessive extension of copyright laws. Stallman has also developed a number of pieces of widely used software, including the original Emacs, the GNU Compiler Collection, the GNU Debugger, and various tools in the GNU coreutils. He co-founded the League for Programming Freedom in 1989. Stallman was born to Alice Lippman and Daniel Stallman, in 1953 in New York City. His first experience with computers
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Stepan Pachikov

    Stepan Pachikov

    Stepan Alexandrovich Pachikov (born February 1, 1950 in Vartashen, recently renamed as Oguz, Azerbaijan) is the co-founder of ParaGraph Intl., Parascript, Evernote Corp. among other software companies which contributed heavily to the development of Handwriting recognition and VRML technologies. Stepan Pachikov was born in Vartashen, Azerbaijan, (from 1991 - Oguz) the son of Alexander Stepanovich Pachikov and Ekaterina Pankova. Pachikov is half Udi, half Russian. The word 'pachikov' in the Udi language means "the son of two branches". He attended Novosibirsk State University, Tbilisi State University (Georgia) and Moscow State University where he received an honorary master's degree in economic applications of mathematical methods. He received his PhD in fuzzy logic from the USSR Academy of Sciences. In 1989–1997, he worked in Moscow at ParaGraph International, a company which dealt with handwriting recognition software for the Apple Newton. In 1992 he opened the US branch of ParaGraph in Silicon Valley, where he created and distributed software called Calligrapher for handwritten input on tablets and touchscreens. From 1997 to 1998 he served as vice president and established a
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Jawed Karim

    Jawed Karim

    Jawed Karim (born in 1979, East Germany) is a Bengali-German American technologist and co-founder of the popular video sharing website YouTube. Many of the core components of PayPal, including its real-time anti-fraud system, were also designed and implemented by Karim. Karim was born in East Germany, but crossed the Berlin Wall and grew up in West Germany. He moved to the United States with his family in 1992, two years after German reunification. He graduated from Central High School in Minnesota and he attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He left campus prior to graduating to become an early employee at PayPal, but continued his coursework, earning his Bachelor of Science in computer science in 2004. While working at PayPal, he met Chad Hurley and Steve Chen. The three later founded the YouTube video sharing website in 2005. YouTube's first video, Me at the zoo, was uploaded by Karim on April 23, 2005. After co-founding the company and developing the YouTube concept and website with Chad Hurley and Steve Chen, Karim enrolled as a graduate student in computer science at Stanford University while acting as an advisor to YouTube. When YouTube was acquired by
    4.50
    4 votes
    187
    Shawn Fanning

    Shawn Fanning

    Shawn Fanning (born November 22, 1980) is an American computer programmer, serial entrepreneur, and angel investor. He developed Napster, one of the first popular peer-to-peer ("P2P") file sharing platforms, in 1998. The popularity of Napster was widespread and Fanning was featured on the cover of Time magazine. The site in its initial free P2P incarnation was shut down in 2001 after the company's unsuccessful appeal of court orders arising from its encouraging the illegal sharing of copyrighted material. A paid subscription version of the site followed, and was purchased by Rhapsody on December 1st, 2011. Following his involvement with Napster, he joined, and invested in, a number of early-stage technology startup companies. In 2002, Fanning was named to the MIT Technology Review TR100 as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35. In 2003, he opened a new company, Snocap, along with Jordan Mendelson (Napster's Chief Architect), and Ron Conway. The company aspired to be a legitimate marketplace for digital media. However, their partners and the public did not respond well. Customer support was poor, and technical issues were numerous. One of their primary
    4.50
    4 votes
    188
    Chris Saari

    Chris Saari

    Principal Technical Yahoo, Engineering Manager, Electron Herder and Trouble MakerAlumni of Apple, PointCast, Netscape and Macromedia

    Interned at Apple, went to PointCast to work on the graphics and animation engine for Mac and then for Windows. In 1998 went to Mozilla / Netscape as an engineer and manager for Gecko, worked on core Gecko implementation (DOM, XUL, pixel pushing, etc.) and later as a manager on Gecko embedding, Camino, etc. In 2003 he went to Macromedia at first working on Dreamweaver and then on FlexBuilder 2. Lured him away in late 2005 by Yahoo to cause trouble with the Messenger team. Interests include cross platform, high performance, highly scalable software, graphics, human computer interfances, the list goes on. Lately I'm driven to improving software engineering in non-trivial ways, this is part of why XUL, Flex, and WPF are interesting to me, the other part is the world realizing human computer interaction still can get a lot better; see RIAs, iPhone, etc. Personal interests include search and semantic web stuff, making it scalable, functional, easier and more useful for normal humans, which is why I'm mucking with Metaweb.

    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Dave Haynie

    Dave Haynie

    Dave Haynie is the former Commodore International chief engineer on high end and advanced projects. He is still quite vocal in the Amiga community. Dave was born David Bruce Haynie on May 23, 1961, in Summit, New Jersey, United States. He moved to Colts Neck, New Jersey, in 1966, where he lived out his childhood with his three younger sisters. A few early Heathkit projects, and, at the age of 12, a run-in with his dad's borrowed HP desktop calculator changed his life forever. From 12 years on, he taught himself programming, initially on timeshare systems from his dad's account at Bell Laboratories. Later on, he wrote programs on his best friend Scott Scherer's Commodore PET 2001, the first home computer he had seen up close. He left for college at Carnegie Mellon University in 1979. Four years later, he graduated with a double BS in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. He started work at Commodore in 1983 as an engineer under Bil Herd. His first project was to help complete the TED systems comprising Plus/4, C16 and more. After completing the Commodore 128 Bil Herd left the company and Dave Haynie was promoted to chief engineer in the low-end group. After Commodore acquired
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    John Walker

    John Walker

    John Walker (born ca. 1950) is a computer programmer and a co-founder of the computer-aided design software company Autodesk, and a co-author of early versions of AutoCAD, a product Autodesk originally acquired from programmer Michael Riddle. He makes his home near Lignières, Switzerland. In 1974/1975, he wrote the ANIMAL software, which self-replicated on UNIVAC 1100 machines: this is considered to be one of the first computer viruses. Walker also founded the hardware integration manufacturing company Marinchip. Among other things, Marinchip pioneered the translation of numerous computer language compilers to Intel platforms. John Walker moved to Switzerland in 1991, after having lived almost twenty years in California. He now engages in personal projects, including a hardware random number generator called HotBits and his Earth and Moon viewer. He publishes on his personal domain, fourmilab.ch (after his nickname for his personal workshop, "Fourmilab"). John is also known for his efforts in the 196 Palindrome Quest, by taking it to 1,000,000 digits. John Walker's interest for artificial life prompted him to hire Rudy Rucker, a mathematician and science fiction author, for work on
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Marshall Kirk McKusick

    Marshall Kirk McKusick

    Marshall Kirk McKusick (born January 19, 1954 in Wilmington, Delaware) is a computer scientist, known for his extensive work on BSD, from the 1980s to FreeBSD in the present day. He was president of the USENIX Association from 1990 to 1992 and again from 2002 to 2004, and still serves on the board. He is also on the editorial board of ACM Queue Magazine. He is known to friends and colleagues as "Kirk". McKusick received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Cornell University, and 2 M.S. degrees (in 1979 and 1980 respectively) and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1984. McKusick is openly gay and lives in California with Eric Allman, his domestic partner since graduate school. McKusick is an avid wine collector and the temperature and vital statistics of his house and wine cellar are available on the web from his homepage. McKusick started with BSD by virtue of the fact that he shared an office at Berkeley with Bill Joy, who in essence spearheaded the beginnings of the BSD system. Some of his largest contributions to BSD have been to the file system. He helped design the original Berkeley Fast File System (FFS). More recently, he
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Mike Muuss

