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Best North Korean province of All Time

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Best North Korean province of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best North Korean province of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best North Korean province of All Time has gotten 139 views and has gathered 23 votes from 23 voters. O O

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    1
    Ryanggang

    Ryanggang

    Ryanggang Province (Ryangkangto) (Korean: 량강도, Ryanggang-do, pronounced [ɾjaŋɡaŋ] or [jaŋɡaŋ]) is a province in North Korea. The province is bordered by China on the north, North Hamgyong on the east, South Hamgyong on the south, and Chagang on the west. Ryanggang was formed in 1954, when it was separated from South Hamgyŏng. The provincial capital is Hyesan. In South Korean usage, "Ryanggang" is spelled and pronounced as "Yanggang." Along the northern border with China runs the Yalu River and the Tumen River. In between the rivers, and the source of both, is Baekdu Mountain, revered by both the Koreans and Manchurians as the mythic origin of each people. The North Korean government claims that Kim Jong-il was born there when his parents were at a Communist resistance camp at the mountain. The North Korean-Chinese border for 20 miles east of the mountain is "dry, remote and mountainous, barely patrolled," making it one of the crossing areas for refugees from North Korea into China, although most, including refugees from Ryanggang itself, prefer to cross over the Tumen River. Although all of North Korea is economically depressed, Ryanggang province, along with neighboring North
    6.50
    4 votes
    2
    North Hamgyong

    North Hamgyong

    North Hamgyong Province (Hamgyŏng-pukto) is the northernmost province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the northern half of the former Hamgyong Province. The province is bordered by China on the north, South Hamgyong on the southwest, and Ryanggang on the west. On the east is the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea). There is also a short border with Russia. The province is home to the Musudan-ri rocket launching site, and the Hoeryong concentration camp. In 2004 Rason was reabsorbed back into the province, and since 2010 Rason is again a Directly Governed City. North Hamgyong is divided into three cities (si) and 12 counties (kun). These are further divided into villages (ri) in rural areas and dong (neighborhoods) in cities, which are detailed on each county’s individual page. Some cities are also divided into wards known as "kuyŏk", which are administered just below the city level and also listed on its individual page.
    6.00
    4 votes
    3
    North Pyongan

    North Pyongan

    North Pyongan Province (Phyeonganpukto) is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the northern half of the former P'yŏng'an Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is Sinŭiju. In 2002, Sinŭiju Special Administrative Region—near the city of Sinuiju—was established as a separately governed Special Administrative Region. The Yalu River forms the northern border with China. The province is also bordered on the east by Chagang Province and on the south by South Pyong'an Province. Sinŭiju Special Administrative Region (Sinŭiju T'ŭkpyŏl Haengjŏnggu) is located in the western corner of the province, and was created as an administrative entity separate from North P'yŏngan in 2002. North P'yŏngan is bounded by water on the west with Korea Bay and the Yellow Sea (called the West Sea by Koreans). North P'yŏngan is divided into 3 cities ("Si") and 22 counties ("Kun"). file:Heian-Hoku Provincial Office.JPG|North Pyongan Provincial Office during Korea under Japanese rule's period.
    5.75
    4 votes
    4
    South Hamgyong

    South Hamgyong

    South Hamgyong Province (Hamkyeongnamto) is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the southern half of the former Hamgyŏng Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is Hamhung. The province is bordered by Ryanggang to the north, North Hamgyong to the northeast, Kangwon to the south, and South Pyongan to the west. On the east of the province is the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea). South Hamgyong is also home to Yodok prison camp. South Hamgyong is divided into 3 cities ("si"), 2 districts (1 "gu" and 1 "chigu"), and 15 counties ("gun"). These are further divided into villages (ri and dong, with dong also denoting neighborhoods in cities), with each county additionally having one town (up) which acts as its administrative center. These are detailed on each county’s individual page. Some cities are also divided into wards known as "guyok", which are administered just below the city level and also listed on the individual page.
    7.00
    3 votes
    5
    South Hwanghae

