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Best P. G. Wodehouse of All Time

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    1

    The Old Reliable

    The Old Reliable is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on April 18, 1951 by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States on October 11, 1951 by Doubleday & Co, New York. The novel was serialised in Collier's magazine from 24 June to 22 July 1950, under the title "Phipps to the Rescue". The story is set in Hollywood, and follows the romantic and financial difficulties of various film stars, writers, movie moguls, butlers and safe-crackers. The Old Reliable was adapted as a made-for-TV movie in 1988 under the title Tales from the Hollywood Hills: The Old Reliable and starred Lynn Redgrave as Wilhemina ("Bill") Shannon, the "old reliable" of the title.
    8.14
    7 votes
    2

    Percy Frobisher Pilbeam

    Percy Frobisher Pilbeam is a fictional character in the works of P. G. Wodehouse. A journalist turned detective, he is a rather weak and unpleasant man, generally disliked by all. He appears in several novels, but is perhaps best known for his involvement with the denizens of Blandings Castle, in Summer Lightning (1929) and Heavy Weather (1933). Pilbeam is a rather slimy-looking man, with shiny black hair in a marcelled wave, eyes a little too close together, pimples and a shabby-looking moustache (which is occasionally described as "fungoid"). He has a tendency to dress in rather loud check suits, and a taste for pretty girls. He has an efficient and practical mind, full of pep and vigour. A member of the "Junior Constitutional Club", and an F.R.Z.S., Pilbeam is also a keen motorcyclist. His taste for girls is clear in his approval of Miss "Flick" Sheridan, and his adoration and pursuit of Sue Brown (which enrages Ronnie Fish to the extent of running amok and destroying a restaurant). Pilbeam has a paralysing fear of pigs, having read once that a pig, on finding a stranger in its sty, will go for him like a tiger and tear him to ribbons. He has a fondness for champagne, a drink he
    7.13
    8 votes
    3

    The Bishop's Move

    "The Bishop's Move" is a short story by the British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. A part of the Mr. Mulliner series, the story was first published in August 1927 in Liberty" in the United States, and in September 1927 in Strand Magazine in the UK. It also appears in the collection Meet Mr. Mulliner.
    7.83
    6 votes
    4

    Fry and Laurie

    Fry and Laurie were a successful English comedy double act, mostly active in the 1980s and '90s. The duo consisted of Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, who met in 1980 through mutual friend Emma Thompson whilst all three attended the University of Cambridge. They initially gained prominence in a television sketch show, A Bit of Fry & Laurie (1987, 1989-95), and have collaborated on numerous other projects including, most notably, the television series Jeeves and Wooster (1990-93) in which they portrayed P.G. Wodehouse's immortal literary characters Jeeves (Fry) and Wooster (Laurie). Since the conclusion of A Bit of Fry and Laurie, both have gone on to have successful solo careers in television, acting and writing, amongst other things though they still remain friends. They reunited for a retrospective show in 2010 entitled Fry and Laurie Reunited. On 14 May 2012, Fry announced on Twitter that he and Laurie are working together on a new project. Various press sources have since announced that it is to be an adaptation of The Canterville Ghost (1887) by Oscar Wilde and is scheduled for release over Christmas 2014. Fry and Laurie have also appeared together in various television
    8.20
    5 votes
    5

    Jeeves Takes Charge

    "Jeeves Takes Charge" is a short story written by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United States in The Saturday Evening Post on November 18, 1916, and in the United Kingdom in the April 1923 edition of Strand Magazine. Its first book publication was in Carry on, Jeeves in 1925. In 1995 Recorded Books recorded the book onto cassette tape narrated by Alexander Spencer. Bertie Wooster narrates, recalling Jeeves's first days as his valet. Bertie had been staying at Easeby, his Uncle Willoughby's estate in Shropshire, with his valet Meadowes, and had been forced to return to London in search of a new valet after having observed Meadowes stealing his silk socks. At the time, he was engaged to Lady Florence Craye, who upon his departure from Easeby had given him a thick and complicatedly intellectual book entitled Types of Ethical Theory, expecting him to read it in the week before his return. In his London flat, Bertie picks up the volume and begins to read it, feeling achy and suffering from "morning head", but is interrupted by the arrival of Jeeves, a new valet sent by the local agency. Bertie is immediately impressed by Jeeves's manner of walking: he "floated
    8.20
    5 votes
    6

    Ukridge's Dog College

    "Ukridge's Dog College" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the April 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan, and in the United Kingdom in the May 1923 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. Ukridge is introduced to the reader as a childhood friend of the narrator, later revealed to be James "Corky" Corcoran, who having been expelled from school for sneaking out of the school grounds to attend a fair has travelled the world undertaking all manner of enterprises. He is now, much to Corky's surprise, living with his wealthy aunt near Wimbledon Common and dressing smartly. All this soon ends, however, when Ukridge appears in Corky's London apartment, dressed after the old manner and accompanied by half-a-dozen Pekingese dogs. He announces to Corky that he plans to run a school for dogs, training them up as performers for the music hall, and promptly departs for Sheep's Cray in Kent. Some weeks later, Corky receives an urgent telegram from Ukridge, and travels to Kent. There he finds Ukridge in his usual state of financial embarrassment and returns to London
    8.20
    5 votes
    7
    A Prefect's Uncle

    A Prefect's Uncle

    A Prefect's Uncle is an early novel by P.G. Wodehouse. The action of the novel takes place at the fictional "Beckford College", a private school for boys; the title alludes to the arrival at the school of a mischievous young boy called Reginald Farnie, who turns out to be the uncle of the older "Bishop" Gethryn, a prefect, cricketer and popular figure in the school. His arrival, along with that of another youngster, Wilson, who becomes fag to Gethryn, leads to much excitement and scandal in the school, and the disruption of some important cricket matches. Early editions are highly prized by collectors, and first printings regularly sell for over $5,000. The novel was reprinted on June 17, 2004 by R A Kessinger Publishing. It contains approximately 128 pages and has been assigned the ISBN 1-4191-0286-9. The text was released under Project Gutenburg in 2004.
    7.00
    6 votes
    8

    The Episode of the Landlady's Daughter

    "The Episode of the Landlady's Daughter" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse and C. H. Bovill, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the April 1914 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the May 1916 Pictorial Review. It was published in book form in the collection A Man of Means in 1991, and is sometimes referred to by the simplified title "The Landlady's Daughter". It features Roland Bleke, a young man for whom financial success is always a mixed blessing. We first meet Roland Bleke as a clerk in a seed merchants in the provincial town of Bury St. Edwards, where he is pleading with his employer for a pay cut. We learn that Bleke has become engaged to Muriel, daughter of the house in which he lodges, mostly out of an inability to think of anything to say to the girl. Knowing that should his pay reach too high a level the wedding will become inevitable, leaving him in the position of having to support Muriel and her family, including her two unemployed brothers, Bleke arranges to keep his pay low. Having informed the family of his unfortunate pay cut, Bleke finds he has won £40,000 in a sweepstake. He plans to flee, but the family find out about his stroke of luck
    7.00
    6 votes
    9

    A Bit of Luck for Mabel

    "A Bit of Luck for Mabel" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the December 26, 1925 issue of The Saturday Evening Post, and in the United Kingdom in the May 1926 Strand. It was included in the collection Eggs, Beans and Crumpets, published in 1940. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge. Ukridge and his pal Jimmy Corcoran are taking a break in the country, and one night Ukridge decides to tell the story of Mabel and the top hat. Ukridge had met Mabel at a dinner party at his Aunt Julia's house, and had fallen for her hard; she was the daughter of a wealthy colonial type who was busy out in Singapore, and Ukridge began frequenting their house. He has a rival for Mabel's love, who is a Baronet, which worries Ukridge somewhat, but he is given confidence by his dress, which, as he is at the time staying with his aunt, is rather dapper, top hat, spats and all. Ascot is approaching, and Ukridge agrees to attend with Mabel and her family. Aunt Julia discovers that Ukridge has pawned a clock from the spare room, to pay for gifts for Mabel, and kicks him out once more; Ukridge takes lodgings, but one day his hat is blown
    8.00
    5 votes
    10

    Excelsior

    "Excelsior" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the U.K. edition of Argosy magazine on July 1, 1948 under the title "The Hazards of Horace Bewstridge", and was later included in the collection Nothing Serious (1951). It is one of Wodehouse's many golf stories, told by the Oldest Member. The story displays Wodehouse's excellent use of language and humor. It begins with the Oldest Member discussing people who lack the proper golfing spirit ("I have known Bream to concede a hole for the almost frivolous reason that he had sliced his ball into a hornet's nest and was unwilling to play it from where it lay"). He mentions a fine example of a devoted golfer, Horace Bewstridge, and proceeds to tell the man's story. Bewstridge was in love with a woman named Vera Witherby, the niece of Ponsford Botts. Before proposing marriage, however, he intended to acquaint himself with her family, to ensure a good reception. (The Oldest Member began the story with himself finding Bewstridge's list of how to pander to each one of the Bottses: Laugh at Ponsford Botts' Pat and Mike jokes, talk about the pixies and flowers in Mrs. Botts' books, praise the girl of Irwin Botts'
    8.00
    5 votes
    11

    Bring on the Girls

    Bring on the Girls! is a semi-autobiographical collaboration between P. G. Wodehouse and Guy Bolton, first published in the United States on October 5, 1953 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, and in the United Kingdom on May 21, 1954 by Herbert Jenkins, London. Subtitled "The Improbable Story of Our Life in Musical Comedy, With Pictures To Prove It", it takes the form of a series of partly fictionalised, partly apocryphal stories centred on the world of Broadway, where both Wodehouse and Bolton had worked successfully as lyricists, collaborating with the likes of composer Jerome Kern. It features anecdotes about the larger-than-life characters who dominated Broadway between 1915 and 1930, but the biographer Frances Donaldson writes that it is to be read as entertainment rather than history: "Guy, having once invented an anecdote, told it so often that it was impossible to know whether in the end he believed it or not."
    7.80
    5 votes
    12

    Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe

    Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe, 7th Baronet is a fictional character from the Blandings stories of P. G. Wodehouse. The seventh Baronet, who resides at Matchingham Hall, he is the son of the Very Reverend Dean Parsloe-Parsloe and is the rival and enemy of Lord Emsworth, master of Blandings Castle. Parsloe-Parsloe first appears in the short story "The Custody of the Pumpkin" (included in the 1935 collection Blandings Castle and Elsewhere, but written over ten years earlier). He later shows up in several other Blandings tales, including Summer Lightning (1929), Heavy Weather (1933) and Pigs Have Wings (1953). While Emsworth's brother Gally is preparing his reminiscences in Summer Lightning, he reveals quite a lot about the Baronet's black past. Although the first twenty years or so of his life were relatively blameless, he went off the rails to a considerable degree, and was considered a dangerous type by his contemporaries. When Galahad first met him, Parsloe was walking around a supper-table at Romano's, wearing a soup-tureen on his head and holding a stick of celery, claiming he was a sentry outside Buckingham Palace. He is remembered as the only man ever to have been thrown out of
    7.80
    5 votes
    13

    Spenser Gregson

    In the stories and novels of P. G. Wodehouse, Spenser Gregson is Bertie Wooster's Aunt Agatha's first husband. Wodehouse is unclear on Gregson's surname, giving it variously as Spenser, Gregson, and Spenser-Gregson, though it appears most often as simply Gregson, with Spenser as his Christian name. Gregson, SpenserGregson, Spenser
    7.80
    5 votes
    14

    Sticky Wicket at Blandings

    "Sticky Wicket at Blandings" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared, under the title "First Aid for Freddie", in the United States in the October 1966 issue of Playboy magazine, and in the United Kingdom in the April 1967 issue of Argosy. Part of the Blandings Castle canon, it features the absent-minded peer Lord Emsworth, and was included in the collection Plum Pie (1966). Freddie Threepwood is back at Blandings on Dog-Joy business, and his wife Aggie, finding country life a little dull, has headed to the French Riviera. Freddie has befriended Valerie Fanshawe, in hopes of persuading her father, local hunting bigwig Colonel Fanshawe, to invest in Freddie's dog biscuits for his sizeable pack of hounds. Gally warns his nephew Freddie of the dangers of consorting with attractive young girls while his wife is away, but Freddie, hungry for the sale, opts to give Valerie an Alsatian she covets, although the dog belongs to Aggie - he believes he can replace it without her noticing. As Freddie leaves with his gift, Gally hears worrying news - his sister Connie is thinking about sacking venerable butler Beach, who has become a little wheezy in his old age. Freddie gets a
    7.80
    5 votes
    15

    Very Good Eddie

    Very Good Eddie is a musical with a book by Guy Bolton and Philip Bartholomae, music by Jerome Kern, and lyrics by Schuyler Green and Herbert Reynolds, with additional lyrics by Elsie Janis, Harry B. Smith and John E. Hazzard and additional music by Henry Kailimai. The story was based on the farce Over Night by Bartholomae. The show was the second of the series of "Princess Theatre musicals" and was a hit for Bolton and Kern, running for 341 performances and leading to further successful collaborations. The farcical plot focuses on Eddie Kettle, a very short young man newly married to Georgina, who is extremely tall. They board a Hudson River Day Line boat headed for the Honeymoon Inn in Poughkeepsie. Also on board are extremely tall athlete Percy Darling and his very short bride Elsie. Chaos ensues when the couples cross paths and accidentally trade partners. The vaudeville-style adventure continues at the hotel, where guests with names like Gay Anne Giddy, Fullern A. Goat, Tayleurs Dummee, Always Innit, and Madame Matroppo, a sex-crazed opera coach whose student is "Lily Pond" (Lily Pons), pop in and out of rooms while an inebriated desk clerk tries to sort through all the
    7.80
    5 votes
    16

    Rosalie

    Rosalie is a musical with music by George Gershwin and Sigmund Romberg, lyrics by Ira Gershwin and P.G. Wodehouse, and book by William Anthony McGuire and Guy Bolton. The story tells of a princess from a faraway land who comes to America and falls in love with a West Point Lieutenant. It was first produced on Broadway in 1928 at the New Amsterdam Theatre. It was adapted in 1937 as a musical film with songs by Cole Porter. The musical, produced by Florenz Ziegfeld, premiered on Broadway at the New Amsterdam Theatre on January 10, 1928 and ran for 335 performances. Directed by William Anthony McGuire, the cast starred Marilyn Miller as the princess, Frank Morgan as her father, King Cyril, Bobbe Arnst (Mary), Margaret Dale (the Queen), and Jack Donahue. The set designer, Joseph Urban, and costume designer, John Harkrider "devised elaborate stage pictures ranging from a public square...to a West Point ballroom to a Paris nightclub." Michel Fokine choreographed the second act ballet, and there was a chorus of 64. The musical was a mixture of operetta and a 1920s musical. Rosalie was performed in many regional theatres, including the Paper Mill Playhouse, Millburn, New Jersey in 1946 and
    7.60
    5 votes
    17

    Ukridge Sees Her Through

    "Ukridge Sees Her Through" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the September 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the October 1923 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. Ukridge's friend Jimmy Corcoran is persuaded to hire a typist to speed his writing. He meets Dora Mason, former secretary to Ukridge's Aunt Julia and now partner in a typing firm, and finds she gained her partnership based on a promise from Ukridge that he will provide the £100 she needs to buy the share. Shocked, Corcoran asks his friend how he hopes to find the money. Ukridge reveals that Hank Philbrick, an old friend from Canada has made it big, and has been persuaded by Ukridge to buy an English country house; Ukridge has contracted with an agent, who will split the hefty commission with Ukridge. Corcoran meets Ukridge late one night, and finds with him the Canadian, who is in a state of severe inebriation. Ukridge tells Corky that he has been drinking heavily since he came into his fortune. Some days later, Ukridge arrives at his friend's house,
    8.75
    4 votes
    18
    Zadie Smith

    Zadie Smith

    Zadie Smith (born on 25 October 1975) is a British novelist, essayist and short story writer. As of 2012, she has published four novels, all of which have received substantial critical praise. In 2003, she was included on Granta's list of 20 best young authors. She joined New York University's Creative Writing Program as a tenured professor on September 1, 2010. Smith has won the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2006 and her novel White Teeth was included in Time magazine's TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005 list. Zadie Smith was born as Sadie Smith in the northwest London borough of Brent – a largely working-class area – to a Jamaican mother, Yvonne Bailey, and a British father, Harvey Smith. Her mother had grown up in Jamaica and emigrated to Britain in 1969. Their marriage was her father's second. Zadie has a half-sister, a half-brother, and two younger brothers, one of whom is the rapper and stand-up comedian Doc Brown and the other is rapper Luc Skyz. As a child she was fond of tap dancing; as a teenager she considered a career as an actress in musical theatre; and as a university student she earned money as a jazz singer and wanted to become a journalist. Her
    7.40
    5 votes
    19

    Mr Mulliner

    Mr. Mulliner is a fictional character from the short stories of P. G. Wodehouse. Mr. Mulliner is a loquacious pub raconteur who, no matter what the topic of conversation, can find an appropriate (if improbable) story about a member of his family to match it. Like much of Wodehouse's work, the Mr. Mulliner stories were originally written for magazine publication. Thirty-seven of the 41 overall Mulliner stories were originally published between 1926 and 1937. The final four stories appeared much later, being published in widely-spaced intervals between 1947 and 1970. Like his fellow Wodehouse character, the Oldest Member, the raconteur Mr. Mulliner can turn any conversation into a "recollection". A habitué of the Angler's Rest pub, his fellow drinkers are identified only by their beverages. (Mr Mulliner is a Hot Scotch and Lemon.) Wodehouse revealed in an introduction that he devised Mr Mulliner after collecting notebooks full of ideas that could not be used because they were too outlandish, until he had the happy notion of a fisherman whose veracity could be doubted. The tales of Mulliner all involve one of his relations: there are dozens upon dozens of cousins, nieces, and nephews.
    8.25
    4 votes
    20

    If I Were You

    If I Were You is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on September 3, 1931 by Doubleday, Doran, New York, and in the United Kingdom on September 25, 1931 by Herbert Jenkins, London. The story concerns the romantic troubles of young Anthony Bryce, Earl of Droitwich. Engaged to be married to Violet Waddington, heiress to 'Waddington's 97 Soups', Tony's life is thrown into chaos when his old nurse comes to pay him a visit, revealing a long-kept family secret. Tony departs for London with the resourceful Polly Brown, leaving the ancestral home in the hands of the Socialist barber Syd Price.
    7.00
    5 votes
    21

    Sunset at Blandings

    Sunset at Blandings is an unfinished novel by P. G. Wodehouse. Characters: Wodehouse was still working on the book when he died in 1975; the published version was edited by Richard Usborne, and includes Wodehouse's notes on the ending of the story. The story is, as the poignant name suggests, another tale set at Blandings Castle, filled as ever with romance and imposters. Galahad Threepwood uses his charm and wit to ensure his brother Clarence continues to lead a quiet and peaceful life.
    7.00
    5 votes
    22

    The Episode of the Live Weekly

    "The Episode of the Live Weekly" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse and C. H. Bovill, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the July 1914 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the August 1916 Pictorial Review. It was published in book form in the collection A Man of Means in 1991. It is the fourth of six stories to feature Roland Bleke, a young man for whom financial success is always a mixed blessing. Roland Bleke, his wealth further increase following the outcome of "The Episode of the Theatrical Venture", sees a pretty young girl crying in the park. Trying to comfort her, he learns she has lost her job as editor of the Woman's Page of Squibs magazine. His chivalry stirred, Bleke tells her he plans to buy the paper. Visiting the offices, he meets the vibrant young chief editor, and learns the condition of the paper - financially crippled following a competition run by early staff, the prize for which was £5 a week for life. The winner of the prize continues to drain the income of the paper, bringing it to the verge of ruin. Bleke buys it anyway, restoring the girl to her position, but he soon finds his attraction to her drained by her clear affection for her
    7.00
    5 votes
    23

    Lady Constance Keeble

    Lady Constance Keeble (née Constance Threepwood, later Constance Schoonmaker) is a recurring fictional character in the Blandings stories by British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being Lord Emsworth's most formidable sister, a strikingly handsome woman, with a fair, broad brow, and perfectly even white teeth. She has the carriage of an empress, and her large grey eyes are misleadingly genial. When we first meet her in Leave it to Psmith, she is recently married to wealthy Joe Keeble, and acting as châtelaine at Blandings. She has an interest in the Arts, and frequently invites writers and such to the castle; poets Aileen Peavey and Ralston McTodd and tenor Orlo Watkins are prime examples of this trait. She endeavours in vain to persuade her brother Lord Emsworth to dress more suitably, and to pay attention to important matters such as the family, rather than his garden and his beloved pig, Empress of Blandings. She bullies him mercilessly, forcing him to dress up in a tight collar and top hat for the Blandings Parva Annual School Treat, and making him act as a Justice of the Peace and make speeches at important local events. She also has a horror of anyone in her distinguished
    8.00
    4 votes
    24

    Heavy Weather

    Heavy Weather is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on July 28, 1933 by Little, Brown and Company, Boston, and in the United Kingdom on August 10, 1933 by Herbert Jenkins, London. It had been serialised in the Saturday Evening Post from 27 May to 15 July 1933. It is part of the Blandings Castle series of tales, the fourth full-length novel to be set there, and forms a direct sequel to Summer Lightning (1929), with many of the same characters remaining at the castle from the previous story. It also features the re-appearance by Lord Tilbury, who had previously appeared in Bill the Conqueror (1924) and Sam the Sudden (1925). With the Hon. Galahad's reminiscences removed from the market, publisher Lord Tilbury is anxious to get hold of the manuscript, while Lady Constance Keeble and Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe want to lay hands on it for quite other reasons. Lord Emsworth fears that Parsloe-Parsloe is out to spoil his prize pig Empress of Blandings' chances at the forthcoming county show, and keeps detective Pilbeam on hand to keep watch. Meanwhile, Sue Brown is anxious to hide her old friendship with Monty Bodkin from her jealous fiance Ronnie Fish,
    6.80
    5 votes
    25

    The Custody of the Pumpkin

    "The Custody of the Pumpkin" is a short story by British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. It first appeared in the U.S. in the 29 November 1924 issue of The Saturday Evening Post, and in the UK in the December 1924 issue of Strand Magazine. Part of the Blandings Castle canon, it features the absent-minded peer Lord Emsworth, and was included in the collection Blandings Castle and Elsewhere (1935), although the story takes place sometime between the events of Leave it to Psmith (1923) and Summer Lightning (1929). Lord Emsworth, enjoying the views around his castle with a telescope on the turret above the west wing, spies his younger son Freddie Threepwood kissing a girl in a spinney by the end of the water-meadow. Enraged, he confronts the young man, who reveals the girl is named Aggie, and is a "sort of cousin" of Head Gardener Angus McAllister. Emsworth demands that McAllister send the girl away, but the angered Scotsman hands in his notice. Realising that McAllister has gone, he realises that deputy head gardener, Robert Barker, is not up to the job of preparing his precious pumpkin, "The Hope of Blandings", for the Shrewsbury Show, Emsworth heads up to London to retrieve the man.
    6.80
    5 votes
    26

    Eggs, Beans, and Crumpets

    Eggs, Beans and Crumpets is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on April 26, 1940 by Herbert Jenkins, London, then with a slightly different content in the United States on May 10, 1940 by Doubleday, Doran, New York. Most of the stories feature regular characters: Drones Club member Bingo Little, Mr Mulliner, Ukridge and, in the US edition, Freddie Widgeon and the Oldest Member. The US edition of the book also included: Missing from the US edition were "Romance at Droitgate Spa" and "All's Well with Bingo", which had been included in The Crime Wave at Blandings (1937).
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    Christopher Hitchens

    Christopher Hitchens

    Christopher Eric Hitchens (13 April 1949 – 15 December 2011) was a British American author and journalist whose career spanned more than four decades. Hitchens, often referred to colloquially as "Hitch", contributed to New Statesman, The Nation, The Atlantic, The London Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, and Vanity Fair. He was an author of twelve books and five collections of essays, and concentrated on the subjects of politics, literature and religion. As a staple of talk shows and lecture circuits, he was a prominent public intellectual, and his confrontational style of debate made him both a lauded and controversial figure. Known for his contrarian stance on a number of issues, he critiqued revered figures such as Mother Teresa, and Diana, Princess of Wales. Initially describing himself as a socialist, Hitchens began his break from the established political left after what he called the "tepid reaction" of the Western left to the Rushdie Affair. The September 11 attacks "exhilarated" him, strengthening his internationalist embrace of an interventionist foreign policy, and his criticism of what he called "fascism with an Islamic face." His numerous editorials in
    7.75
    4 votes
    29

    Comrade Bingo

    "Comrade Bingo" is a comic story by P. G. Wodehouse. It is part of the "Bertie Wooster" series. Richard "Bingo" Little falls in love with the daughter of a left-wing, probably, communist or socialist leader called Charlotte Corday Rowbotham. In an attempt to get close to her, Little joins the group, called the Heralds of the Red Dawn, whose aims are to "massacre the bourgeoisie, sack Park Lane and disembowel the hereditary aristocracy". This leads to an event where Bertie passes through Speakers' Corner where he meets Bingo's uncle, who recently inherited the lordship of Bittlesham. Bingo, in an attempt to impress the members of the group and the girl, starts to berate his uncle and Bertie. However, he is not recognised as he is wearing a beard. The next day he meets Bingo and he tells Bertie about his plan. He tells Bertie to expect his friends for tea at Bertie's apartment. Bingo talks about how his uncle has a racing horse that can't lose. He tells Bertie to back it, saying he'll do the same and then will be able to afford a wedding. When they arrive at Bertie's apartment, he is introduced to Mr. Rowbotham, who promptly asks "Are you part of our movement?" To which Wooster
    7.75
    4 votes
    30

    Reggie Pepper

    Reginald Pepper, known as "Reggie", is a fictional character who appears in seven short stories by P.G. Wodehouse. He is a young man-about-town with far more money than brain cells (he was left a fortune by his late uncle Edward Pepper, of Pepper, Wells and Co., the colliery people). He is considered to be an early prototype for Bertie Wooster, who, along with his valet Jeeves, is one of Wodehouse's most famous creations. with their dates of first publication: (Source: http://home.earthlink.net/~nmidkiff/pgw/story.html) The British versions of "Absent Treatment", "Helping Freddie", "Rallying Round Old George" and "Doing Clarence A Bit of Good" were collected along with four early Jeeves stories in My Man Jeeves, published in May 1919 by George Newnes. The American versions of "Absent Treatment", "Brother Alfred" and "Rallying Round Clarence" were collected in the American edition of The Man with Two Left Feet, published in 1933 by A.L. Burt. The British versions of "Disentangling Old Percy", "Concealed Art" and "The Test Case" were published as Plum Stones Volume 2: The Unrepublished Reggie Pepper in 1993 by Galahad Books, a specialist Wodehouse publisher. The American versions of
    7.75
    4 votes
    31

