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Best National Forest of All Time

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    1

    Ozark-St. Francis National Forest

    The Ozark – St. Francis National Forest is a United States National Forest that is located in the state of Arkansas. It is composed of two separate forests, Ozark National Forest and St. Francis National Forest, each with their own biological, topographical, and geological differences. Together, the two forests are home to 23 developed campgrounds, and include nine swimming areas, 395 miles (636 km) of hiking trails, and 370 miles (600 km) of streams for fishing. The majority of the trails in what are now the Ozark National Forest and St. Francis National Forest were constructed under the Works Progress Administration and Civilian Conservation Corps. The Forest contains 11,000 acres (45 km) of old-growth forests. The old-growth forests typically occur in the southern portion of the Forest on ridges and steep south-facing slopes and are dominated by Shortleaf Pine and various oaks, including Post Oak, Blackjack Oak, Eastern Black Oak, White Oak, and Northern Red Oak. The Forest is also home to six different endangered species. Several National Scenic Byways cross the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest, including the Scenic 7 Byway which runs from Missouri to Louisiana, 60 miles
    7.75
    8 votes
    2
    Ochoco National Forest

    Ochoco National Forest

    The Ochoco National Forest is located in Central Oregon in the United States, north and east of the City of Prineville, location of the National Forest Headquarters. It encompasses 850,000 acres (3,440 km) of rimrock, canyons, geologic oddities, dense pine forests, and high desert terrain, as well as the headwaters of the North Fork of the Crooked River. A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the Forest was 95,000 acres (38,000 ha). In descending order of forestland area, it occupies lands within Crook, Harney, Wheeler, and Grant counties. The national forest also administers the Crooked River National Grassland, which is in Jefferson County. The Ochoco National Forest is composed of three ranger districts: The former Snow Mountain Ranger District is now administered by the Malheur National Forest, as part of the Emigrant Creek Ranger District. The forest contains three wilderness areas comprising 36,200 acres (146 km): Popular recreational activities in the Ochoco National Forest include hiking, fishing, camping, hunting, horseback riding, stargazing, birding and rock hounding.
    7.00
    6 votes
    3
    Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest

    Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest

    The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (HTNF) is the principal U.S. National Forest located in the U.S. state of Nevada. With an area of 5,640,424 acres (22,825.99 km), it is the largest National Forest of the United States outside of Alaska. It does not resemble most other National Forests in that it has numerous fairly large but non-contiguous sections scattered about most of the state of Nevada and a portion of eastern California. Its 10 ranger districts are scattered across the many mountain ranges in Nevada, from the Santa Rosa Range in the north to the Spring Mountains near Las Vegas in the south. A small part of the forest (about 11%) is actually in eastern California, in the areas around Bridgeport and Markleeville and other areas east of the Sierra Nevada mountains. The forest lies in 13 counties in Nevada and 6 in California. The counties with the largest amount of forest land are Nye, Elko, and White Pine in Nevada, and Mono County in California, but there are 15 other counties with land in this widely dispersed forest. Forest headquarters are located in Sparks, Nevada. The smaller and more northeasterly Humboldt National Forest is located generally in eastern and northern
    6.67
    6 votes
    4
    Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

    Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

    The Rogue River – Siskiyou National Forest is a United States National Forest located on both sides of the border between the states of Oregon and California. The formerly separate Rogue River and Siskiyou National Forests were administratively combined in 2004. Now, the Rogue River – Siskiyou National Forest ranges from the crest of the Cascade Range west into the Siskiyou Mountains, covering almost 1,800,000 acres (7,300 km). Forest headquarters are located in Medford, Oregon. The former Rogue River portion of the Rogue River – Siskiyou National Forest is located in parts of five counties in southern Oregon and northern California. In descending order of land area they are Jackson, Klamath, Douglas, Siskiyou, and Josephine counties, with Siskiyou County being the only one in California. It has a land area of 628,443 acres (981.9 sq mi, or 2,543.2 km²). There are local ranger district offices located in Ashland, Butte Falls, Grants Pass, Jacksonville, and Prospect. The former Siskiyou portion of the Rogue River – Siskiyou National Forest is located in parts of four counties in southwestern Oregon and northwestern California. In descending order of land area they are Curry,
    7.80
    5 votes
    5

    Homochitto National Forest

    Homochitto National Forest is a U.S. National Forest in southwestern Mississippi comprising 191,839 acres (776.34 km). In the mid-1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) began reforestation of the area and developing a system of roadways and recreational areas. In descending order of land area the forest is located in parts of: The forest is headquartered in Jackson, Mississippi, as are all six National Forests in Mississippi. There are local ranger district offices located in Meadville.
    6.50
    6 votes
    6
    Willamette National Forest

    Willamette National Forest

    The Willamette National Forest is a National Forest located in the central portion of the Cascade Range of US state of Oregon. It comprises 1,678,031 acres (6,790.75 km) making it one of the largest national forests. Over 380,000 acres (694 mi, 1,540 km) are designated wilderness which include seven major mountain peaks. There are also several National Wild and Scenic Rivers within the forest. The forest is named for the Willamette River, which has its headwaters in the forest. The forest headquarters are located in the city of Eugene. There are local ranger district offices in McKenzie Bridge, Mill City, Detroit, Sweet Home, and Westfir. The forest is famous for being at the center of the controversy between the logging industry and the endangered species status of the Northern Spotted Owl. Environmentalists maintain that the forest was aggressively clear-cut for many years threatening a federally listed endangered species. The timber industry contends that the forest can simultaneously provide lumber jobs and wildlife habitat. Since April 1994, the forest is governed by the Northwest Forest Plan, which restrict, but does not eliminate, logging in potential spotted owl habitat.
    6.50
    6 votes
    7
    Chugach National Forest

    Chugach National Forest

    The Chugach National Forest is a 5.4 million acre (23,000 km²) United States National Forest in south central Alaska. It is located in the mountains surrounding Prince William Sound including the eastern Kenai Peninsula and the delta of the Copper River. It is the second-largest (third-largest if the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest is considered as one entity) forest in the U.S. national forest system, and is the northernmost national forest. The Chugach National Forest envelops Prince William Sound and is surrounded by the Chugach Mountains. It was originally designated in 1907 by Theodore Roosevelt and was originally 23 million acres (93 000 km²) in size. Approximately one-third of the area of the forest is rocks and ice. The supervisor's office is located in Anchorage. There are local ranger district offices located in Cordova, Girdwood, and Seward. Though the Chugach forest is largely wild, with only 90 miles (140 km) of Forest Service roads, none of it is currently designated as wilderness. In descending order of land area within the forest it is located in parts of the Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Kenai Peninsula Borough, Anchorage Municipality, Matanuska-Susitna Borough,
    6.33
    6 votes
    8

    Boise National Forest

    The Boise National Forest is a US national forest located north and east of the city of Boise, Idaho. It is about 2,654,000 acres (10,740 km) in size, ranging in elevation from 2,600 to 9,800 feet (800 to 3000 m). The mountainous landscape developed through uplifting, faulting, and stream cutting. Most of the land lies within the Idaho Batholith, a large and highly erodible geologic formation. The major rivers that run through it include the Boise, the Payette and the South and Middle forks of the Salmon River. Portions of the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, the Sawtooth Wilderness, and Sawtooth National Recreation Area are within the forest, although none of these areas are managed by Boise National Forest. Conifer forest covers most of the Boise National Forest. Tree species include ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, Engelmann Spruce, lodgepole pine, grand fir, subalpine fir, western larch, and whitebark pine. Shrubs and grasses grow in the non-forested areas. Wildflowers splash color in both forests and shrub-land. The Forest contains large expanses of summer range for big game species like mule deer and elk. Trout are native to most streams and lakes. Oceangoing salmon
    7.40
    5 votes
    9
    Roosevelt National Forest

    Roosevelt National Forest

    The Roosevelt National Forest is a National Forest located in north central Colorado. It is contiguous with the Colorado State Forest as well as the Arapaho National Forest. The forest is administered jointly with the Arapaho National Forest and the Pawnee National Grassland from offices in Fort Collins, and is denoted by the United States Forest Service as ARP (Arapaho, Roosevelt, Pawnee). The forest encompasses a mountainous area of the foothills on the eastern side of the continental divide of the Front Range in Larimer County and Boulder County. In Larimer County it includes the upper valleys of the Cache la Poudre and Big Thompson Rivers. It includes forested areas along both sides of the Poudre Canyon and along the north and east sides of Rocky Mountain National Park. Smaller parts of the forest also extend into northern Gilpin and extreme northwestern Jefferson counties. The Roosevelt National Forest is divided into two ranger districts, the Canyon Lakes Ranger District, with offices in Fort Collins, and the Boulder Ranger District, with offices in Boulder. The Roosevelt National Forest began in 1897 as part of the Medicine Bow Forest Reserve. It was renamed the Colorado
    8.50
    4 votes
    10
    Umatilla National Forest