    South Hwanghae

    South Hwanghae Province (Hwanghainamto) is a province in western North Korea. The province was formed in 1954 when the former Hwanghae Province was split into North and South Hwanghae. The provincial capital is Haeju. The province is part of the Haeso region, and is bounded on the west by the Yellow Sea, on the north and east by North Hwanghae province. There are some administrative exclaves of Nampo City in the north of the province. The southern border of the province is marked by the Korean Demilitarized Zone with South Korea. The province draws its name from what were the largest cities in Hwanghae, Haeju and Hwangju; the name, which literally means "Yellow Sea" in Korean, also references the Yellow Sea, which forms the province's eastern bound. The coastline of South Hwanghae is dotted by many small islands, many of which are uninhabited. Many of the largest islands, such as Baengnyeong-do are administered by South Korea. The Northern Limit Line, which runs through the region and demarcates the maritime boundary between the north and south, is another frequent subject of contention between the two countries. The largest islands which indisputably belong to North Korea are
    6.00
    3 votes
    6
    Kangwon-do

    Kangwon-do

    Kangwon Province (Kangweonto) is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province (also spelled Kangwon Province) formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan. Kangwŏn was one of the Eight Provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. The province was formed 1395, and derived its name from the names of the principal cities of Gangneung (or Kangnŭng; 강릉; 江陵) and the provincial capital Wonju (or Wŏnju; 원주; 原州). In 1895, Kangwŏn was replaced by the Districts of Chuncheon (Chuncheon-bu; 춘천부; 春川府) in the west and Gangneung (Gangneung-bu; 강릉부; 江陵府) in the east. Wonju became part of Chungju District. In 1896, Korea was redivided into thirteen provinces, and the two districts were merged to re-form Kangwŏn Province. Although Wonju rejoined Kangwŏn province, the provincial capital was moved to Chuncheon. In 1945, Kangwŏn Province (along with the rest of Korea) was divided by the 38th parallel north in 1945 into Soviet and American zones of occupation in the north and south respectively. In 1946, the northern province was expanded to include the North Korean portion of Gyeonggi
    7.00
    2 votes
    7
    South Pyongan

    South Pyongan

    South Pyongan Province (Phyeongannamto) is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the southern half of the former P'yŏng'an Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is P'yŏngsŏng. The province is bordered by North P'yŏng'an and Chagang to the north, South Hamgyŏng and Kangwŏn to the east and southeast, and North Hwanghae and P'yŏngyang to the south. The Yellow Sea and Korea Bay are located to the west. South P'yŏngan is divided into: Its administrative divisions are: The below former counties of South Pyongan were merged with Nampo in 2004, and are administered as part of that city:
    7.00
    2 votes
    8
    Chagang

    Chagang

    Chagang Province (Jakangto) is a province in North Korea; it is bordered by China to the north, Ryanggang and South Hamgyong to the east, South P'yŏngan to the south, and North P'yŏngan to the west. Chagang was formed in 1949, after being demarcated from North P'yŏngan. The provincial capital is Kanggye. Chagang Province is located in the northwestern part of Korea. It is a mountainous province; with the mountainous area amounting to 98 per cent of its total area. The mean height above sea level is 750 meters and the slope of most regions is 15 to 40 degrees. The province has a distinct continental climate under the influence of the Asian continent. It has very cold and long winters, and brief springs and falls. The climate is characterized by great differences in daily and yearly temperature. In summer, downpours of rain and hail are frequent. Thus thunder and lightning occur frequently. The province has great mineral wealth, and is North Korea's main source of lead, zinc, gold, copper, molybdenum, tungsten, antimony, graphite, apatite, alunite, limestone, calcium carbonate, anthracite and iron ores. There are also crystals and valuable gems there. The province abounds in
    6.00
    1 votes
    9
    North Hwanghae

    North Hwanghae

    North Hwanghae Province (Hwanghaipukto) is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1954 when the former Hwanghae Province was split into North and South Hwanghae. The provincial capital is Sariwon. The province is bordered by Pyongyang and South Pyongan to the north, Kangwon to the east, Kaesong Industrial Region to the south, and South Hwanghae southwest. In 2003, Kaesong Directly Governed City (Kaesong Chikhalsi) became part of North Hwanghae. North Hwanghae is divided into 3 cities ("si") and 19 counties ("kun"). Three of these counties (Chunghwa, Kangnam, and Sangwon) were added to the province in 2010 after being split from Pyongyang. North Hwanghae is connected to the rest of the country (and allegedly to South Korea) by way of the Pyongbu Railway Line (known in South Korea as the Kyongui Line), which, in theory, runs from Pyongyang to Pusan; however, in reality, the line is cut short by the Korean Demilitarized Zone. It is also served by several large highways, most notably the Pyongyang-Kaesong Motorway. There are several higher-level educationary facilities in North Hwanghae, all government-run. These include the Kye Ung Sang Sariwon University of
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