    Over Seventy

    Over Seventy is an autobiographical work by P.G. Wodehouse, including a collection of articles originally from Punch magazine. It was first published in the United States on May 3, 1956 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York under the title America, I Like You, and in the United Kingdom, in a considerably expanded form, on October 11, 1957 by Herbert Jenkins, London, with the Over Seventy title and the subtitle An Autobiography with Digressions. Much of the writing describes Wodehouse's feelings concerning the United States, his adopted homeland, with the journalism and stories inserted in context.
    6.60
    5 votes
    32

    Psmith in the City

    Psmith in the City is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published on 23 September 1910 by Adam & Charles Black, London. The story was originally released as a serial in The Captain magazine, between October 1908 and March 1909, under the title The New Fold. It continues the adventures of cricket-loving Mike Jackson and his immaculately-dressed friend Psmith, first encountered in Mike (1909). Mike Jackson, cricketer and scion of a cricketing clan, finds his dreams of studying and playing at Cambridge upset by news of his father's financial troubles, and must instead take a job with the "New Asiatic Bank". On arrival there, Mike finds his friend Psmith is also a new employee, and together they strive to make the best of their position, and perhaps squeeze in a little cricket from time to time. Playing cricket for a team run by Psmith's father, Mike meets John Bickersdyke for the first time when he walks behind the bowler's arm, causing Mike to get out on ninety-eight. Shortly afterward, Mike's father regretfully informs him that, having lost a large amount of money, he will have to sell the house, and won't be able to send Mike to Cambridge as he had hoped. Mike hears that Psmith is
    6.60
    5 votes
    33

    Indiscretions of Archie

    Indiscretions of Archie is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on February 14, 1921 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on July 15, 1921 by George H. Doran, New York. The book was adapted from a series of short stories, originally serialised in the Strand in the UK, between March 1920 and February 1921, and, all except one, in Cosmopolitan in the US between May 1920 and February 1921. The stories were rewritten and reorganised to create a more flowing novel form. The one story that was not published in Cosmopolitan, "Strange Experience of an Artist's Model", was collected in Wodehouse on Crime (1981) under the title "Indiscretions of Archie". The original story titles and publication dates were as follows: The book tells the story of impoverished, embarrassment-prone Drone Archibald "Archie" Moffam (pronounced "Moom"), and his difficult relationship with art-collecting, hotel-owning millionaire father-in-law Daniel Brewster, father of Archie's new bride Lucille. Archie's attempts to ingratiate himself with Brewster only get him further into trouble.
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    The Luck Stone

    The Luck Stone

    The Luck Stone is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, written under the pseudonym Basil Windham. It was compiled from a serial which appeared in ''Chums:An Illustrated Paper for Boys" between September 16, 1908 and January 20, 1909, when Wodehouse was twenty seven years old. It was first published as a book long after Wodehouse's 1975 death, on March 31, 1997 by Galahad Books, in a limited run with the ISBN 1-898549-13-3. It has subsequently been published in paperback by Odbody & Marley (2006), ISBN 1-4196-2321-4. Like much of Wodehouse's writing of the period, the story is set in a public boys' school. But it departs from that usual form as described by Wodehouse in a letter written to a friend: "I've been commissioned by Chums to do a 70,000 word serial by July. They want it not so public-schooly as my usual stuff and with a rather lurid plot." It was his only such novel of mystery, high adventure, and danger, given the term "blood and thunder" by Wodehouse scholar Richard Usborne. Usborne observed, "Doubtless Wodehouse enjoyed writing The Luck Stone. …He had shown, in breezy asides throughout his school novels, …that he had read acres of catchpenny fiction, had enjoyed it all and knew
    10.00
    2 votes
    35

    The Globe By the Way Book

    The Globe By the Way Book is a collection of extracts from the By The Way column, a feature of London newspaper The Globe. The columns were written by P. G. Wodehouse and Herbert Westbrook, and the book was published in June 1908 by the Globe Publishing Company, London. Wodehouse was editor of the By the Way column from 1904 to 1909, and wrote a fictionalised account of his time on the paper, also in collaboration with Westbrook, entitled Not George Washington.
    6.40
    5 votes
    36

    The Politeness of Princes

    "The Politeness of Princes" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the July 1902 issue of The Captain. It is a school story, set at Wrykyn school. The story later appeared in the United States in the collection The Swoop! and Other Stories (1979), and was the title story of the Project Gutenberg eBook The Politeness of Princes and Other School Stories. The title comes from the saying, "Punctuality is the politeness of princes." Chapple, a boy in Seymour's house, has trouble dragging himself out of bed in time for breakfast; sleeping in a small room by himself, he generally arrives just as the other boys are leaving, and has to charm the staff into providing him with food and coffee. Eventually, Seymour notices his tardiness, and begins to punish him for arriving late. Chapple, taking advice from his friends, tries leaving the sheets off his bed, so the cold will wake him; he pulls them on again and sleeps on. He tries setting his watch ahead; he forgets to wind it and is later than ever. Finally, he tries leaving his blankets off and setting his watch ahead, but wakes far too early. Taking a stroll round the school to kill time until
    6.40
    5 votes
    37

    A Damsel in Distress

    A Damsel in Distress is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on 4 October 1919 by George H. Doran, New York, and in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, on 17 October 1919. It had previously been serialised in The Saturday Evening Post, between May and June that year. Golf-loving American composer George Bevan falls in love with a mysterious young lady who takes refuge in his taxicab one day; when he tracks her down to a romantic rural manor, mistaken identity leads to all manner of brouhaha... The story was made into a silent, black-and-white movie in 1919. In 1928 Wodehouse collaborated with Ian Hay in adapting the book for the stage: Hay, Wodehouse and A. A. Milne invested in the production, about which Wodehouse said "I don't think we shall lose our money, as Ian has done an awfully good job.". The play, which opened at the New Theatre, London, on 13 August 1928, had a successful run of 234 performances. Wodehouse was involved in adapting the novel as a musical in 1937.
    7.25
    4 votes
    38

    Tuppy Glossop

    Hildebrand "Tuppy" Glossop is a fictional character appearing in some of P. G. Wodehouse Jeeves books. He is a member of the Drones Club and a good friend of Bertie Wooster. In Right Ho, Jeeves, we learn that Tuppy is of Scottish origin. Tuppy is engaged to Bertie's favourite cousin, Angela Travers. Jeeves has ruined Tuppy's relationships with the opera singer Cora Bellinger and the dog lover Miss Dalgleish in order to keep Tuppy with Angela, usually upon the request of Angela's mother (Bertie's Aunt Dahlia). In Right Ho, Jeeves, Angela breaks the engagement because Tuppy disparages a shark that had attacked her while she was aquaplaning in Cannes. Bertie makes an attempt to restore the status quo with disastrous results, causing Jeeves to step in and restore their engagement with his normal brilliance. Tuppy's uncle is Bertie's nemesis (and later good friend) Sir Roderick Glossop and his cousin is Bertie's ex-fiancée Honoria Glossop. In the book Much Obliged, Jeeves, Angela and Tuppy haven't married after being two years engaged due to a lack of funds on Tuppy's part. Angela's mother Dahlia takes it upon herself to do something about Tuppy's financial woes. She decides that L.P
    7.25
    4 votes
    39

    Daphne Winkworth

    Dame Daphne Winkworth is a recurring fictional character from the Blandings Castle and Jeeves stories of English comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a menacing and scowling woman who is rarely seen to smile. She is an intimate acquaintance of Bertie Wooster's Aunt Agatha, another old harridan character. She is the widow of Sir P. B. Winkworth, the noted historian. She has also been a guest at Blandings Castle, making her, along with Roderick Glossop, one of the links between the worlds of Jeeves and Lord Emsworth. She used to be the headmistress of a girl's school in Eastbourne prior to retirement. Dame Daphne's seat is at Deverill Hall, Hampshire, a large Tudor Manor which has been at its present location in the village of Kings Deverill for longer than anyone can really remember. She lives with her four sisters, all of whom have never been married and have spent their entire lives within the walls of Deverill Hall. They are: Emmeline (the serious one), Myrtle (the artistic one), Charlotte (the deaf one), and Harriet (the masculine one). Dame Daphne, however, is the widow of noted historian Sir P. B. Winkworth, though she wouldn't discuss the subject. She has a daughter, Gertrude
    8.33
    3 votes
    40

    Major Brabazon-Plank

    Major Brabazon-Plank, later Major Plank, is a recurring fictional character from the Uncle Fred and Jeeves stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a famed explorer who led an expedition up the Amazon but is afraid of babies. Major Brabazon-Plank is a famed explorer who led at least one expedition up the Amazon River in Brazil. While in Peru, Major Plank judged a bonny baby competition, for which he was wounded in the leg. (He will show the scar when asked.) In South Africa, he hitched-hiked from Johannesburg to Cape Town to avoid being married. In Mozambique, his native servant stole a box of Havanas and his false teeth. (Major Plank had to trade a case of gin and two strings of beads to a native chief to get the false teeth back.) In the Malay States, Major Plank knew a fellow. He suffers from a poor memory due to having contracted malaria, and from a great fear of Bonny Babies competitions because of his experience in Peru. In Uncle Dynamite, as Major Brabazon-Plank, he is back from leading an expedition up the Amazon with Bill Oakshott. Visiting Ashenden Manor, he finds Uncle Fred usurping his identity. Uncle Fred and Major Plank were acquaintance in their young
    8.33
    3 votes
    41

    Rupert Baxter

    Rupert Baxter is a fictional character in the Blandings stories by P. G. Wodehouse. Often called The Efficient Baxter (although the castle staff call him Nosy Parker), he is Lord Emsworth's secretary, and an expert on many things, including Egyptian scarabs. He invariably wears his rimless spectacles, suspects everyone of being an impostor, and is, as his epithet suggests, extremely efficient. Baxter is an efficient and practical individual. He likes order, and despises Lord Emsworth's fuzzy mind and lifestyle. He sees himself as a man destined to bring order to Blandings, and is proud of his position as de facto ruler of one of England's largest houses. It is this pride which brings him back time and again to Blandings, despite the better pay and working conditions available to him in the household of Mr J. Horace Jevons, his employer before and after his reigns at Blandings, a man who treats him with the respect, and even obsequiousness, he demands; Mr Jevons' financial advice also allows Baxter to treble his savings. Not the most emotional of men, his head is rarely turned by women, although on one occasion, meeting Sue Brown but believing her to be Myra Schoonmaker, he finds
    8.33
    3 votes
    42

    Bingo Little

    Richard P. "Bingo" Little is a recurring fictional character from the Drones and the Jeeves stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a friend of Jeeves's master Bertie Wooster and a member of the Drones Club. Bingo Little is a longtime friend of Bertie Wooster. They were born in the same village a few days apart, and went together to preparatory school (under Rev. Upjohn), secondary school at Eton College, then to the University of Oxford. Unlike most other members of the Drones Club, Bingo gained a degree "of some sort" as Bertie puts it. Like Bertie, he is a member of the idle rich, as his uncle made a fortune on "Little's Liniment (It Limbers Up the Legs)," and he exists on an allowance; however, due to occasional scrapes with his uncle he is forced to supplement this income by teaching or betting on horse races. Bingo's most noteworthy character trait is his overwhelming romantic nature, where he is inclined to fall in love at first sight on a regular basis and become highly emotional about his affections. Bertie compares him in The Inimitable Jeeves to "the hero of a musical comedy who takes the centre of the stage, gathers the boys round him in a circle, and
    9.50
    2 votes
    43

    Lady Glossop

    Lady Delia Glossop is a recurring fictional character in the Jeeves stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being the wife of well known nerve specialist Sir Roderick Glossop, mother to Oswald and Honoria Glossop, and an acquaintance of Bertie's fearsome Aunt Agatha Gregson. She features in many of the early Jeeves books, but, we are told by Bertie, dies just before the events of Thank You, Jeeves (1934), whereupon her husband endeavours to remarry Mrs Myrtle Pongleton, the Dowager Lady Chuffnell. Lady Glossop first meets Bertie when he becomes matrimonially bound to her daughter Honoria, an arrangement worked by her and Bertie's fearsome Aunt Agatha. Bertie is quite horrified by the prospect of marrying into the Glossop family, and bequeaths that Jeeves sort the whole affair out so that a satisfactory conclusion may be reached, for him. Jeeves stumbles upon the information that both Glossops have a severe horror of moggies, and so at dinner that evening at Bertie's flat, releases several cats. The Glossops leave with the distinct impression that Bertie is to be avoided. Lady Glossop is more sympathetic towards Bertie's woolly-headedness that her husband, and is in the
    9.50
    2 votes
    44

    Big Money

    Big Money is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on January 30, 1931 by Doubleday, Doran, New York, and in the United Kingdom on March 20, 1931 by Herbert Jenkins, London. It was serialised in Collier's (US) from 20 September to 6 December 1930 and in the Strand Magazine (UK) between October 1930 and April 1931. The story concerns two young men, Godfrey, Lord Biskerton "Biscuit" and his one-time inseparable comrade John Beresford "Berry" Conway, and their efforts to raise money and to woo their respective girls.
    7.00
    4 votes
    45

    Roland Bleke

    Roland Bleke is a fictional character created by British author P. G. Wodehouse. Bleke appears in 6 of Wodehouse's short stories.
    7.00
    4 votes
    46

    The Head of Kay's

    The Head of Kay's is a novel by English author P.G. Wodehouse. Set at the fictional school of Eckleton, the story centres around the house of "Kay's", the riotous boys therein, its tactless, unpopular master Mr. Kay, and Fenn, the head boy. The story features practical jokes, fighting between the boys and with the locals in the nearby town, politics amongst the houses of the school, a trip to an army-style camp, and plenty of cricket and rugby.
    7.00
    4 votes
    47

    Ukridge and the Home from Home

    "Ukridge and the Home from Home" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the February 1931 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the June 1931 Strand. It was included in the collection Lord Emsworth and Others, published in the U.K in 1937, and in the U.S. version of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets, published in 1940. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge. Ukridge arrives at his friend Jimmy Corcoran's house at 3 a.m., dressed in his pyjamas and mackintosh. He relates to his friend how he had been left in charge of his Aunt Julia's house, and had come up with the ingenious idea of renting out rooms to an exclusive clientele of boarders while she was away. For a time the plan goes smoothly. With the staff bribed to help, he fills the house with paying guests, and rakes in their money while playing the gracious host. However, meeting an old friend of his Aunt's, he hears she is returning sooner than expected, and tries to think of a way to get rid of the guests before their contracted stays are up. After a plot to imply the drainage in the house is faulty fails, Ukridge decides to claim the house is infected
    7.00
    4 votes
    48

    A Slice of Life

    "A Slice of Life" is a short story by the British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. A part of the Mr. Mulliner series, the story was first published in 1926 in Strand Magazine, and appeared almost simultaneously in Liberty in the United States. It also appears in the collection Meet Mr. Mulliner. The main character in this story, Wilfred Mulliner, plays off-stage parts in Mulliner's Buck-U-Uppo. Wilfred Mulliner, the inventor of Mulliner's Magic Marvels, a set or creams and lotions that help 'alleviate the many ills to whtich the flesh is heir,' falls in love with Angela Purdue and recommends Mulliner's Raven Gypsy Face-Cream to help her keep her sunburn on. Angela fears that her guardian, Sir Jasper ffinch-ffarrowmere, will not approve of the marriage and her fears seem to be realized when the guardian arrives at Wilfred's home with a message from Angela calling the engagement off. Wilfred suspects the work of the dastardly baronet and being a man of action sets forth for Yorkshire where the baronet lives at ffinch Hall and, while wandering around the grounds at night, he hears a woman sobbing. Within a week, Wilfred enters the house as a valet (he bribes Sir Jasper's valet and
    6.00
    5 votes
    49

    A Few Quick Ones

    A Few Quick Ones is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United States on 13 April 1959 by Simon & Schuster, New York, and in the United Kingdom on 26 June 1959 by Herbert Jenkins, London. All the stories in the collection feature recurring Wodehouse characters and themes: four Drones Club members (two Freddie Widgeon and two Bingo Little), two golf stories (one with the Oldest Member and one without), two Mr Mulliner, one Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, and one Ukridge. The Ukridge story "A Tithe for Charity" did not appear in the original U.S. edition, which instead featured a 1958 "exclusive" pseudo-Drones story entitled "Unpleasantness at Kozy Kot" (actually a rewritten version of the 1928 Jeeves story "Fixing It for Freddie" collected in Carry On, Jeeves). "Jeeves Makes an Omelette" was a rewritten version of the 1913 Reggie Pepper story "Doing Clarence a Bit of Good", which appeared in the UK collection My Man Jeeves.
    8.00
    3 votes
    50

    Deep Waters

    "Deep Waters" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the March 25, 1910 issue of Collier's Weekly, and in the United Kingdom in the June 1910 issue of the Strand. It was included in the collection The Man Upstairs, (1914). George Barnert Callender, playwright and an excellent swimmer, is at Marvis Bay for the production of his play Fate's Footballs, shortly to be put on there. He is on the pier, dwelling on the play's troubles, particularly its star Arthur Mifflin, when he sees a very attractive girl in the water. Straining to follow her as she swims beneath him, he falls from the pier, and is just about to swim off when she grasps him and begins to drag him to shore. He lets her do this, hoping to form an acquaintanceship, and on the shore they meet and she offers to teach him to swim. They meet again later, and he learns her name is Mary Vaughan, staying at the same hotel as George with an aunt. Next day, the troupe arrive to perform George's play, and Mifflin, full of ideas to promote the piece, heads out on a boat trip with George. Explaining it is a stunt to attract attention to the play, Mifflin upsets the boat, expecting George to
    8.00
    3 votes
    51

    French Leave

    French Leave is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on January 20, 1956 by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States on September 28, 1959 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York. It does not feature any of Wodehouse's regular characters or settings, but tells a typically Wodehousean tale of troubled lovers, impoverished aristocrats, millionaires, servants and policemen, mostly set in the fictitious French resort of Roville. The titles of some of the French characters in the novel, the Marquis de Maufringneuse et Valerie-Moberanne, the Comte d'Escrignon and Prince Blamont-Chevry, are similar to those of some recurring characters in Honoré de Balzac's La Comédie humaine: the Duchesse de Maufrigneuse, the Marquis d'Esgrignon and the Princesse de Blamont-Chauvry. A Comtesse de Valérie-Moberanne made a fleeting appearance in The Triumphs of Eugène Valmont, by Robert Barr.
    8.00
    3 votes
    52

    Gussie Fink-Nottle

    Augustus "Gussie" Fink-Nottle ('Spink-Bottle' to Bertie's Aunt Dahlia) is a fictional character in the Jeeves novels of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a lifelong friend of Jeeves's master Bertie Wooster and a possible member of the Drones Club. Described as "a teetotal bachelor with a face like a fish", he wears horn-rimmed spectacles and is a noted newt fancier. Gussie Fink-Nottle met Bertie Wooster at Malvern House Preparatory School, where they were schoolmates; growing up, he took up residence in a remote part of Lincolnshire to pursue his beloved newt studies. When, in Right Ho, Jeeves, he first sees Madeline Bassett, he falls in love with her; too shy to tell her he convinces Bertie to break the news for him. Madeline misunderstands Bertie, thinking that he loves her and is trying to tell her indirectly and when later in the book, she becomes engaged to Gussie, she promises to marry Bertie if ever Gussie leaves her. Consequently, Bertie spends a great deal of time keeping Gussie engaged to Madeline. A threat to their engagement is the presence of Roderick Spode, a friend of Madeline's father Sir Watkyn Bassett. Having loved her in silence for years but convinced
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    8.00
    3 votes
    54

    Leave it to Psmith

    Leave it to Psmith is a comic novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on November 30, 1923 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on March 14, 1924 by George H. Doran, New York. It had previously been serialised, in the Saturday Evening Post in the U.S. between February 3 and March 24, 1923, and in the Grand Magazine in the UK between April and December that year; the ending of this magazine version was rewritten for the book form. It was the fourth and final novel featuring Psmith, the others being Mike (1909) (later republished as Mike and Psmith (1953)), Psmith in the City (1910), and Psmith, Journalist (1915) - in his introduction to the omnibus The World of Psmith, Wodehouse said that he had stopped writing about the character because he couldn't think of any more stories. It was also the second novel set at Blandings Castle, the first being Something Fresh (1915). The Blandings saga would be continued in many more novels and shorts. The story was adapted into a play by Wodehouse and Ian Hay, which first played at the Shaftesbury Theatre, London from September 27, 1930 and ran for 156 performances. An Indian television serial called Isi
    8.00
    3 votes
    55

    Performing Flea

    Performing Flea is a non-fiction book, consisting of a series of letters written by P. G. Wodehouse to William Townend, a friend of Wodehouse since their schooldays together at Dulwich College. It was originally published in the United Kingdom on 9 October 1953 by Herbert Jenkins, London. The title alludes to a disparaging comment by the playwright Seán O'Casey, who, in a letter to The Daily Telegraph in July 1941, referring to Wodehouse's radio broadcasts from Berlin, wrote that "If England has any dignity left in the way of literature, she will forget for ever the pitiful antics of English literature's performing flea". The letters are introduced and annotated by Townend, who had provided Wodehouse with the inspiration for his character Ukridge. The United States version of the book, entitled Author! Author!, was published on 20 June 1962 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York. It was substantially reworked, with commentary by Wodehouse replacing much of Townend's contribution.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56

    Pongo Twistleton

    Reginald "Pongo" Twistleton is a character in the Uncle Fred books by P. G. Wodehouse. A member of the Drones Club in London, he's a nervous young man described by Sally Painter, the woman who loves him, as a "baa-lamb". Due to his craven disposition, he's easily bullied (in a good-natured way) by his Uncle Fred, Earl of Ickenham, who gets him to go on mad adventures where they impersonate people. Their exploits together have instilled in him an irrational fear of his uncle, and he is exceedingly glad that Lady Ickenham strictly forbids her husband from setting foot in London, a prohibition which, of course, Uncle Fred flouts at the earliest opportunity. Pongo is the brother of Valerie Twistleton. He is known for having an open heart with a large welcome mat, which women frequently flit in and out of. However, in Uncle Dynamite, he finally got himself engaged to the truly ghastly Hermione Bostock, though exactly how he managed to do so is still a mystery. Fortunately, with the help of his Uncle Fred and the knowledge that she regularly wakes up at 6 in the morning, he realised that they were not meant to be and promptly got together with Sally Painter. He is a close friend of Barmy
    8.00
    3 votes
    57

    Something Fresh

    Something Fresh is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published as a book in the United States, by D. Appleton & Company on September 3, 1915, under the title Something New, having previously appeared under that title as a serial in the Saturday Evening Post between June 26 and August 14, 1915. It was published in the United Kingdom by Methuen & Co. on September 16, 1915. The novel introduces Lord Emsworth of Blandings Castle, whose home and family reappear in many of Wodehouse's later short stories and novels; in a new preface added to Something Fresh in 1969, Wodehouse dubbed this series of stories "the Blandings Castle Saga". Young neighbours and fellow-writers Ashe Marson and Joan Valentine, newly met and both in need of a change of direction, find themselves drawn down to Blandings, for various reasons attempting to retrieve a scarab belonging to an American millionaire, absent-mindedly purloined by Lord Emsworth. Once within the Castle's idyllic walls, despite impersonating servants, romance cannot help but blossom; meanwhile, Freddie Threepwood, engaged to the millionaire's daughter, is worried about some incriminating letters. The novel begins with Ashe Marson, a
    8.00
    3 votes
    58

    Tom Travers

    Tom Travers (Thomas Portarlington Travers) is a character in P.G. Wodehouse's Jeeves stories. Travers is the he husband of Aunt Dahlia and the uncle of Bertie Wooster. Travers, known to Bertie as Uncle Tom, reluctantly funded his wife's rarely-profitable magazine Milady's Boudoir, which he always called "Madame's Nightshirt". Milady's Boudoir was eventually sold onto a newspaper and magazine owner from Liverpool called Lemuel Trotter. In contrast to the inherited wealth of others in the stories, it is intimated that Uncle Tom made his fortune doing business in the Far East, and as a result is cranky and unlikely to part with his money, much to Aunt Dahlia's chagrin. She describes him howling over for weeks after paying his income taxes. He also has notoriously bad digestion problems which cause him much suffering, that only the cooking of his French chef Anatole can allay. Uncle Tom's worst enemy is Sir Watkyn Bassett, the prominent, foul, twisted toad of Totleigh Towers and ex-magistrate of Totleigh-in-the-Wold. Sir Watkyn, who fined Bertie Wooster five pounds for stealing a policeman's helmet on Oxford University boat race night, is also a rival collector of silver. This rivalry
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    9.00
    2 votes
    60

    First Aid for Dora

    "First Aid for Dora" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the July 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the August 1923 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. Our narrator Jimmy Corcoran spots Ukridge helping an attractive young girl onto a bus; intrigued, he finds the girl is one Dora Mason, secretary to Ukridge's Aunt Julia, a novelist. Later, having won some money on the Derby, Corcoran promises his friends a night out, but returning home to dress, he finds Bowles has let Ukridge borrow his evening suit. Dismayed, Corcoran must in turn borrow an ancient outfit from Bowles, which in addition to being rather snug, smells rather strongly of moth-balls, rendering his evening less than pleasant. Seeing Ukridge enjoying himself in his fine clothes, Corcoran upbraids him strongly, but hears that Ukridge is entertaining the pretty Dora. The next day, Ukridge arrives with the news that, attempting to smuggle the girl back into his aunt's house, they were caught by a police officer, who woke the aunt, who in turn sacked Dora.
    9.00
    2 votes
    61

    James Green

    James "Jim" Green (born 3 December 1944 in Kalabancoro, Mali, is a British writer and broadcaster who turned to writing as a full-time profession after a 25 year career in teaching. He has had over 40 titles published in various genres, from educational text books to travel guides to crime novels. His first foray into crime novels was called Bad Catholics (2010 Luath), the first part of a trilogy chronicling the exploits of reformed gangster Jimmy Costello. James has since moved to Accent Press to write a five book series on the development of the US intelligence service Green was raised and attended school in Coventry, Warwickshire. He was the second of three children, his brothers being Michael (b.1938) and Francis 'Frank', (1948–2001). All three brothers eventually became Catholic primary school headteachers. Jim Green was educated by the Vincentian Fathers at Bishop Ullathorne Gammar School , Coventry. He left school at sixteen and, after working as coal-miner, farm-worker, motor-cycle courier and building labourer, he went to St. Mary's College, Twickenham and qualified as a teacher. By the 1970s Green was a rising primary headteacher and began writing educational books as a
    9.00
    2 votes
    62