    Umatilla National Forest

    The Umatilla National Forest, in the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon and southeast Washington, covers an area of 1.4 million acres (5,700 km²). In descending order of land area the forest is located in parts of Umatilla, Grant, Columbia, Morrow, Wallowa, Union, Garfield, Asotin, Wheeler, and Walla Walla counties. (Columbia, Garfield, Asotin, and Walla Walla counties are in Washington, while the rest are in Oregon.) More than three-quarters of the forest lies in the state of Oregon. Forest headquarters are located in Pendleton, Oregon. There are local ranger district offices in Heppner and Ukiah in Oregon, and in Pomeroy and Walla Walla in Washington. The Umatilla National Forest takes its name from the Umatilla Indian word meaning "water rippling over sand." Explorers Lewis and Clark passed through the area in 1805 on the Columbia River, and Marcus and Narcissa Whitman passed through in 1836 to establish a mission at Wailatpu near Walla Walla, Washington. Thousands of emigrants later followed the Oregon Trail west, and many remained in the Blue Mountain region. Discovery of gold in Oregon in 1851 led to the settlement of the North Fork John Day River area. More than $10 million
    8.50
    4 votes
    11
    Tahoe National Forest

    Tahoe National Forest

    Tahoe National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in the state of California, northwest of Lake Tahoe. It includes the 8,587-foot (2,617 m) peak of Sierra Buttes, near Sierra City, which has views of Mount Lassen and Mount Shasta. It is located in parts of six counties. In descending order of forestland area they are Sierra, Placer, Nevada, Yuba, Plumas, and El Dorado counties. (The El Dorado County portion is very tiny, at only four acres.) The forest has a total area of 871,495 acres (1,361.71 sq mi, or 3,526.82 km). Its headquarters is in Nevada City, California. There are local ranger district offices in Camptonville, Foresthill, Sierraville, and Truckee. Tahoe National Forest has many natural and man-made resources for the enjoyment of its visitors, including hundreds of lakes and reservoirs, river canyons carved through granite bedrock, and many miles of trails including a portion of the Pacific Crest Trail. Also within its borders is the National Wilderness Preservation System's Granite Chief Wilderness. The forest also serves as the water supply headwaters for the towns of Lincoln, Auburn, Rocklin, California, and Reno and Sparks, Nevada, which receive the water
    6.00
    6 votes
    12
    Bridger-Teton National Forest

    Bridger-Teton National Forest

    Bridger-Teton National Forest is located in western Wyoming, United States. The forest consists of 3.4 million acres (14,000 km), making it the second largest National Forest outside of Alaska. The forest stretches from Yellowstone National Park, along the eastern boundary of Grand Teton National Park and from there rides along the western slope of the Continental Divide to the southern end of the Wind River Range. The forest also extends southward encompassing the Salt River Range and Wyoming Range mountains near the Idaho border. Located within the forest are the Gros Ventre, Bridger Wilderness and Teton Wildernesses, totaling 1.2 million acres (4,900 km). Other points of interest contained in the forest include Gannett Peak (13,804 ft/4,207 m), the tallest mountain in Wyoming, and the Gros Ventre landslide, which is one of the largest readily visible landslides on earth. All of the forest is in turn a part of the 20-million-acre (81,000 km) Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. While Gannett Peak is the highest summit in the forest, another 40 named mountains rise above 12,000 feet (3,658 m). The high altitudes and abundant snowfall, exceeding 600 inches (50 ft/15 m) at some locations,
    8.25
    4 votes
    13

    Coeur d'Alene National Forest

    The Coeur d'Alene is a U.S. National Forest located in the Idaho panhandle and is one of three forests that are aggregated into the Idaho Panhandle National Forest (the other two are the Kaniksu National Forest and St. Joe National Forests). Coeur d'Alene National Forest is located in Shoshone, Kootenai, and Bonner counties in northern Idaho. It has a total area of 726,362 acres (1,135 sq mi or 2,940 km²). The forest headquarters is located in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. There are local ranger district offices located in Coeur d'Alene and Silverton.
    8.25
    4 votes
    14
    Gifford Pinchot National Forest

    Gifford Pinchot National Forest

    Gifford Pinchot National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in southern Washington, USA. With an area of 1.32 million acres (5300 km), it extends 116 km along the western slopes of Cascade Range from Mount Rainier National Park to the Columbia River. It includes the 110,000 acre (445 km) Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, established by Congress in 1982. In addition, Congressional action since 1964 has established the following wilderness areas: A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the Forest was 198,000 acres (80,000 ha), some of which is contained within its wilderness areas. The forest offices are located in Vancouver, Washington. There are local ranger district offices in Randle, Amboy, and Trout Lake. The forest is named after the first chief of the United States Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot. Washington towns near entrances of the forest include Cougar, Randle, and Carson. Gifford Pinchot National Forest is one of the older national forests in the United States. Included as part of the Mount Rainier Forest Reserve in 1897, the area was set aside as the Columbia National Forest in 1908. It was renamed the Gifford Pinchot
    5.83
    6 votes
    15
    Los Padres National Forest

    Los Padres National Forest

    Los Padres National Forest is a forest located in southern and central California, which includes most of the mountainous land along the California coast from Ventura to Monterey, extending inland. Elevations range from sea level to 8,847 feet (2,697 m). The forest is approximately 1,950,000 acres (7890 km²) in area, of which 1,762,400 acres (7,132.18 km²) or about 88% are public lands; the rest are privately owned inholdings. The forest is divided between two noncontiguous areas. The northern division is within Monterey County and includes the beautiful Big Sur Coast and scenic interior areas. This is a very popular area for hiking, with 323 miles (520 km) of hiking trails and 11 campgrounds (ranging from very rugged to suitable for recreational vehicles). This division also contains the Ventana Wilderness, home to the California Condor. The "main division" of the forest includes lands within San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and Kern Counties, with a small extension into Los Angeles County in the Pyramid Lake area, between Castaic and Gorman. Mountain ranges within the Los Padres include the Santa Lucia Mountains, La Panza Range, Caliente Range (a small part), Sierra Madre
    6.60
    5 votes
    16
    Bighorn National Forest

    Bighorn National Forest

    Bighorn National Forest is located in northern Wyoming, United States and consists of over 1.1 million acres (4,500 km²). Created as a US Forest Reserve in 1897, it is one of the oldest government-protected forest lands in the U.S. The forest is well east of the continental divide and extends from the Montana border for a distance of 80 miles (130 km) along the spine of the Big Horn Mountains, an outlying mountain range separated from the rest of the Rocky Mountains by Bighorn Basin. Elevations range from 5,000 feet (1,500 m) along the sagebrush and grass-covered lowlands at the foot of the mountains, to 13,189 feet (4,020 m) on top of Cloud Peak, the highest point in the Big Horn Mountains. The forest is named after the Bighorn River, which is partially fed by streams found in the forest. While the river and forest used the name "Bighorn" all in one word, the mountains associated with the forest are referred to as the "Big Horns". Within the forest is the Cloud Peak Wilderness area in which no motorized or mechanical equipment is allowed. The only access into the 189,000 acre (765 km²) wilderness is on foot or horseback. There are 1,500 miles (2,400 km) of trails in the forest,
    7.75
    4 votes
    17
    Bitterroot National Forest

    Bitterroot National Forest

    Bitterroot National Forest comprises 1.587 million acres (6,423 km²) in west-central Montana and eastern Idaho, of the United States. It is located primarily in Ravalli County, Montana (70.26% of the forest), but also has acreage in Idaho County, Idaho (29.24%), and Missoula County, Montana (0.49%). Founded in 1898, the forest is located in the Bitterroot and the Sapphire mountain ranges with elevations ranging from 2,200 feet (650 m) along the Salmon River in Idaho to 10,157 foot (3,100 m) Trapper Peak. Roughly half the forest (743,000 acres, 3,000 km²) make up part or all of three distinct Wilderness areas. These areas include the Anaconda-Pintler, Selway-Bitterroot and Frank Church River of No Return Wildernesses. The distinction is that in wilderness areas, no roads, logging, mining or other construction is permitted and all access must be done either on foot or horseback; even bicycles are not permitted. Hunting however is allowed forest-wide including wilderness areas. The Lewis and Clark Expedition passed through parts of what are now forest lands in 1805. After the discovery of gold in Idaho and then Montana in the 1860s, numerous mining towns were built, some of which
    7.75
    4 votes
    18
    Nebraska National Forest

