Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 141 views
  • 105 votes
  • 105 voters
  • 15%
Best Parks and Recreation of All Time

More about Best Parks and Recreation of All Time:

Best Parks and Recreation of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Parks and Recreation of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Parks and Recreation of All Time has gotten 141 views and has gathered 105 votes from 105 voters. O O

Best Parks and Recreation of All Time is a top list in the General category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of General or Best Parks and Recreation of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about General on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Parks and Recreation of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Parks and Recreation of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Rashida Jones

    Rashida Jones

    Rashida Leah Jones (born February 25, 1976) is an American film and television actress, comic book author, screenwriter and occasional singer. She played Louisa Fenn on Boston Public and Karen Filippelli on The Office as well as roles in the films I Love You, Man, Our Idiot Brother, The Social Network and The Muppets. In 2009, Jones began appearing on the NBC comedy series Parks and Recreation as Ann Perkins. Jones was born in Los Angeles, the younger daughter of media mogul, producer, and musician Quincy Jones, and actress Peggy Lipton. She has an older sister, Kidada Jones, and five half-siblings by her father's other relationships. Her father is of mostly African-American, as well as Welsh, ancestry. Her mother is Ashkenazi Jewish (a descendant of immigrants from Russia and Latvia), and Rashida attended Hebrew school. She was raised in Bel Air, Los Angeles, California. Jones said of her mixed-race parentage, "It was the 1970s and still not that acceptable for them to be together." In his autobiography, Jones's father recalled how he would often find his six-year-old daughter under the covers after bedtime with a flashlight reading five books at a time. Jones maintains she grew
    8.60
    5 votes
    2

    Pawnee Zoo

    "Pawnee Zoo" is the second season premiere of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation, and the seventh overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on September 17, 2009. In the episode, Leslie accidentally takes a stand in favor of same-sex marriage when she holds a marriage for two male penguins during a publicity stunt for the zoo. The episode was written by Norm Hiscock and directed by Paul Feig. The writing staff sought to address more topical issues during the second season, and the gay marriage plot was inspired by the real-life pairing of Harry and Pepper, a pair of romantically involved male penguins at the San Francisco Zoo. Although Hiscock said he was focused more strongly on comedy than making a political or social statement, both the script and the show's protagonist ultimately takes a position in favor of same-sex marriage. "Pawnee Zoo" received generally positive reviews, with several commentators claiming it showed improvement and growth compared to the show's first season, which received lukewarm reviews. According to Nielsen Media Research, "Pawnee Zoo" was watched by 5 million households. Among viewers aged
    6.83
    6 votes
    3
    Chris Pratt

    Chris Pratt

    Christopher Michael "Chris" Pratt (born June 21, 1979) is an American actor, best known for his roles as Harold Brighton "Bright" Abbott in the television series Everwood, the recurring character Winchester "Ché" Cook in season 4 of The OC, Andy Dwyer in the television series Parks and Recreation and for portraying baseball player Scott Hatteberg in the film Moneyball. Pratt was born in Virginia, Minnesota and raised in Lake Stevens, Washington. He was waiting tables at the Bubba Gump Shrimp Company restaurant in Maui, Hawaii, when he was discovered by actor-director Rae Dawn Chong; she cast him in the horror film Cursed Part 3. Pratt's first regular television role was on the series Everwood, where he co-starred as Harold Brighton "Bright" Abbott. After Everwood's cancellation, Pratt joined the cast of The O.C. for its fourth season, playing Ché, an activist. He also had an appearance in the action film Wanted, as James McAvoy's best friend. Pratt married actress Anna Faris on July 9, 2009 in Bali. On August 25, 2012, Pratt and Faris welcomed a son, Jack. Pratt portrays the dimwitted yet lovable Andy Dwyer in NBC's Parks & Recreation. The character Andy Dwyer is married to the
    8.25
    4 votes
    4