    Right Ho, Jeeves

    Right Ho, Jeeves is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, the second full-length novel featuring the popular characters Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, after Thank You, Jeeves. It also features a host of other recurring Wodehouse characters, and is mostly set at Brinkley Court, the home of Bertie's Aunt Dahlia. It was first published in the United Kingdom on October 5, 1934 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on October 15, 1934 by Little, Brown and Company, Boston, under the title Brinkley Manor. Before being published as a book, it had been sold to the Saturday Evening Post, in which it appeared in serial form from December 23, 1933 to January 27, 1934, and in England in the Grand Magazine from April to September 1934. Wodehouse had already started planning this sequel while working on Thank You, Jeeves. Bertie returns to London from several weeks in Cannes spent in the company of his Aunt Dahlia Travers and her daughter Angela. In Bertie's absence, Jeeves has been advising Bertie's old school friend, Gussie Fink-Nottle, who is in love with Madeline Bassett. Gussie is too timid to speak to her. Madeline, a friend of Bertie's cousin Angela, is staying at Brinkley Court (country
    9.00
    2 votes
    63

    Michael "Mike" Jackson

    Mike Jackson is a recurring fictional character in the early novels by British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a good friend of Psmith. He appears in all the Psmith books. Mike is a solid, reliable character with a strong sense of fair play, but an appetite for excitement and a stubbornness that often leads him into trouble. He is a keen and talented cricketer, and comes from a cricketing family (his elder brothers have all distinguished themselves), and as we follow Mike's life he himself achieves considerable cricketing success. However, as Wodehouse's writing developed away from the school stories of his early period, cricket becomes a less important aspect of the tales, as does Mike himself. Mike Jackson appears in five novel-length works, all of which appeared as magazine serials before being published in book form. In his first appearance ("Jackson Junior", later retitled Mike at Wrykyn) Mike is the sole focus of the story. Mike at Wrykyn starts with Mike heading off to prestigious Wrykyn school, where all his brothers had attended and one, Bob, is still an important figure, and a fixture in the school cricket team. Mike goes through many adventures, interspersed with
    5.80
    5 votes
    64

    Florence Craye

    Lady Florence Craye is a fictional character who appears in P. G. Wodehouse's Jeeves stories and novels. Lady Florence, the daughter of Percy Craye, Earl of Worplesdon and elder sister to Edwin, a nasty little runtish type of lad, is the sometime fiancee of Bertie Wooster. At the opening of the first-occurring story, "Jeeves Takes Charge", Bertie is (unusually for him, as later stories show) quite enthusiastic about this state of affairs, citing Florence's "wonderful profile," repeatedly, and even undertaking to read a book titled "Types of Ethical Theory," which she has foisted upon him. However, the friendly relations soon deteriorate, as Bertie discovers that she was a little too controlling for his liking, and had dark plans afoot to try to make him read Nietzsche. "The root of the trouble was that she was one of those intellectual girls, steeped to the gills in serious purpose, who are unable to see a male soul without wanting to get behind it and shove." - Joy in the Morning It is later revealed that her staff refer to Lady Florence as "Lady Caligula". In all subsequent stories, Florence is regarded by Bertie as a dangerous threat to his happy bachelor life, and on multiple
    7.67
    3 votes
    65

    The Girl in Blue

    The Girl in Blue is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United Kingdom on October 29, 1970 by Barrie & Jenkins, London, and in the United States on February 22, 1971 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York. More Wodehousian romance and intrigue are on the cards when the fate of the titular painting, a Gainsborough miniature, gets tangled up in the lives of some young lovers.
    7.67
    3 votes
    66

    The Long Arm of Looney Coote

    "The Long Arm of Looney Coote" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the November 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the December 1923 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. Corky runs into Looney Coote at Sandown Park Racecourse, where the latter has had some luck on the horses but lost his wallet; we hear of the impending dinner of Wrykyn Old Boys. There, after heavily plugging a bookmaking business he has become partner in, Ukridge hears that his old pal Boko Lawlor is standing for Parliament in the forthcoming by-election at Redbridge, and goes down to help. He sends Corky many telegrams detailing the successes of the campaign, and persuades him to pen a song to help the cause. Corky meets Coote again, and hears that his expensive new car has been stolen. Sending Coote on his way to Scotland Yard to report the theft, Corky heads down to Redbridge to see how his song is going down. Dragged out to canvas a poor neighbourhood, he finds that the situation is not as simple as Ukridge implied - the seat is very close and
    7.67
    3 votes
    67

    The Man Upstairs

    "The Man Upstairs" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the March 1910 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the same month's issue of Cosmopolitan, with the setting relocated to New York. It was included in the UK collection The Man Upstairs, (1914), and in the U.S. appeared in the later collection The Uncollected Wodehouse (1976). Annette Brougham, a quick-tempered female composer and music-teacher, is disturbed by a knocking on her ceiling. She visits the flat above to complain, but despite her initial feelings of anger towards him, she soon finds herself drawn to "Alan Beverley", the modest and charming struggling artist she finds there. Reginald Sellers, another resident of the building, a pompous and self-important painter, criticizes Alan's work harshly, and Annette defends him, but regrets her cruelty towards Reginald. The boorish Sellers finds some success with his art, selling several paintings to a Glasgow millionaire named Bates, and continues to lord it over his less high-achieving neighbour. Annette publishes a waltz she has written, and that too begins to sell surprisingly well. She is happy, but disappointed
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Uncle Dynamite

    Uncle Dynamite is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on October 22, 1948 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on December 3, 1948 by Didier & Co., New York. It features the mischievous Uncle Fred, who had previously appeared in Uncle Fred in the Springtime (1939). Frederick Altamont Cornwalis Twistleton, fifth Earl of Ickenham, known to all as Uncle Fred, is on the loose once again (Lady Ickenham having decamped for a wedding in Trinidad), and Reginald ("Pongo") Twistleton, his long-suffering nephew (and Drones Club member) has every right to be petrified. Uncle Fred has just arrived at Ashenden Manor, home of Sir Aylmer Bostock, Pongo's future father-in-law. Pongo is already in residence and has committed two rank floaters: accidentally smashing a whatnot from Sir Aylmer's collection of African curios, and (in the course of demonstrating how Brazilian natives kill birds with rude slings) smashing a coveted bust of his host. Pongo's solution is to replace the busted bust with another one, abstracted from Ickenham hall. But unknown to him, the replacement bust was fashioned by his former fiancée Sally Painter, and conceals valuable
    7.67
    3 votes
    69

    Buttercup Day

    "Buttercup Day" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the November 21, 1925 issue of The Saturday Evening Post, and in the United Kingdom in the December 1925 Strand. It was included in the collection Eggs, Beans and Crumpets, published in 1940. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge. Ukridge, impoverished as ever, complains to his friend Jimmy Corcoran of his lack of funds, and also of the way charity collectors take a heavy toll on what money he does get hold of. His Aunt Julia is holding a fete in the grounds of her house while she is away, and he asks Corky to help him guard the place from the revelers. Arriving at the Heath House, Corky is made to buy a paper flower from a pretty girl who informs him it is "Buttercup Day". Inside, Ukridge tells him it is all a plan of his - he has hired the girl, going in halves with her for the money she collects. Corky is shocked, but Ukridge explains that at no point is any real charity mentioned. With the money, suitably increased by some astute gambling, he plans to found a cat ranch in America. A stuttering curate enters, and complains about the Buttercup girl; Corky is
    10.00
    1 votes
    70

    Mrs. Scholfield

    Mrs. Scholfield is a character who never appears but is mentioned in the Jeeves stories of PG Wodehouse. She is sister to Bertie Wooster, and apparently lives or spends some considerable portion of her time in India. She is never given a first name, nor are we told whether she is older or younger than Bertie. They do, however, seem to be on good terms, as, when Bertie begins to brood over his own lack of children (in 'Bertie Changes His Mind'), he hits upon the idea of buying a large house and having his sister and her three young daughters live together so that he can 'be a proper uncle to them.' This would seem to suggest that, whoever Mr. Scholfield was, he is no longer in evidence; the point is however somewhat moot as Jeeves, realising that his influence would be considerably decreased were Mrs. Scholfield to run the household, successfully scuppers the plan. Interestingly, when asked by Chuffy Chuffnell in Thank You, Jeeves if he has any sisters, Bertie replies in the negative. Explanations for this inconsistency among Wodehouse scholars range from Mrs. Scholfield's untimely passing somewhere between the story and the novel, to the idea that Bertie simply preferred not to
    10.00
    1 votes
    71

    Not George Washington

    Not George Washington is a semi-autobiographical novel by P. G. Wodehouse, written in collaboration with Herbert Westbrook. It was first published in the U.K. on 18 October 1907 by Cassell and Co., London. Much of the book is a lightly fictionalised account of Wodehouse's early career as a writer and journalist in London. For example, from 1904 to 1909 Wodehouse edited the "By the Way" column for the now-defunct Globe newspaper, while the book's main character, James Orlebar Cloyster, writes the "On Your Way" column for the Orb newspaper. The tale is told from several viewpoints.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Summer Moonshine

    Summer Moonshine is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on October 8, 1937 by Doubleday, Doran, New York, and in the United Kingdom on February 11, 1938 by Herbert Jenkins, London. It had previously been serialised in The Saturday Evening Post (US) from 24 July to 11 September 1937 and in Pearson's Magazine (UK) between September 1937 and April 1938. Former big-game hunter Sir Buckstone Abbott, finding himself hard up, takes in paying guests at his pile, Walsingford Hall, while hoping to sell the place to a wealthy Princess. Pretty soon, all kinds of schemes, plots and romantic entanglements are going on.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    The Castaways

    "The Castaways" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the Strand Magazine in June 1933, and was included in the collection Blandings Castle and Elsewhere, published in 1935. The story is one of many narrated by pub raconteur Mr Mulliner, and concerns his nephew Bulstrode Mulliner, a writer in Hollywood. Wodehouse here compares the labor of writing of dialogue for talking movies to being stranded on a desert island.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    The Letter of the Law

    "The Letter of the Law" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the February 1936 edition of Redbook, and in the United Kingdom in the April 1936 issue of the Strand. It was included in the UK collection Lord Emsworth and Others (1937), and in the U.S. edition of Young Men in Spats (1936). It is a golf story, narrated by the Oldest Member. The President's Cup and the love of Gwendolyne Poskitt occasion the only time the Oldest Member ever saw profit from driving into anyone. Young Wilmot Bing loves Gwendolyne, but has recently smitten her father (a member of the Wrecking Crew) a juicy one on the leg for holding up play. To win her hand, the Oldest Member recommends that Wilmot appease Poskitt, and he does so—up to the day of the President's Cup match. In that match, Poskitt plays well above form, but ends up in match play against Wadswordth Hemmingway, an ex-lawyer-turned-golfer who carries the Book of Rules in his bag and makes it his best club. With one swing, Wilmot ensures that Poskitt gets the Cup and Wilmot gets his bride.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    The Masked Troubadour

    "The Masked Troubadour" is a short story by English comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the U.K. in the December 1936 issue of the Strand. It was included in the UK collection Lord Emsworth and Others (1937), and in the U.S. equivalent Crime Wave at Blandings. It stars young Drones Club member Freddie Widgeon. "Reggie and the Greasy Bird" is a rewritten version of the story with different settings and main characters, created because Wodehouse needed the money for his taxes. It appeared in the U.S. in the November 28, 1936 issue of The Saturday Evening Post, and was later included in booklet 9 of Plum Stones, a collection of Wodehouse oddities and rarities. Freddie Widgeon is heartbroken and penniless, again, to no surprise of his Drones Club fellows such as Catsmeat Potter-Pirbright. And his uncle Lord Blicester will only provide should Freddie seduce and marry Dora Pinfold, who does Good Works in a sort of a mission over on Notting Hill. However Dora Pinfold is already entwined in a relationship with Arthur Gooding. Falling in love with the girl as is his habit, Freddie borrows a few bob to shower the Notting Hill mothers with cocoa and buns, but loses it on a
    10.00
    1 votes
    77

    Aunt Agatha

    Agatha Gregson, née Wooster, later Lady Worplesdon, is a recurring fictional character in the Jeeves stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being best known as Aunt Agatha, Bertie Wooster's least favourite aunt, and a counterpoint to her sister, Bertie's Aunt Dahlia. Fearsome and strong-willed, she is always trying to get Bertie married, though without success, thanks to Jeeves's interference. She is known as "the nephew-crusher". Bertie would avoid her if he could, but far too often finds himself bent to her indomitable will. Agatha had at first been affianced to Percy Craye, though upon reading in the papers of his behavior at a Covent Garden ball, she had ended the engagement. She then married Spenser Gregson, who is her husband for most of the Wodehouse canon, though he dies in time for her to marry Craye, who had by then become Lord Worplesdon, Earl of Worplesdon, whereupon she becomes Lady Worplesdon. She has one son, Thomas Gregson, (Thos.). She is also the stepmother of Lord Worplesdon's daughter, Florence Craye. She has a pet dog companion named McIntosh. It is a West Highland white terrier and was the center of the plot of Episode of the Dog McIntosh and its TV
    6.50
    4 votes
    78

    Meet Mr Mulliner

    Meet Mr Mulliner is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. First published in the United Kingdom on September 27, 1927 by Herbert Jenkins, and in the United States on March 2, 1928 by Doubleday, Doran, it introduces the irrepressible pub raconteur Mr Mulliner, who narrates all nine of the book's stories. The last story, "Honeysuckle Cottage", was not originally a Mr Mulliner story; it was given a Mulliner frame for the book, and is the only one of the stories which is not explicitly narrated from the bar-parlour of the Anglers' Rest public house. The original story titles and publication dates were as follows:
    6.50
    4 votes
    79

    Spring Fever

    Spring Fever is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published on May 20, 1948, in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States by Doubleday and Co, New York. Although not featuring any of Wodehouse's regular characters, the cast contains a typical Wodehousean selection of English aristocrats, wealthy Americans, household staff and imposters. Wealthy New York businessman G. Ellery Cobbold has sent his son Stanwood, a blundering ex-American football player, to London, to separate him from Hollywood starlet Eileen Stoker with whom he is in love. When Cobbold discovers that Stoker is also in London, making pictures, he insists that Stanwood goes to stay with a distant relation, curmudgeonly widower Lord Shortlands. But Stanwood stays put. Instead, good-looking movie agent Mike Cardinal goes to Shortlands' castle (Beevor, in Kent), posing as Stanwood. He is pursuing Shortland's beautiful daughter Terry. But Terry is wary of him because he is too handsome. Lord Shortlands himself is in love with his cook, Mrs Punter, and would like to marry her. Unfortunately she insists on £200 to buy a pub, which Shortlands doesn't have, the purse-strings at Beevor Castle being
    6.50
    4 votes
    80

    The Crime Wave at Blandings

    "The Crime Wave at Blandings" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in two parts, in the October 10 and October 17, 1936 editions of the Saturday Evening Post, and in the United Kingdom in the January 1937 issue of the Strand. It was included in the collection Lord Emsworth and Others, (1937), and provided the title to the U.S. equivalent of that collection. The story was a rewritten version of an older piece, entitled "Creatures of Instinct", which had appeared in the Strand in October 1914, and in the U.S. in McClure's that same month. It is set at Blandings Castle, home of Lord Emsworth, and features several other well-known characters; the story is considered something of a classic, and is included in many "Best of Wodehouse" collections. Lady Constance has decided that Lord Emsworth's grandson George needs a tutor to keep him in line over the summer holidays—and chooses the efficient Rupert Baxter. Meanwhile, his niece Jane wants him to employ her fiancé, George Abercrombie, the position of Estate Manager at Blandings, much to the dismay of Connie. Emsworth, who would rather be reading Whiffle's 'On the Care of the Pig', cannot imagine
    6.50
    4 votes
    81

    The White Feather

    The White Feather is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published on 9 October 1907 by Adam & Charles Black, London. It is set at Wrykyn school, scene of Wodehouse's earlier book The Gold Bat (1904), and the later Mike (1909). Like many early Wodehouse novels, the story first appeared as a serial in the boys' magazine The Captain, between October 1905 and March 1906. The phrase "white feather" is a reference to cowardice. When Sheen, a quiet and studious boy, finds himself facing a street brawl between boys of Wrykyn and those of St. Jude's, their sworn enemies, he slips away to safety to avoid the wrath of his masters. However, his cowardliness is noticed by his fellows, who send him to Coventry. In order to save his reputation, he must train secretly under boxing legend Joe Bevan. Can he overcome the many obstacles in his path, and restore the school's honour in the ring?
    6.50
    4 votes
    82

    His was a life which lacked, perhaps, the sublimer emotions which raised Man to the level of the gods, but it was undeniably an extremely happy one. He never experienced the thrill of ambition fulfilled, but, on the other hand, he never knew the agony of

    Full quotation text: His was a life which lacked, perhaps, the sublimer emotions which raised Man to the level of the gods, but it was undeniably an extremely happy one. He never experienced the thrill of ambition fulfilled, but, on the other hand, he never knew the agony of ambition frustrated. His name, when he died, would not live for ever in England's annals; he was spared the pain of worrying about this by the fact that he had no desire to live for ever in England's annals. He was possibly as nearly contented a human being can be in this century of alarms and excursions.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83

    The Great Sermon Handicap

    "The Great Sermon Handicap" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the June 1922 edition of Strand Magazine, and saw its first book publication in The Inimitable Jeeves in 1923. Its plot continues into "The Purity of the Turf" but the two may be read as independent stories. Bertie Wooster complains to his valet Jeeves of the oppressive weather and inactivity in London in the summer. Jeeves replies with typical unflappability: Bertie opens the letter and reads it with confusion. It comes from his cousin Eustace, who offers to let Bertie in on an opportunity to make some money. Eustace and his twin brother Claude, Bertie's cousins, are part of a reading party studying the classics with Rev. Francis Heppenstall and staying at Twing Hall, the seat of Lord Wickhammersley, a good friend of Bertie's late father. Bingo Little is also present at Twing, though Eustace's letter does not reveal why, nor does it reveal how the twins propose to make the money. Jeeves observes that the letter continues on the back, and Bertie reverses it to discover the header: followed by a list of vicars, along with the towns to which they belong, as well as a series of handicaps in
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    The Heart of a Goof

    The Heart of a Goof is a collection of nine short stories by English comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United Kingdom on April 15, 1926 by Herbert Jenkins, and in the United States on March 4, 1927 by George H. Doran, New York, under the title Divots. The stories all concern golf, and are told by the Oldest Member; the book can be considered a sequel to The Clicking of Cuthbert (1922). The dedication, "To my daughter Leonora without whose never-failing sympathy and encouragement this book would have been finished in half the time", is a recycling of the dedication to A Gentleman of Leisure (1910), which read "To Herbert Westbrook, without whose never-failing advice, help, and encouragement this book would have been finished in half the time". The original story titles and publication dates were as follows:
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    Aubrey Upjohn

    The Reverend Aubrey Upjohn is a recurring fictional character from the Jeeves and Drones Club stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being the Headmaster at Malvern House Preparatory School during Bertie Wooster's tenure there. Aubrey Upjohn was the headmaster of St. Asaph's preparatory school in Bramley-on-Sea, attended by Freddie Widgeon. (in "Bramley Is So Bracing") Aubrey Upjohn appears the most in one book, Jeeves in the Offing. At the time of this story, he has left his post at the school. He becomes the target of a slanderous article by Kipper Herring. He threatens to initiate a litigation, but Jeeves, as usual, smooths things out. At one time, he marries Jane Mills, a friend of Aunt Dahlia who later dies. He is the guardian of her daughter, Phyllis Mills. Aubrey Upjohn is featured in: Aubrey Upjohn is mentioned in:
    7.33
    3 votes
    86

    Blandings Castle and Elsewhere

    Blandings Castle and Elsewhere is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United Kingdom on 12 April 1935 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and, as Blandings Castle, in the United States on 20 September 1935 by Doubleday Doran, New York. All the stories had previously appeared in Strand Magazine (UK) and all except the last in various US magazines. The first six stories all take place at the book's namesake Blandings Castle; they are set some time between the events of Leave it to Psmith (1923) and those of Summer Lightning (1929). The seventh concerns Bobbie Wickham, an acquaintance and sometime fiancée of Bertie Wooster, and the last five are narrated by Mr Mulliner. Several of the Blandings shorts from this collection were adapted for television by the BBC, broadcast in February and March 1967 in six half-hour episodes. They starred Ralph Richardson as Lord Emsworth, Derek Nimmo as Freddie Threepwood, Meriel Forbes as Lady Constance, and Stanley Holloway as Beach. Unfortunately the master tapes of all but the first part ("Lord Emsworth and the Girl Friend"), were wiped, and no known copies exist. Three of the stories featured in the collection,
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Psmith

    Psmith

    Rupert Psmith (or Ronald Eustace Psmith, as he is called in the last of the four books in which he appears) is a recurring fictional character in several novels by British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being one of Wodehouse's best-loved characters. The P in his surname is silent ("as in pshrimp" in his own words) and was added by himself, in order to distinguish him from other Smiths. A member of the Drones Club, this monocle-sporting Old Etonian is something of a dandy, a fluent and witty speaker, and has a remarkable ability to pass through the most amazing adventures unruffled. Wodehouse said that he based Psmith on Rupert D'Oyly Carte (1876–1948), the son of the Gilbert and Sullivan impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte, as he put it "the only thing in my literary career which was handed to me on a silver plate with watercress around it". Carte was a school acquaintance of a cousin of Wodehouse at Winchester College, according to an introduction to Leave it to Psmith. Rupert's daughter, Bridget D'Oyly Carte, however, believed that the Wykehamist schoolboy described to Wodehouse was not her father but his elder brother Lucas. Lucas was also at Winchester. Psmith appears in four
    7.33
    3 votes
    88

    Ring for Jeeves

    Ring for Jeeves is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 22 April 1953 by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States on 15 April 1954 by Simon & Schuster, New York, under the title The Return of Jeeves. The novel features one of Wodehouse's best-known characters, Jeeves. It is the only Jeeves novel in which his employer, Bertie Wooster, does not appear (though he is mentioned). Wodehouse adapted the story from a play, Come On, Jeeves, that he had written with his lifelong friend and collaborator Guy Bolton. Although the story remains the same, there are some differences between the UK and US editions. Structurally, the sequence of early chapters is different: what is the opening chapter of the UK edition becomes chapter 5 in the US edition, with other chapters being re-arranged accordingly. And while the US edition retains the name Towcester from the play which preceded the novel, this becomes Rowcester in the UK edition. Additionally, Sir Roderick Carmoyle's employer, Harrods, is replaced with the fictional department store Harrige's in the UK edition. The story opens with Jeeves's employer, Bertie Wooster, having enrolled in a school that
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    The Come-back of Battling Billson

    "The Come-back of Battling Bilson" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the June 1935 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the July 1935 Strand. It was included in the collection Lord Emsworth and Others, published in the U.K in 1937, and in the U.S. version of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets, published in 1940. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge. Jimmy Corcoran, having had a story idea turned down by Hollywood, attacks the talking picture, but his friend Ukridge comes to its defence. He has, he says, always had a special affection for the talkies. He tells his friend why... About to be left alone once more at his Aunt Julia's house, Ukridge realises he can make some quick cash by renting out the lawns to a party of folk dancers. Of course, Aunt Julia's trip is unexpectedly cancelled, and Ukridge needs some cash to pay back the dancers, who are upset at having their party cancelled at the last minute. Ukridge sets up a bout for "Battling" Billson, using the man's desire to wed his girl Flossie to persuade him to take part. Finding Billson's training methods (mostly involving ale and cigars) somewhat
    7.33
    3 votes
    90

    Uncle George

    George Wooster, the Rt. Hon. Lord Yaxley, is a fictional character who appears in P. G. Wodehouse's Jeeves novels and short stories. He is the brother of Bertie Wooster's father, and is hence most often addressed as Uncle George. He is an eccentric, enormously fat old fellow who likes ties and is keen to maintain good bowel condition (he has a man in Harley Street for that very predicament). However, his is a lonely life, and he is forever making engagements with unsuitable females, all of whom are far too young for him; there was the barmaid at the Criterion Theatre, then Miss Rhoda Platt, another barmaid. This is a matter of severe irritation and embarrassment to his sister, Agatha Gregson, who believes very strongly in keeping up appearances and the intermarriage of the nobility. "I am sorry to tell you my brother has gone mad," she says to Bertie when she informs him of Uncle George's proposed matrimonial alliance to Miss Platt. He finally settles down with Maude Wilberforce, a woman, according to Jeeves, of "sturdy, middle-class stock, definitely of the people." This peeves Aunt Agatha quite considerably. P.G. Wodehouse named Lord Yaxley after Yaxley Hall in Suffolk where
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    6.25
    4 votes
    92

    Doctor Sally

    Doctor Sally is a short novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on April 7, 1932 by Methuen & Co., London. In the United States, it was serialised in Collier's Weekly from July 4 to August 1, 1931 under the title The Medicine Girl, and was included under that name in the US collection The Crime Wave at Blandings (1937). The story was adapted from Wodehouse's play, Good Morning, Bill (1927), which was itself based on a work by the Hungarian playwright Ladislaus Fodor, and tells of golf expert Dr. Sally Smith, and of Bill Bannister, who loves her.
    7.00
    3 votes
    93

    Joy in the Morning

    Joy in the Morning is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on August 22, 1946 by Doubleday & Co., New York, and in the United Kingdom on June 2, 1947 by Herbert Jenkins, London. Some later American paperback editions bore the title Jeeves in the Morning. The story is another adventure of Bertie Wooster and his resourceful valet Jeeves. The title derives from an English translation of Psalms 30:5: Bertie is persuaded to brave the home of his fearsome Aunt Agatha and her husband Lord Worplesdon, knowing that his former fiancee, the beautiful and formidably intellectual Lady Florence Craye will also be in attendance. What ensues will come to be remembered as The Steeple Bumpleigh Horror, with Bertie under constant threat of engagement to Craye, violence from her oafish suitor Stilton Cheesewright, the unfortunate interventions of her young brother Edwin and unnamed peril from the acid tongue of Aunt Agatha. Only the masterful Jeeves can save the day.
    7.00
    3 votes
    94