    Nebraska National Forest

    The Nebraska National Forest is a United States National Forest located in the U.S. state of Nebraska. The total area of the national forest is 141,864 acres (574 km). The national forest comprises two ranger districts. The 90,000-acre (364 km) Bessey Ranger District is located in the Sandhills of central Nebraska. Encompassing about 63.9% of the forest's total area, it lies in parts of Thomas and Blaine counties. It was established in 1902 by Charles E. Bessey as an experiment to see if forests could be created in treeless areas of the Great Plains for use as a national timber reserve. This effort resulted in a 20,000-acre (80.9 km) forest, the largest human-planted forest in the United States. Today, the forest's nursery supplies 2.5 to 3 million seedlings per year. The 52,000 acres (210 km) Pine Ridge Ranger District is located in the Pine Ridge region of northwest Nebraska. It contains about 36.1% of the forest's total area, and it lies in part of Dawes and Sioux counties. The native ponderosa forests were added to the National Forest system in the 1950s. The Soldier Creek Wilderness, a federally designated wilderness area, is located in the forest. The nursery is listed on the
    7.50
    4 votes
    19
    Shasta-Trinity National Forest

    Shasta-Trinity National Forest

    The Shasta-Trinity National Forest is a federally designated forest in northern California, USA. It is the largest National Forest in California and is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The 2,210,485 acre (894,552 Ha) forest encompasses five wilderness areas, hundreds of mountain lakes and 6,278 miles (10,103 km) of streams and rivers. Major features include Shasta Lake, the largest man-made lake in California and Mount Shasta, elevation 14,179 feet (4,322 m). The Shasta-Trinity National Forest offers a wide range of recreational activities. Some of these include hiking, backpacking, mountain climbing, horseback riding, camping, boating, fishing, sightseeing, downhill skiing and riding, snowboarding, cross-country skiing, and snowmobiling. In descending order of land area, the forest is located in parts of Trinity, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Modoc and Humboldt counties. In 1905, the first timber sale under the new US Forest Service agency occurred on what was then called the Shasta Reserve. The Shasta National Forest and the Trinity National Forest were administratively combined in 1954 and officially became the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. The more westerly section of the
    7.50
    4 votes
    20
    Wenatchee National Forest

    Wenatchee National Forest

    Wenatchee National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in Washington. With an area of 1,735,394 acres (2,711.55 sq mi, or 7,022.89 km²), it extends about 137 miles along the eastern slopes of the Cascade Range of Washington, USA from Okanogan National Forest to Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The forest is located in Chelan, Kittitas and Yakima counties. There are six officially designated wilderness areas within Wenatchee National Forest that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. All of them lie partially in neighboring National Forests (as indicated). The Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forests are managed as one forest with headquarters in Wenatchee, Washington. There are local ranger district offices located in Chelan, Cle Elum, Entiat, Leavenworth, and Naches. The first forest supervisor of Wenatchee National Forest was Albert H. Sylvester, who named over a thousand natural features in the region. A 1993 United States Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the Forest was 318,800 acres (129,000 ha). Wildfires are not uncommon in the National Forest. In September 2012, a severe lightning storm ignited hundreds of fires, the
    7.50
    4 votes
    21

    William B. Bankhead National Forest

    The William B. Bankhead National Forest is one of Alabama's four National Forests, covering 181,230 acres (733 km). It is home to Alabama's only National Wild and Scenic River, the Sipsey Fork. It is located in northwestern Alabama, around the town of Double Springs. It is named in honor of William B. Bankhead, a longtime U.S. Representative from Alabama. Known as the "land of a thousand waterfalls", this National Forest is popular for hiking, horseback riding, hunting, boating, fishing, swimming, canoeing and more. Within the forest lies the Sipsey Wilderness, with a host of wildlife and an abundance of swift streams, limestone bluffs, and waterfalls. Native American relics abound in Bankhead, one of the Southern United States's premier sites for petroglyphs, prehistoric drawings, and rock carvings, at sites such as the Kinlock Shelter. The forest is headquartered in Montgomery, as are all four of Alabama's National Forests. The other National Forests in the state are Conecuh, Talladega, and Tuskegee. There are local ranger district offices located in Double Springs. The forest was established as Alabama National Forest on January 15, 1918 with 66,008 acres (267.12 km). On June
    7.50
    4 votes
    22
    Cleveland National Forest

    Cleveland National Forest

    Cleveland National Forest encompasses 460,000 acres (720 sq mi (1,900 km)), mostly of chaparral, with a few riparian areas. A warm dry mediterranean climate prevails over the Forest. It is the southernmost National forest of California. It is administered by the United States Forest Service, a government agency within the United States Department of Agriculture. It is divided into the Descanso, Palomar and Trabuco Ranger Districts and is located in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. Cleveland National Forest was created on July 1, 1908 with the consolidation of Trabuco Canyon National Reserve and San Jacinto National Reserve by President Theodore Roosevelt and named after former president Grover Cleveland. The Cleveland National Forest was the site of both of the largest wildfires in California history, the 2003 Cedar Fire, and the Santiago Canyon Fire of 1889. Both fires widely consumed many sections of the area, and endangered many animal species as well. A National Forest Adventure Pass is required for parking in the Cleveland National Forest as well as other National Forests in Southern California, and may be obtained from local merchants, visitor centers, or
    8.67
    3 votes
    23
    Gallatin National Forest

    Gallatin National Forest

    Founded in 1899, Gallatin National Forest is located in south central Montana, United States. The forest comprises 1,819,515 acres (7,363.32 km) and has portions of both the Absaroka-Beartooth and Lee Metcalf Wilderness areas within its boundaries. Gallatin National Forest borders Yellowstone National Park on the north and northwest and is part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, a region which encompasses almost 20,000,000 acres (81,000 km). The forest is named after Albert Gallatin (1761–1849), U.S. Secretary of the Treasury and scholar of Native American languages and cultures. There are six separate mountain ranges within the forest including the Gallatin, Madison, Bridger, Crazy, Absaroka, and Beartooth Ranges. The Beartooth's are home to Granite Peak, which at 12,799 ft (3,901 m), is the highest point in Montana and also in the forest. Quake Lake on the Madison River is the site of the 1959 earthquake and landslide which formed the lake. A separate section of the forest north of Livingston, Montana is located in the Crazy Mountains which rise over 7,000 ft (2,100 m) above the great plains to the east. The forest includes two wilderness areas, the Absaroka-Beartooth (943,626
    7.00
    4 votes
    24
    Lewis and Clark National Forest

    Lewis and Clark National Forest

    Lewis and Clark National Forest is located in west central Montana, United States. Spanning 2,800 square miles (7,300 km), the forest is managed as two separate zones. The eastern sections, under the Jefferson Division, is a mixture of grass and shrublands dotted with "island" pockets of forested areas. Here, cattle leases to local ranchers as well as timber harvesting are the norm. The western Rocky Mountain Division which straddles the Continental divide, is more oriented more towards preservation, primarily because much of the land has been designated as wilderness. Forest headquarters are located in Great Falls, Montana. There are local ranger district offices in Choteau, Harlowton, Neihart, Stanford, and White Sulphur Springs. The forest lands were originally created in 1897 which makes this forest one of the oldest forest preserves in the U.S. The forest is named in honor of the members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which passed through the forest between 1804 and 1806. Prior to that the region was inhabited by Indians for a period of at least 8,000 years and when the expedition first came to the area, the Blackfeet, Sioux, Cheyenne, Flathead and Crow Indians all
    7.00
    4 votes
    25
    Mount Hood National Forest

    Mount Hood National Forest

    The Mount Hood National Forest is located 62 miles (100 km) east of the city of Portland, Oregon, and the northern Willamette River valley. The Forest extends south from the Columbia River Gorge across more than 60 miles (97 km) of forested mountains, lakes and streams to the Olallie Scenic Area, a high lake basin under the slopes of Mount Jefferson. The Forest encompasses some 1,067,043 acres (4,318.17 km). Forest headquarters are located in Sandy, Oregon. A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the Forest was 345,300 acres (139,700 ha). The Forest is divided into four separate districts - Barlow (with offices in Dufur), Clackamas River (Estacada), Hood River (Mount Hood-Parkdale), and Zigzag (Zigzag). In descending order of land area the National Forest is located in parts of Clackamas, Hood River, Wasco, Multnomah, Marion, and Jefferson counties. Mount Hood National Forest was first established as the Bull Run Forest Reserve in 1892. It was merged with part of Cascade National Forest on July 1, 1908 and named Oregon National Forest. The name was changed again to Mount Hood National Forest in 1924. In 2010, Mount Hood National Forest was honored
    7.00
    4 votes
    26
    Apalachicola National Forest