    Beauty Pageant

    "Beauty Pageant" is the third episode of the second season of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation, and the ninth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on October 1, 2009. In the episode, Leslie serves as a judge in the Miss Pawnee beauty pageant and becomes determined to prevent an attractive, but talentless and unintelligent, contestant from winning. The episode was written by Katie Dippold and directed by Jason Woliner. It featured stand-up comedian Louis C.K. in his second guest appearance as Dave Sanderson, a Pawnee police officer who develops a romantic interest in Leslie. According to Nielsen Media Research, the episode was seen by 4.63 million households, a slight improvement over the previous week. "Beauty Pageant" received generally positive reviews, with several commentators claiming the season continued a trend of funnier episodes than in the first season. At the beginning of the episode, Leslie (Amy Poehler) proudly announces to the parks and recreation staff that she will be judging the Miss Pawnee beauty pageant, a job she takes very seriously. Tom (Aziz Ansari), excited at the prospective of judging
    8.00
    4 votes
    5

    The Banquet

    "The Banquet" is the fifth episode of the first season of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on May 8, 2009. It was written by Tucker Cawley and directed by Beth McCarthy-Miller. In the episode, Leslie attends an award banquet for her mother, a veteran of local government politics, who encourages Leslie to resort to blackmail in order to get her way with a zoning board official. The episode received positive reviews, with Entertainment Weekly claiming the series appears to have grown more "settled and focused" after this episode. According to Nielsen Media Research, it was watched by 4.64 million households in its original airing, continuing a downward trend in ratings since the pilot episode, although NBC had already committed to renewing the show for a second season. "The Banquet" and the rest of the first season of Parks and Recreation was released on DVD in the United States on September 8, 2009. Leslie (Amy Poehler) is proud that her mother, school system employee Marlene Knope (Pamela Reed), is to receive a public service award during an upcoming banquet. Ann (Rashida Jones), excited to go to a social
    7.75
    4 votes
    6

    Christmas Scandal

    Leslie designs the Pawnee Winter Wonderland Festival, but has to hide from the press when a meeting with a disgraced Councilman lands her in the middle of a sex scandal. Meanwhile, Ron offers to cover for Leslie for the day, and quickly discovers how much work she really does.
    7.50
    4 votes
    7

    Kaboom

    "Kaboom" is the sixth episode of the second season of Parks and Recreation, and the twelfth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on October 22, 2009. In the episode, Leslie tries to have the pit filled in and injures Andy in the process, opening Pawnee up to a possible lawsuit. The episode was written by Aisha Muharrar and directed by Charles McDougall, and featured guest performances by comedians Paul Scheer and H. Jon Benjamin. "Kaboom" saw the filling in of the Pawnee pit, a focal plot device in Parks and Recreation since the first episode. As part of a multi-network television campaign to spotlight volunteerism, the episode predominantly featured the real-life organization KaBOOM!, a charity that builds playgrounds in locations all over the United States. According to Nielsen Media Research, the episode was seen by 4.98 million household viewers, an improvement over the previous week. "Kaboom" received generally positive reviews, with several commentators praising the series for resolving the long-standing pit subplot. The episode opens with Leslie (Amy Poehler) receiving a speakerphone call about abnormal transactions on her credit
    7.25
    4 votes
    8

    The Reporter

    "The Reporter" is the third episode of the first season of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on April 23, 2009. The episode was written by Daniel J. Goor and directed by Jeffrey Blitz. In the episode, Leslie enlists a local reporter to write an article about the park, but the interviews go poorly, and the problem escalates after Mark gets romantically involved with the journalist. The episode featured actress and comedian Alison Becker in a guest appearance as Pawnee Journal reporter Shauna Malwae-Tweep. "The Reporter" received generally mixed reviews, with some commentators still comparing it unfavorably to The Office, another comedy series created by the Parks and Recreations co-creators. According to Nielsen Media Research, it was watched by 5.23 million households in its original airing, continuing a downward trend in ratings since the pilot episode. "The Reporter" and the rest of the first season of Parks and Recreation was released on DVD in the United States on September 8, 2009. Leslie (Amy Poehler) announces she has invited a reporter from the local Pawnee Journal newspaper to write a story about the
    6.75
    4 votes
    9
    Satire