    Much Obliged, Jeeves

    Much Obliged, Jeeves is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on October 15, 1971 by Barrie & Jenkins, London and in the United States on October 15, 1971 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York under the name Jeeves and the Tie that Binds. The two editions have slightly different endings. Wodehouse's American editor gave the US edition its title and rewrote the last page, adding Jeeves's disclosure about the eighteen pages from the Junior Ganymede club book and his expressed desire to remain permanently in Wooster's employment. Written only a few years before his death, Much Obliged, Jeeves is the second-to-last appearance of Wodehouse's characters, Jeeves and Bertie Wooster (the last being Aunts Aren't Gentlemen (1974)). It forms the fourth and final installment of the Totleigh Towers saga, though it actually takes place at Brinkley Court, the home of Bertie's Aunt Dahlia, near the town of Market Snodsbury. A heretofore unknown old school chum of Bertie's, Ginger Winship, is standing for the House of Commons in a by-election, and Aunt Dahlia has offered the use of Brinkley as a general H. Q. for the campaign. Dahlia persuades Bertie to come down to
    7.00
    3 votes
    95

    No Wedding Bells for Him

    "No Wedding Bells for Him" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the October 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the November 1923 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. Ukridge and Corky run into a friend of Ukridge's, a chauffeur driving a shiny new Daimler, and he offers to take them for a ride. Along the way they are seen by a creditor of Ukridge's, who they shake off, and almost hit a young girl, who Ukridge insists they drive to her home near Clapham Common. He befriends her family, who are impressed by the car and Ukridge's famous Aunt Julia. When Corky meets Ukridge a week later in the British Museum, he is accompanied by two children. He reveals he has been visiting the house, mainly for the free food, and promising to take the family out on trips in his friend's car, which they believe to be his, and to introduce them to his aunt, who, he reveals, has disowned him, in a letter which states "from now on, I have no nephew". Returning from short holiday, Corky hears from George Tupper that Ukridge is engaged.
    7.00
    3 votes
    96

    The Exit of Battling Billson

    "The Exit of Battling Billson" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the December 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the January 1924 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. Corky is in the Welsh town of "Llunindnno" to report on the emergence of a popular revivalist speaker, and is amazed to run into Ukridge outside a theatre - he has been ejected for attacking a man who had stolen his seat, attempting to lift him out by the ears. Ukridge is in town to promote a boxing match between a local man and "Battling" Billson, this time as manager of the affair, sharing the ticket sales with his partner from his failed bookmaking enterprise. Corky attends the stirring revivalist meeting, and later meets Billson, who was also at the meeting. Billson, swayed by the speaker, has become an advocate of teetotalism and non-violence, and has been dispruting drinkers in local pubs. Ukridge, dismayed that Billson refuses to fight, intends to take his place, having made an agreement with the other boxer that he will treat Ukridge gently.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97

    There's Always Golf

    "There's Always Golf" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the March 1936 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the April 1936 edition of Redbook, under the title "Not Out of Distance". It was included in the UK collection Lord Emsworth and Others, (1937), and in the U.S. edition of Young Men in Spats (1936). It is a golf story, narrated by the Oldest Member. Clarice Fitch was a force to be reckoned with, recalls the Oldest Member, and weedy, bespectacled accountant Ernest Plinlimmon is powerfully affected by the impact of her personality. But like hundreds of others, he escapes her notice, until he encounters her on the eighteenth fairway, needing a four to win the Medals Competition. But she is not playing—she is tying her shoelace. When a forceful woman comes between a man and a coveted tournament medal, she sees the true depths of his soul.
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    7.00
    3 votes
    99

    Catsmeat Potter-Pirbright

    Claude Cattermole "Catsmeat" Potter-Pirbright is a recurring fictional character from the Jeeves stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a member of the Drones Club and a longtime school friend of Jeeves's master Bertie Wooster. An actor also known as Claude Cattermole on stage or Claude Pirbright from his birth name Claude Cattermole Pirbright, he has the nickname Catsmeat (i.e. lights - lung-based cat food). Catsmeat Potter-Pirbright and Bertie Wooster went together to preparatory school, secondary school at Eton, then to the University of Oxford. He is the brother of Cora Pirbright, and engaged to Gertrude Winkworth, the daughter of Dame Daphne Winkworth. His main role is in the 1949 Jeeves novel The Mating Season, during which Bertie Wooster and Gussie Fink-Nottle swap their identities, while Catsmeat pretends to be the faux-Gussie's valet Meadowes and Jeeves pretends to be the faux-Bertie's valet, before complications ensue. Otherwise, he is usually the bit player who moves the action forward or tilts the story at the right moment. Catsmeat is described as being "Brilliant, but unsound" by the Rev. Aubrey Upjohn, whose review of Catsmeat Bertie happens to see
    8.00
    2 votes
    100

    Extricating Young Gussie

    "Extricating Young Gussie" is a short story by British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse (1881–1975), being the first appearance of two of his most popular characters, the ingenious valet Jeeves and his master Bertie Wooster. It was first published in the U.S. in the 15 September 1915 issue of The Saturday Evening Post, and in the UK in the January 1916 edition of the Strand Magazine. It was included in the collection The Man with Two Left Feet (1917). "Extricating Young Gussie" features the first appearance of some of Wodehouse's most popular and enduring characters - valet extraordinaire Jeeves (whose role in this debut story is very small) and his master Bertie Wooster (whose surname is not actually mentioned). Bertie's imperious Aunt Agatha also appears. The first meeting of Jeeves and Bertie would be chronicled one year later, in the November 1916 short story "Jeeves Takes Charge". Aunt Agatha drags Bertie out of bed "in the small hours [around] half past eleven". She is most distressed that her nephew, and Bertie's cousin Gussie Mannering-Phipps "has lost his head over a creature", a chorus-girl in New York that he may marry, so she demands that Bertie head over there and stop
    8.00
    2 votes
    101

    Louder and Funnier

    Louder and Funnier is a collection of essays by P.G. Wodehouse, first published as a book in the United Kingdom on 10 March 1932 by Faber and Faber, London. Most of the essays, which cover a broad range of topics, derive from articles written for the American Vanity Fair magazine between 1914 and 1923. During much of this period, Wodehouse was the magazine's drama critic, but he also wrote many other articles, often as many as four in a single month, some under pseudonyms such as "P Brooke-Haven" and "Pelham Grenville"; many of the articles which provided material for the book were published originally under these pseudonyms. For the purposes of the book, Wodehouse substantially rewrote the articles, excising some material and adding new material; several chapters in the book derive from material in two different articles written years apart. In his introduction to the book, Wodehouse explained that he had borrowed the title from "the old story ... of the nervous after-dinner speaker" who is speaking in a faltering undertone when a voice demands "Louder, please", to be followed soon after by another voice requesting, "Louder, please, and funnier".
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Love Among the Chickens

    Love Among the Chickens

    Love Among the Chickens is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published as a book in the United Kingdom in June 1906 by George Newnes, London, and in the United States by Circle Publishing, New York, on 11 May 1909, having already appeared there as a serial in Circle magazine between September 1908 and March 1909. The English edition was dedicated "to Sir Bargrave and Lady Deane"; the Rt Hon Sir Henry Bargrave Deane QC was a High Court judge and a cousin of Wodehouse's mother. In 1921, Wodehouse revised the book. In the 1906 version, the first five chapters were narrated in the third person, before shifting to the first person. The new version was narrated entirely in the first person and had a slightly different ending. The new edition was published in May 1921 by Herbert Jenkins and carried an extended dedication to Wodehouse's old school friend, Bill Townend, in which Wodehouse thanked his friend for the original idea for the story and commented that "... I have practically re-written the book. There was some pretty bad work in it, ..." This is the only novel to feature the recurring character Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, whose appearances are otherwise confined to short
    8.00
    2 votes
    103

    Miss Mapleton

    Miss Mapleton is a fictional female character from the stories of Bertie Wooster and his indefatigable valet Jeeves, written by PG Wodehouse. She is headmistress of St Monica's School for Girls in Hertfordshire and a close friend of Bertie Wooster's Aunt Agatha. When Bertie is arrested for trespassing on school grounds whilst returning Bobbie Wickham's cousin Clementina to her room after she sneaked out to see her elder cousin play in the South Hertfordshire Women's Tennis Championship, she, having been told by Jeeves that Bertie was not trespassing or attempting to make a burglarious entry, but chasing a robber, managed to have him removed from jail. However, this was to be done only on the condition that Bertie give a lecture to the school on the values of healthy living the following morning, for, in order to add verisimilitude to his tale, Jeeves had informed her that he was a well-known orator on a tour of the Home Counties. Bertie, being rather woolly-headed, angered Miss Mapleton by firstly telling the girls how to gamble, then a joke about a scantily-clad chorus girl, and he left the school in a hurry before she had a chance to recover and have him arrested for breaching
    8.00
    2 votes
    104

    Money For Nothing

    Money for Nothing is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 27 July 1928 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on 28 September 1928 by Doubleday, Doran, New York. Immediately prior to publication it appeared as a serial, in London Calling magazine (UK) from 3 March to 28 July 1928 and in Liberty magazine (US) between 16 June and 22 September 1928. The action is mostly set at Rudge Hall, home to miser Lester Carmody, and at Healthward Ho, a health farm run by "Chimp" Twist, along with his cohorts "Soapy" and "Dolly" Molloy, who all previously appeared in Sam the Sudden (1925), and returned in Money in the Bank (1946). Hugo Carmody, Lester's nephew, and his friend Ronnie Fish also appear at Blandings Castle, home of Ronnie's uncle Lord Emsworth, in Summer Lightning (1929) and Heavy Weather (1933).
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Oh, Boy!

    Oh, Boy!

    Oh, Boy! is a musical in two acts, with music by Jerome Kern and book and lyrics by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse. The story concerns befuddled George, who elopes with Lou Ellen, the daughter of Judge Carter. He must win over her parents and his Quaker aunt. His dapper polo champion friend Jim is in love with madcap actress Jackie, but George must hide her while she extricates herself from a scrape with a bumbling constable whom she punched at a party raid. The piece was the most successful of the "Princess Theatre Musicals", opening in February 1917 and transferring to the Casino Theatre in November 1917 to finish its Broadway run of 463 performances. A London production, under the title Oh, Joy! opened in January 1919 at the Kingsway Theatre, where it ran for 167 performances. A silent film version was also produced in 1919. Early in the 20th century, American musical theatre consisted of a mix of elaborate European operettas, like The Merry Widow (1907), British musical comedy imports, likeThe Arcadians (1910), George M. Cohan's shows, American operettas, like those of Victor Herbert, ragtime-infused American musicals, and the spectacular revues of Florenz Ziegfeld and others.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106

    The Adventures of Sally

    The Adventures of Sally is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse. It appeared as a serial in Collier's Weekly magazine in the United States from 8 October to 31 December 1921, and in the Grand Magazine in the United Kingdom from April to July 1922. It was first published as a book in the UK by Herbert Jenkins, London, on October 17, 1922, and in the US by George H. Doran, New York, on March 23, 1923, under the title Mostly Sally. It was serialised again, under this second title, in The Household Magazine from November 1925 to April 1926. The story concerns a young American girl named Sally, who inherits a considerable fortune and finds her life turned upside down.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107

    The Level Business Head

    "The Level Business Head" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the May 1926 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the February 1926 Liberty. It was included in the collection Lord Emsworth and Others, published in the U.K in 1937, and in the U.S. version of Eggs, Beans and Crumpets, published in 1940. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge. Jimmy Corcoran is surprised to find himself dining at Ukridge's Aunt Julia's house, where he is not usually welcome; Ukridge explains that he has recently acquired a certain degree of power over his aunt, thanks to his having pawned her brooch. He explains... Ukridge runs into Joe the Lawyer, a notorious bookmaker, and is offered the chance to buy a half-share in a dog with excellent prospects. Ukridge can't afford the stake £50, of course, so at first refuses, but later that day Aunt Julia, about to depart on yet another tour, tasks him with collecting her brooch from a jeweller's and locking it safely in her desk. He pawns the brooch, and hands the cash over to Joe the Lawyer. The next day, Joe informs him that the dog has died and offers to reimburse him £5,
    8.00
    2 votes
    108

    Ukridge's Accident Syndicate

    "Ukridge's Accident Syndicate" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the May 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the June 1923 Strand, under the title "Ukridge, Teddy Weeks and the Tomato". It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. The story is told in flashback as Ukridge and his friend James Corcoran stand outside the wedding of one Teddy Weeks, a successful movie star. The tale begins some years earlier, when Weeks was a struggling actor who believed all he needed to get his breakthrough role was a decent wardrobe. Ukridge, Corocoran, Weeks and others are dining at their regular haunt when one of their number reveals he has acquired accident insurance as a bonus for subscribing to a magazine, and has subsequently received five pounds after a minor cycling accident. Ukridge is inspired by this, and persuades his comrades to form a syndicate, subscribing to all magazines offering this free insurance, arranging an "accident" and splitting the insurance monies. Lots are drawn, and Weeks is selected as the one to be insured and to
    8.00
    2 votes
    109

    My Man Jeeves

    My Man Jeeves is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom in May 1919 by George Newnes. Of the eight stories in the collection, half feature the popular characters Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, while the others concern Reggie Pepper, an early prototype for Wooster. Although the book was not published in the United States, all the stories had appeared there, mostly in The Saturday Evening Post or Collier's Weekly, and in the Strand in the UK, prior to the publication of the UK book. Several appeared later in rewritten form in Carry on, Jeeves (1925), such as "Helping Freddie", which in its later incarnation was called "Fixing It for Freddie" and featured Jeeves and Wooster. The other Reggie Pepper stories were included in the U.S. version of The Man with Two Left Feet (1917). Jeeves and Wooster had first appeared in the short story "Extricating Young Gussie", which appeared in the Saturday Evening Post in 1915, and was included in The Man with Two Left Feet.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110

    Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin

    Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on October 12, 1972 by Barrie & Jenkins, London and in the United States on August 6, 1973 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York under the title The Plot That Thickened. Monty Bodkin, nephew of Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe, is back from his adventures in Hollywood, with his situation (as introduced in Heavy Weather (1933) andThe Luck of the Bodkins (1935)) still as complicated as ever. Getting involved with sneaky crook Alexander "Chimp" Twist and his associates Soapy and Dolly Molloy was never going to help any...
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Terry Pratchett

    Terry Pratchett

    Sir Terence David John "Terry" Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is an English novelist, known for his frequently comical work in the fantasy genre. He is best known for his popular and long-running Discworld series of comic fantasy novels. Pratchett's first novel, The Carpet People, was published in 1971, and since his first Discworld novel (The Colour of Magic) was published in 1983, he has written two books a year on average. His latest Discworld book, Snuff is the third fastest selling novel since records began in the United Kingdom selling 55,000 copies in the first three days. Pratchett was the UK's best-selling author of the 1990s, and as of August 2010 had sold over 65 million books worldwide in thirty-seven languages. He is currently the second most-read writer in the UK, and seventh most-read non-US author in the US. Pratchett was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) "for services to literature" in 1998. In addition, he was knighted in the 2009 New Year Honours. In 2001 he won the Carnegie Medal for his young adult novel The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents. In December 2007, Pratchett publicly announced that he was suffering from
    9.00
    1 votes
    112

    Young Men in Spats

    Young Men in Spats is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 3 April 1936 by Herbert Jenkins, London, then in the United States with a slightly different selection of stories on 23 July 1936 by Doubleday, Doran, New York. The collection, recounting the adventures of various members of the Drones Club (except for the last one), features many familiar characters from Wodehouse's other writings, including Freddie Widgeon and the irrepressible Mr Mulliner. One story, "Uncle Fred Flits By", features the first appearance of Pongo Twistleton and his Uncle Fred, who would go on to feature in four novels, including two appearances at Blandings Castle. The US edition contains a slightly different selection of stories from the UK version. "Tried in the Furnace" and "Trouble Down At Tudsleigh" had not previously appeared in the US, and were held back so they could garner greater income from magazine sales. (Both stories eventually appeared in Cosmopolitan.) These two stories were accordingly replaced by three Oldest Member golf stories, "There's Always Golf", "The Letter of the Law", and "Farewell to Legs". These three Oldest Member stories
    9.00
    1 votes
    113

    Bertie Wooster

    Bertram Wilberforce "Bertie" Wooster is a recurring fictional character in the Jeeves novels of British author P. G. Wodehouse. An English gentleman, one of the "idle rich" and a member of the Drones Club, he appears alongside his valet, Jeeves, whose genius manages to extricate Bertie or one of his friends from numerous awkward situations. As the first-person narrator of ten novels and over 30 short stories, Bertie ranks as one of the most vivid comic creations in popular literature. Bertie’s middle name, “Wilberforce”, is the doing of his father, who won money on a horse named Wilberforce in the Grand National the day before Bertie was born and insisted on Bertie carrying that name (mentioned in Much Obliged, Jeeves). Due to the volume of stories and time span over which Wodehouse wrote them, there are a number of inconsistencies and contradictions in the information given about his relatives. "Bertie" and several of his relations appear in the early Wodehouse story "Extricating Young Gussie". In that story the family name is Mannering-Phipps, not Wooster, and the story has never been included in collections of Jeeves and Wooster materials, however the incidents described in
    6.67
    3 votes
    114

    Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize

    The Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize is the UK's only literary award for comic literature. Established in 2000 and named in honour of P G Wodehouse, past winners include Paul Torday in 2007 with Salmon Fishing in the Yemen and Marina Lewycka with A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian 2005 and Jasper Fforde for The Well of Lost Plots in 2004. Gary Shteyngart was the first American winner in 2011. The Prize is sponsored and organized by Bollinger, a producer of sparkling wines from the Champagne region of France, and Everyman Library, a book imprint that is a division of Random House. The winner is announced at the annual Hay Festival in May and is presented with jeroboam of Champagne Bollinger Special Cuvée, 52 volumes of the Everyman Wodehouse edition, and a Gloucester Old Spot pig is named after the winning novel.
    6.67
    3 votes
    115

    Something Fishy

    Something Fishy is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on January 18, 1957 by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States on January 28, 1957 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, under the title The Butler Did It. The plot concerns a tontine formed by a group of wealthy men weeks before the 1929 stock market crash, and a butler named Keggs who, having overheard the planning of the scheme, years later decides to try to make money out of his knowledge. The novel features hero Bill Hollister and anti-hero Roscoe Bunyun who are the sons of the men who set up the tontine and the last one to become married will receive one million dollars from the tontine. Keggs, the former butler to Bunyun's father is now retired and informs Roscoe of the secret tontine. Keggs, having become wealthy, houses the genial and often confused Lord Uffenham, his most recent employer and now hard up for money and Uffenham's daughter, Jane. A chance meeting between Bill and Jane turns to romance, Keggs' plan is undone by Roscoe, and Lord Uffenham and Keggs plot to save the day for Bill and Jane. It also features Percy Pilbeam, the unscrupulous head of the Argus Detective
    6.67
    3 votes
    116

    Summer Lightning

    Summer Lightning is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on 1 July 1929 by Doubleday, Doran, New York, under the title Fish Preferred, and in the United Kingdom on 19 July 1929 by Herbert Jenkins, London. It was serialised in The Pall Mall Magazine (UK) between March and August 1929 and in Collier's (US) from 6 April to 22 June 1929. It forms part of the Blandings Castle saga, being the third full-length novel to be set there, after Something Fresh (1915) and Leave It to Psmith (1923). Heavy Weather (1933) forms a semi-sequel to the story, with many of the same characters involved. Gally is down at Blandings and writing his memoirs, to the horror of all who knew him in their wild youths, particularly Lord Emsworth's neighbour and pig-fancying rival Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe. While sinister forces, including the efficient Baxter and the unpleasant Percy Pilbeam, scheme to put a stop to the book, Ronnie Fish and his old pal Hugo Carmody are entangled in difficult relationships, which require much subterfuge, some pig-theft and a little imposter-ing to resolve... Hugo Carmody, who became secretary to Lord Emsworth following the failure of The Hot Spot,
    6.67
    3 votes
    117

    Edwy Searles Brooks

    Edwy Searles Brooks (11 November 1889 - 2 December 1965) was a British novelist who also wrote under the pen-names Berkeley Gray, Victor Gunn, Rex Madison, and Carlton Ross. Brooks was born in Hackney, London. He is believed to have written around 40 million words. Brooks published his first short story, "Mr Dorien's Missing £2000", in July 1907, when he was seventeen. His first major breakthrough came in 1910, when the paper The Gem gave him an assignment to publish a serial named "The Iron Island", the main character being Frank Kingston. In 1912, he wrote his first Sexton Blake stories and in 1915, started writing stories for the Nelson Lee Library, becoming the lead writer of the detective series after which the publication was named. In 1917 he started the St. Frank's series in that paper, the stories for which he is best remembered. Additional serial assignments followed, including those featuring Clive Derring and Sexton Blake. In 1918, he launched the character of Rupert Waldo, an early superhero. In 1918, he married Frances Goldstein, who became his assistant and collaborator through the years. The two took great pride in delivering clean manuscripts for publication
    5.75
    4 votes
    118

    Pig-hoo-o-o-o-ey

    "Pig-Hoo-o-o-o-ey" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the 9 July 1927 issue of Liberty, and in the United Kingdom in the August 1927 Strand. Part of the Blandings Castle canon, it features the absent-minded peer Lord Emsworth, and was included in the collection Blandings Castle and Elsewhere (1935), although the story takes place sometime between the events of Leave it to Psmith (1923) and Summer Lightning (1929). Lord Emsworth, keen that his fat pig, the Empress of Blandings, should win the 87th annual Shropshire Agricultural Show, is distraught when his pigman, Wellbeloved, is sent to prison for fourteen days for being drunk and disorderly in a Market Blandings inn. The pig immediately goes off her feed, and with the vet baffled, Emsworth is in no state to listen to his sister Connie's bleatings about his niece Angela breaking off her engagement from Lord Heacham in favour of the quite unsuitable James Belford, who Emsworth himself always liked, being a friend of the lad's father, a local parson. Emsworth, still distracted about his pig, is sent to London to have stern words with Belford; dining with him at the Senior Conservative
    5.75
    4 votes
    119

    The Eighteen-Carat Kid and Other Stories

    The Eighteen-Carat Kid and Other Stories is a collection of early short stories and a novella by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on September 1, 1980 by Continuum, New York, five years after Wodehouse's death. The collection was edited and introduced by Wodehouse's biographer, David A. Jasen. The stories had all previously appeared in magazines, and William Tell Told Again (a retelling of the William Tell legend) was published as an illustrated book in the United Kingdom in 1904.
    5.75
    4 votes
    120

    Company for Gertrude

    Company for Gertrude is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the September 1928 Strand, and in the United States in the October 1928 issue of Cosmopolitan. Part of the Blandings Castle canon, it features the absent-minded peer Lord Emsworth, and was included in the collection Blandings Castle and Elsewhere (1935), although the story takes place sometime between the events of Leave it to Psmith (1923) and Summer Lightning (1929). Lord Emsworth's world is far from ideal - not only has his neighbour Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe stolen his pigman Wellbeloved, but his niece Gertrude is imprisoned in the house, mooning miserably about the place and, worse still, trying to be "helpful" by tidying his study. Meanwhile Freddie Threepwood, back in England to promote his father-in-law Mr Donaldson's "Dog-Joy" biscuits, has just been turned down by his dog-loving Aunt Georgiana, Gertrude's mother, when he runs into his old Oxford pal Beefy Bingham. Bingham, Freddie learns, is in love with cousin Gertrude, but as he is not well-off, the family have closed ranks and sent Gertrude away to Blandings. Inspired by a Super-film he has seen, Freddie sends
    7.50
    2 votes
    121

    Frozen Assets

    Frozen Assets is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on July 14, 1964 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York under the title Biffen's Millions, and in the United Kingdom on August 14, 1964 by Herbert Jenkins, London. Set in the publishing world, Frozen Assets is a romantic comedy featuring the recurring Wodehouse characters, publishing magnate Lord Tilbury and his devious lackey Percy Pilbeam.
    7.50
    2 votes
    122

    The Code of the Woosters

    The Code of the Woosters is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published on 7 October 1938, in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States by Doubleday, Doran, New York. It was serialised in The Saturday Evening Post (US) from 16 July to 3 September 1938 and in the London Daily Mail from 14 September to 6 October 1938. The Code of the Woosters is the third full-length novel to feature two of Wodehouse's best-known creations, Bertie Wooster and his valet Jeeves. The Code of the Woosters is the first installment in the Totleigh Towers saga. It introduces the characters of Sir Watkyn Bassett, the owner of Totleigh Towers, and Roderick Spode, later known as Lord Sidcup after his ascension to Earldom. The story opens with Bertie recovering from a bachelor party he has thrown the night before for Gussie Fink-Nottle, his fish-faced, newt-fancying friend. While still convalescing, he is summoned before his somewhat beloved Aunt Dahlia and ordered by her to go to a particular antique shop and "sneer at a cow creamer". This is an effort to sap the confidence of the shop's owner and thus drive down the piece's price before it is purchased by Dahlia's collector
    7.50
    2 votes
    123

    The Man With Two Left Feet

    The Man With Two Left Feet, and Other Stories is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on March 8, 1917 by Methuen & Co., London, and in the United States in 1933 by A.L. Burt and Co., New York. All the stories had previously appeared in periodicals, usually the Strand in the UK and the Red Book magazine or the Saturday Evening Post in the US. It is a fairly miscellaneous collection — most of the stories concern relationships, sports and household pets, and do not feature any of Wodehouse's regular characters; one, however, "Extricating Young Gussie", is notable for the first appearance in print of two of Wodehouse's best-known characters, Jeeves and his master Bertie Wooster (although Bertie's surname isn't given and Jeeves's role is very small), and Bertie's fearsome Aunt Agatha. In the U.S. version of the book, "Wilton's Holiday", "Crowned Heads" and the two-part "The Mixer" were omitted, and replaced with three other stories, "Absent Treatment", "Rallying Round Old George" and "Doing Clarence a Bit of Good", which all feature Reggie Pepper and had all appeared in the UK in My Man Jeeves (1919).
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    124

    The Uncollected Wodehouse

    The Uncollected Wodehouse is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. First published in the United States on November 9, 1976 by Seabury, New York, it contains 14 short stories, five of which had appeared in the United Kingdom in the 1914 collection The Man Upstairs. All had previously appeared in UK. periodicals between 1901 and 1915; some had also appeared in the U.S. The collection was edited and introduced by David A. Jasen, and features a foreword by Malcolm Muggeridge. The Cosmopolitan story "The Matrimonial Sweepstakes", a reset and slightly lengthened version of "The Good Angel", marks the earliest mention of Lord Emsworth.
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    The Beauty of Bath