    Mike Muuss

    Michael John Muuss (October 16, 1958 - November 20, 2000) was the author of the freeware network tool ping. A graduate of Johns Hopkins University, Muuss was a senior scientist specializing in geometric solid modeling, ray-tracing, MIMD architectures and digital computer networks at the United States Army Research Laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland when he died. He wrote a number of software packages (including BRL-CAD) and network tools (including ttcp and the concept of the default route or "default gateway") and contributed to many others (including BIND). However, the thousand-line ping, which he wrote in December 1983 while working at the Ballistic Research Laboratory, is the program for which he is most remembered. Due to its usefulness, ping has been implemented on a large number of operating systems, initially BSD Unix, but later others including Windows and Mac OS X. In 1993, the USENIX Association gave a Lifetime Achievement Award (Flame) to the Computer Systems Research Group at University of California, Berkeley, honoring 180 individuals, including Muuss, who contributed to the CSRG's 4.4BSD-Lite release. Muuss is mentioned in two books, The Cuckoo's Egg
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Robert Abbott

    Robert Abbott

    Robert Abbott (born March 2, 1933) is an American game inventor, sometimes referred to by fans as "The Official Grand Old Man of Card Games". Though early in his life he worked as a computer programmer with the IBM 360 assembly language, he has been designing games since the 1950s. Two of his more popular creations include the chess variant Baroque chess (also known as Ultima) and Crossings, which later became Epaminondas. Eleusis was also successful, appearing in several card game collections, such as Hoyle's Rules of Games and New Rules for Classic Games, among others. In 1963, Abbott himself released a publication, Abbott's New Card Games, which included instructions for all of his card games, in addition to Baroque chess. Abbott also invented logic mazes, the first of which appeared in Martin Gardner's Mathematical Games column in the October 1962 issue of Scientific American. One of the more prominent of these is Theseus and the Minotaur, which was originally published in the book Mad Mazes. Recently, his game Confusion was named "Best New Abstract Strategy Game" for 2012 by GAMES Magazine. Abbott was born in St. Louis, Missouri, and attended St. Louis Country Day School.
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    StankDawg

    StankDawg

    David Blake (born 1971), also known as StankDawg, is the founder of the hacking group Digital DawgPound (DDP) and a long-time member of the hacking community. He is known for being a regular presenter at multiple hacking conferences, but is best known as the creator of the "Binary Revolution" initiative, including being the founding host and producer of Binary Revolution Radio, a long-running weekly Internet radio show which ran 200 episodes from 2003 to 2007. Blake was born in Newport News, Virginia on September 13, 1971. He received an AAS (Associates in Applied Sciences) degree from the University of Kentucky 1992, and has a BS in Computer Science from Florida Atlantic University as well as a CEH certificate. He presently lives and works as a computer programmer/analyst in Orlando, Florida. Blake is a member of the International High IQ society. StankDawg is a staff writer for the well-known hacker periodical 2600: The Hacker Quarterly, as well as the now-defunct Blacklisted! 411 magazine. He has also been a contributing writer to several independent zines such as Outbreak, Frequency, and Radical Future. He has been a frequent co-host of Default Radio and was a regular on Radio
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Ben Croshaw

    Ben Croshaw

    Benjamin Richard "Yahtzee" Croshaw (born 24 May 1983, Rugby, Warwickshire, England) is an English comedic writer, video game journalist and author of adventure games created using Adventure Game Studio software. He writes articles for Australia's Hyper magazine, a major games publication. He uses his website "Fully Ramblomatic" as an outlet for his own work, including weekly dark humour articles, essays, fiction, and webcomics. He also makes a series of video-reviews named Zero Punctuation for The Escapist, as well as the weekly column Extra Punctuation. In the February 2008 issue of PC Gamer (US), Croshaw took over Gary Whitta's "Backspace" column as a contributing editor. In August 2010 his novel Mogworld was published. He is one of the four founders of The Mana Bar; an Australian cocktail bar and video gaming lounge originally in Brisbane, Australia, and a second venue in Melbourne, Australia, intends to continue to spread around Australia and potentially internationally. Originally Croshaw created a series of adventure games with MS Paint starring his signature character Arthur Yahtzee. Croshaw became known in the Adventure Game Studio (AGS) community for the Rob Blanc trilogy.
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Daniel Glazman

    Daniel Glazman

    Daniel Glazman (born 1967) is a JavaScript programmer, best known for his work on Mozilla's Editor and Composer components and Nvu, a standalone version of the Mozilla Composer, created for Linspire Corporation. He lives in France. Glazman studied at École Polytechnique, graduating in 1989, and Sup'Télécom Paris, graduating in 1991. He started work at Grif SA, a software company specialising in SGML editors. He worked at the Research & Development Centre of Electricité de France from 1994 to 2000, holding several positions from research engineer to team manager. During 2000 he also worked at Amazon.fr and Halogen before joining Netscape Communications Corporation to work on Mozilla's CSS rendering, Editor and Composer. Glazman was involved in the standardization of HTML 4 and CSS 2 and remains active in W3C's CSS Working Group. He was appointed co-chairman of the CSS Working Group in April 2008. He now runs his own company, Disruptive Innovations.
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Jaan Tallinn

    Jaan Tallinn

    Jaan Tallinn (born February 14, 1972) is an Estonian programmer who participated in the development of Skype and FastTrack/Kazaa. Jaan Tallinn is partner and co-founder of the development company Bluemoon which created the game SkyRoads. He graduated from the University of Tartu in 1996 with a BSc in Theoretical Physics with a thesis that involved traveling interstellar distances using warps in space-time. Jaan is a member of the advisory board at Lifeboat Foundation and member of Estonian President's Academic Advisory Board.
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Tim Schafer

    Tim Schafer

    Timothy Schafer (born July 26, 1967) is an American computer game designer. He founded Double Fine Productions in January 2000, after having spent over a decade at LucasArts. Schafer is best known as the designer of critically acclaimed games Full Throttle, Grim Fandango, Psychonauts, and Brütal Legend, and co-designer of the early classics The Secret of Monkey Island, Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge and Day of the Tentacle. He is known in the video game industry for his story-telling and comedic writing style. While studying computer science at UC Berkeley, Tim Schafer worked at Lucasfilm Games. During his application process for the job, he had a somewhat disastrous phone interview in which he mentioned being a fan of Ballblaster. The interviewer, David Fox, informed him that the Lucasfilm Games title was Ballblazer, and that only the pirated version was known as Ballblaster. Schafer was still permitted to send in his resume and a cover letter, so to make up for the phone interview, he sent in a comic of himself applying for and getting the job at Lucasfilm Games, drawn as a text adventure. On March 21, 1989 Schafer sent a job application to Atari, which was denied. Atari
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Sun Microsystems

    Sun Microsystems

    Sun Microsystems, Inc. was a company that sold computers, computer components, computer software, and information technology services. Sun was founded on February 24, 1982. At its height, Sun headquarters were in Santa Clara, California (part of Silicon Valley), on the former west campus of the Agnews Developmental Center. On January 27, 2010, Sun was acquired by Oracle Corporation for US$7.4 billion, based on an agreement signed on April 20, 2009. The following month, Sun Microsystems, Inc. was merged with Oracle USA, Inc. to become Oracle America, Inc. Sun products included computer servers and workstations built on its own RISC-based SPARC processor architecture as well as on x86 based AMD's Opteron and Intel's Xeon processors; storage systems; and a suite of software products including the Solaris operating system, developer tools, Web infrastructure software, and identity management applications. Other technologies include the Java platform, MySQL, and NFS. Sun was a proponent of open systems in general and Unix in particular, and a major contributor to open source software. Sun's main manufacturing facilities were located in Hillsboro, Oregon and Linlithgow, Scotland. The
    4.67
    3 votes
    200
    Tantek Çelik