    Satire

    Satire, is primarily a literary genre or form, although in practice it can also be found in the graphic and performing arts. In satire, vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, and society itself, into improvement. Although satire is usually meant to be funny, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism, using wit as a weapon. A common feature of satire is strong irony or sarcasm—"in satire, irony is militant"—but parody, burlesque, exaggeration, juxtaposition, comparison, analogy, and double entendre are all frequently used in satirical speech and writing. This "militant" irony or sarcasm often professes to approve of (or at least accept as natural) the very things the satirist wishes to attack. Satire is nowadays found in many artistic forms of expression, including literature, plays, commentary, and media such as lyrics. The word satire comes from the Latin word satur and the subsequent phrase lanx satura. Satur meant "full," but the juxtaposition with lanx shifted the meaning to "miscellany or medley": the expression lanx satura literally means "a full dish of various kinds of fruits." The
    5.20
    5 votes
    10

    The Camel

    "The Camel" is the ninth episode of the second season of Parks and Recreation, and the fifteenth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on November 12, 2009. In the episode, Leslie and the parks department bicker as they work on a proposal for a new town hall mural, while Ron and Andy share an awkward moment at Andy's new shoe-shine job. The episode was written by Rachel Axler and was directed by Millicent Shelton. The title refers to the figure of speech that a camel is a "horse made by a committee", and refers to the final mural proposed by the parks department. "The Camel" included references to several Indiana celebrities, including Greg Kinnear, John Mellencamp, Larry Bird, Michael Jackson and David Letterman, all of whom have a place in the mural representing Leonardo Da Vinci's The Last Supper. Stand-up comedian Kirk Fox made a guest appearance as Joe, from the Pawnee sewer department. According to Nielsen Media Research, "The Camel" was seen by 4.67 million viewers, a drop from the previous week. The episode received generally positive reviews, with particular praise for the Ron and Andy subplot, and the jokes involving Jerry's
    6.25
    4 votes
    11
    Parks and Recreation

    Parks and Recreation

    Parks and Recreation is an American comedy television series on the NBC television network, led by Amy Poehler, who stars as Leslie Knope, a perky, mid-level bureaucrat in the parks department of Pawnee, a fictional town in Indiana. It was conceived by Greg Daniels and Michael Schur and debuted on April 9, 2009. The show has run for four seasons and a fifth has been commissioned for the 2012/13 season. It uses a single-camera, mockumentary filming style, with the implication being that a documentary crew is filming everyone. More recently, the Parks and Recreation staff has tried to differentiate their show from The Office through differences in filming technique, and decided in favor of multiple camera angles and frequent jump cuts. The writers researched local California politics for the show, and consulted with urban planners and elected officials. The Leslie Knope character underwent minor changes after the first season in response to audience feedback that she seemed unintelligent and "ditzy". The writing staff tried to incorporate current events into their episodes, such as a government shutdown in Pawnee inspired by the real-life global financial crisis. Several guest stars
    7.33
    3 votes
    12

    Boys' Club

    "Boys' Club" is the fourth episode of the first season of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on April 30, 2009. It was written by Alan Yang and directed by Michael McCullers. In the episode, Leslie tries to integrate herself into the local "boys club" by drinking wine from an illegal gift basket, and gets into trouble as she tries to accept responsibility for her supposed mistake. In a B story, Andy cleans his apartment while Ann is at work. The episode included beer and props from Upland Brewing Company, a real-life company based in Bloomington, Indiana, in an attempt to give Pawnee an authentic Indiana atmosphere. "Boys' Club" received positive to fair reviews, with some commentators praising the episode for better developing the show's supporting characters. According to Nielsen Media Research, it was watched by 5.28 million households in its original airing, which was consistent with the previous week. "Boys' Club" and the rest of the first season of Parks and Recreation was released on DVD in the United States on September 8, 2009. The episode opens with Leslie (Amy Poehler) and Tom (Aziz Ansari)
    9.50
    2 votes
    14