    The Beauty of Bath

    The Beauty of Bath is a musical comedy with a book by Seymour Hicks and Cosmo Hamilton, lyrics by C. H. Taylor and music by Herbert Haines; additional songs were provided by Jerome Kern (lyrics and music), F. Clifford Harris (lyrics) and P. G. Wodehouse (lyrics). The story concerns a young woman from a noble family, who falls in love with an actor. She then meets a sailor who appears identical to the actor and mistakes him for the latter. Her father objects to a marriage with the actor, but when it turns out that she really loves the sailor, all objections fall away. The piece was produced by Charles Frohman, opened at the Aldwych Theatre on March 19, 1906, moved on December 26, 1906 to the newly built Hicks Theatre, and ran for a total of 287 performances. It starred Hicks and his wife, Ellaline Terriss. Zena Dare later joined the cast, replacing Terriss. At the interval of a play, the fashionable audience mill about in the foyer, complimenting the new hit play and its leading actor, Mr. Beverley. Sir Timothy Bun, Lady Bun, and their large family of "adopted" daughters, "the twelve Bath Buns", are part of the crowd. An actress, Miss Truly St. Cyr, is courted by a young lord. Mrs.
    5.50
    4 votes
    126

    Show Boat

    Show Boat is a 1927 musical in two acts, with music by Jerome Kern and book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. Based on Edna Ferber's bestselling novel of the same name, the musical follows the lives of the performers, stagehands, and dock workers on the Cotton Blossom, a Mississippi River show boat, over a span of nearly fifty years, from 1880 to 1927. Its themes include racial prejudice and tragic, enduring love. The musical contributed such classic songs as "Ol' Man River", "Make Believe", and "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man". The arrival of Show Boat on Broadway was a watershed moment in the history of American musicals. Compared to the trivial and unrealistic operettas, light musical comedies, and "Follies"-type musical revues that defined Broadway in the 1890s and early 20th century, Show Boat "was a radical departure in musical storytelling, marrying spectacle with seriousness." According to The Complete Book of Light Opera: "Here we come to a completely new genre – the musical play as distinguished from musical comedy. Now... the play was the thing, and everything else was subservient to that play. Now... came complete integration of song, humor and production numbers into a
    6.33
    3 votes
    127

    Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves

    Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, published in the United States on March 22, 1963 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, and in the United Kingdom on August 16, 1963 by Herbert Jenkins, London. It is the ninth of eleven novels featuring Bertie Wooster and his valet Jeeves. In Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves, Bertie Wooster returns to Totleigh Towers, the site of an earlier ordeal that nearly landed him in prison and, worse still, in bonds of marriage to Madeline Bassett, the syrupy daughter of the house who believes the stars are God's daisy chain. Only Gussie Fink-Nottle, Bertie's childhood friend and Madeline's on-again off-again fiancé, stands between our hero and the dreaded state of matrimony. No surprise, then, that matrimonial disaster looms for our hero when Madeline, inspired by the life of Percy Bysshe Shelley, orders Gussie to abandon his beloved steak and kidney pie and take up a vegetarian diet. Add the intrigues of Miss Stiffy Byng to win her fiancé the Reverend Stinker Pinker a vicarage, the rivalry of collectors Sir Watkyn Bassett and Bertie's Uncle Tom over an objet d'art, and the irresistible culinary attractions of American Emerald Stoker, and you
    6.33
    3 votes
    128

    Thank You, Jeeves

    Thank You, Jeeves is a Jeeves novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on March 16, 1934 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on April 23, 1934 by Little, Brown and Company, New York. The story had previously been serialised, in the Strand Magazine in the UK from August 1933 to February 1934, and in the U.S. in Cosmopolitan Magazine from January to June 1934; it would later appear in the American Family Herald & Evening Star, between March 24 and August 11, 1937. After a falling-out concerning Bertie’s relentless playing of the banjolele, Jeeves leaves his master’s service and finds work with Bertie’s old friend, Lord “Chuffy” Chuffnell. Bertie travels to one of Chuffy’s cottages in Dorset in order to continue practising his banjolele-playing without complaints from his neighbours. Chuffy, whose high rank is matched only by his low financial status, is hoping to sell his dilapidated family manor to the American millionaire J. Washburn Stoker, who in turn plans to rent out the property to the famous “nerve specialist” Sir Roderick Glossop, who intends to marry Chuffy’s Aunt Myrtle. Chuffy has also fallen in love with Mr. Stoker’s daughter,
    6.33
    3 votes
    129

    Uncle Fred

    Frederick Altamont Cornwallis Twistleton, 5th Earl of Ickenham, commonly known as Uncle Fred, is a fictional character who appears in short stories and novels written by P. G. Wodehouse between 1935 and 1961. An energetic and mischievous old chap, his talent for trouble is the bane of his nephew Pongo Twistleton's life. The Uncle Fred stories comprise one short and four novels, two of which are set at Blandings Castle: Uncle Fred is a tall, slim, distinguished-looking man, with a jaunty moustache, and an "alert and enterprising eye". As a child he gambolled at Mitching Hill, his Uncle Willoughby's estate just outside London, which later became the suburb of Valley Fields; it was there that he shot the gardener in the trousers seat with his bow and arrow, and threw up after his first cigar. He was a younger son, and therefore not expected to inherit his present title; he spent much time in America, working variously as a cowboy, a soda jerk, a newspaper reporter and a prospector in the Mojave Desert, before a number of deaths in the family left him heir to the Earldom. While in America, he was friends with James Schoonmaker, and his daughter Myra. In later youth, he became a member
    6.33
    3 votes
    130

    Freddie Threepwood

    The Honourable Frederick Threepwood is a fictional character in the Blandings stories by P. G. Wodehouse. A member of the Drones Club affectionately known as "Freddie", he is the second son of Lord Emsworth, and a somewhat simple-minded youth who brings his father nothing but trouble. Freddie has one brother, George, and a sister, Mildred. Freddie's youth was a rather wild and reckless time. He was expelled from Eton for "breaking out at night and roaming the streets of Windsor in a false mustache", and was sent down from Oxford, where he had been good friends with "Beefy" Bingham, for "pouring ink from a second-story window on the junior dean of his college". Despite two years at an expensive London crammer's, he failed to qualify for the army. During this time he gathered a wide circle of shady and dubious friends, mostly involved in the turf, including the unpleasant Mr R Jones, and an equally broad set of gambling debts. When Lord Emsworth is required to pay off £500 worth of said debts, Freddie is recalled to Blandings Castle, the family's traditional prison for straying youth, where he is kept for his own safety, despite the discomfort this causes his father; this is where we
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    1 votes
    131

    George Alexander Pyke, Lord Tilbury

    George Alexander Pyke, Lord Tilbury is a recurring fictional character in the stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. Pyke is a publishing magnate, the founder and owner of the Mammoth Publishing Company. Outside his business, he has a passion for pigs and is the owner of a prize pig named Buckinghamshire Big Boy. Pyke appears in several novels, including two set at Blandings Castle: Summer Lightning (1929) and Heavy Weather (1933). Wodehouse introduces Pyke in Bill the Conqueror as plain Sir George Pyke. Mammoth Publishing Company is already a mighty undertaking and Pyke is about to become a Lord – he selects the Tilbury title based on the address of his headquarters, at Tilbury House on Tilbury Street. Pyke is not a tall man and runs somewhat to fat. His similarity to Napoleon, both in physique and character, is often remarked upon. He is a widower, his late wife Lucy having left him a son named Roderick. He also has a sister named Francie, who is married to an archaeologist, and he had an elder brother, named Edmond. After school, where he knew both Lord Emsworth and his brother Galahad Threepwood and was given the nickname Stinker, he became a clerk in a solicitor's
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    1 votes
    132
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    133

    Laughing Gas

    Laughing Gas is a comic novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on September 25, 1936 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on December 4, 1936 by Doubleday, Doran, New York. It is set in Hollywood in the early 1930s (the Depression is mentioned twice) and is, compared to, say, Budd Schulberg's What Makes Sammy Run? (1941), a light-hearted and exclusively humorous look at the film industry and in particular at child stars. Both Schulberg and Wodehouse describe the methods of all those would-be screenwriters and actors hunting for jobs, but Wodehouse's depiction is not at all serious or critical. Drone Reginald Swithin, the third Earl of Havershot ("Reggie") is 28, unmarried, and has a face like a gorilla. As the new head of his family, he is assigned a delicate task by his Aunt Clara and by Plimsoll, the family lawyer: He is to go to Hollywood and look for Aunt Clara's son, his cousin Eggy, who seems to have gotten himself into trouble, and bring him back home. In particular, Reggie is to prevent Eggy from getting engaged, let alone married, to some American gold-digger who would undoubtedly be far beneath the titled family. On the train from
    8.00
    1 votes
    134

    Plum Stones

    Plum Stones is a collection of short stories by P.G. Wodehouse. All of the stories contain a different Character (such as Plum Pie).It was published after his death (in 1993) by Galahad books. It contains stories previously never published in a book. There is very little known about it and it wasn't widely published. One of the stories is a Bobbie Wickham short story called "Dudley Is Back to Normal". Another is "Reggie and the greasy bird"(nothing to do with Jeeves and the greasy bird), a rewrite of "The Masked Troubadour". All were previously published in some of the many magazines that he worked for.
    8.00
    1 votes
    135

    Rosie M. Banks

    Rosie M. Banks is a recurring fictional character in the Jeeves and Drones Club stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a romance novelist and the wife of Bingo Little. Suggested real-life models for this character include prolific early twentieth-century female romance novelists such as Ethel M. Dell and Ruby M. Ayres. Rosie M. Banks is a fictional romance novelist, the author of works such as: All for Love; A Red, Red Summer Rose; Madcap Myrtle; Only a Factory Girl; The Courtship of Lord Strathmorlick; Mervyn Keene, Clubman; 'Twas Once in May; By Honour Bound; and A Kiss at Twilight. She is highly popular among women readers for her subject matter, but not so well regarded by other characters: Bertie Wooster proclaimed her work to be "the most pronounced and widely-read tripe on the market", and her husband Bingo has said that when she "gets in front of a dictating-machine she becomes perfectly maudlin". Bingo nervously changes the subject every time his wife's books are brought up in conversation. She submitted an article for Milady's Boudoir (the women's paper of Dahlia Travers, Bertie Wooster's Aunt Dahlia), entitled "How I Keep the Love of My Husband-Baby",
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    1 votes
    136

    Sam the Sudden

    Sam the Sudden is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 15 October 1925 by Methuen, London, and in the United States on 6 November 1925 by George H. Doran, New York, under the title Sam in the Suburbs. The story had previously been serialised under that title in the Saturday Evening Post from 13 June to 18 July 1925. The cast includes the recurring character Lord Tilbury, publishing magnate and founder of the Mammoth Publishing Company, who had appeared in Wodehouse's novel of the previous year, Bill the Conqueror, and who would later visit Blandings Castle in Heavy Weather (1933). It also introduced the criminals Alexander "Chimp" Twist, Dora "Dolly" Molloy and Thomas "Soapy" Molloy, who reappeared in Money for Nothing (1928) and Money in the Bank (1946). The story is a romantic comedy, the hero of which is Sam Shotter, an old boy of Wrykyn school. Sent to England by his uncle to work for the Mammoth Publishing Company, he finds a girl he has long adored, despite only knowing her from a photograph. He woos the girl, and his man woos her maid, while a syndicate of crooks circle their suburb, seeking hidden treasure... Sam Shotter, having failed to
    8.00
    1 votes
    137

    The Coming of Bill

    The Coming of Bill is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published, as Their Mutual Child, in the United States in 1919 by Boni and Liveright, New York, and in the United Kingdom on 1 July 1920 by Herbert Jenkins, London. The story first appeared in Munsey's Magazine in May 1914, under the title The White Hope. The book tells the story of Kirk Winfield, his marriage to Ruth, and their child called Bill. Bill's upbringing is threatened by the interference of Ruth's busybody writer aunt, Mrs Lora Delane Porter. A silent film version of Their Mutual Child was made in 1920.
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    1 votes
    138

    The Episode of the Theatrical Venture

    "The Episode of the Theatrical Venture" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse and C. H. Bovill, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the June 1914 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the July 1916 Pictorial Review. It was published in book form in the collection A Man of Means in 1991. It is the third of six stories to feature Roland Bleke, a young man for whom financial success is always a mixed blessing. Roland Bleke, a very wealthy man after the events of "The Episode of the Financial Napoleon", finds himself wowed by Miss Billy Verepoint, an attractive and domineering actress. He soon ends up the owner of a notoriously unsuccessful theatre, the Windsor, bought from its unscrupulous former owner, who found his insurance agent's attitude to keeping the place safe from fire a little too strict for his liking. As her friends start working on a revue to be performed at the theatre and starring Miss Verepoint, Bleke proposes to her, mostly out of fear, and is accepted pending her making a success of her theatrical career. At rehearsals, Bleke is horrified by Miss Verepoint's behaviour and, in dread of having to spend his life married to her, goes away to Norfolk
    8.00
    1 votes
    139

    The Small Bachelor

    The Small Bachelor is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 28 April 1927 by Methuen & Co., London, and in the United States on 17 June 1927 by George H. Doran, New York. The story tells of the romantic troubles of George Finch, a short would-be artist living in New York's Greenwich Village. A theatrical adaptation, entitled "Over the Moon", was written by American playwright, Steven Dietz. It premiered at the Arizona Theatre Company in 2003, and was subsequently seen at the Seattle Repertory Theatre.
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    1 votes
    140

    Very Good, Jeeves

    Very Good, Jeeves is a collection of eleven short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, all featuring Jeeves and Bertie Wooster. It was first published in the United States on 20 June 1930 by Doubleday, Doran, New York, and in the United Kingdom on 4 July 1930 by Herbert Jenkins, London. The stories had all previously appeared in Strand Magazine in the UK and in Liberty or Cosmopolitan magazines in the US between 1926 and 1930. As well as Jeeves and his master Bertie Wooster, the stories also feature many regular characters, including Tuppy Glossop, Bingo Little, Bobbie Wickham, Aunt Dahlia, Aunt Agatha and Sir Roderick Glossop. The original story titles and publication dates were as follows:
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    1 votes
    141

    Full Moon

    Full Moon is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States by Doubleday & Company on May 22, 1947, and in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins on October 17, 1947. It is the sixth full-length novel to be set at the beautiful but trouble-ridden Blandings Castle, home of Lord Emsworth. Clarence, 9th Earl of Emsworth, is forced to play host to his younger son Freddie, while two of his nieces, Prudence Garland and Veronica Wedge are romantically entangled with, respectively, Gally's godson Bill Lister and American millionaire Tipton Plimsoll. Further complications ensue when Tipton thinks Bill's gorilla-like face is an apparition brought about by too much drink, Lister is hired to paint the Empress's portrait, and Aggie's necklace gets waylaid. Lord Emsworth is aghast to learn that his younger son Freddie is back in England from America, sent over to push "Donaldson's Dog-Joy" to the English dog-owning public. He is less worried to hear that his niece Prudence Garland is being called a "dream rabbit" by unknown men over the telephone. Freddie meets Prudence, and learns her caller was none other than Bill Lister, an old pal of Freddie's and godson of his uncle
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    142

    Monty Bodkin

    Montague "Monty" Bodkin (also referred to as Montrose) is a recurring fictional character in three novels of English comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a wealthy young member of the Drones Club, tall, slender and lissom, well-dressed, well-spoken, impeccably polite, and generally in some kind of romantic trouble. Monty is featured in: When we first meet Monty Bodkin at the start of Heavy Weather, he is employed by Lord Tilbury as assistant editor of Tiny Tots, one of the many imprints of the mighty Mammoth Publishing Company, his uncle Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe having prevailed upon Tilbury to give him the job at a public dinner. Monty does not work, however, because of any need for income; as he himself explains, there are "wheels within wheels". He is in love with Gertrude Butterwick but her father, named J. G. Butterwick in this novel (it'll evolve), feeling that his daughter should not marry some kind of a waster, requires Monty to hold down a job for a full year, and Gertrude, being an old-fashioned sort of girl of solid middle-class stock, refuses to elope with Monty. His time at Tiny Tots is brief, however, as he finds himself left in charge one day when the regular
    7.00
    2 votes
    143

    Nothing Serious

    Nothing Serious is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United Kingdom on 21 July 1950 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on 24 May 1951 by Doubleday & Co., New York. It is a mixed bag of stories, mostly featuring appearances from several of Wodehouse's recurring characters, including two Drones Club stories (the first about Bingo Little and another about Freddie Widgeon), five Oldest Member golf stories, one Blandings Castle, one independent, and one Ukridge story.
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    144

    Plum Pie

    Plum Pie is a collection of nine short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on September 22, 1966 by Barrie & Jenkins (under the Herbert Jenkins imprint), and in the United States on December 1, 1967 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York. All stories except one belong to a large bag of P. G. Wodehouse regular series: one Jeeves, one golf story, one Blandings, one Ukridge, two Drones Club member Bingo Little, one Mr Mulliner, and one longer Freddie Threepwood novella. Most of the stories had previously appeared in Argosy in the UK, and in Playboy or The Saturday Evening Post in the U.S.; the UK version included some extra notes and interspersions between the stories.
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    2 votes
    145

    Psmith, Journalist

    Psmith, Journalist is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first released in the United Kingdom as a serial in The Captain magazine between October 1909 and February 1910, and published in book form in the UK on September 29, 1915, by Adam & Charles Black, London, and, from imported sheets, by Macmillan, New York, later that year. The story was also incorporated into the US version of The Prince and Betty, published by W.J.Watt and Co., New York, on February 14, 1912. This combined the magazine versions of The Prince and Betty and Psmith, Journalist, and is a very different book from that published as The Prince and Betty in the UK. It continues the adventures of the silver-tongued Psmith, one of Wodehouse's best loved characters, and his friend Mike Jackson. The story begins with Psmith accompanying his fellow Cambridge student Mike to New York on a cricketing tour. Through high spirits and force of personality, Psmith takes charge of a minor periodical, and becomes imbroiled in a scandal involving slum landlords, boxers and gangsters - the story displays a strong social conscience, rare in Wodehouse's generally light-hearted works. Mr Wilberfloss, editor of Cosy Moments magazine, is forced
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    2 votes
    146
    Sally

    Sally

    Sally is a musical comedy with music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Clifford Grey and book by Guy Bolton (inspired by the 19th century show, Sally in our Alley), with additional lyrics by Buddy De Sylva, Anne Caldwell and P. G. Wodehouse. It was originally produced by Florenz Ziegfeld, opening on December 21, 1920 at the New Amsterdam Theatre on Broadway. It ran for 570 performances, which was one of the longest runs on Broadway up to that time. By the time it closed in 1924 (including revivals), it would prove to be among the top five money makers of the 1920s. The show was designed as the musical comedy debut of Marilyn Miller, a 22-year old Ziegfeld Follies girl. Miller would continue to be a star on Broadway until her death in 1936. Kern, Bolton, and Wodehouse had collaborated on a number of musical comedies at the Princess Theatre. The story combined the innocence of these earlier "Princess musicals" with the lavishness of the "Follies" formula. The score recycles some material from previous Kern shows, including "Look for the Silver Lining" and "Whip-poor-will" (with lyrics by De Sylva, from the flop "Zip Goes a Million"); "The Lorelei" (lyrics by Anne Caldwell); and "You Can't
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    2 votes
    147

    The Clicking of Cuthbert

    The Clicking of Cuthbert is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, all with a golfing background. It was first published in the United Kingdom on February 3, 1922 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on May 28, 1924 by George H. Doran, New York, under the title Golf Without Tears. There are some slight differences between the two editions, chiefly as regards the names of places and golfers, which were adapted to suit the country of publication. The first story in the collection introduces the Oldest Member, a repeat Wodehouse character, who narrates all but the last story. Three of the stories in the collection—the title story, "Ordeal by Golf" and "The Long Hole"—were filmed in 1924 as part of a series of six films of Wodehouse golf stories; Peter Haddon played Cuthbert in the title story. The original story titles and publication dates were as follows:
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    2 votes
    148

    The Episode of the Financial Napoleon

    "The Episode of the Financial Napoleon" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse and C. H. Bovill, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the May 1914 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the June 1916 Pictorial Review. It was published in book form in the collection A Man of Means in 1991, and is sometimes referred to by the title "The Bolt for the Blue". It is the second of six stories to feature Roland Bleke, a young man for whom financial success is always a mixed blessing. The aeroplane which flew Roland Bleke to freedom at the end of "The Episode of the Landlady's Daughter" lands in the garden of the Sussex home of one Geoffrey Windlebird, financier of somewhat dubious standing. A perpetual juggler of near-bankrupt companies, Windelbird is on the edge of bankruptcy and scandal as a mining claim he has heavily oversold is about to be exposed. Bleke knows him by reputation, and he, having been shown Bleke's picture in the newspaper by his wife, knows of Bleke's recent windfall. Bleke, sick after his cold flight, is taken in by the Windlebirds. Worried that his fiancee may object to his disappearance, he arranges with Windelbird to have her paid off, a deal on
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    2 votes
    149

    The Girl on the Boat

    The Girl on the Boat is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse. The story first appeared as a serial in Woman's Home Companion in the United States, under the title Three Men and a Maid, from October to December 1921. It was first published as a book in the U.S. on April 26, 1922 by George H. Doran, New York, and as The Girl on the Boat in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, on June 15, 1922. The maid of the title is red-haired, dog-loving Wilhelmina "Billie" Bennet, and the three men are Bream Mortimer, a long-time friend and admirer of Billie, Eustace Hignett, a lily-livered poet who is engaged to Billie at the opening of the tale, and Sam Marlowe, Eustace's dashing cousin, who falls for Billie at first sight. All four find themselves on an ocean liner headed for England together, along with a capable young woman called Jane Hubbard who is smitten with Eustace, and typically Wodehousian romantic shenanigans ensue A film adaptation was made in 1961, starring Norman Wisdom as Marlowe, Richard Briers as Eustace, Philip Locke as Bream Mortimer and Millicent Martin as Billie. Richard Briers later portrayed another Wodehouse character, Galahad Threepwood, in a BBC adaptation of Heavy
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    2 votes
    150

    The Gold Bat

    The Gold Bat is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published on 13 September 1904 by Adam & Charles Black, London. Set at the fictional public school of Wrykyn, the novel tells of how two boys, O'Hara and Moriarty, tar and feather a statue of the local M.P. as a prank. They get away with it, but O'Hara had borrowed a tiny gold cricket bat belonging to Trevor, the captain of the cricket team, and after the escapade he discovers the trinket is missing. Schoolboy honour is at stake, and the book covers events that term including inter-house rugby matches and the appearance of a mysterious society called the League, as Trevor and friends try to get the gold bat back. Wrykyn School would appear again in The White Feather (1907), and as the setting of the first half of Mike (1909); it would be mentioned occasionally in later Wodehouse works.
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    151

    The Luck of the Bodkins

    The Luck of the Bodkins is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on October 11, 1935 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on January 3, 1936 by Little, Brown and Company, Boston. The two editions are significantly different, though the plot remains the same. The novel was serialised in Passing Show magazine (UK) from 21 September to 23 November 1935, and this version was published as the UK edition. For its US magazine appearance, in the Red Book, between August 1935 and January 1936, Wodehouse re-wrote the story, reducing its length, and this became the US book edition. The story concerns the complicated love life of amiable young Drone Monty Bodkin, the nephew of Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe, who had previously appeared in Heavy Weather (1933), when he was employed as the latest in the long line of Lord Emsworth's secretaries. The plot of The Luck of the Bodkins continues into Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin (1972), in which Monty, the object of his affections, hockey-playing Gertrude Butterwick, and movie-mogul Ivor Llewellyn all return.
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    152
    Jeeves

    Jeeves

    Reginald Jeeves is a fictional character in the short stories and novels of P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975), being the valet of Bertie Wooster (Bertram Wilberforce Wooster). Created in 1915, Jeeves continued to appear in Wodehouse's work until his final completed novel Aunts Aren't Gentlemen in 1974. He was Wodehouse's most famous character. The name "Jeeves" comes from Percy Jeeves (1888–1916), a Warwickshire cricketer killed in the First World War. Both the name "Jeeves" and the character of Jeeves have come to be thought of as the quintessential name and nature of a valet or butler inspiring many similar characters (as well as the name of the Internet search engine Ask Jeeves). A "Jeeves" is now a generic term in references such as the Oxford English Dictionary. In a conversation with a policeman in "Jeeves and the Kid Clementina," Jeeves refers to himself as both a "gentleman's personal gentleman" and a "personal gentleman's gentleman." This means that Jeeves is a valet, not a butler—that is, he serves a man and not a household. However, Bertie Wooster has lent out Jeeves as a butler on several occasions, and notes: "If the call comes, he can buttle with the best of them." The
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    3 votes
    153

    Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit

    Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on October 15, 1954 by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States on February 23, 1955 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, under the title Bertie Wooster Sees It Through. It is the seventh novel featuring Bertie Wooster and his valet Jeeves. Bertie finds himself once more at Brinkley Court, sampling the delights of Anatole's cooking while attempting to help Aunt Dahlia sell off her magazine Milady's Boudoir to the Liverpudlian Trotters, avoiding trouble in the shape of ex-fiancee Florence Craye, her hulking beau Stilton Cheesewright and the equally fearsome Spode. The novel was dramatised for BBC Radio in 1990, with Richard Briers as Bertie Wooster and Michael Hordern as Jeeves.
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    154
    P. G. Wodehouse

    P. G. Wodehouse

    Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, KBE ( /ˈwʊd.haʊs/; 15 October 1881 – 14 February 1975) was an English humorist, whose body of work includes novels, short stories, plays, poems, song lyrics, and numerous pieces of journalism. He enjoyed enormous popular success during a career that lasted more than seventy years and his many writings continue to be widely read. Despite the political and social upheavals that occurred during his life, much of which was spent in France and the United States, Wodehouse's main canvas remained that of a pre- and post-World War I English upper-class society, reflecting his birth, education and youthful writing career. An acknowledged master of English prose, Wodehouse has been admired both by contemporaries such as Hilaire Belloc, Evelyn Waugh and Rudyard Kipling and by recent writers such as Stephen Fry, Christopher Hitchens, Douglas Adams, J. K. Rowling, and John Le Carré. Best known today for the Jeeves and Blandings Castle novels and short stories, Wodehouse was also a playwright and lyricist who was part author and writer of 15 plays and of 250 lyrics for some 30 musical comedies, many of them produced in collaboration with Jerome Kern and Guy
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    Pigs Have Wings