    Tantek Çelik

    Tantek Çelik is a computer scientist of Turkish-American descent and was the Chief Technologist at Technorati. He is one of the principal editors of several CSS Specifications. He worked at Microsoft from 1997 to 2004, where he helped lead development of the Macintosh version of Internet Explorer. Between 1998 and 2003, he managed a team of software developers that designed and implemented the Tasman rendering engine for Internet Explorer for Mac version 5. During his time at Microsoft he also served as their alternate representative (1998–2000) and later their representative (2001–2004) to a number of working groups at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C); he is credited on a number of recommendations relating to XHTML and Cascading Style Sheets due to this work. While working for Microsoft, he also developed the "box model hack" that is used by web designers to work around the Internet Explorer box model bug. Before working at Microsoft he worked in a variety of software engineer roles at Sun Microsystems, Oracle Corporation and Apple Computer. During his four years at Apple Computer (1992–1996), he spent most of his time on the OpenDoc project, first as a senior software
    4.67
    3 votes
    201
    Andrew S. Tanenbaum

    Andrew S. Tanenbaum

    Andrew Stuart "Andy" Tanenbaum (sometimes referred to by the handle ast) (born March 16, 1944) is an American computer scientist and professor of computer science at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam in the Netherlands. He is best known as the author of MINIX, a free Unix-like operating system for teaching purposes, and for his computer science textbooks, regarded as standard texts in the field. He regards his teaching job as his most important work. Since 2004 he has operated a web site dedicated to analysis of polling data in U.S. federal elections. He was born in New York City and grew up in suburban White Plains, New York. He received his B.Sc. degree in Physics from MIT in 1965. He received his Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1971. Tanenbaum served as a lobbyist for the Sierra Club. He moved to the Netherlands to live with his wife, who is Dutch, but he retains his United States citizenship. He teaches courses about Computer Organization and Operating Systems and supervises the work of Ph.D. candidates at the VU University Amsterdam. He is well recognized for his textbooks on computer science: Operating Systems: Design and Implementation
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Berkshire Hathaway

    Berkshire Hathaway

    Berkshire Hathaway Inc. is an American multinational conglomerate holding company headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, United States, that oversees and manages a number of subsidiary companies. The company averaged an annual growth in book value of 20.3% to its shareholders for the last 44 years, while employing large amounts of capital, and minimal debt. Berkshire Hathaway stock produced a total return of 76% from 2000–2010 versus a negative 11.3% return for the S&P 500. The company is known for its control by investor Warren Buffett, who is the company's chairman and CEO. Buffett has used the "float" provided by Berkshire Hathaway's insurance operations (paid premiums which are not held in reserves for reported claims and may be invested) to finance his investments. In the early part of his career at Berkshire, he focused on long-term investments in publicly quoted stocks, but more recently he has turned to buying whole companies. Berkshire now owns a diverse range of businesses including confectionery, retail, railroad, home furnishings, encyclopedias, manufacturers of vacuum cleaners, jewelry sales; newspaper publishing; manufacture and distribution of uniforms; as well as several
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Bryan Cantrill

    Bryan Cantrill

    Bryan M. Cantrill is an engineer who worked at Sun Microsystems and later at Oracle Corporation following its acquisition by Sun. He left Oracle on July 25, 2010 to become the Vice President of Engineering at Joyent. Cantrill was born in Vermont, later moving to Colorado, where he attained the rank of Eagle Scout. He studied computer science at Brown University, spending two summers at QNX Software Systems doing kernel development. Upon completing his B.Sc. in 1996, he immediately joined Sun Microsystems to work with Jeff Bonwick in the Solaris Performance Group. In 2005 Bryan Cantrill was named one of the 35 Top Young Innovators by Technology Review, MIT's magazine. Cantrill was included in the TR35 list for his development of DTrace, a function of the OS Solaris 10 that provides a non-invasive means for real-time tracing and diagnosis of software. Sun technologies and technologists, including DTrace and Cantrill, also received an InfoWorld Innovators Award that year. In 2006, "The DTrace trouble-shooting software from Sun was chosen as the Gold winner in The Wall Street Journal's 2006 Technology Innovation Awards contest." In 2008, Cantrill, Mike Shapiro and Adam Leventhal were
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    David Jones

    David Jones

    David Jones is a British game programmer and entrepreneur who founded DMA Design in 1988 (now known as Rockstar North as of 2002) and Realtime Worlds in 2002. Jones created major game series Lemmings and the highly acclaimed, but controversial Grand Theft Auto video game (which later spawned many successful sequels). Jones founded the computer game company Realtime Worlds in 2002 where he worked as a creative director of the company. His most recent work was creating the original franchise Crackdown for the Xbox 360 console and the open-ended massively multiplayer online game, APB: All Points Bulletin.
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Robert Watson

    Robert Watson

    Robert N.M. Watson (born 3 May 1977 in Harrow, London, UK) is a FreeBSD developer, and founder of the TrustedBSD Project.. He is currently employed as a Senior Research Associate (senior post-doctoral researcher) in the Security Research Group at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. Dr. Watson graduated in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University and has attained a PhD from University of Cambridge. As well as Cambridge, he has worked at the National Institutes of Health, Carnegie Mellon University, Trusted Information Systems, Network Associates, McAfee, and SPARTA. He is currently pursuing a PhD in computer security at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, supervised by Ross Anderson and Markus Kuhn and sponsored by Google. His work has also been supported by DARPA, Apple Computer, the Navy, and other U.S. government agencies. His main research interests are network security and operating system security. His main open source software contributions include his work in developing the multi-threaded and multi-processor FreeBSD network stack, the TrustedBSD project, and OpenBSM. His writing has been featured in forums such as ACM's Queue Magazine, the
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Stu Megan

    Stu Megan

    • Web Link(s): stumegan.org
    Stu Megan, ( Stewart A. Megan, born 1952) now semi-retired, has been a computer software professional since 1968, having worked on early core memory computers such as the LEO Computers LEO III, a room-sized machine that used only switches for control and ferrite rods for memory to working at Netscape as the System Test Engineering Manager for more recent internet technology products such as Netscape's Directory Server (NDS) . He now owns his own Remote QA TestLab Services Company and several websites. In his spare time, he has been involved in various volunteerism projects. One of these projects was the Spacewatch project. During the time there, he was involved in searching for Near Earth Asteroids. He also created and ran a support site for the astronomers on the project. By analyzing online images, he discovered amongst others, the close-approaching asteroids 2004 BV18 on January 19, 2004 and 2004 UH1 on October 23, 2004. He analysed over 10,000 online images during his time on the project. In July 2004, the asteroid designated 15462 Stumegan was named 'stumegan' in honor of Stewart A Megan's discovery work at the Spacewatch FMO project. The citation states Stewart A. Megan (b.
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    TELUS

    TELUS

    Telus (TSX: T, NYSE: TU) is a national telecommunications company in Canada that provides a wide range of telecommunications products and services including internet access, voice, entertainment, video, and satellite television. The company is based in Burnaby, British Columbia, part of Greater Vancouver. Telus' wireless division, Telus Mobility, offers CDMA 2000, IDEN, and HSPA+-based mobile phone networks. Telus is a member of the British Columbia Technology Industry Association. Telus Communications (Alberta) was created in 1990 by the government of Alberta as a holding company in order to facilitate the privatization of a crown corporation, the Alberta Government Telephones Commission (AGT). In 1995, it acquired Edmonton Telephones Corporation (Ed Tel) from the City of Edmonton making Telus the owner of all telephone service in the province. In 1996, Telus was introduced to the public as the consumer brand, replacing AGT and EdTel. In 1998, Telus (Alberta) and BCTel announced a proposed merger. In 1999, Telus Corporation was created by the merger of Telus (Alberta) and BCTel. While Telus was the surviving company, it moved its headquarters to Vancouver. As a result of the
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    Theo de Raadt

    Theo de Raadt

    Theo de Raadt (/ˈθiː.oʊ dɛˈrɔːt/; Dutch pronunciation: [ˈteː.o dɛˈraːt]; born May 19, 1968 in Pretoria, South Africa) is a software engineer who lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He is the founder and leader of the OpenBSD and OpenSSH projects, and was a founding member of the NetBSD project. Theo de Raadt is the eldest of four children to a Dutch father, and a South African mother, with two sisters and a brother. Concern over the mandatory two-year armed forces conscription in South Africa led the family to emigrate to Calgary, Alberta, Canada in November 1977. In 1983 the largest recession in Canada since the Great Depression sent the family to the Yukon. Prior to the move de Raadt got his first computer, a Commodore VIC-20, which was soon followed by an Amiga. It is with these computers that he first began to develop software. In 1992 he obtained a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Calgary. The NetBSD project was founded in 1993 by Chris Demetriou, Adam Glass, Charles Hannum, and de Raadt, who collectively felt frustration at the speed and quality of Jolix, the then standard Berkeley software distribution, and believed that a more open development model would be of
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Werner Koch