    Hunting Trip

    "Hunting Trip" is the tenth episode of the second season of American comedy television series Parks and Recreation, and the sixteenth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on November 19, 2009. In the episode, Leslie tries to prove she can hang out with the guys by attending Ron's annual hunting trip, where Ron is accidentally shot. The episode was written by Daniel J. Goor and was directed by series co-creator Greg Daniels. It also introduced a romantic subplot between the characters Andy and April which continued throughout the second season and into the third. Series co-creator Michael Schur said the pairing was not previously planned, but grew when it was discovered actors Aubrey Plaza and Chris Pratt had strong comedic chemistry together. According to Nielsen Media Research, "Hunting Trip" was seen by 4.61 million viewers, a slight drop from the previous week's episode, "The Camel". The episode received generally positive to mixed reviews, with commentators particularly praising the Andy and April subplot, as well as the continued development of the Leslie Knope character. The episode opens with Andy (Chris Pratt) giving piggyback rides
    9.00
    2 votes
    16
    6.67
    3 votes
    17

    Canvassing

    "Canvassing" is the second episode of the first season of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on April 16, 2009. The episode was written by Rachel Axler and directed by Seth Gordon. In the episode, Deputy Director of Parks and Recreation Leslie and her staff canvas the neighborhood to seek support for an upcoming town meeting on their park proposal but end up drawing more critics than allies. The episode was originally supposed to be the third episode of the series, but the broadcast order was changed and "Canvassing" was switched with "The Reporter". The episode received generally mixed reviews. According to Nielsen Media Research, "Canvassing" was watched by 5.92 million households in its original airing, which media outlets said was commendable, although it was about 900,000 less households than the pilot episode received the previous week. "Canvassing" and the rest of the first season of Parks and Recreation was released on DVD in the United States on September 8, 2009. The episode begins with Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler), Deputy Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation for Pawnee, Indiana
    8.50
    2 votes
    18

    The Stakeout

    "The Stakeout" is the second episode of the second season of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation, and the eighth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on September 24, 2009. In the episode, Leslie conducts surveillance on a community garden in an attempt to find out who planted marijuana there. The episode was written by Rachel Axler and directed by Seth Gordon. It marked the first in a series of guest appearances by stand-up comedian Louis C.K. as Dave Sanderson, a Pawnee police officer who develops a romantic interest in Leslie. A scene in which Sanderson arrests Tom Haverford in his own van mirrors the real-life controversial 2009 arrest of Henry Louis Gates. According to Nielsen Media Research, the episode was seen by 4.22 million households, a 800,000-household drop from the previous week's season premiere, "Pawnee Zoo". "The Stakeout" received generally positive reviews, with several commentators saying it marked a continued improvement over the first Parks and Recreation season. Ann (Rashida Jones), who is preparing for her first date with Mark (Paul Schneider), worriedly asks Leslie (Amy Poehler) if she has any
    8.50
    2 votes
    19

    Ron and Tammy

    Leslie is upset when she learns the library department wants to take over her lot. Making matters worse, the library is run by Ron's ex-wife Tammy, who still has a powerful emotional hold on him. Meanwhile, Andy gets a job in hopes of winning Ann back.
    5.00
    4 votes
    20

    Greg Pikitis

    Leslie enlists the help of Dave and Andy in order to catch a local teen vandal. Meanwhile, Ann struggles to make her Halloween party fun, and ends up getting help from an unlikely source.
    6.33
    3 votes
    21