    Pigs Have Wings is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared as a serial in Collier's Weekly between August 16 and September 20, 1952. It was first published as a book in the United States on October 16, 1952 by Doubleday & Company, New York, and in the United Kingdom on October 31, 1952 by Herbert Jenkins, London. It is the seventh novel set at Blandings Castle. The absent minded Lord Emsworth finds himself once again embroiled in fierce rivalry in the pig-rearing arena with his neighbour, the obese baronet Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe. With Emsworth's champion Empress of Blandings in line for a third straight victory in the local show and Parsloe bringing in a ringer, suspicions run high. Meanwhile, Blandings has its full complement of romantic entanglements. Fortunately, the ever-resourceful Gally is on hand to help out. Lord Emsworth, his brother Galahad and butler Beach, hearing that devious neighbour Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe has done the unthinkable and brought in a new and enormous pig from Kent, are in turmoil. Galahad and Beach are desperate to secure their savings, confidently invested in a wager on the mighty Empress, while Emsworth is as ever suspicious of his
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    Aunts Aren't Gentlemen

    Aunts Aren't Gentlemen is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on October 17, 1974 by Barrie & Jenkins, London, and in the United States under the title The Cat-nappers on April 14, 1975 by Simon & Schuster, New York. It was the last novel to feature some of Wodehouse's best known characters, Bertie Wooster and his resourceful valet Jeeves, and the last novel fully completed by Wodehouse before his death. Aunts Aren't Gentlemen is another of the Bertie-Jeeves exploits in which Aunt Dahlia starts horsing around and enmeshes, amongst others, Bertie, Vanessa Cook, Orlo Porter, Major Brabazon-Plank (now Major Plank), Potato Chip the horse, and The Cat That Kept Popping Up. The story begins with Bertie finding himself with pink spots about the thorax, so he flies off to E. Jimpson Murgatroyd (the sombre bird of Harley Street who despotted Tipton Plimsoll in Full Moon). After getting mixed with Orlo Porter fleeing from a policeman and a crowd, Bertie is sentenced by the doc to a quiet life in the country. Thus Bertie goes to Maiden Eggesford in Somerset, with its two leading men, Jimmy Briscoe and Pop Cook, their respective horses, Simla and Potato Chip, and
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    Empress of Blandings

    Empress of Blandings is a fictional pig, featured in many of the Blandings Castle novels and stories by P. G. Wodehouse. Owned by the doting Lord Emsworth, the Empress is an enormous black Berkshire sow, who wins many prizes in the "Fat Pigs" class at the local Shropshire Agricultural Show, and is subject of many plots and schemes, generally involving her kidnap for various purposes. Once the pig bug has taken hold of her master, the Empress becomes a regular feature in the Blandings books, playing some part in most of the subsequent stories: In the course of the Blandings saga, the Empress is tended to by a large and disparate bunch of pig-keepers, most of them rather unappealing types who, unsurprisingly, smell strongly of pig. "Pig-hoo-o-o-o-ey", wherein we first meet the noble beast, tells of how she misses her first keeper, Wellbeloved, when he is sent to jail for a spell; her pining is worrisome to her master, with the big show approaching, until she is pepped up by James Belford's hog-calling techniques, returning to her trough with enough gusto to take her first Silver Medal. Soon after, to Emsworth's disgust, Wellbeloved defects to Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe, whose own
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    Jeeves in the Springtime

    "Jeeves in the Springtime" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the December 1921 edition of Strand Magazine in two parts, "Jeeves Exerts the Old Cerebellum" and "No Wedding Bells for Bingo", and appeared in the same format when first published in a book, The Inimitable Jeeves, in 1923. However, since the plot of the first story concludes in the second, the two are often published as a single story. Bertie Wooster awakens one spring morning in high spirits, and announces to Jeeves, his valet: He thereupon departs for the park, where he encounters Bingo Little, a friend from his school days, adorned with a hideous deep-red satin tie decorated with horseshoes. Bingo replies embarrassingly that he was given it. The pair stroll along and sit on chairs by the water, where Bingo enquires whether Bertie likes the name Mabel. He does not, and says so, but realizes immediately that Bingo has fallen in love, as he does perpetually, and most often in the springtime. Bingo suggests that Bertie meet Mabel for lunch "near the Ritz". They end up in a tea-and-bun shop about fifty yards east of the Ritz Hotel, where Bertie wonders why Bingo, who is moderately wealthy,
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    Mike

    Mike is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published on 15 September 1909 by Adam & Charles Black, London. The story first appeared in the magazine The Captain, in two separate parts, collected together in the original version of the book; the first part, originally called Jackson Junior, was republished in 1953 under the title Mike at Wrykyn, while the second half, called The Lost Lambs in its serialised version, was released as Enter Psmith in 1935 and then as Mike and Psmith in 1953 – this marks the first appearance of the popular character of Psmith. The first half of the story, found in Mike at Wrykyn, introduces Michael "Mike" Jackson. Mike is the youngest son of a renowned cricketing family. Mike's eldest brother Joe is a successful first-class player, while another brother, Bob, is on the verge of his school team. When Mike arrives at Wrykyn himself, his cricketing talent and love of adventure bring him success and trouble in equal measure. The second part, also known as Enter Psmith or Mike and Psmith, takes place two years later. Mike, due to take over as cricket captain at Wrykyn, is withdrawn from the school by his father and sent to a lesser school, called Sedleigh. On
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    Roderick Glossop

    Sir Roderick Glossop is a recurring fictional character in the comic novels of P. G. Wodehouse. Sometimes referred to as "the noted nerve specialist" or "the loony doctor", he is the most famous practitioner of psychiatry in Wodehouse's works, appearing in several Wooster-Jeeves stories and one Blandings story. Glossop represents one of the most fearsome authority-figures in the Wodehouse canon who is not an aunt. His character does not satirize any psychological fads in particular, but he manages to appear on the scene whenever one of Wodehouse's hapless heroes happens to be dressed or behaving in a way that might be construed to indicate insanity. During the events of Uncle Fred in the Springtime, he is impersonated by Lord Ickenham, who borrows his identity to take lodgings in Blandings so as to resolve a series of complications. Sir Roderick, of course, suspects nothing. In The Inimitable Jeeves, he is the president of the West London branch of the Anti-Gambling League. Bertie Wooster's Aunt Agatha is a friend of Sir Roderick's wife Lady Glossop. In Thank You, Jeeves his wife has been dead for two years and he has become engaged to Lady Chuffnell. In Jeeves in the Offing they
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    Sebastian Beach

    Sebastian Beach is a fictional character in the Blandings stories by P. G. Wodehouse. He is the butler at Blandings Castle, seat of Lord Emsworth and his family, where he serves for over eighteen years. Like all butlers in properly-run Edwardian homes, Beach is always known by his surname . He is a heavy-set man, whose favorite pastime is drinking port in the pantry, though he occasionally switches to brandy during crises. He has a pleasant singing voice, a mellow baritone reminiscent of a cask of very old, dry sherry. He is somewhat more emotional than Wodehouse's other famous domestic servant, Jeeves, although when in the company of his masters Beach generally limits himself to a slightly-raised eyebrow, even when strongly moved. He suffers from corns, an ingrowing toenail, swollen joints, nervous headaches, and especially from the lining of his stomach, which is not what he could wish the lining of his stomach to be. Before joining the staff at Blandings, he was once employed by the somewhat eccentric Major-General Magnus. He has grown very proud of the castle, and of its museum. A discerning man, he regrets Lady Constance's fondness for artistic types, finding their dress sense
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    Stevyn Colgan

    Stevyn Colgan

    Stevyn Colgan (born 11 August 1961) is a British writer, artist and speaker. Colgan's first book Joined-Up Thinking was published on 3 October 2008. He has written two further books, Henhwedhlow and Constable Colgan's Connectoscope. He is a contributor to the BBC TV series QI and the regular QI Annuals, and a researcher for BBC Radio 4's The Museum of Curiosity.. Colgan was born on 11 August 1961. His late father was a homicide detective and writer. His mother lives in Cornwall. He has two younger brothers. Colgan was born in London while his father was an officer with the Metropolitan Police Force. The family returned to Cornwall in 1963. Stevyn was educated at Blackwater Infants School near Truro, St Marys School Penzance, St Pauls County Primary School, Penzance, and Helston Comprehensive School, Helston. Although accepted for an arts degree course at Cornwall Polytechnic, he chose to join the Metropolitan Police Force in 1980. In an interview, he stated that this was as the result of a bet with his father. Colgan served in Hillingdon, Westminster and Ealing Borough stations as well as with Clubs and Vice, IT Training and the force's Examinations Unit. In his later career he
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    The Smile that Wins

    "The Smile that Wins" is a short story by the British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. A part of the Mr. Mulliner series, the story was first published in the United States, in the October 1931 issue of American Magazine. It was subsequently published in the United Kingdom, in the February 1932 issue of Strand Magazine, before being collected in Mulliner Nights (1933). The story was adapted for television as part of the third series of BBC's Wodehouse Playhouse and was first shown on 31 October 1978, with John Alderton as Adrian Mulliner. It was adapted for radio as part of the BBC's series Meet Mr Mulliner, being first broadcast on 13 May 2002. Adrian Mulliner, a private detective, falls in love with Lady Millicent Shipton-Bellinger, the daughter of the fifth Earl of Brangbolton who has a horror of detectives ever since Millecent's Uncle Joe's troubles in 1928. The father insists that Millicent must marry Sir Jasper Addleton, the financier. Heartbroken, Adrian has a bad attack of dyspepsia (he suffers from the disease and it was the melancholic dyspeptic look that first attracted Millicent) and a doctor advises him that the best cure for dyspepsia is to smile. Adrian, who hasn't
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    Bill the Conqueror

    Bill the Conqueror is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on November 14, 1924 by Methuen & Co., London, and in the United States on February 20, 1925 by George H. Doran, New York, the story having previously been serialised in the Saturday Evening Post from May 24 to July 12, 1924. The full title reads Bill the Conqueror, His Invasion of England in the Springtime. The cast includes the recurring characters Sir George Pyke (later Lord Tilbury), publishing magnate and founder of the Mammoth Publishing Company (who would later visit Blandings Castle in Heavy Weather (1933)), and his subordinate Percy Pilbeam. The story is a romantic comedy, revolving around a young girl whose family want her to marry against her wishes. Big, strong Bill West, inspired by his love of Alice Coker, takes her brother Judson to London, under strict instructions to keep him sober; there he meets his old friend Flick Sheridan. Meanwhile, devious schemes are afoot at the home of Bill's uncle Cooley... George Pyke is overjoyed at hearing he is shortly to be made a lord, but disappointed with his wimpy son Roderick's handling of Society Spice, one of his leading publications. He
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    Galahad at Blandings

    Galahad at Blandings is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on January 13, 1965 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York under the title The Brinkmanship of Galahad Threepwood, and in the United Kingdom on August 26 the same year by Barrie & Jenkins, London. It forms part of the Blandings Castle saga, being the ninth full-length novel to be set there. Lord Emsworth's idyllic demesne, Blandings Castle, is as usual overrun with overbearing sisters, overefficient secretaries, and the lovestruck; even worse, an alleged old flame has appeared, determined to put an end to the Earl's peaceful, pig-loving existence. All Gally's genius is required to sort things out satisfactorily... Galahad Threepwood is in residence at Blandings Castle, and finds his brother Lord Emsworth, the ninth Earl, beset by the usual collection of woes. His sister, Lady Hermione Wedge, has not only hired a secretary (Sandy Callender) to mind his affairs, but has also invited Dame Daphne Winkworth to stay and, as Galahad discovers, to reignite an old flame and take up permanent residence as the next Countess. Joining the house party are Tipton Plimsoll, a young multimillionaire who is engaged
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    Lord Emsworth Acts for the Best

    "Lord Emsworth Acts for the Best" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the June 1926 Strand Magazine, and in the United States in the 5 June 1926 issue of Liberty. Part of the Blandings Castle canon, it features the absent-minded peer Lord Emsworth, and was included in the collection Blandings Castle and Elsewhere (1935), although the story takes place sometime between the events of Leave it to Psmith (1923) and Summer Lightning (1929). Beach, long-serving butler at Blandings, is considering handing in his notice after 18 years, unable to bear the shame of his master Lord Emsworth's rather disreputable new beard. His Lordship himself, unaware of these ructions below stairs, is worried by a telegram from his younger son Freddie, who is back in London from America. Visiting Freddie, Emsworth learns that the boy has fallen out with his wife Aggie; having written a scenario for Hollywood to impress her, he tried to persuade a prominent starlet to promote it for him; however, he is seen dining with the girl by Jane Yorke, a friend of his wife. Yorke tells Aggie she has seen Freddie with another girl, and she promptly leaves him. Freddie
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    Mulliner's Buck-U-Uppo

    Mulliner's Buck-U-Uppo is a short story by the British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. A part of the Mr. Mulliner series, the story was first published in the United States by Liberty Magazine on August 07, 1926 and in the UK in The Strand in November 1926. A BBC TV adaptation of the story first aired on 12 December, 1978 in the series Wodehouse Playhouse starring John Alderton as Augustine Mulliner and Belinda Carroll as Jane Brandon. Augustine Mulliner, a meek and mild young curate, arrives in Lower-Briskett-in-the-Midden to assist the vicar, the Rev. Stanley Brandon and falls in love with the vicar's daughter, Jane Brandon. The young lovers wonder how to approach the fierce vicar about their love when a package arrives from Augustine Mulliner's aunt containing a tonic, Buck-U-Uppo (it works directly on the corpuscles). Mulliner takes a tablespoonful as recommended by his aunt and becomes more confident and assertive. The next morning, after another tablespoonful, he rescues a visiting bishop chased up a tree by a dog and firmly ends a quarrel between the bishop and the vicar, receives the vicar's blessings for his love for Jane, saves the bishop from being forced to wear thick
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    Piccadilly Jim

    Piccadilly Jim is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on February 24, 1917 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York, and in the United Kingdom in May 1918 by Herbert Jenkins, London. The story had previously appeared in the US in the Saturday Evening Post between 16 September and 11 November 1916. The novel features Ogden Ford and his mother Nesta (both previously encountered in The Little Nugget (1913)). Nesta has remarried, to the hen-pecked, baseball-loving millionaire Mr. Peter Pett, and Ogden remains spoilt and obnoxious. The story takes its title from the charismatic character of Jimmy Crocker, Nesta's nephew and a reforming playboy. 'Jim' is called upon to assist in the kidnapping of Ogden, amongst much confusion involving imposters, crooks, detectives, butlers, aunts etc. - all in the name of romance of course. Piccadilly Jim has been adapted as a film three times, in 1919, 1936 and 2004, with Jimmy Crocker played by, respectively, Owen Moore, Robert Montgomery and Sam Rockwell. The 2004 version had a screenplay adapted by Julian Fellowes and was directed by John McKay.
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    Salman Rushdie

    Salman Rushdie

    Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (Hindi: अहमद सलमान रुशदी (Devanagari), احمد سلمان رشدی (Nastaʿlīq);  /sælˈmɑːn ˈrʊʃdi/; born 19 June 1947) is a British Indian novelist and essayist. His second novel, Midnight's Children (1981), won the Booker Prize in 1981. Much of his fiction is set on the Indian subcontinent. He is said to combine magical realism with historical fiction; his work is concerned with the many connections, disruptions and migrations between East and West. His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses (1988), was the centre of a major controversy, provoking protests from Muslims in several countries, some violent. Death threats were made against him, including a fatwā issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the Supreme Leader of Iran, on 14 February 1989. Rushdie was appointed Commandeur de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France in January 1999. In June 2007, Queen Elizabeth II knighted him for his services to literature. In 2008, The Times ranked him thirteenth on its list of the fifty greatest British writers since 1945. Since 2000, Rushdie has lived in the United States, where he has worked at Emory University and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His most
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    The Prince and Betty

    The Prince and Betty is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse. It was originally published in Ainslee's Magazine in the United States in January 1912, and, in a slightly different form, as a serial in Strand Magazine in the United Kingdom between February and April 1912, before being published in book form, in the UK only, by Mills & Boon, London, on 1 May that year. A substantially different version, which incorporated the plot of Psmith, Journalist, was published in the US by W. J. Watt, New York on 14 February 1912. The story tells of how unscrupulous millionaire Benjamin Scobell decides to build a casino on the small Mediterranean island of Mervo, dragging in the unwitting heir to the throne to help. Little does he know that his stepdaughter Betty has history with the young man John Maude, and his schemes lead to a rift between the newly-reunited pair. The US novel version of The Prince and Betty combines the original story, transferred to a New York setting, with the plot of Psmith, Journalist, substantially rewritten to merge in the romance of John Maude (who becomes an American in this version) and Betty. A silent, black-and-white film version was made in 1919; it featured Boris
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    174

    Ukridge and the Old Stepper

    "Ukridge and the Old Stepper" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the June 9, 1928 issue of Liberty, and in the United Kingdom in the June 1928 Strand. It was included in the collection Eggs, Beans and Crumpets, published in 1940. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge. Ukridge and his friend Jimmy Corcoran, the latter angry that Ukridge has stolen his best new suit, run into the titular Old Stepper in the street one day, and Corky is astounded to see Ukridge blank the fellow, despite his friendly greeting and offer of a free lunch. Ukridge explains how the chill fell on their relationship... Ukridge is sent by his Aunt Julia to her cottage in the country, mainly because her neighbour there is a successful man in the jute trade, and she hopes he may give Ukridge a job. Ukridge is sceptical, until he sees the man's daughter over his hedge and falls in love with her. Later, a stranger calls at the house, and introduces himself as Ukridge's "Uncle Percy" - having married Ukridge's stepmother's stepsister (hence the nickname "The Old Stepper") - freshly arrived from Australia. Ukridge takes him in, and is delighted
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    Quick Service

    Quick Service is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on October 4, 1940 by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States on November 11, 1940 by Doubleday, Doran, New York. Although it does not feature any of Wodehouse's regular characters or settings, it is a typically Wodehousean comedy, featuring impoverished but romantic youths, wealthy but grouchy relatives, charming and resourceful friends, chirpy criminals, country houses, imposters, servants etc. Most of the action occurs at Claines Hall in Sussex, the country seat of Mrs and Mr Steptoe of Los Angeles. The story revolves around: Mrs Chavendar, upon consuming a forkful of ham, pronounces it unfit for human consumption, and decides to call ham, ham, to Duff's face. This doesn't suit George, who is hoping to get his guardian to fork out money to allow him to trot up the aisle. So, young Sally rallies around to avert the disaster, and so meets Joss. When the two come face-to-face, Cupid does quick work on Joss, a red-blooded, efferevescent young man, and he jumps at the opportunity of playing valet at Claines Hall. Getting his employer, that tough-egg, Steptoe, to waltz to his tune is but a
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    176

    Birth of a Salesman

    "Birth of a Salesman" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the 26 March 1950 issue of This Week magazine. Part of the Blandings Castle canon, it features the absent-minded peer Lord Emsworth, and was included in the collection Nothing Serious (1950). The story's title is a play on Death of a Salesman, the now-classic stageplay by Arthur Miller, which had won a Pulitzer Prize the previous year. Lord Emsworth is visiting America for the wedding of his niece Veronica to millionaire Tipton Plimsoll. With currency restrictions forcing him to stay at Freddie's house in Long Island, Emsworth finds himself ill at ease, chafed by his son's new-found self-confidence, the result of his successes as a salesman. Left alone in the house one day, Emsworth finds the cold lunch left for him unappealing, and resolves to fix himself some scrambled eggs. This task proves more difficult than he recalled from his more active youth, and when a young girl calls at the door selling richly bound encyclopaedias of Sport, he invites her in to make them for him and join him at his lunch. The girl, who is only known as "Mrs Ed", reveals she is trying to earn money,
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    177

    Do Butlers Burgle Banks?

    Do Butlers Burgle Banks? is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on August 5, 1968 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, and in the United Kingdom on September 19, 1968 by Barrie & Jenkins, London. Bond's Bank, which Mike Bond has inherited from his over-enthusiastically philanthropist uncle Horace, is insolvent. With the examiners due shortly and no solution in sight, Mike faces the prospect of a stretch in the clink for not revealing this earlier. If the criminal mastermind Appleby had known this, he probably wouldn't have insinuated his way into the temporary butler vacancy. But then he probably wouldn't have fallen in love with Ada. And Chicago mobster Charlie Yost wouldn't have come along to settle his score with Appleby.
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    Ice in the Bedroom

    Ice in the Bedroom is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published as a book in the United States (where the title was The Ice in the Bedroom) on February 2, 1961 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, and in the United Kingdom on October 15, 1961 by Herbert Jenkins, London. The story was originally published, in a condensed version, in the November 5, 1960, issue of the Toronto Star Weekly. It features several Wodehouse characters from earlier books, including Drones Freddie Widgeon and Oofy Prosser, and the trio of criminals, "Chimp" Twist and "Soapy" and "Dolly" Molloy. The novel has two intertwined sub-plots. Freddie Widgeon, who wishes to marry Sally Foster, is seeking to escape from a dull job in a London office to become the manager of a coffee plantation in Kenya. Meanwhile, in the normally quiet suburb of Valley Fields, where Freddie is living, a cache of jewellery, hidden in the home of Freddie's neighbour, is attracting the attention of a small gang of petty criminals. The story is essentially a re-working of Sam the Sudden (1925), which was also set in the fictional Valley Fields, had a sub-plot in which the same three crooks were hunting for hidden treasure, and entwined
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    179

    Lord Emsworth

    Clarence Threepwood, 9th Earl of Emsworth, or Lord Emsworth, is a recurring fictional character in the Blandings stories by British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. He is the amiable and somewhat absent-minded head of the large Threepwood family. Longing for nothing more than to potter peacefully in the idyllic gardens of Blandings Castle, he must frequently face the unpleasant reality of his domineering sisters and familial duties. Wodehouse frequently named his characters after places with which he was familiar, and Lord Emsworth takes his name from the Hampshire town of Emsworth, where Wodehouse spent some time in the 1890s; he first went there in 1903, at the invitation of his friend Herbert Westbrook, and later took a lease on a house there called "Threepwood Cottage", which name he used as Lord Emsworth's family name. Westbrook worked at a school in the town, and Wodehouse also mentions it in his 1909 novel Mike, as the place where Mike was at school prior to Wrykyn. Some of the many characters who are named after places in the vicinity of Emsworth include Lord Emsworth's heir, Viscount Bosham, Lady Anne Warblington, Lord Stockheath, the Duchess of Havant (in A Gentleman of
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    Roderick Spode

    Roderick Spode

    Roderick Spode, Bt, 7th Earl of Sidcup, often known as Spode or Lord Sidcup, is a recurring fictional character from the Jeeves novels of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being an "amateur Dictator" and the leader of a fictional fascist group in London called The Black Shorts. In the 1990s television series, Jeeves and Wooster, he is portrayed by John Turner and depicted as having a rather Hitleresque appearance. Spode is a large and intimidating figure, appearing "as if Nature had intended to make a gorilla, and had changed its mind at the last moment". He is constantly in love with Madeline Bassett, and though he intended to remain a bachelor during his career as a dictator, he nevertheless attempted to protect her from men "playing fast and loose"; to this end, he threatened on several occasions to beat Bertie Wooster and Gussie Fink-Nottle to a jelly. He marches his followers around London and the countryside, preaching loudly to the public on the dissoluteness of modern society until a heckler hits him in the eye with a potato. Spode is modelled after Sir Oswald Mosley, leader of the British Union of Fascists, who were nicknamed the blackshirts. Spode was at first an
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    181

    The Reverent Wooing of Archibald

    "The Reverent Wooing of Archibald" is a short story by British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a part of the Mr Mulliner series and related to the Drones Club series. It features Archibald Mulliner, the sock collector who can mimic a hen laying an egg, and his love Aurelia Cammarleigh. Its was first published in the August 1928 issue of UK literary magazine Strand, and first appeared in the U.S. in the September 1928 issue of Cosmopolitan. It was collected in the 1929 book Mr Mulliner Speaking. "The Reverent Wooing of Archibald" has been adapted on TV by BBC One for the sitcom anthology Comedy Playhouse, as a 30 minutes episode, aired 9 July 1974. "The Reverent Wooing of Archibald" is the first of three Archibald-and-Aurelia short stories told by Mr Mulliner, about his nephew Archibald and his love for Aurelia. The two next are "Archibald and the Masses" and "The Code of the Mulliners", both collected in Young Men in Spats (1936) As it nears closing-time at the Angler's Rest, several drinkers discuss changing trends in modern society, especially concerning the proportions and personality of young women. Four men, identified by their drinks – a Gin-and-Ginger-Ale, a Draught
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    The Swoop! and Other Stories

    The Swoop! and Other Stories is a collection of early short stories and a novella by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on April 11, 1979 by The Seabury Press, New York, four years after Wodehouse's death. The collection was edited and introduced by Wodehouse's biographer, David A. Jasen, and featured an "appreciation" by Malcolm Muggeridge. The Swoop! (a satirical spoof) was published as a book in the United Kingdom in 1909, and many of the stories had previously appeared in magazines. Two of them also featured in the UK collection Tales of St. Austin's (1903), and four in The Man Upstairs (1914).
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    Douglas Adams

    Douglas Adams

    • Web Link(s): Douglas Adams @ discogs
    Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist and dramatist. He is best known as the author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which started life in 1978 as a BBC radio comedy before developing into a "trilogy" of five books that sold over 15 million copies in his lifetime, a television series, several stage plays, comics, a computer game, and in 2005 a feature film. Adams's contribution to UK radio is commemorated in The Radio Academy's Hall of Fame. Adams also wrote Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (1987) and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (1988), and co-wrote The Meaning of Liff (1983), Last Chance to See (1990), and three stories for the television series Doctor Who. A posthumous collection of his work, including an unfinished novel, was published as The Salmon of Doubt in 2002. Adams became known as an advocate for environmentalism and conservation, and also as a lover of fast cars, cameras, technological innovation, and the Apple Macintosh. He was a staunch atheist, famously imagining a sentient puddle who wakes up one morning and thinks, "This is an interesting world I find myself in—an interesting hole I find myself
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    Tales of St. Austin's

    Tales of St. Austin's

    Tales of St. Austin's is a collection of short stories and essays, all with a school theme, by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published on 10 November 1903 by Adam & Charles Black, London, all except one item having previously appeared in the schoolboy magazines, The Captain and Public School Magazine. The stories are set in the fictional public school of St. Austin's, which was also the setting for The Pothunters (1902); they revolve around cricket, rugby, petty gambling and other boyish escapades. Stories Essays Several of the stories were eventually published in the U.S. in the collections The Swoop! and Other Stories (1979) and The Eighteen-Carat Kid and Other Stories (1980); others, along with many school stories never published in book form in Wodehouse's lifetime, were collected in Tales of Wrykyn and Elsewhere (1997).
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    A certain critic—for such men, I regret to say, do exist—made the nasty remark about my last novel that it contained “all the old Wodehouse characters under different names”. ... With my superior intelligence, I have outgeneralled this man by putting in a