    Werner Koch

    Werner Koch (born 1961-07-11) is a German free software author. He is best known as the principal author of the GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG or GPG). He was also Head of Office and German Vice-Chancellor of the Free Software Foundation Europe. He lives near Düsseldorf, Germany.
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    Chu Bong-Foo

    Chu Bong-Foo

    Chu Bong-Foo is the inventor of the Cangjie method, the most widely available Chinese input method. He is said to be the father of the modern Chinese computing, as his public domain input method, created in 1976, has sped up the computerization of Chinese society. Chu spent his childhood in Taiwan, but worked at Brazil, United States, Taiwan, Shenzhen and Macau. Chu was born in 1937 in Huanggang, Hubei to father Chu Wan-Yin, also called Chu Huai-bing. His family led a wandering life during the turbulent days of mainland China, and they finally settled down in Taiwan. There he studied at a local high school. He was an imaginative teenager who also spent much time reading fictions, but so much so that it negatively affected his studies. Later he also became interested in cinema. After graduating from Taiwan Provincial Agriculture Institute and his military service, he taught briefly at an elementary school in Hualien. In this period he witnessed the poverty of countryside, and developed a sense of mission for rural development and cultural improvement. Finding teaching not to his taste, he went to Brazil instead to develop his career, only to find life more difficult. Over that
    4.33
    3 votes
    211
    Brendan Kehoe

    Brendan Kehoe

    Brendan Patrick Kehoe (December 3, 1970 – July 19, 2011) was an Irish-born software developer and author. Born in Dublin, he was raised in China, Maine in the United States. In his early teens, he was first exposed to computing when he was given a Commodore 64 computer and he used this machine to teach himself about computing and computer networks. On leaving high-school, he moved to Widener University where he continued his computer studies, leaving in 1992. He wrote two books and a number of technology articles in the specialist press (e.g., Boardwatch Magazine) on the topic of the Internet. His first book, Zen and the Art of the Internet: A Beginner's Guide, first published by Prentice Hall in July 1992 was the first mass-published user's guide to the Internet. Zen was written while Kehoe was still at Widener; he struck a bargain with the publishers to ensure that the original edition of the book would remain free-of-charge in the internet for everyone to access. In a survey taken by PC Magazine for the twentieth anniversary of the PC, Zen and the Art of the Internet was listed as one of the "top sci-fi/tech non-fiction book of the past twenty years" (1981–2001). It also
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    David S. Miller

    David S. Miller

    David Stephen Miller (born November 26, 1974) is an American software developer working on the Linux kernel, where he is the primary maintainer of networking and the SPARC implementation, and is also involved in other development work. He is also a founding member of the GNU Compiler Collection steering committee. As of 2010, Miller tops the top 10 kernel developer as counted by number of changes, with 2987 commits since 2005. He worked at the Rutgers University Center for Advanced Information Processing, at Cobalt Microserver, and then Red Hat since 1999. Miller ported the Linux kernel to the Sun Microsystems SPARC in 1996 with Miguel de Icaza. He has also ported Linux to the 64-bit UltraSPARC machines, including UltraSPARC T1 in early 2006 and later the T2 and T2+. As of 2010 he continues to maintain the sparc port (both 32-bit and 64-bit). In April 2008, Miller contributed the SPARC port of the Gold, a from-scratch rewrite of the GNU linker. Miller is one of the maintainers of the Linux TCP/IP stack and has been key in improving its performance in high load environments. He also wrote and/or contributed to numerous network card drivers in the Linux kernel. He gave the keynote at
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    IBM

    IBM

    International Business Machines Corporation, or IBM, is an American multinational technology and consulting corporation, with headquarters in Armonk, New York, United States. IBM manufactures and sells computer hardware and software, and offers infrastructure, hosting and consulting services in areas ranging from mainframe computers to nanotechnology. The company was founded in 1911 as the Computing Tabulating Recording Company (CTR) through a merger of three companies: the Tabulating Machine Company, the International Time Recording Company, and the Computing Scale Company. CTR adopted the name International Business Machines in 1924, using a name previously designated to CTR's subsidiary in Canada and later South America. Its distinctive culture and product branding has given it the nickname Big Blue. In 2012, Fortune ranked IBM the #2 largest U.S. firm in terms of number of employees (433,362), the #4 largest in terms of market capitalization, the #9 most profitable, and the #19 largest firm in terms of revenue. Globally, the company was ranked the #31 largest in terms of revenue by Forbes for 2011. Other rankings for 2011/2012 include #1 company for leaders (Fortune), #1 green
    5.00
    2 votes
    214
    Peiter Zatko

    Peiter Zatko

    Peiter C. Zatko, better known as Mudge, was a member of the high profile hacker think tank the L0pht as well as the long-lived computer and culture hacking cooperative The Cult of the Dead Cow. In 2010 Mudge accepted a position as a program manager at DARPA where he directs and funds cyber security research. Born in December 1970, Mudge graduated from the Berklee College of Music and is an adept guitar player. Mudge was responsible for early research of a security vulnerability known as the buffer overflow. In 1995 he published "How to Write Buffer Overflows", one of the first papers on the topic. He published several security advisories on vulnerabilities in Unix and was a leader in the full disclosure movement. He was the initial author of security tools L0phtCrack, AntiSniff, and l0phtwatch. Mudge was one of the first people from the hacker community to reach out and build relationships with government and industry. In demand as a public speaker, he spoke at hacker conferences such as Defcon and academic conferences such as Usenix. Mudge has also been a member of CULT OF THE DEAD COW since 1996. He was one of the seven L0pht members who testified before a Senate committee in
    5.00
    2 votes
    215
    Robert Cook

    Robert Cook

    Robert Cook is a co-founder of Metaweb. He was a software programmer at Brøderbund in the 1980s and was the model for one of the characters in Jordan Mechner's game Prince of Persia. He designed and created the computer game D/Generation and was technical director for the computer game The Last Express.
    5.00
    2 votes
    216
    Ryo Kawasaki

    Ryo Kawasaki

    Ryo Kawasaki (川崎燎, Kawasaki Ryo) (born February 25, 1947) is a pioneering jazz fusion guitarist from Tokyo, Japan. He is best known as one the first musicians to develop and popularise the fusion genre and for helping to develop the guitar synthesizer in collaboration with Roland Corporation and Korg. His album Ryo Kawasaki and the Golden Dragon Live was one of the first all digital recordings and he created the Kawasaki Synthesizer for the commodore 64. During the 60s he played with various Japanese jazz groups and also formed his own bands. In the early 70s he came to New York where he settled and worked with Gil Evans, Elvin Jones, Chico Hamilton, Ted Curson, Joanne Brackeen amongst others. In the mid-80s, Kawasaki drifted out of performing music in favour of writing music software programmes for computers. He also produced several techno dance singles, formed his own record company called Satellites Records, and later returned to jazz-fusion in 1991. Ryo Kawasaki was born in Kōenji, Tokyo while Japan was still struggling and recovering from the early post World War II period. His father Torao Kawasaki was a renowned and honored Japanese diplomat and worked for The Japanese
    5.00
    2 votes
    217
    Terry Callier