    Apalachicola National Forest

    The Apalachicola National Forest is the largest U.S. National Forest in the state of Florida. It encompasses 632,890 acres (988.9 sq mi; 2,561.2 km) and is the only national forest located in the Florida Panhandle. The National Forest provides water and land-based outdoors activities such as hiking, swimming, boating, hunting, fishing, horse-back riding, and off-road ATV usage. Apalachicola National Forest contains two Wilderness Areas: Bradwell Bay Wilderness Area and Mud Swamp/New River Wilderness. There area also several special purpose areas: Camel Lake Recreation Area, Fort Gadsden Historical Site, Leon Sinks Geological Area, Silver Lake Recreation Area, and Wright Lake Recreation Area. In descending order of forest land area it is located in parts of Liberty, Wakulla, Leon, and Franklin counties. The forest is headquartered in Tallahassee, as are all three National Forests in Florida, but there are local Forest ranger district offices located in Bristol and Crawfordville. Hunting and fishing are monitored and governed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). The national forest itself is a wildlife management area. The FWC divides the management area
    8.33
    3 votes
    27

    San Isabel National Forest

    San Isabel National Forest is located in central Colorado. The forest contains 19 of the state's 54 fourteeners, peaks over 14,000 feet (4,300 m) high, including Mount Elbert, the highest point in Colorado. It is one of eleven national forests in the state of Colorado and contains the Sawatch Range, the Collegiate Peaks, and Sangre de Cristo Range. It has a total area of 1,120,233 acres (1,750.36 sq mi, or 4,533.42 km²) spread out over parts of eleven counties in central Colorado. In descending order of land area it is located in Chaffee, Custer, Lake, Huerfano, Fremont, Pueblo, Saguache, Las Animas, Park, Costilla, and Summit counties. San Isabel National Forest is co-managed by the Forest Service together with Pike National Forest, Cimarron National Grassland, and Comanche National Grassland from offices in Pueblo. There are local ranger district offices located in Cañon City, Leadville, and Salida. There are seven officially designated wilderness areas lying within San Isabel National Forest that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Four of them extend into neighboring National Forests, and of these, one also onto land under management of the National Park
    8.33
    3 votes
    28

    Delta National Forest

    Delta National Forest is a U.S. National Forest in western Mississippi. It is located in Sharkey County and has an area of 60,898 acres (246.4 km). The forest is headquartered in Jackson, as are all six National Forests in Mississippi, but there are local ranger district offices located in Rolling Fork. It is one of only six National Forests that are contained entirely within a single county. The Green Ash-Overcup Oak-Sweetgum Research Natural Areas within the Delta National Forest are a rare example of a pristine bottomlands hardwood forest. They were declared National Natural Landmarks in May 1976.
    10.00
    2 votes
    29

    Angelina National Forest

    Angelina National Forest is a United States National Forest, one of four located in Texas. The 153,180-acre (619.9 km) Angelina National Forest is located in East Texas in parts of San Augustine, Angelina, Jasper and Nacogdoches counties. It is managed together with the three other National Forests in Texas (Davy Crockett, Sabine, and Sam Houston) from Forest Service offices in Lufkin, Texas. There are local district offices located in Zavalla. The forest lies in the Neches River Basin and on the north and south shores of Sam Rayburn Reservoir. Longleaf Pine is the predominant cover type in the southern portion of the forest, while Loblolly and Shortleaf Pine are the dominant species in the northern portion. Hundreds of wildlife species exist in the forest. Principal game in the is deer, squirrel, wild turkey, woodcock, quail, dove and duck. The forest provides wintering habitat for the threatened Bald Eagle. The Red-cockaded Woodpecker, an endangered species, is found throughout the forest. Humans came to the area around 8,000 years ago. Archeological sites document the evidence of man's presence over the entire period since then. In 1934, the Texas Legislature approved a
    8.00
    3 votes
    30

    Tuskegee National Forest

    The Tuskegee National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in Macon County, Alabama, just north of Tuskegee and west of Auburn. The topography is level to moderately sloping, with broad ridges with stream terraces and broad floodplains. Tuskegee National Forest is the smallest national forest in the U.S. (and one of only six that is contained entirely within a single county), but supports many outdoor activities. The forest is headquartered in Montgomery, as are all four of Alabama's National Forests. The other National Forests in the state are Conecuh, Talladega and William B. Bankhead. There are local ranger district offices located in Tuskegee. There are four main hiking trails within the National Forest and three of these are also mountain biking trails. There are also horse trails, two fish ponds, the Uchee Shooting Range, Tsinia Wildlife Viewing Area, primitive camping and the Taska Recreation Area.
    8.00
    3 votes
    31

    St. Joe National Forest

    The St. Joe National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in the Idaho panhandle and is one of three forests that are aggregated into the Idaho Panhandle National Forest (the other two are the Coeur d'Alene and Kaniksu National Forests). In descending order of land area St. Joe National Forest is located in parts of Shoshone, Latah, Clearwater, and Benewah counties. It has a total area of 867,882 acres (3,512 km). The forest headquarters is located in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. There are local ranger district offices located in Avery and St. Maries.
    9.50
    2 votes
    32
    Coronado National Forest

    Coronado National Forest

    The Coronado National Forest includes an area of about 1.78 million acres (7,200 km) spread throughout mountain ranges in southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. It is located in parts of Cochise, Graham, Santa Cruz, Pima, and Pinal counties in Arizona, and Hidalgo County in New Mexico. The National Forest is divided into five ranger districts. The districts themselves are not contiguous; each consists of multiple "sky island" mountain ranges. The Santa Catalina Ranger District near the city of Tucson comprises the Santa Catalina and Rincon Mountains. Included in this area is the highest peak of the Santa Catalinas, Mount Lemmon, the rugged Pusch Ridge Wilderness Area, and the popular Sabino Canyon. Much of this district was part of Santa Catalina National Forest before its inclusion in Coronado. The Safford Ranger District comprises the mountain ranges surrounding the city of Safford, Arizona. These five ranges are the Pinaleño, Galiuro, Santa Teresa, Winchester, and Greasewood Mountains. Included in this area is the highest peak of the Pinaleños, Mount Graham. Mount Graham National Forest was a formerly separate national forest, combined into Crook National Forest on
    6.50
    4 votes
    33
    San Bernardino National Forest

    San Bernardino National Forest

    The San Bernardino National Forest is a federally managed forest encompassing 823,816 acres (3,333.87 km) of which 677,982 acres (2,743.70 km) are federal. The forest is made up of two main divisions, the San Bernardino Mountains on the easternmost of the Transverse Ranges, and the San Jacinto and Santa Rosa Mountains on the northernmost of the Peninsular Ranges. Elevations range from 2,000 to 11,499 feet (600 to 3505 m). The forest includes five wilderness areas: San Gorgonio, Cucamonga, San Jacinto, Santa Rosa and Bighorn Mountain. Forest headquarters are located in the city of San Bernardino. There are district offices in Fontana, Idyllwild, and Skyforest. This site was the filming location for Daniel Boone in 1936, Part of the 1969 musical film Paint Your Wagon was shot here. According to United States Geological Survey maps of the forest, it consists of two large areas or tracts: a northern and southern portion. The west border of the forest adjoins Angeles National Forest and runs north-south about ten miles west of Interstate 15. At its widest parts, the northern portion of the forest runs about 57 miles (90 km) on an east-west dimension. It runs about 24 miles (40 km) on a
    6.50
    4 votes
    34
    Chippewa National Forest

    Chippewa National Forest

    Chippewa National Forest is a National Forest located in northcentral Minnesota, United States, in the counties of Itasca, Cass, and Beltrami. Forest headquarters are located in Cass Lake, Minnesota. There are local ranger district offices in Blackduck, Deer River, and Walker. The forest covers 666,623 acres (2,697.73 km). Water is abundant, with over 1,300 lakes (including Leech Lake), 923 miles (1,485 km) of rivers and streams, and 400,000 acres (1,600 km) of wetlands. The forest was established as the Minnesota Forest Reserve on June 27, 1902, with passage of the Morris Act. While this act mainly addressed the disposition of unallotted lands on Ojibwe Indian reservations in Minnesota, 200,000 acres (810 km) of the Chippewas of the Mississippi, Cass Lake, Leech Lake, and Winnibigoshish Indian reservations were designated as a Forest Reserve. The Reserve was re-established as the Minnesota National Forest on May 23, 1908. In 1928 the forest was renamed in honor of the Chippewa Indians from whose land the forest was created. Subsequent boundary expansions and land purchases increased the area of the forest to its present size. Today, approximately 75 percent of the forest's land is
    7.67
    3 votes
    35

    Hell Gate National Forest

    Hell Gate National Forest was established as the Hell Gate Forest Reserve by the U.S. Forest Service in Montana on October 3, 1905 with 1,581,120 acres (6,398.6 km). It became a National Forest on March 4, 1907. On July 1, 1908 the entire forest was divided between Beaverhead, Deerlodge, Missoula and Bitterroot National Forests and the name was discontinued.
    7.67
    3 votes
    36
    Kisatchie National Forest