    Pilot

    "Pilot" is the pilot episode of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on April 9, 2009. The episode was written by series co-creators Michael Schur and Greg Daniels, and directed by Daniels. Like the rest of the series, the pilot was filmed in the same mockumentary style as The Office, the NBC comedy series also created by Daniels. The episode introduces the protagonist Leslie Knope, played by Amy Poehler, as well as the other regular characters played by cast members Rashida Jones, Paul Schneider, Aziz Ansari, Aubrey Plaza and Nick Offerman. Knope is a mid-level bureaucrat in the Parks and Recreation department in the fictional town of Pawnee, Indiana. In "Pilot", Knope sets out to turn a construction pit into a park after local nurse Ann Perkins (Jones) complains about the dangerous pit during a town meeting. Her anti-government boss Ron Swanson (Offerman) reluctantly allows her to form an exploratory committee after her friend and colleague Mark Brendanawicz (Schneider) secretly intervenes on her behalf. Daniels and Schur first started writing the script in the summer of 2008, when they were in the early
    8.00
    2 votes
    22

    Greg Pikitis

    "Greg Pikitis" is the seventh episode of the second season of Parks and Recreation, and the thirteenth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on October 29, 2009. In the episode, Leslie attempts to catch a suspected teenage vandal in the act of defacing a public statue. Meanwhile, Ann throws a Halloween party, which turns out to be very boring until Tom livens it up. The episode was written by series co-founder Michael Schur and directed by Dean Holland, an editor on the series. "Greg Pikitis" featured a guest performance by stand-up comedian Louis C.K. as Dave Sanderson, Leslie's police officer boyfriend. It also featured Cody Klop as Greg Pikitis, a teenager whom Leslie considers her nemesis. According to Nielsen Media Research, "Greg Pikitis" was seen by 4.96 million household viewers, only a slight drop from the previous week despite direct competition from the 2009 World Series. The episode received generally positive reviews. Leslie (Amy Poehler) visits the Pawnee high school to confront Greg Pikitis (Cody Klop), a teenager who she describes as her "arch-nemesis". Leslie warns Greg she knows he vandalizes the town's statue of Mayor
    10.00
    1 votes
    23

    Practice Date

    "Practice Date" is the fourth episode of the second season of Parks and Recreation, and the tenth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on October 8, 2009. In the episode, Ann takes Leslie to dinner to help prepare for her first date, while the rest of the parks department tries to learn secrets about each other as part of a game. The episode was written by Harris Wittels and directed by Alex Hardcastle. It featured stand-up comedian Louis C.K. in his third guest appearance as Dave Sanderson, a Pawnee police officer who develops a romantic interest in Leslie. The episode also featured a fictional sex scandal mirroring the real-life 2009 scandal of South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford. "Practice Date" was the first episode to establish the personality of Jerry as the co-worker everyone else in the office picks on, and marked the first of several appearances by Jay Jackson as news reporter Perd Hapley. According to Nielsen Media Research, the episode was seen by 4.97 million household viewers, an improvement over the previous week's episode, "Beauty Pageant". "Practice Date" received generally positive reviews, with several commentators
    10.00
    1 votes
    24

    The Camel

    After one of the murals in City Hall is defaced, Leslie and the Parks Department compete to come up with a new design. Meanwhile, Andy and Ron share an uncomfortable moment at the shoeshine stand.
    10.00
    1 votes
    25

    Beauty Pageant

    Leslie gets to judge a beauty contest, but ends up having conflicting opinions on "the ideal woman" with the other judges. While on a date with Mark, Ann learns Andy has been living in the pit.
    7.50
    2 votes
    26
    Amy Poehler