    Terry Callier

    Terrence O. Callier, known as Terry Callier (born May 24, 1945, Chicago, Illinois) is an American jazz, soul and folk guitarist and singer-songwriter. Callier was born in the North Side of Chicago, and raised in the Cabrini–Green housing area. He learned piano, was a childhood friend of Curtis Mayfield, Major Lance and Jerry Butler, and began singing in doo-wop groups in his teens. In 1962 he took an audition at Chess Records, where he recorded his debut single, "Look at Me Now". At the same time as attending college, he then began performing in folk clubs and coffee houses in Chicago, becoming strongly influenced by the music of John Coltrane. He met Samuel Charters of Prestige Records in 1964, and the following year they recorded his debut album. Charters then took the tapes away with him into the Mexican desert, and the album was eventually released in 1968 as The New Folk Sound of Terry Callier. Two of Callier's songs, "Spin, Spin, Spin" and "It's About Time", were recorded by the psychedelic rock band H. P. Lovecraft in 1968, as part of their H. P. Lovecraft II album. H. P. Lovecraft featured fellow Chicago folk club stalwart George Edwards, who would go on to co-produce
    5.00
    2 votes
    218
    Matthew Smith

    Matthew Smith

    Matthew Smith (born 1966) is a British computer game programmer. He is best known for his games Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy for the ZX Spectrum, released in 1983 and 1984 respectively. He is also a playable character in the 2005 mobile game, Jet Set Racing. He was born in London, but his family moved around a great deal, finally ending up in Wallasey. He started out programming on a TRS-80. His first commercial game was a Galaxian clone for the TRS-80 called Delta Tower One. He then went on to produce a game on the VIC-20 called Monster Muncher. He obtained a ZX Spectrum on loan from Bug-Byte Software Ltd. in return for a contract to make three games. The first of these was Styx in 1983. He wrote Manic Miner in just six weeks and it was an instant success. While some games at the time were quite basic and amateur, Manic Miner was an addictive platform game with in-game music (a first for the ZX Spectrum). The sequel, Jet Set Willy, took considerably longer to write and was an even bigger success. Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy are two of the most famous and popular ZX Spectrum games, reputedly co-written with renowned programmer Andrew Dryden. After the creation of Jet Set Willy
    4.50
    2 votes
    219
    Dan Bricklin

    Dan Bricklin

    Daniel Singer "Dan" Bricklin (born 16 July 1951), often referred to as “The Father of the Spreadsheet”, is the American co-creator, with Bob Frankston, of the VisiCalc spreadsheet program. He also founded Software Garden, Inc., of which he is currently president, and Trellix Corporation, which is currently owned by Web.com. Bricklin was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, where he attended Akiba Hebrew Academy during his high school years. He earned a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973, where he was a resident of Bexley Hall. He began his college career as a mathematics major, but soon switched to computer science. Upon graduating from MIT, Bricklin worked for Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) until 1976, when he began working for FasFax, a cash register manufacturer. In 1977, he decided to return to school, and he earned a Master of Business Administration from Harvard University in 1979. While a student at Harvard Business School, Bricklin co-developed VisiCalc in 1979, making it the first electronic spreadsheet. It ran on an Apple II computer, and was considered a fourth generation
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Danese Cooper

    Danese Cooper

    Danese Cooper (born January 19, 1959) is an American programmer, computer scientist, and an advocate of open source software. Cooper has held many leadership roles within the computer science sector. She has managed teams at Symantec and Apple Inc. and for six years served as chief open source "evangelist" for Sun Microsystems before leaving to serve as senior director for open source strategies at Intel. In 2009 she worked as "Open Source Diva" at REvolution Computing (now Revolution Analytics). She is a board observer at Mozilla, and serves as a member of the Apache Software Foundation. She was a board member at Open Source Initiative. Cooper's major work within the open source area of computer science has garnered her the nickname "Open Source Diva". She was recruited, while at a sushi bar in Cupertino, to a position at Sun working towards opening the source code to Java. Within six months she quit frustrated by the claims of open source development with Java that Sun made, only to find that little "open sourcing" was taking place. Sun sought to keep Cooper understanding her need to further open source software and re-hired her as their corporate open source officer. Her six
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Daniel Henry Holmes Ingalls, Jr.

    Daniel Henry Holmes Ingalls, Jr.

    Daniel Henry Holmes Ingalls, Jr. is a pioneer of object-oriented computer programming and the principal architect, designer and implementor of five generations of Smalltalk environments. He designed the bytecoded virtual machine that made Smalltalk practical in 1976. He also invented Bit blit, the general-purpose graphical operation that underlies most bitmap graphics systems today, and pop-up menus. He designed the generalizations of BitBlt to arbitrary color depth, with built-in scaling, rotation, and anti-aliasing. His major contributions to the Squeak system include the original concept of a Smalltalk written in itself and made portable and efficient by a Smalltalk-to-C translator. Ingalls received his B.A. in Physics from Harvard University, and his M.S. in Electrical engineering from Stanford University. While working toward a Ph.D. at Stanford, he started a company, to sell a software measurement invention that he perfected and never returned to academia. Ingalls' first well known research was at Xerox PARC, where he began a lifelong research association with Alan Kay, and did his award winning work on Smalltalk. He then moved to Apple Inc. He left research for a time to run
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Federico Heinz

    Federico Heinz

    Federico Heinz is a Latin-American programmer and Free Software advocate living in Argentina. He is a co-founder and current president of Fundación Vía Libre, a non-profit organization that promotes the free flow of knowledge as a motor for social progress, and the use and development of Free Software. He has helped legislators such an Argentina's Ing. Dragan, Dr. Conde, and Peru's Dr. Villanueva draft and defend legislation demanding the use of Free Software in all areas of public administration. He speaks fluent Spanish, English, and German.
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Keith Packard

    Keith Packard

    Keith Packard (born April 16, 1963) is a software developer, best known for his work on the X Window System. Packard is responsible for many X extensions and technical papers on X. He has been heavily involved in the development of X since the late 1980s as a member of the MIT X Consortium, XFree86 and the X.Org Foundation. Packard gained a BA in mathematics from Reed College, Oregon in 1986. He worked at Tektronix, Inc. in Wilsonville, Oregon designing X terminals and Unix workstations from 1983 until 1988. He then moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts to work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology X Consortium from 1988 to 1992, developing the X Window System reference implementation and standards as the senior member of a small team. He was responsible for X releases at this time. In 1992 he moved to Portland, Oregon to work for Network Computing Devices on X terminals and computer graphics. From 1999 he worked for SuSE from his home in Portland, Oregon on the XFree86 implementation of X. He worked at the Cambridge Research Labs of Compaq (and then Hewlett-Packard) from 2001 until 2005 when the lab closed down. In 2003 he was ejected from XFree86. This led to the formation of
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Ken Schwaber

    Ken Schwaber

    Ken Schwaber is a software developer, product manager and industry consultant. Ken worked with Jeff Sutherland to formulate the initial versions of the Scrum development process and to present Scrum as a formal process at OOPSLA'95. They have extended and enhanced Scrum at many software companies and IT organizations. Schwaber and Sutherland are initial signers of the Agile Manifesto. They are co-authors of the definitive Scrum Guide, which is made available for free by Scrum.org. Today Schwaber runs Scrum.org, which provides Scrum resources, training, assessments, and certifications for Scrum Masters, Scrum Developers, Scrum Product Owners, and organizations using Scrum. He is one of the leaders of the agile software development movement. He is a founder of the Agile Alliance, and he is responsible for founding the Scrum Alliance and creating the Certified Scrum Master programs and its derivatives. Ken left the Scrum Alliance in the fall of 2009 after a serious bicycle accident. He then founded Scrum.org with Alex Armstrong. At Scrum.org, he led the development of new courseware, assessments, and partnerships to improve the quality and effectiveness of Scrum. He has recently
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    1 votes
    225
    Phil Bredesen