    Kisatchie National Forest

    Kisatchie National Forest, the only National forest in Louisiana, USA, is located in the forested piney hills and hardwood bottoms of seven central and northern parishes. It is part of the Tertiary uplands (some of Louisiana's oldest rocks) and has large areas of longleaf pine forests (a forest type that has declined significantly over the last century). It is one of the largest pieces of natural landscape in Louisiana, with some 604,000 acres (2,440 km) of public land, more than half of which is vital longleaf pine and flatwoods vegetation, which support many rare plant and animal species. There are also rare habitats such as hillside seepage bogs and calcareous prairies. The forest also contains and provides a buffer for the Kisatchie Hills Wilderness, a nationally designated wilderness area that contributes to protecting biodiversity of the coastal plain region of the United States. The forest was designated in 1930 during the administration of U.S. President Herbert Hoover, based on efforts of the Louisiana Forestry Department and its botanist and preservationist Caroline Dormon of Natchitoches Parish. Kisatchie National Forest plays an important role in protecting
    7.67
    3 votes
    37
    Osceola National Forest

    Osceola National Forest

    Osceola National Forest is an American National Forest located in Florida. Osceola National Forest was created by President Herbert Hoover's proclamation, on July 10, 1931. It is named in honor of the Native American Seminole warrior, Osceola. The forest is made up of approximately 200,000 acres (809.4 km) of pine flatwoods and cypress-hardwood swamps in northeastern Florida and is about 50 miles (80 km) west of Jacksonville. It is located in parts of Columbia, Baker, Bradford, and Hamilton counties. The forest is headquartered in Tallahassee, as are all three National Forests in Florida, but there are local ranger district offices located in Olustee. There is one officially designated wilderness area in the forest, the 13,660-acre (55.28 km²) Big Gum Swamp Wilderness. Within the forest is the Osceola Research Natural Area, designated a National Natural Landmark in December 1974. Osceola National Forest is home to many species including the American Alligator, the Florida Black Bear and the Red-cockaded Woodpecker, an endangered species. A 23-mile (37.01 km) section of the Florida National Scenic Trail is included in the park grounds. Other hiking trails in the Park include:
    7.67
    3 votes
    38
    El Yunque National Forest

    El Yunque National Forest

    El Yunque National Forest, formerly known as the Luquillo National Forest and the Caribbean National Forest, is a forest located in northeastern Puerto Rico. It is the only tropical rain forest in the United States National Forest System. The forest is commonly known as El Yunque, which may be attributed to either a Spanish approximation of the aboriginal Taíno word yu-ke which means "white lands", or the word "anvil," which is yunque in Spanish. The second-tallest mountain within El Yunque is also named El Yunque. El Yunque National Rainforest is located on the slopes of the Sierra de Luquillo mountains and it encompasses 28,000 acres (43.753 mi² or 113.32 km²) of land, making it the largest block of public land in Puerto Rico. El Toro, the highest mountain peak in the forest rises 1,065 metres (3,494 ft) above sea level. Ample rainfall (over 200 inches a year in some areas) creates a jungle-like setting — lush foliage, crags, waterfalls and rivers are a prevalent sight. The forest has a number of trails from which the jungle-like territory's flora and fauna can be appreciated. El Yunque is also renowned for its unique Taíno petroglyphs. The forest region was initially set aside
    6.25
    4 votes
    39

    Idaho Panhandle National Forest

    Idaho Panhandle National Forest is a national forest located in the U.S. state of Idaho. Approximately 22.4% of the forest (in the Kaniksu portion) extends into the states of Montana (14.1%) and Washington (8.3%). The forest was combined in 2000 from three previous separate National Forests which continue to manage themselves somewhat separately through district offices. The Coeur d'Alene, St. Joe, and Kaniksu National Forests merged to form a 3,224,739-acre (5,038.66 sq mi, or 13,050.06 km) forest in northern Idaho (better known as the Idaho Panhandle). The northernmost portion of the forest shares a boundary with Canada. Forest headquarters are located in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. The Panhandle National Forest contains a wide variety of wildlife. Whitetail Deer, Mule Deer, Elk, Moose, Coyote, Wolf, Bobcat, Cougar, Wolverine, Black Bear and even Grizzly Bear are seen in the forest. Bird species include Wild Turkey, Blue Jays, California Quail, numerous species of Grouse, Osprey, Golden Eagle, Bald Eagle and numerous types of owls. The rivers and lakes in the Panhandle hold some of the best fishing locations in the world. There are two officially designated wilderness areas within
    6.25
    4 votes
    40
    Fremont National Forest

    Fremont National Forest

    The Fremont National Forest is a United States National Forest named after John C. Frémont, who explored the area for the United States Army Corps of Engineers in 1843. It is located in western Lake and eastern Klamath counties in Oregon, and has a land area of 1,207,039 acres (4,885 km). There are local ranger district offices located in Bly, Lakeview, Paisley, and Silver Lake. The Warner Canyon Ski Area was part of Fremont until a land swap transferred ownership to Lake County. Founded in 1908, the Fremont National Forest was originally protected as the Goose Lake Forest Reserve in 1906. The name was soon changed to Fremont National Forest. It absorbed part of Paulina National Forest on July 19, 1915. In 2002, it was administratively combined with the Winema National Forest as the Fremont–Winema National Forests. A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the forest was 549,800 acres (222,500 ha), 113,800 acres (46,100 ha) of which were Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) forests. The sites of two former uranium mines, the White King and Lucky Lass mines, are located on Forest Service lands within Fremont National Forest. They are now Superfund
    9.00
    2 votes
    41

    Tonto National Forest

    The Tonto National Forest, encompassing 2,873,200 acres (11,627 km), is the largest of the six national forests in Arizona and is the fifth largest national forest in the United States. The Tonto National Forest has diverse scenery, with elevations ranging from 1,400 feet (427 m) in the Sonoran Desert to 7,400 feet (2,256 m) in the ponderosa pine forests of the Mogollon Rim (pronounced MOH-gee-on, or MUH-gee-own). The Tonto National Forest is also the most visited "urban" forest in the United States. The boundaries of the Tonto National Forest are the Phoenix metropolitan area to the south, the Mogollon Rim to the north and the San Carlos and Fort Apache Indian Reservation to the east. The Tonto (Spanish for "fool") is managed by the USDA Forest Service and its headquarters are in Phoenix. There are local ranger district offices in Globe, Mesa, Payson, Roosevelt, Scottsdale, and Young. Tonto National Forest began charging user fees in 1996 for daily and overnight stays at expanded amenity recreation sites in the national forest. Five different passes are currently offered for sale: The Half Price passes are for use by Golden Age/Access Passport or Interagency Senior/Access Pass
    9.00
    2 votes
    42
    Siuslaw National Forest

    Siuslaw National Forest

    Siuslaw National Forest ( /saɪˈjuːslɔː/ sy-EW-slaw) is a national forest in western Oregon, United States. Established in 1908, the Siuslaw is made up of a wide variety of ecosystems, ranging from coastal forests to sand dunes. The Siuslaw National Forest encompasses more than 630,000 acres (2,500 km) along the central Oregon Coast, between Coos Bay and Tillamook, and in some places extends east from the ocean, beyond the crest of the Oregon Coast Range, almost reaching the Willamette Valley. The Forest lies primarily in Lane (39% of the forest) and Lincoln (27% of the forest) counties; the rest in descending order of land area are Tillamook, Douglas, Yamhill, Benton, Coos, and Polk counties. It includes the Sand Lake Recreation Area and the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area. The Forest Supervisor's office is located in Corvallis, Oregon, and the Siuslaw is broken up into two ranger districts - the Hebo Ranger District, with approximately 151,000 acres (610 km), and the Central Coast Ranger District, with approximately 479,000 acres (1,940 km). The Forest contains Marys Peak, the highest point in Oregon's Coast Range at 4097 ft (1249 m). Numerous aquatic habitats are found in
    7.33
    3 votes
    43

    Conecuh National Forest

    The Conecuh National Forest in southern Alabama covers 83,000 acres (340 km²), along the Alabama - Florida line in Covington and Escambia counties. Topography is level to moderately sloping, broad ridges with stream terraces and broad floodplains. The Conecuh Trail winds 20 miles (30 km) through Alabama's coastal plain. The trail was built by the Youth Conservation Corps. Each year, beginning in 1976, the young people of the Corps extend the trail through park-like longleaf pine stands, hardwood bottomlands, and other plant communities of the Conecuh National Forest. The name Conecuh is believed to be of Muskogee origin. It means "land of cane," which is appropriate because the trail runs through canebrakes in several sections. Situated just above the Florida panhandle, the forest has a distinct southern flavor of mist-laden hardwood swamps, pitcher plant bogs, and southern coastal plain pine forest. These hilly coastal plains are also home to longleaf pine, upland scrub oak, and dogwood, as well as an aquatic labyrinth of winding creeks and cypress ponds. Clear-cut in the 1930s, the Conecuh was reforested with slash pine that reduced the number of nesting trees for the endangered
    6.00
    4 votes
    44