    Amy Poehler

    Amy Meredith Poehler ( /ˈpoʊlər/; born September 16, 1971) is an American actress, comedian, producer and writer. She was a cast member on the NBC television entertainment show Saturday Night Live from 2001 to 2008. In 2004, she had a minor role in the film Mean Girls with Tina Fey, with whom she worked again in Baby Mama in 2008. She is currently the lead of NBC's comedy Parks and Recreation. She has been nominated twice for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series for her performance on Saturday Night Live, and three times for the Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for her performance in Parks and Recreation. For the latter series, she also received a 2012 Golden Globe Award nomination. Poehler is also a member of the renowned comedy troupe the Upright Citizens Brigade (UCB), who had their own sketch series on Comedy Central from 1998 to 2000. Poehler and the UCB went on to found the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater, which has since become one of the most visible and influential breeding grounds for improvisational comedy since they opened in 1999. The UCB now operate theaters in both New York and Los Angeles, where they also
    7.00
    2 votes
    27
    9.00
    1 votes
    28

    Pawnee Zoo

    When Leslie decides to marry two penguins to promote the local zoo, she inadvertently causes an uproar when both penguins turn out to be male. Meanwhile, Mark puts Ann in an awkward situation when he asks her to go see a movie.
    5.33
    3 votes
    29

    Practice Date

    Leslie is nervous about her first date with Dave, so Ann takes her on a practice date to help her prepare. Meanwhile, after a local councilman is caught up in a sex scandal, Tom, Ron, April and Mark decide to see who can uncover the worst dirt on each other.
    5.33
    3 votes
    30

    Ron and Tammy

    "Ron and Tammy" is the eighth episode of the second season of Parks and Recreation, and the fourteenth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on November 5, 2009. In the episode, the library department tries to take control of a vacant lot where Leslie plans to build a park. Ron's ex-wife, one of Leslie's directors, tries to use Ron to get her way. The episode was written by Mike Scully and directed by Troy Miller. "Ron and Tammy" featured Megan Mullally, the real-life wife of Parks actor Nick Offerman, in a guest appearance as Ron's ex-wife, Tammy. According to Nielsen Media Research, it was seen by 4.93 million household viewers; its rating of 2.2 was the season's highest to that point. "Ron and Tammy" received generally positive reviews and is widely considered one of the best Parks and Recreation episodes, with many commentators praising Offerman's performance. Tammy later returned for the third season sequel episode, "Ron & Tammy: Part Two". Andy (Chris Pratt) takes over as the shoeshiner at the Pawnee town hall, replacing "Old Gus" (Jack Carter), who insults everybody during a farewell party. Later, Mark (Paul Schneider) breaks the bad
    5.33
    3 votes
    31

    Sister City

    "Sister City" is the fifth episode of the second season of Parks and Recreation, and the eleventh overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on October 15, 2009. In the episode, Leslie welcomes a delegation from Venezuela, who act disrespectfully toward Pawnee and the United States. The episode was written by Alan Yang and directed by series co-creator Michael Schur. It featured Saturday Night Live performer Fred Armisen in a guest appearance as Raul, the head of the Venezuelan delegation. According to Nielsen Media Research, the episode was seen by 4.69 million household viewers, a drop from the previous week. The episode received generally positive reviews. Leslie (Amy Poehler) and the Pawnee parks department prepares for a visit by park department officials from Boraqua, Pawnee's sister city in Venezuela. Leslie warns her co-workers the Venezuelan government officials will likely be poor, simple people. Later, the Venezuelan delegation arrives, headed by their parks department vice director Raul Alejandro Bastilla Pedro de Veloso de Morana, the Vice-director Ejectivio del Diputado del Departmento de Parques, L.G.V. (Fred Armisen). There are
    6.50
    2 votes
    32

    Kaboom

    Leslie, Ann and the rest of the Parks Department volunteer to help the organization KaBOOM! build a playground for a neighboring town. After building an entire playground in one day, Leslie gets frustrated at the lack of progress with the pit, and takes some advice from Mark to cut through the red tape.
    8.00
    1 votes
    33

    The Stakeout

    While pruning the new community garden, Leslie and Tom find that someone has been growing marijuana. To find those responsible, they decide to have an all-night stakeout of the garden. Meanwhile, Ann asks Leslie's permission to go on a date with Mark.
    6.00
    2 votes
    34