    Phil Bredesen

    Philip Norman "Phil" Bredesen Jr. (born November 21, 1943) is an American politician and served as the 48th Governor of Tennessee from 2003 to 2011. A member of the Democratic Party, he was first elected Governor in 2002, and was re-elected in 2006. He previously served as the fourth mayor of Nashville and Davidson County from 1991 to 1999. Bredesen was born in Oceanport, New Jersey. His parents were Norma Lucille (née Walborn) and Philip Norman Bredesen. His father, a captain in the U.S. Army Signal Corps, was stationed at Fort Monmouth in New Jersey at the time of Bredesen's birth. The family lived in various locations during Bredesen's early childhood, including Canandaigua, New York and Arlington, Massachusetts. The Bredesen name is of Norwegian origin. When his parents separated in 1951, Norma moved with her two sons, Phil and his younger brother Dean (1947–2006), to her family home in Shortsville, New York, where they lived with Bredesen's maternal grandmother, a widow. Shortsville is the community Bredesen considers to be his hometown, and he lived there until he left for college. He attended the Red Jacket Central Elementary and Secondary School, located in the adjoining
    5.00
    1 votes
    226
    Ward Christensen

    Ward Christensen

    Ward Christensen, born in West Bend, Wisconsin, U.S., is the co-founder of the CBBS bulletin board, the first bulletin board system (BBS) ever brought online. Christensen, along with partner Randy Suess, started development during a blizzard in Chicago, Illinois, and officially established CBBS four weeks later, on February 16, 1978. Christensen was noted for building software tools for his needs. He wrote a cassette-based operating system before floppies and hard disks were common. When he lost track of the source code for some programs he wrote ReSource, an iterative disassembler for the Intel 8080, to help him regenerate the source code. When he needed to send files to Randy Suess he wrote XMODEM. Christensen received two 1992 Dvorak Awards for Excellence in Telecommunications, one with Randy Suess for developing the first BBS, and a lifetime achievement award "for outstanding contributions to PC telecommunications." In 1993 he received the Pioneer Award from the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Christensen has been working for IBM as a technical sales specialist since 1968.
    5.00
    1 votes
    227
    Michael Hawley

    Michael Hawley

    Michael Hawley (born 18 November 1961) is an educator, artist and researcher working in the field of digital media. Previously at MIT’s Media Laboratory where he was a professor and held the Alexander W. Dreyfoos, Jr. endowed chair, Hawley is the founder or co-founder of several major research programs and projects including MIT's GO Expeditions program, Things That Think, Toys of Tomorrow, Counter Intelligence (a culinary research effort), and founder of the nonprofit organization Friendly Planet. He notably was the scientific director of the American Expedition on Mount Everest in 1998, one of the first major scientific expeditions on Everest. Hawley's work has been featured in major media such as National Geographic, Time, the New York Times, and on numerous television networks. His work at MIT has, in his own words, “sought to creatively stretch digital infrastructures, embedding intelligence into all sorts of artifacts and advancing the web of communications.” Hawley was born in November 1961 and grew up in New Providence, NJ, a suburb of New York City. He graduated New Providence High School in 1979. As a teenager he had a job at Bell Labs (Murray Hill, New Jersey), working
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    2 votes
    228
    Andrew Gower

    Andrew Gower

    Andrew Christopher Gower (born 2 December 1978) is a British video game developer and co-founder of Cambridge-based Jagex Games Studio, the company he founded with Paul Gower and Constant Tedder. He wrote the MMORPG RuneScape with the assistance of his brother, Paul Gower. In December 2010 he left the Jagex board of directors. He no longer has holdings in the company. As of November 2011, he is not listed under the credits for RuneScape. Since leaving Jagex, Gower has founded a new gaming development and consulting company, Fen Research, of which he holds 90% of the shares. Currently, he is developing a futuristic sci-fi game. Gower has designed a statistically typed programming language to aid in the project's development. Andrew Gower was born in Nottingham, England. He attended The Becket School and went on to study at Cambridge University. The 2007 Sunday Times Rich List listed Andrew and Paul Gower as the 654th richest entrepreneurs in the UK, worth £113 million. In 2009, the Sunday Times listed them as the 566th richest men, worth an estimated £99 million. The Daily Telegraph also listed Andrew and Paul Gower as the 11th richest young entrepreneurs in the UK. According to his
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    1 votes
    229
    Blake Ross

    Blake Ross

    Blake Aaron Ross (born June 12, 1985) is an American software developer who is known for his work on the Mozilla web browser; in particular, he started the Mozilla Firefox project with Dave Hyatt, as well as the Spread Firefox project with Asa Dotzler while working as a contractor at the Mozilla Foundation. In 2005, he was nominated for Wired magazine's top Rave Award, Renegade of the Year, opposite Larry Page, Sergey Brin and Jon Stewart. He was also a part of Rolling Stone magazine's 2005 hot list. He currently works for Facebook as Director of Product. --96.4.9.40 (talk) 14:07, 15 October 2012 (UTC)==Early life and education== Born in Miami, Florida, Ross created his first website at the age of 10. He began programming while still in middle school and began contributing to Netscape very soon after it was open-sourced. He worked as an intern at Netscape Communications Corporation at the age of 15, while attending high school at Gulliver Preparatory School, from which he graduated in 2003. Later that year, he enrolled at Stanford University, where he is now on a leave of absence to focus on work. He currently resides in nearby Mountain View, California. Ross is most well known for
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Eric Bina

    Eric Bina

    Eric J. Bina (born October 1964) is the co-creator of Mosaic and the co-founder of Netscape. In 1993, Bina along with Marc Andreessen authored the first version of Mosaic while working as a programmer at National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Bina attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, graduating from there with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science in 1986 and a Master's degree in 1988. He joined NCSA in 1991 as a programmer. There, Bina and Andreessen started working on Mosaic in December 1992 and had a working version by March 1993. Mosaic was posted to the Internet and is famed as the first killer application that popularized the Internet. He is one of only five (or six) inductees in the World Wide Web Hall of Fame announced at the first international conference on the World Wide Web in 1994. Eric is reported to have been a very skilled programmer during the time that he worked on Mosaic, and possessed a legendary work ethic that is characterized by several 48-hour stints of continuous software development. While there, his unofficial job title (which appeared on his business cards)
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    1 votes
    231
    Eugene Jarvis

    Eugene Jarvis

    Eugene Peyton Jarvis (born 1955) is a game designer and programmer, known for producing pinball machines for Atari and video games for Williams Electronics. Most notable amongst his works are the seminal arcade video games Defender and Robotron: 2084 in the early 1980s, and the Cruis'n series of driving games for Midway Games in the 1990s. He co-founded Vid Kidz in the early 1980s and currently leads his own development studio, Raw Thrills Inc. In 2008 Eugene Jarvis was named the first Game Designer in Residence by DePaul University's Game Development program. Eugene Jarvis was born in Palo Alto, California in 1955. His first game was chess, which he played as a young child; he was one of the best players at Bellarmine College Preparatory in San Jose. Jarvis's first encounter with computers came while he was in high school attending a one-day course on FORTRAN programming given by IBM. Jarvis originally intended to become a biochemist but decided on studying computers instead. At the University of California, Berkeley, Jarvis did FORTRAN programming on mainframes. At Berkeley he got his first taste of computer gaming, playing Space War in the basement of the physics lab. He
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    Fyodor

    Fyodor

    Gordon Lyon (also known by his pseudonym Fyodor Vaskovich) is a network security expert, open source programmer, writer, and a hacker. He authored the open source Nmap Security Scanner and numerous books, web sites, and technical papers focusing on network security. Lyon is a founding member of the Honeynet Project and Vice President of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. Lyon has been active in the network security community since the mid 1990s. His handle, Fyodor, was taken from Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Most of his programming is done in the C, C++, and Perl programming languages. He lives in Palo Alto, California. Lyon maintains several network security web sites: Lyon has written and co-authored several books: Public interviews with Lyon/Vaskovich have been posted by SecurityFocus, Slashdot, Whitedust, Zone-H, TuxJournal, Safemode, and Google. Many of these provide more personal details than his official bio page does. Lyon attends and speaks at many security conferences. He has presented at DEFCON, CanSecWest, FOSDEM, IT Security World, Security Masters' Dojo, ShmooCon, IT-Defense, SFOBug, and others.
    4.00
    1 votes
    233
    Leonard H. Tower Jr.

    Leonard H. Tower Jr.

