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Best Oxford Churches of All Time

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Best Oxford Churches of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Oxford Churches of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Oxford Churches of All Time has gotten 139 views and has gathered 20 votes from 20 voters. O O

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    1
    St Michael at the Northgate

    St Michael at the Northgate

    St Michael at the North Gate is a church in Cornmarket Street, at the junction with Ship Street, in central Oxford, England. The church is so-called because this is the location of the original north gate of Oxford when it was surrounded by a city wall. Originally built around 1000–1050, with the tower of 1040 still in existence, the church is Oxford's oldest building. The church tower is Saxon. The architect John Plowman rebuilt the north aisle and transept in 1833. The Oxford Martyrs were imprisoned in the Bocardo Prison by the church before they were burnt at the stake in what is now Broad Street nearby, then immediately outside the city walls, in 1555 and 1556. Their cell door can be seen on display in the church's tower. St Michael at the North Gate is the current City Church of Oxford. That title was originally held by St Martin's Church at Carfax, and then by All Saints Church in the High Street when St Martin's Church was demolished in 1896. City Church status passed to St Michael's when All Saints Church was declared redundant in 1971 (it was subsequently converted into the library of Lincoln College, Oxford). The City Church is where the Mayor and Corporation of Oxford
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    2
    University Church of St Mary the Virgin

    University Church of St Mary the Virgin

    The University Church of St Mary the Virgin (St Mary's or SMV for short) is the largest of Oxford's parish churches and the centre from which the University of Oxford grew. It is situated on the north side of the High Street, and is surrounded by university and college buildings. St Mary's possesses an eccentric baroque porch, designed by Nicholas Stone, facing High Street, and a spire which is claimed by some church historians to be one of the most beautiful in England. Radcliffe Square lies to the north and to the east is Catte Street. The 13th century tower is open to the public for a fee and provides good views across the heart of the historic university city, especially Radcliffe Square, the Radcliffe Camera, Brasenose College and All Souls College. A church was established on this site, at the centre of the old walled city, in Anglo Saxon times; records of 1086 note the church as previously belonging to an estate held by Aubrey de Coucy, likely Iffley, and the parish including part of Littlemore. In the early days of Oxford University, the church was adopted as the first building of the university, congregation met there from at least 1252, and by the early 13th century it
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    4

    St Ebbe's, Oxford

    St Ebbe's is a Church of England parish church in central Oxford. The church has a conservative evangelical tradition and participates in the Anglican Reform movement. It has members from many nations, many of whom are students at Oxford University. The Rector is Vaughan Roberts, author and conference speaker. The church holds Sunday morning and evening services both in central Oxford and in Headington, and holds an additional morning service during Oxford University terms. The church also organises a range of small groups, meeting midweek, including a Christianity Explored group aimed at those wanting to find out what Christians believe. The church stands on the site of one dedicated to St Æbbe before 1005. Most sources suggest that this was the Northumbrian St Æbbe of Coldingham, but it has been suggested that Æbbe of Oxford was a different saint. The name was first recorded in about 1005, when the church was granted to Eynsham Abbey. The present church was built in 1814–16. It was enlarged and improved in 1866 and 1904. A fine Norman doorway of the 12th century has been restored and placed at the west end. The church is a parish church for the parish of St Ebbes, a portion of
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    5
    St Aldate's, Oxford

    St Aldate's, Oxford

    St Aldate's is a street in central Oxford, England. It is named after Saint Aldate of whom little is known, although it has also been suggested that the name is a corruption of 'old gate', referring to the south gate in the former city walls. St Aldate's Church is on the west side of the street, in Pembroke Square. A former name for St Aldate's is Fish Street. The street runs south from the generally acknowledged centre of Oxford at Carfax. The Town Hall, which includes the Museum of Oxford, is on the east side of the street. Christ Church, with its imposing Tom Tower, faces the east end of St Aldate's, while Pembroke College (on Pembroke Square) faces its west end. Other adjoining streets include Blue Boar Street to the east side and Pembroke Street, Pembroke Square, Brewer Street, Rose Place, and Speedwell Street to the west. Opposite Christ Church is Alice's Shop, formerly frequented by Alice Liddell, and the model for the Sheep Shop in the "Wool and Water" chapter in Through the Looking-Glass. South of Christ Church is an entrance to Christ Church Meadow and, still on the east side, the Oxford University Faculty of Music, containing the Bate Collection of Musical Instruments.
    6.33
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    7
    St Giles', Oxford

    St Giles', Oxford

    St Giles' is a wide street leading north from the centre of Oxford, England. At its northern end, the road divides into Woodstock Road to the left and Banbury Road to the right, both major roads through North Oxford. At the southern end, the road continues as Magdalen Street at the junction with Beaumont Street to the west. Also to the west halfway along the street is Pusey Street. At the northern end of St Giles' is St Giles' Church, whose churchyard includes the main War Memorial. The church originates from the 12th century. Working from north to south, on the east side are the Lamb & Flag public house (formerly a coaching inn), St John's College, the Oxford Internet Institute (No 1 St Giles'), Balliol College, and Trinity College. On the west side are the International Study Centre of d'Overbroeck's College, St Benet's Hall, the Theology Faculty, the Eagle and Child public house (where J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and other members of the Inklings met), Regent's Park College (Principal's Lodgings and Senior Tutor's house), Pusey House and St Cross College, Blackfriars, and the Taylor Institution, behind which is the Ashmolean Museum (with its main entrance in Beaumont Street).
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    8
    Oxford Oratory

    Oxford Oratory

    The Oxford Oratory Church of St Aloysius Gonzaga (or Oxford Oratory for short) is the Catholic parish church for the centre of Oxford, England. It is located at 25 Woodstock Road. The church is presently served by the Congregation of the Oratory. St. Aloysius' was originally founded as the Jesuit (Society of Jesus) parish of central Oxford. Completed in 1875, the building of St. Aloysius' was an important step in the on-going refoundation of a Roman Catholic presence in Oxford. The parish was served by notable members of the Society for many years - including Gerard Manley Hopkins. The Church also housed a notable collection of relics bequeathed by Hartwell de la Garde Grissell, many of which were destroyed in the 1970s. In the 1980s, the Jesuits left the church and the parish was taken over by the Archdiocese of Birmingham. In 1990, the Archbishop of Birmingham invited members of the Birmingham Oratory to take over the running of the parish and found a new Oratorian community in Oxford. Two priests from Birmingham arrived in September 1990 and, in 1993, the Oxford Oratory was established as an independent Congregation. It is part of the tradition of the Oratory in England to
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