    Full text of the quotation: A certain critic—for such men, I regret to say, do exist—made the nasty remark about my last novel that it contained “all the old Wodehouse characters under different names”. He has probably now been eaten by bears, like the children who made mock of the prophet Elisha: but if he still survives he will not be able to make a similar charge against ''Summer Lightning''. With my superior intelligence, I have outgeneralled this man by putting in all the old Wodehouse characters under the same names. Pretty silly it will make him feel, I rather fancy.
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    188

    Anything Goes

    Anything Goes is a musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. The original book was a collaborative effort by Guy Bolton and P.G. Wodehouse, heavily revised by the team of Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. The story concerns madcap antics aboard an ocean liner bound from New York to London. Billy Crocker is a stowaway in love with heiress Hope Harcourt, who is engaged to Lord Evelyn Oakleigh. Nightclub singer Reno Sweeney and Public Enemy #13 Moonface Martin aid Billy in his quest to win Hope. The musical introduced such songs as "Anything Goes", "You're the Top", and "I Get a Kick Out of You." Since its 1934 debut at the Neil Simon Theatre (at the time known as the Alvin) on Broadway, the musical has been revived several times in the United States and Britain and has been filmed twice. The musical has long been a popular choice for school and community productions. The original idea for a musical set on board an ocean liner came from producer Vinton Freedley, who was living on a boat, having left the US to avoid his creditors. He selected the writing team, P.G. Wodehouse and Guy Bolton, and the star, Ethel Merman. The first draft of the show was called Crazy Week, which became
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    189

    Charlie Connelly

    Charlie Connelly (born 22 August 1970, London, England) is an author and broadcaster. Connelly began his career as a writer of books relating to sporting events, most commonly football. His breakthrough 2002 book, Stamping Grounds, was his fifth, and followed the Liechtenstein national football team in their unsuccessful campaign to qualify for the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Connelly's 2004 follow-up, Attention All Shipping, which was his first to deviate from football as its topic, has been listed as a bestseller and selected as "Book Of The Week" by the UK radio station BBC Radio 4. In 2007, Connelly released his seventh book, In Search of Elvis, which again focused on travel and the impression left by entertainer Elvis Presley. Connelly's eighth book, And Did Those Feet: Walking Through 2000 Years Of British And Irish History, was published in December 2008 and was again a BBC Radio 4 "Book of the Week", in January 2009 read by Martin Freeman. Our Man In Hibernia was published in 2010 and detailed his move to Ireland and his search for his Irish roots while his tenth book, Bring Me Sunshine, which examines the history of the weather and weather forecasting, appeared in September 2012.
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    190

    Money in the Bank

    Money in the Bank is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on 19 January 1942 by Doubleday, Doran, New York, and in the United Kingdom on 27 May 1946 by Herbert Jenkins, London. The UK publication was delayed while Wodehouse was under suspicion of collaboration during World War II. George, 6th Viscount Uffenham, a typically impecunious and absent-minded Wodehousian aristocrat, mislays his Aunt's fortune in diamonds, and is forced to let his family pile, returning there disguised as a butler named Cakebread to seek the gems. The story also features the crooks Alexander "Chimp" Twist and "Dolly" and "Soapy" Molloy, who had earlier appeared in Sam the Sudden (1925) and Money for Nothing (1928).
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    191

    Mr Mulliner Speaking

    Mr Mulliner Speaking is a collection of nine short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United Kingdom on April 30, 1929 by Herbert Jenkins, and in the United States on February 21, 1930 by Doubleday, Doran. All stories are narrated by the inexorable Mr Mulliner about members of his prodigious family, including one who is also a member of the Drones Club. The last three of the stories are about Bobbie Wickham; they were revised and given a Mr Mulliner frame for the book.
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    192

    Success Story

    "Success Story" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the March 1, 1947 issue of Argosy, under the title "Ukie Invests in Human Nature". It was included in the collection Nothing Serious, published in 1950, and features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge.
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    193

    The Man Upstairs

    The Man Upstairs is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 23 January 1914 by Methuen & Co., London. Most of the stories had previously appeared in magazines, generally Strand Magazine in the UK and Cosmopolitan or Collier's Weekly in the United States. Although the book was not published in the U.S., many of the stories were eventually made available to U.S. readers in The Uncollected Wodehouse (1976) and The Swoop! and Other Stories (1979) It is a miscellaneous collection, not featuring any of Wodehouse's regular characters; most of the stories concern love and romance. Annette Brougham, a quick-tempered female composer and music-teacher, is disturbed by a knocking on her ceiling. She visits the flat above to complain, but despite her initial feelings of anger towards him, she soon finds herself drawn to "Alan Beverley", the modest and charming struggling artist she finds there. Reginald Sellers, another resident of the building, a pompous and self-important painter, criticizes Alan's work harshly, and Annette defends him, but regrets her cruelty towards Reginald. The boorish Sellers finds some success with his art, selling
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    194

    The Return of Battling Billson

    "The Return of Battling Billson" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the August 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the September 1923 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. Our plucky narrator Corky, researching for an article in the East End, has his pocket picked and finds himself unable to pay a bill at an inn. Kicked out by the landlord, he is rescued and avenged by a huge, red-headed man - none other than "Battling" Billson. He gives Billson Ukridge's address, and next day is landed with looking after Flossie's ghastly mother and ghoulish brother Cecil, despite having no recollection of who Flossie may be. He beards Ukridge later, and is reminded of Billson's girl, who, it seems, is preventing the huge sailor from returning to the ring, for fear of him damaging his face. Ukridge wants Billson to fight, in a deal which would net them £200, and dealing with the mother, who Flossie can't stand, is Ukridge's way of bringing her on side. Billson enters the ring and starts strongly, but soon fades, and looks certain to
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    195

    Ukridge

    Ukridge is a collection of short stories by P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on June 3, 1924 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on March 19, 1926 by George H. Doran, New York, under the title He Rather Enjoyed It. The stories had previously appeared in Cosmopolitan Magazine in the U.S. and in the Strand Magazine in the U.K The book contains ten short stories relating the adventures of Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, narrated by Ukridge's long-suffering friend, the writer "Corky" Corcoran. Ukridge had previously appeared in Love Among the Chickens (1906), Wodehouse's first novel to be published in the U.S., and would return in some other shorts. The timeline of his adventures is rather hard to follow - the tales collected here begin with him meeting up with Corky after a long separation, and follow fairly neatly on from each other, via being disowned by his Aunt Julia to meeting Millie, to whom he is married by the time of Love Among the Chickens. In the later shorts, however, he seems to be still single and living on and off with his aunt.
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    196

    William Tell Told Again

    William Tell Told Again is a retelling of the William Tell legend in prose and verse, with illustrations. The main, prose element was written by P. G. Wodehouse, while Philip Dadd supplied the frontispiece and 15 full-page illustrations, all in colour. The 15 illustrations were accompanied by verses written by John W. Houghton. The book was published on 11 November 1904 by Adam & Charles Black, London, and was dedicated "to Biddy O'Sullivan for a Christmas present". Although Wodehouse dedicated books to 43 different people, the identity of "Biddy O'Sullivan" was not known until 2006, when she was identified as the young daughter of one Denis O'Sullivan (1869-1908), an actor and singer who was a friend of Wodehouse in the early 1900s. The Wodehouse text of William Tell Told Again was reprinted, without the verses and with different illustrations, by "Bowyer", in an anthology, The Favourite Wonder Book, in 1938.
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    197

    Pillingshot

    Pillingshot is one the schoolboys of St Austin's, a character in some of Wodehouse's early short stories (school stories). His main characteristics are jammy fingers and a runny nose. Moreover, he is cheeky, and likes to pose as a 'master detective'!
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    198

    A Gentleman of Leisure

    A Gentleman of Leisure is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse. The basic plot first appeared in a novella, The Gem Collector, in the December 1909 issue of Ainslee's Magazine. It was substantially revised and expanded for publication as a book, under the title The Intrusion of Jimmy, by W.J. Watt and Co., New York, on 11 May 1910. It was serialised under that title in the British weekly magazine Titbits, between 11 June and 10 September, before being published, as A Gentleman of Leisure, by Alston Rivers Ltd, London, on 15 November 1910. There are minor textual differences between the American and British editions of the book. A Gentleman of Leisure was adapted for the stage in 1911 and has twice been filmed, in 1915 and 1923. The action begins with playboy bachelor Jimmy Pitt in New York; having fallen in love on a transatlantic liner, he befriends a small-time burglar and breaks into a police captain's house as a result of a bet. The cast of characters head to England, and from there on it is a typically Wodehousean romantic farce, set at the stately Dreever Castle, overflowing with imposters, detectives, crooks, scheming lovers and conniving aunts. Sir James Willoughby Pitt, baronet, a
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    199

    Anatole

    Anatole, a fictional character in the works of P. G. Wodehouse, is a highly skilled yet temperamental French chef employed first by Mr and Mrs Bingo Little and later by Dahlia Travers, Bertie Wooster's aunt and chatelaine of Brinkley Court. He was born and raised in Provence, where he learnt his art. Anatole, as described in Right Ho, Jeeves, is "a tubby little man with a moustache of the outsize or soup-strainer type". The ends of his moustache reflect his mood, pointing upward when he is happy and drooping if he is not. He speaks limited English in an idiosyncratic mix of upper-class-twit and working-class Brooklyn, having learnt the language partly from an Irish chauffeur called Maloney while employed by an American family in Nice and partly from Bingo Little. When agitated, he tends to resort to colourful French or Provençal expressions, such as "nom d'un nom d'un nom", "burluberu" or "marmiton de Domange". Everyone who tastes his cooking speaks forever thereafter in reverential tones of his culinary artistry, often referring to him as "God's gift to the gastric juices". He has an "impulsive Provençal temperament", which leads him to resign his post at the merest suggestion of
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    200
    Baronet

    Baronet

    A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a hereditary baronetcy awarded by the British Crown. The practice of awarding baronetcies was originally introduced in England in the 1300s and was used by James I of England in 1611 in order to raise funds. A baronetcy is the only hereditary honour which is not a peerage. A baronet is styled "Sir" like a knight, but ranks above all knighthoods except for the Order of the Garter and, in Scotland, the Order of the Thistle. A baronetcy is not a knighthood and the recipient does not receive an accolade. The term baronet has medieval origins. Sir Thomas de la More, describing the Battle of Battenberg (1321), mentioned that baronets took part, along with barons and knights. According to The Official Roll of the Baronetage: The term baronet was applied to the noblemen who lost the right of individual summons to Parliament, and was used in this sense in a statute of Richard II. A similar rank of lower stature is the banneret. The revival of baronetcies can be dated to Sir Robert Cotton's discovery in the late 16th or early 17th century of
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    202

    Galahad Threepwood

    The Honourable Galahad "Gally" Threepwood is a fictional character in the Blandings stories by P. G. Wodehouse. Lord Emsworth's younger brother, a lifelong bachelor, Gally was, according to Beach, the Blandings butler, "somewhat wild as a young man". When he appears in the Blandings books, he is in his mid- to late-fifties, has thick grey hair and wears a black-rimmed monocle on a black ribbon. Galahad is the only one of the Threepwood siblings never to have married. His true love was Dolly Henderson, with whom he was in love from 1896 to 1898 but who, as a lounge singer who wore pink tights, was not an appropriate bride for a man of his social status. His father sent him to South Africa to prevent him from marrying, following which he spent most of his life drinking heavily and getting up to mischief. A member of the notorious Pelican Club, he appears to have travelled widely and known many people. The prospect of Galahad's writing his reminiscences causes a good deal of consternation among England's well-established upper-class because he had, in younger days, been "a notable lad about town". A partier, drinker, prankster, and ladies' man, and his stories are liable to embarrass
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    Oofy Prosser

    Alexander Charles "Oofy" Prosser is a recurring fictional character from the stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being the millionaire member of the Drones Club and a friend of Jeeves's master Bertie Wooster. The most wealthy and envied member of the Club, he has the nickname "Oofy", which is British slang for "wealthy" or "made of money". Because Oofy is both constantly being asked for £5 or £10 and a miser for loans, "a man in whose wallet moths nest and raise large families", he is considered ugly on both the inside and the outside – the pimples on his face being quite famous. However, Oofy can be a big spender (serving strawberries in winter, at a cost of around a pound sterling each), or a fierce gambler (in a casino, or on bets). Oofy Prosser was featured in 8 episodes (out of 23) of the 1990–1993 British TV series Jeeves and Wooster (in seasons 1–2 and 4, aired 1990–1991 and 1993 in the UK), played by Richard Dixon. Oofy is featured in: Oofy is mentioned in:
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    Hot Water

    Hot Water is a novel by P.G. Wodehouse, first published on August 17, 1932, in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States by Doubleday, Doran, New York. The novel had been serialised in Collier's from 21 May to 6 August 1932. It was subsequently adapted for the stage by Wodehouse and his long-time collaborator Guy Bolton as The Inside Stand (1935). The story takes place at the Chateau Blissac, Brittany, and recounts the various romantic and criminal goings-on there during a house party, hosted by the Vicomte Blissac. It contains a mixture of romance, intrigue and Wodehouse's brand of humour. The story's central character is Packy Franklyn, an American millionaire and sportsman. He is engaged to Lady Beatrice Bracken and is staying in England. A chance meeting with the great Dry legislator, Senator Ambrose Opal, leads to all hell breaking loose when a letter written by the Senator to his bootlegger is used as a tool for blackmail. The book also features Gordon "Oily" Carlisle and Gertie, who reappears in the book Cocktail Time, as well as Soup Slattery and Jane Opal.
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    Jeeves in the Offing

    Jeeves in the Offing is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on 4 April 1960 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, under the title How Right You Are, Jeeves, and in the United Kingdom on 12 August 1960 by Herbert Jenkins, London. The plot is as follows: With Jeeves on vacation, Bertie is a guest at his Aunt Dahlia's spacious residence, Brinkley Court. Also in residence are American family, the Creams, who must be handled with kid gloves to prevent their canceling a big business deal with Bertie’s uncle; Audrey Upjohn, Bertie’s former headmaster, who still chills Bertie’s soul; Upjohn’s insipid daughter, Phyllis, who is infatuated with the playboy kleptomaniac wastrel American, Willie Cream, and must be put off; Bertie's old pal Roberta Wickham, engaged to be married to Bertie’s old pal Reginald Herring, who has written a caustic, libelous review of Upjohn’s memoirs and thus whose future depends on assuaging Upjohn’s wrathful soul; and familiar face Roderick Glossop, eminent psychologist to the wealthy, is there in the disguise of a butler to surreptitiously assess Willie Cream's psyche. The eighth Jeeves novel, Jeeves in the Offing chronicles another
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    206

    A Pelican at Blandings

    A Pelican at Blandings is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on September 25, 1969 by Barrie & Jenkins, London, and in the United States on February 11, 1970 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, under the title No Nudes Is Good Nudes. It is the tenth full-length novel in the Blandings Castle saga and the last one fully completed by Wodehouse. The title refers to Galahad Threepwood, a survivor of the Pelican Club. Blandings Castle lacks its usual balm for the Earl of Emsworth, as his stern sister Lady Constance Keeble is once more in residence. The Duke of Dunstable is also infesting the place again, along with the standard quota of American millionaires, romantic youths, con artists, imposters and so on. With a painting of reclining nude at the centre of numerous intrigues, Gally's genius is once again required to sort things out. Lord Emsworth is in clover at Blandings, with the only guest, Howard Chesney, easily avoided by eating alone in the library. His peace is shattered by the arrival of his sister Connie, along with a friend she has met on the boat over from America, Vanessa Polk, and the news that Dunstable is soon to descend upon the castle
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    207

    Bachelors Anonymous

    Bachelors Anonymous is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on October 15, 1973 by Barrie & Jenkins, London and in the United States on August 28, 1974 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York. Much married, much divorced movie mogul Ivor Llewellyn (friend of Monty Bodkin), and his long-suffering lawyer Ephraim Trout, find the idea of a support group for bachelors appealing. The members can watch each other's backs, keeping them safe from roving females. With spring in the air, however, romance is never far behind...
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    208

    Barmy in Wonderland

    Barmy in Wonderland is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 21 April 1952 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on May 8, 1952 by Doubleday & Company, New York, under the title Angel Cake. The central character is Cyril "Barmy" Fotheringay-Phipps (pronounced "Funghy Fipps"), who also appears in several of the Jeeves and Drones Club stories and novels. The book recounts his adventures in the theatrical world. Wodehouse adapted the novel from a play, The Butter and Egg Man, by George S. Kaufman and, echoing Shakespeare's dedication of his Sonnets, dedicated the US edition to "the onlie begetter of these insuing sonnets, Mr G S K".
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    209

    Lord Emsworth and Others

    Lord Emsworth and Others is a collection of nine short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on March 19, 1937 by Herbert Jenkins, London; it was not published in the United States. The Crime Wave at Blandings, which was published on June 25, 1937 by Doubleday, Doran, New York, is a very different collection, sharing only three of its seven titles with the UK book. Penguin Books published a UK edition of The Crime Wave at Blandings in 1966. The stories in both books had all previously appeared in both British and American magazines. Lord Emsworth and Others contains one story set at Blandings Castle, three golf stories narrated by the Oldest Member, one story featuring Drones Club member Freddie Widgeon, one tale narrated by Mr Mulliner, and three Ukridge stories. The Crime Wave at Blandings contains the Blandings, Mulliner and Freddie Widgeon stories, to which were added two more Drones stories, a Bingo Little story, and a novella, "The Medicine Girl", which had been published separately in the UK as Doctor Sally (1932). The three Oldest Member stories had already appeared in the US edition of Young Men in Spats (1936); the three Ukridge stories were
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    210
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    211

    The Swoop

    The Swoop!, or How Clarence Saved England is a short comic novel by P G Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom by Alston Rivers Ltd, London, on 16 April 1909. Its subtitle is A Tale of the Great Invasion. An adapted and much abbreviated version, set in the United States, appeared in the July and August 1915 issues of Vanity Fair under the title The Military Invasion of America and with the subtitle A Remarkable Tale of the German-Japanese Invasion of 1916. The original story was not published in the United States until 1979, four years after Wodehouse's death, when it was included in the collection The Swoop! and Other Stories. The Swoop! tells of the simultaneous invasion of England by several armies — "England was not merely beneath the heel of the invader. It was beneath the heels of nine invaders. There was barely standing-room." — and features references to many well-known figures of the day, among them the politician Herbert Gladstone, novelist Edgar Wallace, actor-managers Seymour Hicks and George Edwardes, and boxer Bob Fitzsimmons. The invaders are the Russians under Grand Duke Vodkakoff, the Germans under Prince Otto of Saxe-Pfennig — the reigning British
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    212

    Watkyn Bassett

    Sir Watkyn Bassett CBE is a recurring fictional character in the stories of English comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. Bassett is the father of Madeline Bassett, whose mistaken belief that Bertie Wooster wishes to marry her is the basis of a major sub-plot in several stories. He is also the uncle and guardian of Stephanie "Stiffy" Byng. Early in The Code of the Woosters, Bertie Wooster recalls that, only a few months before, he had appeared in the Bosher Street police court, charged with stealing a policeman's helmet on Boat Race Night, and was fined £5 by Bassett, who was then a magistrate. A few weeks after that event, so Wooster recalls, Bassett inherited a fortune from an unnamed relative, retired from the bench, and bought Totleigh Towers, where he took up residence. Wooster expresses his opinion that Bassett acquired his fortune by pocketing the fines he imposed as a magistrate. Bassett is a noted collector of antique silver, his collection rivalling that of Wooster's uncle, Tom Travers: both men "will stop at nothing" to add to their collection. The main plot of The Code of the Woosters centres around the rivalry between Bassett and Travers, and their desire each to acquire a
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    213

    Buried Treasure

    "Buried Treasure" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the September 1936 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the September 27, 1936 edition of This Week, under the title "Hidden Treasure". It is another tale told by pub raconteur Mr Mulliner, concerning a member of his large family, and it was included in the UK collection Lord Emsworth and Others, (1937). Mr Mulliner's nephew Brancepeth wants to marry his beloved Muriel, but hasn't a sou to do it on, so her father Lord Bromborough is forcing her to marry the boob of the first water Edwin Potter (heir of Potter's Potted Meats). Bromborough has a weakness, though: his great moustache Joyeuse, which he compares favorably to Love in Idleness, the facial decoration of Potter's father Sir Preston. Having been invited to Rumpling Hall to paint a portrait of Lord Bromborough, Brancepeth realizes that if he can turn a moustachless Bromborough into an animated cartoon in Hollywood, fame, fortune, and Muriel are his.
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    214

    Company For Henry

    Company For Henry is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on May 12, 1967 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, under the title The Purloined Paperweight, and in the United Kingdom on October 26, 1967 by Barrie & Jenkins, London. Not featuring any of Wodehouse's wide cast of regular characters, Company for Henry is nevertheless a typically Wodehousean tale of romance and intrigue among impoverished aristocrats, former musical stars and American millionaires, set at a country house.
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    215

    Jill the Reckless

    Jill The Reckless is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on October 11, 1920 by George H. Doran, New York, (under the title The Little Warrior), and in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, on 4 July 1921. It was serialised in Collier's (US) between 10 April and 28 August 1920, in Maclean's (Canada) between 1 August and 15 November 1920, in both cases as The Little Warrior, and, as Jill the Reckless, in the Grand Magazine (UK), from September 1920 to June 1921. The heroine here, Jill Mariner, is a young woman from the lower end of the upper class. We follow her through financial disaster, a broken engagement, an awkward stay with some grasping relatives, employment as a chorus girl, and of course, the finding of true love. Other characters include wealthy Drone Freddie Rooke and writer Wally Mason, her childhood friends; her financially inept uncle Major Christopher Selby; her fiancee at the beginning of the book, the M.P Derek Underhill, and his domineering mother, Lady Underhill; Jill's unpleasant relatives, Elmer and Julia Mariner; more Drones Club members, various chorus girls, composers and other theatrical types, and, of course,
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    216

    Carry on, Jeeves

    Carry On, Jeeves is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United Kingdom on 9 October 1925 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on October 7, 1927 by George H. Doran, New York. Many of the stories had previously appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, and some were rewritten versions of stories in the collection My Man Jeeves (1919). The book is considered part of the Jeeves canon. The first story in the book, "Jeeves Takes Charge", describes Jeeves' arrival in his master's life, as a replacement for Wooster's previous, thieving valet, and features Lady Florence Craye, as well as a passing mention of Lord Emsworth and Blandings Castle. Several of the other stories are set in New York, and the book includes appearances by regular characters Bingo Little, Aunt Dahlia, Anatole, and Sir Roderick Glossop.
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    217

    Lord Emsworth and the Girl Friend

    "Lord Emsworth and the Girl Friend" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the 23 January 1926 issue of Liberty, and in the United Kingdom in the February 1926 Strand. Part of the Blandings Castle canon, it features the absent-minded peer Lord Emsworth, and was included in the collection Blandings Castle and Elsewhere (1935), although the story takes place sometime between the events of Leave it to Psmith (1923) and Summer Lightning (1929). Despite glorious weather, Lord Emsworth is miserable; it is August Bank Holiday, which at Blandings means the annual Blandings Parva School Treat. The precious grounds are to be overrun with fairground rides, tea-tents and other amusements for the throngs (their numbers padded this year by a number of children visiting from London for the fresh air), and Emsworth is forced by his sister Connie to wear a stiff collar and a top hat, despite the warm weather and his strong protests. On top of that, Glaswegian Head Gardener Angus McAllister is making noises on his pet hobby, the project to gravel the famous Yew Alley. Emsworth, fond of its mossy carpet, loathes the idea, but his sister is in favour, and
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    218

    Lord Worplesdon

    Percival "Percy" Craye, later Earl of Worplesdon, is a recurring fictional character from the Jeeves stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being Agatha Gregson's second husband, who would have been her first but for Agatha's discovering that he had behaved shamefully at a ball at Covent Garden, whereupon she broke their engagement and married Spenser Gregson instead. Craye, who by the time Spenser is dead has become Earl of Worplesdon, is a distinguished member of the aristocracy, and a landowner in various parts of the kingdom. Lord Worplesdon is Bertie Wooster's uncle by marriage, and once chased the fifteen-year old Bertie "for five miles across difficult terrain" with a hunting crop, after finding him smoking one of his special cigars. He is also the father, by his first wife, of Lady Florence Craye, to whom Bertie was engaged on a number of occasions, and of Edwin, a brattish child with a liking to playing practical jokes on guests. Lord Worplesdon was first mentioned in the short story "Jeeves Takes Charge", in which it was said that he sat down to breakfast one morning, cried "Eggs! Eggs! Damn all eggs!", and ran out of his house, "never again to return to the
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    Bobbie Wickham

    Roberta "Bobbie" Wickham is a recurring fictional character in the Jeeves and Mr Mulliner stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a troublesome redheaded girl, enamoured of practical jokes which often result in general pandemonium. Bobbie Wickham is the daughter of Lady Wickham and the late Sir Cuthbert of Skeldings Hall, Herts. She is also the first cousin, once removed, of Mr. Mulliner, Lady Wickham being his cousin. On more than one occasion Bertie Wooster becomes enamoured of her, and his valet Jeeves, realising that she might be a little too independent and wild for Bertie to tame her, has had to get him out of the daft scrape she has connived him into being a part of. In "Jeeves and the Yule-tide Spirit" (1927), the most notable of these schemes was the affair with Tuppy Glossop's pierced hot water bottles in her parents' house. In "Jeeves and the Kid Clementina" (1930), she also used her womanly charms to get Bertie take her and her kid cousin, Clementina, to dinner, and also to get him to drive Clementina back to school, where he was caught by a policeman while sitting in a tree on the school property. Bobbie Wickham is featured in:
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    Honoria Glossop

    Honoria Glossop is a particularly formidable female from the Jeeves stories by P. G. Wodehouse. She is of a rather muscular, sporty temperament, and as such remains unattached. Honoria is the daughter of the renowned nerve specialist Sir Roderick Glossop and his wife Lady Glossop. She is portrayed in the TV series Jeeves and Wooster by Elizabeth Kettle. Honoria was on many occasions in the stories engaged to Bertie Wooster, something which he, when it came to mind, disliked very much, especially as she persisted in trying to 'Improve his mind' with the aid of several books on famous philosophers. However, he managed to shake her off by outraging her parents, thanks to the aid of his valet, Jeeves, whom she dislikes intensely. Since then, she held a torch for Bertie, and he does his best to keep as far away from her as possible. In Jeeves and the Greasy Bird, Honoria Glossop becomes engaged to a young modern novelist called Blair Eggelston and it looks as if Bertie is finally safe from her. Her braying laugh is a noteworthy feature mentioned in several books, usually in elaborate similes such as "a laugh that sounded like a squadron of cavalry charging across a tin bridge."
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    221