    Leonard "Len" H. Tower Jr. (born June 17, 1949) is a free software activist and one of the founding board members of the Free Software Foundation, where he contributed to the initial releases of gcc and GNU diff. He left the Free Software Foundation in 1997. In 1971, Tower received an SB in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During that time he was Business Manager at The Tech, the student newspaper. As the FSF's first full time paid employee, Tower mostly performed administrative tasks including managing mailing lists, newsgroups and requests for information. In 1986, Tower assisted Stallman with Stallman's initial plan to base the C compiler for the GNU Project on a Pastel compiler Stallman had obtained from Lawrence Livermore Lab. Tower worked on rewriting the existing code from Pastel, a variation of Pascal, into C while Stallman worked on building the new C front end. Stallman dropped that plan when he discovered the Livermore compiler required too much memory, concluding, "I would have to write a new compiler from scratch. That new compiler is now known as GCC; none of the Pastel compiler is used in it, but I managed to adapt and use the C front end that
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    1 votes
    234
    Sam Ruby

    Sam Ruby

    Sam Ruby is a prominent software developer who has made significant contributions to many of the Apache Software Foundation's open source software projects, and to the standardization of web feeds via his involvement with the Atom web feed standard and the feedvalidator.org web service. He currently holds a Senior Technical Staff Member position in the Emerging Technologies Group of IBM. He resides in Raleigh, North Carolina. He is a co-chair of the W3C's HTML Working Group. Sam Ruby received a B.A. in Mathematics from Christopher Newport University, Newport News, Virginia. Sam was hired immediately out of college by IBM and has worked there since. Ruby has been active within various open source projects. Ruby is a current Director of the Apache Software Foundation, as well as being both the foundation's Assistant Secretary and Vice President of Legal Affairs, and the former Chair of the Apache Jakarta Project. He also actively contributes to numerous Apache projects; the ASF Committers page provides a complete and current listing of Apache projects to which he is actively contributing. Notably, he was one of the early Ant contributors, as well as being the creator of Gump. Ruby is
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    1 votes
    235
    Sir Dystic

    Sir Dystic

    Josh Buchbinder, better known as Sir Dystic, has been a member of CULT OF THE DEAD COW (cDc) since May 1997, and is the author of Back Orifice. He has also written several other hacker tools, including SMBRelay, NetE, and NBName. Sir Dystic has appeared at multiple hacker conventions, both as a member of panels and speaking on his own. He has also been interviewed on several television and radio programs and in an award-winning short film about hacker culture in general and cDc in particular. Dystic's pseudonym is taken from a somewhat obscure 1930s bondage comic character named "Sir Dystic D'Arcy." According to the cDc's Sir Dystic, his namesake "tried to do evil things but always bungles it and ends up doing good inadvertently." Back Orifice (often shortened to BO) is a controversial computer program designed for remote system administration. It enables a user to control a computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system from a remote location. The name is a pun on Microsoft BackOffice Server software. The program debuted at DEF CON 6 on August 1, 1998. It was the brainchild of Sir Dystic, a member of the U.S. hacker organization CULT OF THE DEAD COW. According to the
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    1 votes
    236
    Steven Pederson

    Steven Pederson

    Steven W. Pederson is an American software programmer and entrepreneur, best known for being one of the founders of software publisher Edu-Ware Services. While attending UCLA in the late 1970's, he met Sherwin Steffin, who was faculty advisor to the campus radio station where Pederson hosted a program. When Steffin was laid off from the university in 1979, the two decided to start a software company named Edu-Ware Services. Though an economics major, Pederson had taken some computer programming courses. Steffin introduced him to the Apple II computer, and while he finished his degree, he wrote several programs for the new company, including the computer games Space and Terrorist, as well as the educational program Compu-Spell, using a high-resolution font of his own design. Two years later, in 1981, Pederson became President of Edu-Ware. The company was sold to Management Sciences America in 1983. In 1984, Pederson left Edu-Ware to start a new venture.
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    1 votes
    237
    Walter Bright

    Walter Bright

    Walter Bright is a computer programmer known for being the designer of the D programming language. He was also the main developer of the first C++ compiler that translated directly to object without going via C, Zortech C++ (later to become Symantec C++, now Digital Mars C++). Before the C++ compiler, he developed the Datalight C compiler, also sold as Zorland C and later Zortech C. He is also known for Empire, one of the first strategy computer games, written in 1971–1977 on a PDP-10. Walter Bright is the creator and first implementer of the D programming language and has implemented compilers for several other languages. He's an expert in all areas of compiler technology, including front ends, optimizers, code generation, interpreter engines and runtime libraries. Walter regularly writes articles about compilers and programming, is known for engaging and informative presentations, and provides training in compiler development techniques. Many are surprised to discover that Walter is also the creator of the wargame Empire, which is still popular today over 30 years after its debut. Bright graduated from Caltech in 1979 with a B.S. in mechanical engineering. Achievement: 1. The D
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    1 votes
    238
    Bruce Perens

    Bruce Perens

    Bruce Perens is a computer programmer and advocate in the open source community. He created the Open Source Definition and published the first formal announcement and manifesto of open source. He co-founded the Open Source Initiative (OSI) with Eric S. Raymond. In 2005, Perens represented Open Source at the United Nations World Summit on the Information Society, at the invitation of the United Nations Development Program. He has appeared before national legislatures and is often quoted in the press, advocating for open source and the reform of national and international technology policy. Perens is also an amateur radio operator, with callsign K6BP. He is well known in the amateur radio community for his efforts towards open radio communications standards. Perens poses Open Source as a means of marketing the free software philosophy of Richard Stallman to business people who are more concerned with profit than freedom, and states that open source and free software are only two ways of talking about the same phenomenon. This differs from Stallman and Raymond. Perens postulates an economic theory for business use of Open Source in his paper The Emerging Economic Paradigm of Open
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    0 votes
    239
    Don Daglow

    Don Daglow

    Don Daglow (born circa 1953) is an American computer game and video game designer, programmer and producer. He is best known for being the creator of games from multiple genres, including pioneering simulation games, role-playing games, as well as sports games, with the first computer baseball game and the first graphical MMORPG, all between 1971 and 1995. He founded long-standing game developer Stormfront Studios in 1988; as of 2007, more than 12,500,000 Stormfront games had been sold. In 2008 Daglow was honored at the 59th Annual Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards for Neverwinter Nights pioneering role in MMORPG development. Along with John Carmack of id Software and Mike Morhaime of Blizzard Entertainment, Daglow is one of only three game developers to accept awards at both the Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards and at the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences Interactive Achievement Awards. In 2003 he was the recipient of the CGE Achievement Award for "groundbreaking accomplishments that shaped the Video Game Industry." In 1971 Daglow was studying playwriting at Pomona College in Claremont, California. A computer terminal connected to the Claremont Colleges PDP-10
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    Grace Hopper

    Grace Hopper

    Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy officer. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She conceptualized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term "debugging" for fixing computer glitches (motivated by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as "Amazing Grace." The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 "Hopper" supercomputer at NERSC. Hopper was born Grace Brewster Murray in New York City. She was the oldest in a family of three children. She was curious as a child, a lifelong trait. At the age of seven she decided to determine how an alarm clock worked. She dismantled seven alarm clocks before her mother realized what she was doing; she was then limited to one clock. For her preparatory school
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    Jeff Minter

    Jeff Minter

    Jeff 'Yak' Minter (born in Reading, 22 April 1962) is a British video game designer and programmer. He is the founder of software house Llamasoft and his recent works include Neon (2004), a non-game music visualization program that has been built into the Xbox 360 console, and the video games Space Giraffe (Xbox Live Arcade, 2007 and PC, 2008), and Space Invaders Extreme (Xbox Live Arcade, May 2009). Fans of Minter's games have identified a number of distinctive elements common to his games. They are often arcade style shoot 'em ups. They often contain titular and/or in-game references demonstrating his fondness of ruminants (llamas, sheep, camels, etc.). Many of his programs also feature something of a psychedelic element, as in some of the earliest "light synthesizer" programs including his Trip-a-Tron. In online forums and informal game credits pages Minter usually signs as "Yak", which is, in his own words "a pseudonym chosen a long time ago, back in the days when hi-score tables on coin-op machines only held three letters, and I settled on Yak because the yak is a scruffy hairy beast - a lot like me ;-)." Jeff Minter had expressed an interest in programming computers from a
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    242
    John Ousterhout