    Hunting Trip

    Leslie tries to prove she can hang with the guys so she invites herself on Ron’s annual hunting trip, but things don’t go as planned. Meanwhile, April and Andy bond in the office while everyone is away.
    5.50
    2 votes
    35

    Sister City

    Leslie plays host to the Parks and Recreation department from Pawnee’s sister city, Boraqua, Venezuela, and is shocked at the cultural differences. Tom becomes an errand boy, and April plays hard to get.
    7.00
    1 votes
    36

    Situation comedy

    A situation comedy, often shortened to sitcom, is a genre of comedy that features characters sharing the same common environment, such as a home or workplace, accompanied with jokes as part of the dialogue. Such programs originated in radio, but today, sitcoms are found almost exclusively on television as one of its dominant narrative forms. A situation comedy television program may be recorded in front of a studio audience. The effect of a live studio audience can be imitated by the use of a laugh track. As opposed to stand up comedy and sketch comedy, a situation comedy has a storyline and ongoing characters in, essentially, a comedic drama. The situation is usually that of a family, workplace, or a group of friends through comedic sequences. Traditionally comedy sketches were presented within a variety show and mixed with musical performances, as in vaudeville. The emerging mass medium of radio allowed audiences to regularly return to programs, so programs could feature the same characters and situations each episode and expect audiences to be familiar with them. Sitcom humor is often character driven and by its nature running gags evolve during a series. Often the status quo of
    7.00
    1 votes
    37

    Comedy-drama

    Comedy-drama (dramedy, comedrama, comedic drama, or seriocomedy) is a genre of theatre, film, and television that combines elements of comedy and drama, having both humorous and sometimes serious content. Traditional Western theatre, beginning with the ancient Greeks, was divided into comedy and tragedy. A tragedy typically ended with the death or destruction of a fictional or historical hero, whereas a comedy focused on the lives of middle to lower class characters and ended with their success. The term drama was used to describe all the action of a play. Beginning in the 19th century, authors such as Anton Chekhov, George Bernard Shaw, and Henrik Ibsen blurred the line between comedy and drama. The advent of radio drama, cinema, and in particular television created greater pressure in marketing to clearly define a product as either comedy or drama. While in live theatre the difference became less and less significant, in mass media comedy and drama were clearly divided. Comedies were expected to keep a consistently light tone and not challenge the viewer by introducing more serious content. By the early 1960s, television companies commonly presented half-hour-long "comedy" series
    6.00
    1 votes
    38

    Mockumentary

    A mockumentary (a portmanteau of the words mock and documentary), is a type of film or television show in which fictitious events are presented in documentary format. These productions are often used to analyze or comment on current events and issues by using a fictitious setting, or to parody the documentary form itself. They may be either comedic or dramatic in form, although comedic mockumentaries are more common. A dramatic mockumentary (sometimes referred to as docufiction) should not be confused with docudrama, a fictional genre in which dramatic techniques are combined with documentary elements to depict real events. Mockumentaries are often presented as historical documentaries, with B roll and talking heads discussing past events, or as cinéma vérité pieces following people as they go through various events. Though the precise origins of the genre are not known, examples emerged during the 1950s, when archival film footage became relatively easy to locate. A very early example was a short piece on the "Swiss Spaghetti Harvest" that appeared as an April fools' joke on the British television program Panorama in 1957. The term "mockumentary" is thought to have been
    5.00
    1 votes
    39

    Tom's Divorce

    After Leslie finds out that Tom is getting a divorce, the department takes him out on the town to cheer him up. Meanwhile, Andy tries to hustle Mark in a game of pool.
    5.00
    1 votes
    40
    Aziz Ansari