    Sam Houston National Forest

    The Sam Houston National Forest, one of four National Forests in Texas, is located 50 miles north of Houston. The forest is administered together with the other three United States National Forests and two National Grasslands located entirely in Texas, from common offices in Lufkin, Texas. The units include Angelina, Davy Crockett, Sabine, and Sam Houston National Forests, plus Caddo National Grassland and Lyndon B. Johnson National Grassland. There are local ranger district offices located in New Waverly. Summers in the Sam Houston National Forest are hot and humid and winters generally are short and mild. The average summer temperature is 83 °F (28 °C), but mid-summer temperatures often reach the upper 90s °F (30s °C). The average winter temperature is 53 °F (12 °C). Rarely do temperatures drop to less than 10 °F (-12 °C) or rise to over 110 °F (43 °C). The average rainfall is 44 inches (1.1 m). Normally dryer periods occur during September – October and February – March. The three counties that contain the Sam Houston National Forest - Montgomery, San Jacinto, and Walker - have yielded evidence of human occupation dating back 12,000 years. More recently, the basins of the San
    6.00
    4 votes
    45

    Kaibab National Forest

    At 1.6 million acres (6,500 km) the Kaibab National Forest borders both the north and south rims of the Grand Canyon, in north-central Arizona. It is divided into three major sections: the North Kaibab Ranger District (offices in Fredonia) and the South Kaibab and are managed by USDA Forest Service. The South Kaibab is further divided into two forests, the Tusayan Ranger District (offices in Grand Canyon), and the Williams Ranger District (offices in Williams). The Grand Canyon is a natural boundary between the North Kaibab and the South Kaibab. The South Kaibab covers 1,422 square miles (3,680 km) and the North Kaibab stretches over 1,010 square miles (2,600 km). Elevations vary on the forest from 5,500 feet (1,676 m) in the southwest corner to 10,418 feet (3,175 m) at the summit of Kendrick Peak on the Williams Ranger District. The forest as a whole is headquartered in Williams. The Kaibab Plateau is an island surrounded by lower elevations. The plateau, with elevation up to 9,000 feet (2,700 m) is bordered on the south by the Grand Canyon, on the east and the west by tributary canyons of the Colorado River, and on the North by tiers of uplifted cliffs. The North Kaibab Ranger
    8.50
    2 votes
    46

    Kaniksu National Forest

    The Kaniksu National Forest (pronounced kuh-NICK-sue) is a U.S. National Forest located in northeastern Washington, the Idaho panhandle, and northwestern Montana. The Idaho portion is one of three forests that are aggregated into the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, along with the Coeur d'Alene National Forest and St. Joe National Forest. Kaniksu National Forest has a total area of 1,627,833 acres (6,587.6 km). About 55.7% is in Idaho, 27.9% in Montana, and 16.4% in Washington. The name Kaniksu is from a Kalispel Indian word which means "black robe." It was used to refer to the Jesuit missionaries who brought their faith to North Idaho and Eastern Washington. Kaniksu National Forest was established on July 1, 1908 from a portion of Priest River National Forest. On September 30, 1933 a portion of Pend Oreille National Forest was added, and on July 1, 1954 part of Cabinet National Forest was added. Kaniksu was administratively combined with Coeur d'Alene and St. Joe National Forests on July 1, 1973. The forest headquarters are located in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. There are local ranger district offices located in Bonners Ferry, Priest Lake, and Sandpoint (all in Idaho). A portion of the
    8.50
    2 votes
    47
    Talladega National Forest

    Talladega National Forest

    The Talladega National Forest is located in the U.S. state of Alabama and covers 392,567 acres (613.39 sq mi, or 1,588.66 km) at the southern edge of the Appalachian Mountains. Before it was bought by the federal government in the 1930s, the area that comprises the Talladega was extensively logged and represented some of the most abused, eroded wastelands in all of Alabama. Pine forest regrowth now hosts a diverse eco-system. The tiny 7,400 acre (30 km) Cheaha Wilderness preserves a portion of this natural wealth near Rebecca Mountain. The forest's second wilderness area, the Dugger Mountain Wilderness protects the area around Alabama's second-highest mountain peak. The forest is headquartered in Montgomery, as are all four of Alabama's National Forests. The other National Forests in the state are Conecuh, Tuskegee, and William B. Bankhead. The Talladega National Forest is physically separated into two areas, and divided into three Ranger Districts: The forest covers parts of eleven counties in Alabama. In descending order of forest land area they are Cleburne, Clay, Bibb, Talladega, Perry, Hale, Calhoun, Chilton, Tuscaloosa, Cherokee, and Dallas counties.
    8.50
    2 votes
    48
    Ashley National Forest

    Ashley National Forest

    Ashley National Forest is a National Forest located in northeastern Utah and southwestern Wyoming. Within the Forest’s bounds are 1,382,346 acres (5,594 km) (with 1,287,909 acres (5,212 km) in Utah and 96,223 acres (389 km) in Wyoming) of vast forests, lakes, and mountains, with elevations ranging from 6,000 to 13,500 feet (1,800 to 4,100 m). The Forest covers portions of Daggett, Duchesne, Summit, Uintah, and Utah counties in Utah and Sweetwater County in Wyoming. Some of the most popular landmarks located in the Forest include the Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area and the Uinta Mountains, which contains the highest mountain peak in Utah (Kings Peak). The Forest also includes 276,175 acres (1,117.64 km), or about 60.5%, of the High Uintas Wilderness area (with the rest being in the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest). The headquarters for the Ashley National Forest are located in Vernal, Utah with ranger district offices in Vernal; Duchesne, Utah; Roosevelt, Utah; Manila, Utah; and Green River, Wyoming. Petroglyphs (rock art) found throughout the Forest suggest that the land had been hunted for centuries by Indians before being discovered. The first white men believed to
    10.00
    1 votes
    49

    Biabo Cordillera Azul National Forest

    The Cordillera Azul National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Cordillera Azul) in Peru was created as a product of the process of categorization and definitive delimitation of the Reserved Zone Blue Biabo mountain range. As soon as the process was finished, the zone corresponding to the Blue Mountain range was declared as National Park by means of supreme decree.
    10.00
    1 votes
    50
    Klamath National Forest

    Klamath National Forest

    Klamath National Forest is a 1,737,774-acre (2,715 sq mi; 7,033 km) national forest, in the Klamath Mountains, located in Siskiyou County in northern California, but with a tiny extension (1.5 percent of the forest) into southern Jackson County in Oregon. The forest contains continuous stands of ponderosa pine, Jeffrey pine, Douglas fir, red fir, white fir and incense cedar. Old growth forest is estimated to cover some 168,000 acres (680 km) of the forest land. Forest headquarters are located in Yreka, California. There are local ranger district offices located in Fort Jones, Happy Camp, and Macdoel, all in California. Klamath was established on May 6, 1905. There are four officially designated wilderness areas in Klamath National Forest that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Two of them extend into neighboring National Forests, and one of those into land managed by the Bureau of Land Management.
    10.00
    1 votes
    51
    Caribou-Targhee National Forest

    Caribou-Targhee National Forest

    Caribou-Targhee National Forest is located in the states of Idaho and Wyoming, with a small section in Utah in the United States. The forest is broken into several separate sections and extends over 2.63 million acres (10,600 km). To the east the forest borders Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park and Bridger-Teton National Forest. Most of the forest is a part of the 20-million-acre (81,000 km) Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Caribou and Targhee National Forests were combined from original forest lands created in 1891. Two designated wilderness areas are located in the easternmost sections of the forest, bordering on National Park lands. The 123,451-acre (500 km) Jedediah Smith Wilderness is adjacent to Grand Teton National Park on the western slope of the Teton Range. Known for karst limestone formations, the wilderness has many caves and provides excellent views of the less often seen west face of the Teton peaks. The smaller 10,715-acre (43 km) Winegar Hole Wilderness borders Yellowstone National Park and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway, and was set aside primarily to protect prime grizzly bear habitat. While western sections of the forest have a
    7.00
    3 votes
    52
    Malheur National Forest