    John Ousterhout

    John Kenneth Ousterhout ( /ˈoʊstərhaʊt/, born October 15, 1954) is the chairman of Electric Cloud, Inc. and a professor of computer science at Stanford University. He founded Electric Cloud with John Graham-Cumming. Ousterhout previously was a professor of computer science at University of California, Berkeley where he created the Tcl scripting language and the Tk platform-independent widget toolkit. Ousterhout also led the research group that designed the experimental Sprite operating system and the first log-structured file system. Ousterhout is also the original author of the Magic VLSI Computer-aided design program. He received his Bachelor's degree in Physics from Yale University in 1975, and his Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1980. Ousterhout received the Grace Murray Hopper Award in 1987 for his work on CAD systems for very-large-scale integrated circuits . For the same work, he was inducted in 1994 as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. Ousterhout is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 1994, Ousterhout left Berkeley to join Sun Microsystems Laboratories, which hired a team to join him in Tcl development. After
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    243
    Luca Pagano

    Luca Pagano

    Luca Pagano (born July 28, 1978 in Preganziol) is an Italian-born poker player who finished third place in the Barcelona Open, a European Poker Tour (EPT) event, in 2004. He has placed in the money in multiple EPT events since then. He also placed in two events at the 2006 World Series of Poker. He has a computer programming background, but has been a full time professional poker player since 2004 and is a member of Team PokerStars, a group of players sponsored by PokerStars. As of 2010, his total live tournament winnings exceed $1,500,000.
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    244
    Marc Fleury

    Marc Fleury

    Marc Fleury (born Paris, 1968) is the creator of JBoss, an open-source Java application server. Fleury holds a degree in mathematics and a Doctorate in physics from the École Polytechnique in Paris and a Master in Theoretical Physics from the École Normale. He worked in France for Sun Microsystems before moving to the United States where he has worked on various Java projects. Marc's research interest focused on middleware, and he started the JBoss project in 1999. JBoss Group, LLC was incorporated in 2001 in Atlanta, Georgia. JBoss became a corporation under the name JBoss, Inc. in 2004. After selling his company to Red Hat, Fleury became Senior Vice President and General Manager of the JBoss Division. However, Fleury went on a "Paternity Leave" in January 2007, supposedly until 15 March 2007 but was widely rumored to be leaving Red Hat. On 9 February 2007, his departure from Red Hat was made public, saying Fleury "has decided to leave Red Hat to pursue other personal interests, such as teaching, research in biology, music and his family." He is an ex-lieutenant for the French paratroopers. Fleury writes a blog with his wife Nathalie. In 2008 Fleury started a new open source
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    Martin Felix Krafft

    Martin Felix Krafft

    Martin Felix Krafft (born February 14, 1979) is a prominent Debian developer (nicknamed madduck), computer science enthusiast, and freelance security, privacy, and open-source consultant. He is the author of the book The Debian System. Martin joined Debian in 1997 and became an official developer in 2001. He has since worked on user support, public representation, security issues, quality assurance, integration tasks, as well as the maintenance of packages, such as mdadm, hibernate, and logcheck. His current focus is on workflows and process improvement. Under the supervision of Prof. Brian Fitzgerald and Dr. Kieran Conboy, Martin researches the adoption and use of tools and technologies by Debian package maintainers. He pursues a Ph.D. degree as an external student of the University of Limerick, Ireland, partially funded by Lero — the Irish Software Engineering Research Centre. He also spear-heads the vcs-pkg project, an effort to integrate version control systems with software package maintenance and to facilitate collaboration between maintainers of the same software package in different distributions. Not very fond of graphical user interfaces, Martin hacks on netconf, a modern
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    246
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    Philip Gale

    Philip Gale

    The death of Philip Gale by suicide took place on Friday March 13, 1998. Gale fell to his death from a classroom window on the fifteenth floor of a building on the MIT campus. Before ending his life, Gale (a pioneering Internet software developer, computer prodigy, and avid musician) had earned roughly a million dollars worth of stock options for his innovative internet service provider (ISP) programs at EarthLink. Philip Chandler Gale (born 1978, Los Angeles, California) and his sister Elizabeth were the children of Marie Gale, a Scientology official, and David Gale, a software programmer who died from a heart attack in 1995. Gale was profoundly affected by his father's death, and still struggling to come to terms with it at the time of his suicide. Gale was educated at The Delphian School in Sheridan, Oregon, a private boarding school based on the ideas of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. He started education at The Delphian School, at the age of eight, graduated from there at age 14 and was admitted to MIT at the age of fifteen. At MIT, he joined the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity as a freshman in the fall of 1994, and by the time of his suicide had chosen to major in music. Gale
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    248
    Russ Nelson

    Russ Nelson

    Russell "Russ" Nelson (born March 21, 1958) is an American computer programmer. He was a founding board member of the Open Source Initiative and briefly served as its president in 2005. In 1983, Nelson co-wrote a MacPaint clone, Painter's Apprentice with Patrick Naughton. Nelson was the original developer of Freemacs (a variant of Emacs used by FreeDOS). While attending university, Nelson began developing the collection of drivers later commercially released as the "Crynwr Collection". In 1991, he founded Crynwr Software, a company dedicated to creating bulk e-mail software, located in Potsdam, New York. In 1998, Nelson became one of the first group to serve on the Board of Directors of the Open Source Initiative, joining Brian Behlendorf, Ian Murdock and Chip Salzenberg. In February 2005, he became the President of the Open Source Initiative, but resigned a few days later, on February 23, 2005, because a posting on his personal blog was deemed to be racist. Nelson apologized to those who perceived the post, which he withdrew because it "was not well written", as racist, and indicated that he did not believe himself to be politically savvy enough for the role of president. Six
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    249
    Scott Adams

    Scott Adams

    Scott Adams (born July 10, 1952) is the co-founder, with ex-wife Alexis, of Adventure International, an early publisher of games for home computers. Born in Miami, Florida and currently living in Platteville, Wisconsin, Adams was the first person known to create an adventure-style game for personal computers, in 1978 on a 16KB Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I, written in the BASIC programming language. Colossal Cave was a year earlier, but on a mainframe, the PDP-10. These early text adventure games use a minimal parser, recognizing 2-word commands of the form VERB NOUN. The parser only scanned the first three letters of each command, so inputting SCREAM BEAR, SCRATCH BEAR or SCREW BEAR would be treated identically. Scott had access to an advanced 16-bit computer at home, built by his brother Richard Adams, that gave him a jump on game programming in his leisure time. The Adventure International games were subsequently released on most of the major home PC platforms of the day, including TRS-80, Apple II series, Atari 8-bit series and Commodore PET. Versions of the games were also made for later platforms such as Vic-20 and some also had versions produced with rudimentary graphics.
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    Sean Egan

    Sean Egan

    Sean Egan is a software engineer at Google, where he worked on Google Talk and is currently working on Google Maps. He is the former project leader of Pidgin, a popular instant messaging client. He is also the author of the book Open Source Messaging Application Development: Building and Extending Gaim. Born on April 5, 1982, in Long Island, New York, Sean Egan graduated from Chaminade High School in Mineola, New York and earned his Bachelor of Science degree at Binghamton University with a major in computer science. He has been a major contributor to the field of open-source real-time communication software since 2000, when he started working on Pidgin, an open-source, multi-protocol, cross-platform instant messaging application. Sean Egan became an official part of the Pidgin team in January 2001 and was maintainer of Pidgin from early 2002 until April 2008 when he announced his retirement. He was hired by Google, Inc. in September 2005 as a software engineer on the Google Talk team. As a leader of the libjingle project, Sean Egan is focusing his efforts on ensuring interoperability in the voice features of XMPP-based instant messaging clients.
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