    Aziz Ansari

    Aziz Ansari (born February 23, 1983) is an American actor, writer, and stand-up comedian. He stars as Tom Haverford on the NBC show Parks and Recreation. Ansari began his career performing standup comedy in New York City during the summer of 2001 while attending New York University. In 2007, he created and starred in the critically acclaimed MTV sketch comedy show Human Giant, which ran for two seasons. This led to acting roles in feature films including Funny People, I Love You, Man, Observe and Report, and 30 Minutes or Less. In addition to his acting work, Ansari has continued to work as a standup comedian. He released his debut CD/DVD, entitled Intimate Moments for a Sensual Evening, in January 2010 on Comedy Central Records, and still tours nationally between acting commitments. In 2010 and 2011, he performed his Dangerously Delicious tour. This tour was self released for download on his website in March of 2012 and debuted on Comedy Central in May of 2012. He is currently performing his third major tour of new material titled, Buried Alive. Aziz Ansari was born in Columbia, South Carolina to a Muslim family from Tamil Nadu in southern India. His mother, Fatima, works in a
    4.00
    1 votes
    41

    Nick Offerman

    Nick Offerman (born June 26, 1970) is an American actor, writer, and carpenter. He is best known for his breakout role as Ron Swanson in the acclaimed NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation. Offerman grew up in Minooka, Illinois. His father, Ric, taught social studies at a junior high school in nearby Channahon. He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1993. That year, he and a group of fellow students co-founded the Defiant Theatre, a Chicago-based theatre company. Offerman lived in Chicago in the mid-1990s, where he participated with theatre companies such as Steppenwolf, Goodman, and Wisdom Bridge. At Steppenwolf, he also worked as a fight choreographer and master carpenter. During this time, Offerman became acquainted with Amy Poehler, who was heavily involved with the Chicago improv comedy scene. Offerman has appeared in films such as November (2004), Cursed (2005), Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous (2005), Sin City (2005), and The Men Who Stare at Goats (2009). He has been married since 2003 to Will & Grace actress Megan Mullally. Offerman guest-starred on Will & Grace during its fourth season and on King of Queens, playing a
    4.00
    1 votes
    42
    Rock Show

    Rock Show

    "Rock Show" is the sixth episode and season finale of the first season of the American comedy television series Parks and Recreation. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on May 14, 2009. It was written by Norm Hiscock and directed by Michael Schur. In the episode, Andy gets the casts removed from his legs, and Ann starts reevaluating their relationship when she learns he kept them on longer than necessary so she would keep pampering him. An intoxicated Mark flirts with Leslie, who feels conflicted about whether she wants to move forward when he is drunk. The episode generated positive reviews. Several commentators claimed "Rock Show" represented a turning point in the series, in which the show found its own tone and broke away from similarities to The Office. According to Nielsen Media Research, it was watched by 4.25 million viewers in its original airing, the lowest viewership for the season. "Rock Show", along with an "Extended Producer's Cut" of the episode, was included on the Parks and Recreation Season One DVD, which was released in the United States on September 8, 2009. The parks and recreation department have cake to celebrate Andy (Chris Pratt) having his leg
    4.00
    1 votes
    43

    Tom's Divorce

    "Tom's Divorce" is the 11th episode of the second season of American comedy television series Parks and Recreation, and the seventeenth overall episode of the series. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on December 3, 2009. In the episode, Tom gets a divorce and Leslie tries to cheer him up, unaware it was a green card marriage. Meanwhile, Andy challenges Mark to a game of pool with the hopes of winning back Ann's affections. The episode was written by Harris Wittels and was directed by Troy Miller. Although officially entitled "Tom's Divorce", it has also been referred to in some media reports as "The Fourth Floor" in reference to the pre-credits sequence in which Leslie visits the horrifying and grotesque fourth floor of the Pawnee Hall, a scene that was praised by television reviews. According to Nielsen Media Research, "Tom's Divorce" was seen by 4.83 million viewers, an increase over the previous episode, "Hunting Trip". The episode received generally positive reviews, particularly for the development of Tom's character, although commentators voiced less praise for the subplot involving Ann, Mark and Andy. Ron (Nick Offerman) sends Leslie (Amy Poehler) to run an
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Parks and Recreation of All Time

    Top List Voters