    Malheur National Forest

    The Malheur National Forest is a National Forest in the U.S. state of Oregon. It contains more than 1.4 million acres (5,700 km) in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon. The forest include high desert grasslands, sage, juniper, pine, fir, and other tree species. Elevations vary from about 4,000 feet (1,200 m) to the 9,038-foot (2,755 m) peak of Strawberry Mountain. The Strawberry Mountains extend east to west through the center of the forest. U.S. Route 395 runs south to north through the forest, while U.S. Route 26 runs east-west. The forest was established by President Theodore Roosevelt on June 13, 1908 and is named after the Malheur River, from the French, meaning literally "misfortune". It is managed for timber extraction, cattle grazing, gold mining and wilderness use by the Forest Service, a division of the US Department of Agriculture. A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the forest was 312,000 acres (1,260 km). In descending order of land area the forest is located in parts of Grant, Harney, Baker, and Malheur counties. There are three ranger districts in the forest, with offices in John Day, Prairie City, and Hines, Oregon. The Malheur
    5.75
    4 votes
    53

    Samuel R. McKelvie National Forest

    The Samuel R. McKelvie National Forest is located in the north-central Sandhills region of the U.S. state of Nebraska. Created on October 15, 1971 (the forest has been some type of protected area since 1902), the forest is named after former Governor Samuel R. McKelvie. Encompassing an area of 116,079 acres (47,000 ha), the forest is a combination of prairie grasslands and pine forest "islands". Most of the existing forested sections were manmade, planted by hand over the past 75 years. The protein content of the native grasses is among the highest found anywhere in the world and numerous lease options are provided to local ranchers. Planted trees include Eastern Juniper, Scots Pine and Ponderosa Pine which continues to need replanting as it is harvested but has also managed to spread throughout the region independently. Indigenous wildlife such as pronghorn, white-tailed deer, mule deer, coyote and fox are plentiful. Of the 150 species of birds known to inhabit the forest, pheasant, grouse, hawk and turkey are the more commonly found. The forest has a small campground. Immediately to the south and east of the national forest is Merritt Reservoir, a dam on the Snake River. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    54
    Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

    Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

    The Wallowa–Whitman National Forest is a United States National Forest in Oregon. Formed by a merger of the formerly separate Wallowa and Whitman national forests, it is located in the northeastern corner of the state, in Wallowa, Baker, Union, Grant, and Umatilla counties in Oregon, and includes small areas in Nez Perce and Idaho counties in Idaho. The forest is named for the Wallowa band of the Nez Perce, who originally lived in this area, and Marcus and Narcissa Whitman, Presbyterian missionaries who settled north of here in 1836. Forest headquarters are located in Baker City, Oregon. The national forest may be divided into several distinct sections, which together cover 2,300,000 acres (9,300 km) of land, including 600,000 acres (2,400 km) of designated wilderness. A large section of the forest is located in the rugged Wallowa Mountains, south of Joseph, in the upper reaches of the Wallowa, Minam, and Imnaha drainages. The alpine area in the heart of the mountain range is designated as the Eagle Cap Wilderness. Bordering the national forest on the north, Wallowa Lake State Park is located on the shore of Wallowa Lake. A smaller section of the forest is located north of
    6.67
    3 votes
    55
    Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest

    Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest

    The Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest is a 2.76-million-acre (11,169 km) United States National Forest which runs along the Mogollon Rim and the White Mountains in east-central Arizona and extending into New Mexico, USA. Both forests are managed as one unit by USDA Forest Service from the forest headquarters in Springerville, Arizona. Apache-Sitgreaves has over 400 species of wildlife. With its high elevation and cool summer breezes it is a popular weekend destination from the hot desert for Phoenix, Arizona residents. The forest is divided into 5 Ranger Districts (Clifton, Alpine, Springerville, Lakeside, and Black Mesa) that span almost 300 miles (480 km) from Clifton, Arizona in the east-central portion of Arizona to the eastern boundary of the Coconino National Forest in north-central Arizona. The Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest borders the western and northern borders of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. It is located in parts of Greenlee, Apache, Navajo, and Coconino counties in eastern and east-central Arizona, and Catron County in western New Mexico. The more northwesterly Sitgreaves National Forestportion lies adjacent to the north side of the Fort Apache Indian
    8.00
    2 votes
    56
    Cherokee National Forest

    Cherokee National Forest

    The Cherokee National Forest is a large National Forest created on June 14, 1920 and managed by the U.S. Forest Service and encompassing some 655,598 acres (2,653.11 km). The Cherokee National Forest headquarters are located in Cleveland, Tennessee. The Cherokee National Forest mostly lies within eastern Tennessee, along the border with North Carolina, and comprises nearly the entire border area except for the section within Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The Cherokee National Forest has two separate sections: a northern region directly north of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and a southern section directly south of the Smokies. The Cherokee National Forest contains such notable sites as the Ocoee River (site of the 1996 Olympic whitewater events); 150 miles (240 km) of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail; Citico Creek Wilderness; Big Frog Mountain within Big Frog Wilderness, and surrounds both the Tennessee Valley Authority Watauga Reservoir and Wilbur Reservoir. The forest is located in parts of ten counties in Tennessee and one county in North Carolina. In descending order of forestland area they are Polk, Monroe, Carter, Unicoi, Cocke, Johnson, Greene,
    8.00
    2 votes
    57
    Helena National Forest

    Helena National Forest

    Helena National Forest is located in west-central Montana, in the United States. Covering 984,558 acres (400,000 ha), the forest is broken into several separate sections. The eastern regions are dominated by the Big Belt Mountains, and are the location of the Gates of the Mountains Wilderness, which remains much as it did when the Lewis and Clark Expedition passed through the region. The western sections have both the continental divide and the Scapegoat Wilderness area, which is part of the Bob Marshall Wilderness complex. The southern region includes the Elkhorn Mountains. The forest is composed of a mixture of grass and sagebrush covered lowlands with "island" pockets of lodgepole pine and more mountainous areas where Douglas fir, spruce and larch can be found. The rocky mountains in the region do not exceed 10,000 feet (3,000 m). The grizzly bear has a sizeable sustained population in the northwestern section of the forest, especially in the Scapegoat Wilderness. Black bears are numerous as are elk, moose, mule deer, and antelope. There are also small populations of bighorn sheep and mountain goats. Along streams and lakes, sightings of nesting bald eagles and other birds of
    8.00
    2 votes
    58
    Medicine Bow - Routt National Forest

    Medicine Bow - Routt National Forest

    Medicine Bow – Routt National Forest is the official title to a U.S. Forest Service managed area extending over 2,222,313 acres (8,993.38 km) in the states of Wyoming and Colorado, United States. What were once three separate areas, Medicine Bow National Forest, Routt National Forest and Thunder Basin National Grassland were administratively combined in 1995 due to similarity of the resources, proximity to each other and for administrative purposes. The Medicine Bow National Forest section (1,096,891 acres) is located in southeastern Wyoming and was originally created as a forest reserve in 1902. Named after the Native American powwows in which numerous tribes would congregate here in search of mountain mahogany, which was an excellent wood for the manufacturing of bows, and to perform rituals hoped to cure diseases and thus make "good medicine". Areas of interest include the Snowy Range where the highest peak is Medicine Bow Peak at 12,013 feet (3,662 m) and is visible from Snowy Range Pass, 10,847 ft (3,306 m), on Wyoming highway 130. The Encampment River, Huston Park, Savage Run and Platte River Wildernesses are all located within the Medicine Bow portion of the National Forest.
    8.00
    2 votes
    59
    Ocala National Forest

    Ocala National Forest

    The Ocala National Forest is the second largest National Forest in the U.S. state of Florida and covers approximately 607 square miles (1,572.12 km) of Central Florida. It is located three miles (5 km) east of Ocala and 16 miles (25.75 km) southeast of Gainesville. The Ocala National Forest, established in 1908, is the oldest national forest east of the Mississippi River and the southernmost national forest in the continental U.S. The word Ocala is thought to be a derivative of a Timucuan Indian term meaning "fair land" or "big hammock". The forest is headquartered in Tallahassee, as are all three National Forests in Florida, but there are local ranger district offices located in Silver Springs and Umatilla. The Ocala National Forest lies between the Ocklawaha and St. Johns Rivers in Central Florida. In descending order of land area it is located in parts of Marion, Lake, Putnam, and Seminole counties. The Ocala National Forest receives more visitors than any other national forest in the Sunshine State. Millions annually visit the forest, which is one of Central Florida's last remaining traces of forested land. The Ocala National Forest contains a high proportion of remaining
    8.00
    2 votes
    60
    Ouachita National Forest