    Rev. Augustine Mulliner

    The Rev. Augustine Mulliner is a recurring fictional character from the Mr Mulliner short stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being a Mulliner nephew who rose from meek curate to married vicar thanks to the Buck-U-Uppo tonic. Starting as a timid, pale young curate at Lower Briskett-in-the-Midden, he went on to marry his vicar's daughter Jane Brandon (Mulliner's Buck-U-Uppo). He became secretary to the Bishop of Stortford ("The Bishop's Move"). Augustine then became the vicar of Walsingford-below-Chiveney-on-Thames ("Gala Night"). His rise through the ranks of the Church of England was partially due to his uncle Wilfred's tonic Buck-U-Uppo.
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    222

    The Debut of Battling Billson

    "The Debut of Battling Billson" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the June 1923 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the July 1923 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. Ukridge, observing the wealth displayed by a prominent boxing manager, resolves to get in on the game himself, and thus make his fortune. By good fortune, an old acquaintance of his from his world-roaming days, an enormous and powerful sailor named Billson, famed for his ability to mop up stevedores by the dozen in bar fights, has landed in England and is looking for shore work, having fallen for a barmaid named Flossie. Ukridge scoops him up, and the two visit James Corcoran prior to heading to the training ground. Arriving at his first fight, Billson (now dubbed "Battling Billson") meets his opponent, and is touched by the man's life story. In the ring, this sentimentality affects his performance, until a few strong blows enrage him; he is, however, hesitant, and is knocked out when distracted. Ukridge hears that the champion, Tod Bingham, is offering
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    The Inimitable Jeeves

    The Inimitable Jeeves

    The Inimitable Jeeves is a semi-novel collecting Jeeves stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, on May 17, 1923, and in the United States by George H. Doran, New York on September 28, 1923, under the title Jeeves. The novel combined 11 previously-published stories, of which the first six and the last were split in two, to make a book of 18 chapters. It is now often printed in 11 chapters, mirroring the original stories. All the stories had previously appeared in the Strand Magazine in the UK, between December 1921 and November 1922, except for one, "Jeeves and the Chump Cyril", which had appeared in the Strand in August 1918. That story had appeared in the Saturday Evening Post (US) in June 1918. All the other stories appeared in Cosmopolitan magazine in the US between December 1921 and December 1922. This was the second collection of Jeeves stories, after My Man Jeeves (1919); the next collection would be Carry on, Jeeves, in 1925. All of the short stories are connected and most of them involve Bertie's friend Bingo Little, who is always falling in love. The original story titles and publication dates were as follows (with
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    224

    Uncle Fred Flits By

    "Uncle Fred Flits By" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the July 1935 edition of Redbook, and in the United Kingdom in the December 1935 issue of the Strand. It was included in the collection Young Men in Spats (1936). It marks the first appearances of Pongo Twistleton and his mischievous Uncle Fred, who would go on to appear in four novels, including two visits to Blandings Castle. Our tale is told by a Crumpet to a guest at the Drones Club. On seeing Pongo Twistleton acting in a distracted and despairing manner, the Crumpet explains that a visit from Pongo's notorious Uncle Fred is imminent, and that previous visits have shown that despair is the only sensible option in such circumstances. He relates one particular incident... When Uncle Fred suggests to his nephew a visit to a suburb, once an estate owned by an uncle when he was younger, Pongo is amazed and relieved, believing the suburbs do not hold anything like the opportunities offered by the city for someone like his uncle to cut loose and cause havoc. They head down and inspect the old family land, but find themselves caught in a shower of rain and take shelter in a doorway.
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    225

    Uneasy Money

    Uneasy Money is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on March 17, 1916 by D. Appleton & Company, New York, and in the United Kingdom on October 4, 1917 by Methuen & Co., London. The story had earlier been serialised in the U.S in the Saturday Evening Post from December 1915, and in the UK in the Strand Magazine starting December 1916. It was the second novel Wodehouse sold to George Horace Lorimer of the Post, after Something Fresh. The story doesn't include any of Wodehouse's regular characters or settings; instead it tells of amiable, kindly but hard-up Lord "Bill" Dawlish, golf lover, and his adventures in romance, golf and the theatre. William FitzWilliam Delamere Chalmers, Lord Dawlish, is hard-up for money. When he is unexpectedly bequeathed a million pounds by an American he once helped at golf, and furthermore learns that the millionaire left his niece and nephew only twenty pounds, he is uneasy. He endeavours to approach them (in then-rural Long Island) and see if he can fix up something, like giving them half the inheritance. He discovers that it can be difficult to give money away... Also features engagements being broken off and renewed anew,
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    226

    Aunt Dahlia

    Dahlia Travers (née Wooster) is a recurring fictional character in the Jeeves novels of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being best known as Bertie Wooster's bonhomous, red-faced Aunt Dahlia. She is much beloved by her nephew, in contrast with her sister, Bertie's Aunt Agatha. Proprietor of the weekly newspaper for women Milady's Boudoir, she is married to Tom Travers, mother of Angela Travers and Bonzo Travers, and employs the supremely gifted French chef Anatole. Dahlia and Tom Travers make their residence at Brinkley Court outside Market Snodsbury in Worcestershire. They were married "the year Bluebottle won the Cambridgeshire". Dahlia is Tom's second wife. Aunt Dahlia is "built rather on the lines of Mae West", but red-faced. Her most notable personal characteristic is her carrying voice. Riding as she did for years with "the Quorn and the Pytchley", she tend to address one as if half a mile away, and can emit a yelp that could be heard in the next county. She is also a Governor of Market Snodsbury Grammar School, for which she has the formidable task to find speakers for prize-giving day. When called, Bertie would rather shove it off on to his friend Gussie Fink-Nottle
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    Edwin Craye

    Edwin Craye is a fictional character in the novels of P.G. Wodehouse who appears in a few of the Jeeves novels of the author. Younger brother of Florence Craye, and son of Percy Craye, Earl of Worplesdon, Edwin has a propensity to do good deeds, as per his Boy Scouts motto. He is, however, always behind in these good deeds and hence is trying to catch up. He often annoys the objects of his good deeds, notably Bertie Wooster in the short story Jeeves Takes Charge. Edwin also appears in the novel Joy in the Morning causing a lot of annoyance to his sister and father due to his incessant meddling. In a memorable episode in the novel, Bertie kicks Edwin in the "seat of the pants" to make Florence despise him and remove any threat of her wanting to get engaged to him. However, this act, instead of producing the results he wants, makes Florence very happy with him, since Edwin, doing another of his good deeds, pastes her articles upside-down in her scrap-book. Craye, EdwinCraye, Edwin
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    228

    Honeysuckle Cottage

    "Honeysuckle Cottage" is a short story by the British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. The story was first published in the 24 January 1925 issue of the Saturday Evening Post in the United States and in the February 1925 issue of the Strand Magazine in the United Kingdom. Wodehouse subsequently added a framing device in which the story is told by the character of Mr. Mulliner. It is this version which appears in the 1927 short story collection Meet Mr. Mulliner, and subsequent Wodehouse anthologies. When the hardboiled mystery novelist, James Rodman, a distant cousin of Mr. Mulliner, receives an inheritance from his aunt, Leila J. Pinckney, a romance novelist, along with the condition that he stay for six months in Honeysuckle Cottage, where she wrote nine million one hundred and forty thousand words of glutinous sentimentality. James moves to the cottage to write in peace, but he soon finds a damsel in distress intruding into his writing, a thing he had studiously avoided until now. And then, a real girl arrives in the form of Rose Maynard, who is injured when struck by a car outside the cottage gates. When even Rodman's tough literary agent is mellowed by the atmosphere of the
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    Oh, Kay!

    Oh, Kay! is a musical with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and a book by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse. It is based on the play La Presidente by Maurice Hanniquin and Pierre Veber. The plot revolves around the adventures of the Duke of Durham and his sister, Lady Kay, English bootleggers in Prohibition Era America. Kay finds herself falling in love with a man who seems unavailable. Oh Kay! was named for Kay Swift, and the leading male character is named Jimmy after her husband, Jimmy Warburg. It opened on Broadway at in 1926, starring Gertrude Lawrence and Victor Moore, and ran for 256 performances. The musical opened on the West End in 1927. This production starred Gertrude Lawrence and John Kirby, and ran for 213 performances. Producers Alex A. Aarons and Vinton Freedly imagined Oh, Kay! as a Princess Theatre-style show, with a contemporary setting, simple sets, and a farcical story. Gertrude Lawrence, who had been featured in the Andre Charlot revues of 1924 and 1925, was chosen as the star before the songs or story had been written. In accordance with the typical creative process for early American musicals, George and Ira Gershwin wrote the score to Oh, Kay!
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    Oldest Member

    The Oldest Member is a fictional character from the short stories and novels of P. G. Wodehouse. He narrates the majority of Wodehouse's golf stories from the terrace of a golf club whose location is unclear, and he never has a proper name. We don't even know whether the Golf Club is located in England or in the United States. In The Clicking of Cuthbert, it appears to be in England. In The Heart of a Goof, it seems to be in the United States, but then, some characters will talk about pounds instead of dollars, and Marvis Bay is mentioned in one of the story. And we know that Marvis Bay is one of the favorite fictional English seaside resorts of Wodehouse. While the club's members enjoy having drinks in the clubhouse after a brisk eighteen holes, they do so fully aware of the risk that the Oldest Member, who, though he has long since given up golf, has seen all and knows all, might pick up on their conversation and begin to relate a story from his experience. Once he has started talking, he cannot be stopped. These stories are often told to another character, 'the young man', who, for some reason, seems eager to leave before the story has even started. BBC Radio 4 aired an
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    232

    Something to Worry About

    "Something to Worry About" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the February 1913 issue of The Strand Magazine and in the United States in the March 1913 issue of Metropolitan. It was included in the UK collection The Man Upstairs, (1914), but was not collected in book form in the US until The Swoop! and Other Stories (1979). Sally Preston, a London girl born and bred, is found to be an aficionado of the movies by her father, who disapproves of such entertainments, and is sent to stay with an aunt at a small, sleepy seaside village in Hampshire. She tells her story to Tom Kitchener, a simple young gardener next door, who promptly falls in love with her. So too do most of the other young men of the village, who begin to visit the house in increasing numbers. Tom, too shy to visit and jealous of the men who do, decides to shower her with gifts; it being autumn and all the flowers gone, all he has to shower with are vegetables, which he proceeds to give generously. Her aunt's husband warns him off, but he rebels, proposes to her awkwardly, and is amazed to find himself accepted. Tom buys her a puppy, and she soon finds herself in trouble
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    Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge

    Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge (pronounced "Fanshawe Ewkridge" (as in fridge)) is a fictional character from the short stories and novels of P. G. Wodehouse. Ukridge is a schemer who will do anything to increase his funding—except, of course, work. An alert and creative opportunist, he makes sure that no kindness shown to him, however small, will go unexploited for financial gain. Though Ukridge never achieved the gigantic popularity of the same author's Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Wodehouse retained a certain fondness for him, his last appearance in a Wodehouse story being as late as 1966. With completed new stories appearing over a span of 60 years, he is in fact the longest-running of Wodehouse's characters, topping Jeeves and Wooster (1915-1974, or 59 years) and the denizens of Blandings Castle (1915-1969, or 54 years). He appears in the following stories: Standing around 6' 2" tall, with large ears and a loud voice, Ukridge makes a striking figure, generally found wearing worn grey flannel trousers and a golf coat with a bright yellow Mackintosh over it; his collar is rarely properly attached to his shirt, and his pince-nez glasses are held in place with wire from a ginger
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    234

    The Episode of the Exiled Monarch

    "The Episode of the Exiled Monarch" , a.k.a. The Diverting Episode of the Exiled Monarch, is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse and C. H. Bovill, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the August 1914 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the September 1916 Pictorial Review. It was published in book form in the collection A Man of Means in 1991. It is the fifth of six stories to feature Roland Bleke, a young man for whom financial success is always a mixed blessing. A new dance craze, the caoutchouc, has hit town, and Roland Bleke quickly falls for the potent charms of its principal proponent, Maraquita. Finally meeting her, however, he soon realises that he has bitten off more than he can chew. She drags him to her house, which he finds filled with the former aristocracy of Paranoya, a small country reeling from a recent revolution. Bleke discovers that he is expected to fund the liberation of the country from it oppressors. Plans for a bloody counter-revolution commence, and Bleke finds himself threatened by advocates of the new regime. Maraquita suggests they scupper the enemy by writing a will leaving all Bleke's money to her cause. Bleke finds himself beset
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    The Episode of the Hired Past

    "The Episode of the Hired Past" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse and C. H. Bovill, which first appeared in the United Kingdom in the September 1914 issue of the Strand, and in the United States in the October 1916 Pictorial Review. It was published in book form in the collection A Man of Means in 1991. It is the last of six stories to feature Roland Bleke, a young man for whom financial success is always a mixed blessing. Roland Bleke is once again engaged to be married, this time to Lady Eva Blyton, daughter of an Earl. Feeling utterly out of place in such exalted company, he cannot think of a way to break off the engagement honourably, until Teal, her father's butler, overhearing Bleke's despair, offers a suggestion. Bleke pays £100 for the butler's niece Maud, a plebiean barmaid, to pose as a jilted former lover; he writes some compromising letters to the girl, and she appears at the house, creating a scene and satisfactorily, though painfully, bringing an end to Bleke's engagement. Later, Bleke is in a happy reverie as he opens his post; one of the letters is from a solicitor, saying that Maud has several letters in her possession, as well as witnesses in the shape of Miss
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    236

    The Go-getter

    "The Go-getter" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the March 1931 issue of Cosmopolitan, and in the United Kingdom in the August 1931 Strand. Part of the Blandings Castle canon, it features the absent-minded peer Lord Emsworth, and was included in the collection Blandings Castle and Elsewhere (1935), although the story takes place sometime between the events of Leave it to Psmith (1923) and Summer Lightning (1929). Freddie Threepwood, still trying to persuade his Aunt Georgiana of the benefits of Donaldson's Dog-Joy, hears that his cousin Gertrude has become infatuated with Orlo Watkins, a weedy tenor invited to the castle by Lady Constance. While visiting his friend Beefy Bingham to borrow his dog Bottles, Freddie learns that she has indeed all but "handed him the bird". Freddie tells this to Lady Georgiana, while giving a rather poor demonstration of Dog-Joy's powers, during which Bottles is scared off by Susan, one of Lady Georgiana's Pekes. He later tries to reason with his cousin, but to no avail; the glamour of the singer has taken her over. That evening, while the household take after-dinner coffee in the drawing room, Freddie
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    The Mating Season

    The Mating Season is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on September 9, 1949 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on November 29, 1949 by Didier & Co., New York. It stars Bertie Wooster and his valet Jeeves. It is the second installment of the Totleigh Towers saga, chronicling Bertie's continuing difficulties with Madeline Bassett. Bertie Wooster and Gussie Fink-Nottle swap their identities, while Catsmeat Potter-Pirbright pretends to be the faux-Gussie's valet Meadowes and Jeeves pretends to be the faux-Bertie's valet, before complications ensue. Together, they find themselves at the Aunt-ridden Deverill Hall, Hampshire, seat of the imposing Dame Daphne Winkworth, where Gussie's on-off engagement to Madeline Bassett is once again in danger, leaving Bertie at risk of becoming reattached to her. Bertie must also defend his friend Catsmeat's girl Gertrude Winkworth, daughter of Dame Daphne, from the attentions of the attractive Esmond Haddock, while avoiding fulfilling his Aunt Agatha's wish that he marry her himself... All of Jeeves' considerable powers are required to bring things to a satisfactory conclusion. The story was adapted
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    The Pothunters

    The Pothunters is a 1902 novel by P. G. Wodehouse. It was Wodehouse's first published novel, and the first of several school stories, this one set at the fictional public school of St. Austin's. First edition copies of the book in good condition are highly prized by collectors, and can change hands for over $10,000. The story was originally printed as a serial in Public School Magazine, commencing in January 1902, but when the magazine ceased publication in March that year, the remainder of the plot was summarised in the form of a letter from one of the characters. The novel follows the lives of several of the schoolboys as they study, take part in their school sports (particularly boxing and running), and enjoy tea in their studies. After the school's sports trophies ('pots' in contemporary slang) are stolen in a burglary, the boys, their masters, and the police join in the hunt for the 'pots'. The advance of technology has made part of the story opaque to the modern reader. "On Sunday we jellygraph it", writes Wodehouse without explanation. Jellygraph was a method of making a limited number of copies, about 20 to 80, from a master copy written with a special type of pencil
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    A Man of Means

    A Man of Means is a collection of six short stories written in collaboration by P. G. Wodehouse and C. H. Bovill. The stories first appeared in the United Kingdom in the Strand in 1914, and in the United States in Pictorial Review in 1916. They were later published in book form in the UK by Porpoise Books in 1991; the collection was released on Project Gutenberg in 2003. The stories all star Roland Bleke, a young man for whom financial success is always a mixed blessing. The plots follow on from each other, sometimes directly, and occasionally refer back to past events in Bleke's meteoric career.
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    Blandings Castle Saga

    Blandings Castle is a recurring fictional location in nine of the novels and nine of the short stories by prolific British author P. G. Wodehouse. Together these works have come to be known as the Blandings Books, or the Blandings Castle Saga.
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    Cocktail Time

    Cocktail Time is a comic novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on June 20, 1958 by Herbert Jenkins, London and in the United States on July 24, 1958 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York. It stars Frederick Twistleton, Earl of Ickenham, better known as Uncle Fred. The story begins when Uncle Fred knocks off Sir Raymond Bastable’s top hat with a Brazil nut fired through the window of the Drones Club from a catapult. Sir Raymond naturally assumes that the culprit was a young Drone, but is unsure how to respond. A letter to the Times would open him to ridicule, especially as he is about to stand for Parliament. Uncle Fred suggests writing a novel exposing the iniquities of the younger generation. The eventual novel, “Cocktail Time”, which Bastable publishes under a pseudonym, becomes a succès de scandale after being condemned by a bishop. Afraid of being unmasked as the author, Bastable allows his ne’er-do-well nephew Cosmo Wisdom to take the credit, and the royalties, of the book. But, with his friend Gordon “Oily” Carlisle, and Oily’s wife Gertie, Cosmo plots to blackmail Sir Raymond, and to this end writes a letter revealing the true author of “Cocktail
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    Farewell to Legs

    "Farewell to Legs" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the July 14, 1935 edition of This Week, and in the United Kingdom in the May 1936 issue of the Strand. It was included in the UK collection Lord Emsworth and Others, (1937), and in the U.S. edition of Young Men in Spats (1936). It is a golf story, narrated by the Oldest Member. The title is a play on Ernest Hemingway's 1929 novel, A Farewell to Arms. The betrothal of Evangeline Brackett to Angus McTavish is built, in large part, on the way she bites her lip and rolls her eyes when she tops her drive, says the Oldest Member. But when Legs Mortimer takes up residence in the Clubhouse, Evangeline's mind wanders from her golf, and Angus worries that she is losing her form for the Ladies' Medal. But the scales fall from Evangeline's eyes when Legs does the unthinkable on the links.
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    Madeline Bassett

    Madeline Bassett is a recurring character in the Jeeves stories by English comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being one of the young women to whom Bertie Wooster periodically finds himself threateningly engaged. Wooster describes her in Right Ho, Jeeves as " a pretty enough girl in a droopy, blonde, saucer-eyed way, but not the sort of breath-taker that takes the breath ", though elsewhere he describes her as "physically in the pin-up class". These moderate charms must be considered in balance with her personality, which is that of the soppiest, mushiest, sentimentalest young gawd-help-us that ever was; even the devotion of Gussie Fink-Nottle wanes with each new injunction to take up vegetarianism or recite Christopher Robin poems at the village concert. To illustrate her unique outlook on early 20th century life, it may help to mention that Madeline is allegedly fond of remarking in casual conversation that "the stars are God's daisy chain", or that "every time a fairy blows its wee nose a baby is born". Such comments would be in keeping with her general conversational style, which is all too apt to revolve around elves, gnomes, flowers, and small furry creatures. This excessive
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    244

    Mulliner Nights

    Mulliner Nights is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. First published in the United Kingdom on 17 January 1933 by Herbert Jenkins, and in the United States on 15 February 1933 by Doubleday, Doran, it is the third collection featuring Mr Mulliner, who narrates all nine stories contained in the book, telling tall tales of his diverse family.
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    Service With a Smile

    Service with a Smile is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on October 15, 1961 by Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, and in the United Kingdom on August 17, 1962 by Herbert Jenkins, London. It is the eighth full-length novel set at Blandings Castle, and features the unstoppable Uncle Fred in his fourth and final novel appearance. More turmoil at Blandings Castle, as Lord Emsworth finds his idyllic home overrun not only with the local Church Lad's Brigade, but also old curmudgeon the Duke of Dunstable and publishing magnate (and fellow pig-lover) Lord Tilbury, both scheming to get their hands on Emsworth's peerless pig, Empress of Blandings. Meanwhile, star-crossed lovers battle the iron will of Lady Constance Keeble. Fortunately, Uncle Fred is also on hand, to sort things out. Myra Schoonmaker is in durance vile at Blandings Castle, her London season having been cut short by Connie to put a stop to Myra's unfortunate entanglement with impoverished East End curate Bill Bailey. Her misery adds to Lord Emsworth's woes, already weighing heavily thanks to the efficiency of his latest secretary Lavender Briggs and the presence of both the Duke of Dunstable,
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    The Girls of Gottenberg

    The Girls of Gottenberg

    The Girls of Gottenberg is a musical play in two acts by George Grossmith, Jr. and L. E. Berman, with lyrics by Adrian Ross and Basil Hood, and music by Ivan Caryll and Lionel Monckton. P. G. Wodehouse's personal papers indicate that he wrote the lyrics for one song, "Our Little Way", but this was not included in the libretto of show, and he was not credited as a lyricist. The musical opened at the Gaiety Theatre in London, managed by George Edwardes, on 15 May 1907, and ran for 303 performances. It starred George Grossmith, Jr., Edmund Payne and Gertie Millar. The young Gladys Cooper played the small role of Eva. The show also had a Broadway run at the Knickerbocker Theatre opening on 2 September 1908 and an Australian run. One of the best known songs from the show is "Berlin Is on the Spree". Although this show was popular in London in 1907, it had competition from several very successful shows in that season, including the hit productions of The Merry Widow and Miss Hook of Holland.
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    The Little Nugget

    The Little Nugget is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in Munsey's Magazine in August 1913, before being published as a book in the U.K. on August 28, 1913 by Methuen & Co, London, and in the U.S. on February 10, 1914 by W.J. Watt and Co., New York. An earlier version of the story, without the love interest, had appeared as a serial in The Captain between January and March 1913 under the title The Eighteen-Carat Kid; this version was not published in the U.S. until August 1980, when it appeared in a volume entitled The Eighteen-Carat Kid and Other Stories. The Little Nugget was reprinted in the Philadelphia Record on 12 May 1940. The "Little Nugget" of the title is one Ogden Ford, a spoilt, unpleasant child of overindulgent, wealthy parents; he is so dubbed due to his immense ransom value, being a prime target for kidnappers. The novel revolves around numerous schemes to kidnap the boy, for various ends. It is essentially a comic romance, whose hero, Peter Burns, leaves behind a comfortable lifestyle to become a master at the boy's school, thanks to his scheming fiancee, and finds the change of lifestyle invigorating. Ogden and his mother Nesta also appear in
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    248

    The Truth About George

    "The Truth about George" is a short story by the British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse. A part of the Mr. Mulliner series, the story was first published in 1926 in Strand Magazine, and appeared almost simultaneously in Liberty in the United States. It also appears in the collection Meet Mr. Mulliner. George Mulliner, a nephew of Mr. Mulliner, was cursed with a terrible stammer but was not terribly concerned about it until he fell in love with Susan Blake, the daughter of the vicar of East Wobsley, the Worcestershire village in which they lived. Determined to get rid of the stammer, he visits a specialist in London who advises him to go and speak to three perfect strangers each day as a confidence building measure. George decides to do this immediately on the train back to London. Unfortunately, the first person he meets also stammers and to stammer back at this man 'would obviously be madness'. The second person he meets turns out to be a lunatic runaway from the local asylum who thinks he is the Emperor of Abyssinia and wishes to perform a human sacrifice with George playing the lucky lamb. George manages to escape and takes refuge under the seat of a train. A woman enters the same
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    249

    Ukridge Rounds a Nasty Corner

    "Ukridge Rounds a Nasty Corner" is a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, which first appeared in the United States in the January 1924 issue of Cosmopolitan and in the United Kingdom in the February 1924 Strand. It features the irrepressible Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, and was included in the collection Ukridge, published in 1924. When Jimmy Corcoran is hired to help prepare the memoirs of a deceased colonial, he is amazed to see his friend Ukridge visiting the house, pretending not to know him. He had, earlier that day, received a bottle of patent medicine and a parrot, delivered by Ukridge, so he is even more amazed when Ukridge brings up parrots to his employer, Lady Elizabeth Lakenheath. Ukridge later reveals that he has fallen in love with and wooed Millie, Lady Elizabeth's niece and ward, and together they have kidnapped the parrot in order to help obtain the aunt's consent to their marriage. Ukridge is also involved in the sale of "Peppo", the patent medicine. The parrot scheme is successful, but Millie's aunt wishes to meet Ukridge's Aunt Julia. Knowing that any such meeting will result in the revealing of Ukridge's past, they must stop the two from coming into contact
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    250

    Uncle Fred in the Springtime

    Uncle Fred in the Springtime is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on August 18, 1939 by Doubleday, Doran, New York, and in the United Kingdom on August 25, 1939 by Herbert Jenkins, London. It is set at the idyllic Blandings Castle, home of Clarence, Earl of Emsworth, the fifth full-length novel to be set there. It also features Uncle Fred, who first appeared in the short story "Uncle Fred Flits By", which was included in the 1936 collection Young Men in Spats, and would feature in three further novels. When Alaric, Duke of Dunstable decides to take Empress of Blandings away from her loving master and get her fit, Lord Emsworth calls in the services of the redoubtable Uncle Fred. Fred arrives full of the joys of spring, with nephew Pongo Twistleton and old friend Polly Pott in tow, and despite the efforts of the efficient Baxter, endeavours to scupper the Duke and bring together a variety of romantic couplings. In London, Pongo Twistleton is having money troubles, and his wealthy friend Horace Pendlebury-Davenport is in trouble with his girl, Pongo's sister Valerie, for hiring Claude "Mustard" Pott to trail her during the Drones Club weekend at Le
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