    Ouachita National Forest

    The Ouachita National Forest is a National Forest that lies in the western portion of Arkansas and portions of eastern Oklahoma. The Ouachita National Forest is the oldest National Forest in the southern United States. The forest encompasses 1,784,457 acres (7,221 km), including most of the scenic Ouachita Mountains. Six locations in the forest, comprising 65,000 acres (263 km), have been designated as wilderness areas. Ouachita is the French spelling of the Indian word Washita which means "good hunting grounds". The forest was known as Arkansas National Forest on its establishment on December 18, 1907; the name was changed to Ouachita National Forest on April 29, 1926. Rich in history, the rugged and scenic Ouachita Mountains were first explored in 1541 by Hernando de Soto's party of Spaniards. French explorers followed, flavoring the region with names like Fourche La Fave River. The area including the forest nearly became a 165,000-acre (670 km) national park during the 1920s but a last-minute pocket veto by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge ended the effort. The bill had been pushed by U.S. Senator Joseph T. Robinson and U.S. Representative Otis Wingo, both Democrats, and State
    8.00
    2 votes
    61
    Gila National Forest

    Gila National Forest

    The Gila National Forest is a protected national forest in New Mexico in the southwestern United States established in 1905. It covers approximately 2,710,659 acres (1,100,000 ha) of public land, making it the sixth largest National Forest in the continental United States. Part of the area, the Gila Wilderness, was established in 1924 as the first designated wilderness by the U.S. federal government. Aldo Leopold Wilderness and a small part of the Blue Range Wilderness are also found within its borders. (Most of the Blue Range Wilderness lies within neighboring Apache National Forest.) The forest lies in southern Catron, northern Grant, western Sierra, and extreme northeastern Hidalgo counties in southwestern New Mexico. Forest headquarters are located in Silver City, New Mexico. There are local ranger district offices in Glenwood, Mimbres, Quemado, Reserve, Silver City, and Truth or Consequences. Terrain ranges from rugged mountains and deep canyons to semi-desert. Due to the extremely rugged terrain, the area is largely unspoiled. There are several hot springs in Gila National Forest, including Middle Fork Hot Springs, Jordan Hot Springs, and Turkey Creek Hot Springs. The Gila
    6.33
    3 votes
    62
    Pike National Forest

    Pike National Forest

    The Pike National Forest is located in the Front Range of Colorado, USA, west of Colorado Springs and including Pikes Peak. The forest encompasses 1,106,604 acres (4,478 km²) within Clear Creek, Teller, Park, Jefferson, Douglas and El Paso counties. The major rivers draining the forest are the South Platte and Fountain Creek. Rampart Reservoir, a large artificial body of water, is located within the forest. The forest is named after American explorer Zebulon Pike. Much of the bedrock within Pike National Forest is made up of the coarse, pink to orange Pikes Peak granite. Pike National Forest is managed in association with San Isabel National Forest and Comanche National Grassland in Colorado, as well as Cimarron National Grassland in Kansas and is headquartered in Pueblo, Colorado. There are local ranger district offices located in Colorado Springs, Fairplay and Morrison. Pike National Forest was the location of the massive 138,114-acre (558.93 km) Hayman Wildfire of 2002. The Pike and San Isabel National Forest was recently awarded a major reclamation project to fix the damage from the Hayman wildfire. The project was sponsored by The National Arbor Day Foundation, in conjunction
    6.33
    3 votes
    63
    Santa Fe National Forest

    Santa Fe National Forest

    The Santa Fe National Forest is a protected national forest in northern New Mexico in the Southwestern United States. It was established in 1915 and covers 1,558,452 acres (6,306.83 km). Elevations range from 5,300 feet (1600 m) to 13,103 feet (4000 m) at the summit of Truchas Peak, located within the Pecos Wilderness. The Jemez, Coyote, and Cuba districts are located in the Jemez Mountains; the Pecos/Las Vegas district is located in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains; and the Española district is located in both mountain ranges. In descending order of land area the forest lies in parts of Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Mora, and Los Alamos counties. Forest headquarters are located in the city of Santa Fe. Santa Fe National Forest was established on July 1, 1915 by the U.S. Forest Service with the amalgamation of Jemez National Forest to the west of Santa Fe and Pecos National Forest to the east. The former division is remembered in the ranger districts, with the Jemez Ranger District to the west and the Pecos/Las Vegas district to the east. The western districts enclose the Valles Caldera National Preserve, which is administered by Santa Fe from the Jemez district
    6.33
    3 votes
    64
    Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest

    Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest

    The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest ( /ʃɨˈwɑːmɨɡən ˌnɪkəˈleɪ/; the q is silent) is a 1,530,647 acre (6,194.3 km²) U.S. National Forest in northern Wisconsin in the United States. Much of the old growth forest in this region was destroyed by logging in the early part of the 20th century. Some of the trees that grow there today were planted by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s. Legally two separate national forests—the Chequamegon National Forest and the Nicolet National Forest—the areas were established by presidential proclamations in 1933 and have been managed as one unit since 1993. The Chequamegon National Forest comprises three units in the north-central part of the state totaling 865,825 acres (3,503.87 km). In descending order of forestland area it is located in parts of Bayfield, Ashland, Price, Sawyer, Taylor, and Vilas counties. Forest headquarters are in Park Falls. There are local ranger district offices in Glidden, Hayward, Medford, Park Falls, and Washburn. Moquah Barrens Research Natural Area is located with the Chequamegon. Lying within the Chequamegon are two officially designated wilderness areas of the National Wilderness Preservation System. They
    9.00
    1 votes
    65

    Kootenai National Forest

    Kootenai National Forest is located in the far northwestern section of Montana and the northeasternmost lands in the Idaho panhandle, United States along the Canadian border. Of the 2.2 million acres (9,000 km) administered by the forest, less than 3 percent is located in the state of Idaho. Forest headquarters are located in Libby, Montana. There are local ranger district offices in Eureka, Fortine, Libby, Trout Creek, and Troy. Most (about 53%) of the 94,272 acre (381.5 km) Cabinet Mountains Wilderness area is located within the forest, with the balance lying in neighboring Kaniksu National Forest. Wilderness designation prohibits motorized and mechanical travel, including bicycles and eliminates logging, mining, road and or building construction. Snowshoe Peak in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness at 8,738 feet (2,700 m) is the highest peak within the forest. Mountain ranges included in the forest include the Whitefish, Purcell, Bitterroot, Salish, and Cabinet ranges. The Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail traverses the Forest. More than 90 miles of the 1,200 mile long trail are within the Kootenai. The Kootenai and the Clark Fork river are the major rivers and are fed by
    9.00
    1 votes
    66

    Olympic National Forest

    Olympic National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in Washington, USA. With an area of 628,115 acres (2,541.89 km), it nearly surrounds Olympic National Park and the Olympic Mountain range. Olympic National Forest contains parts of Clallam, Grays Harbor, Jefferson, and Mason counties. The landscape of the national forest varies, from the temperate Olympic rain forest to the salt water fjord of Hood Canal to the peaks of Mt. Washington. Annual precipitation averages about 220 inches (5.6 m), giving rise to streams such as the Humptulips River. Olympic National Forest was originally created as Olympic Forest Reserve in 1897, then renamed to Olympic National Forest in 1907. A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the Forest was 266,800 acres (108,000 ha). It is administered in two ranger districts: the Pacific Ranger District on the west side of the Olympic Peninsula, and the Hood Canal Ranger District on the east side. Forest headquarters are located in Olympia, with ranger district offices in Forks, Quinault, and Quilcene. The former office in Hoodsport closed in 2005, and now houses a local Chamber of Commerce, which still sells Northwest
    9.00
    1 votes
    67
    Stanislaus National Forest

    Stanislaus National Forest

    Stanislaus National Forest contains 898,099 acres (1,403.3 sq mi; 3,634.5 km) in four counties in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern California. It was established on February 22, 1897, making it one of the oldest national forests. It was named after the Stanislaus River. It is located primarily in eastern Tuolumne County, adjacent to the northwestern part of Yosemite National Park, but parts of it extend (in descending order of forestland area) into southern Alpine, northern Mariposa, and eastern Calaveras counties. The Emigrant Wilderness is located entirely within its boundaries. Portions of the Carson-Iceberg Wilderness, including the Dardanelles Cone, and the Mokelumne Wilderness are also within the Stanislaus National Forest. It contains 78 lakes, and 811 miles (1,305.2 km) of rivers and streams. It has 1,100 miles (1,770.3 km) of non-motorized trails, and 2,859 miles (4,601.1 km) of roads, 188 miles (302.6 km) of which are paved. The Forest contains some 139,000 acres (560 km) of old growth, which includes Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta), Jeffrey Pine (Pinus jeffreyi), and White Fir (Abies concolor). The proximity of the Stanislaus National Forest to the San Francisco
    9.00
    1 votes
    68
    Uinta National Forest

    Uinta National Forest

    Uinta National Forest ( /juːˈɪntə/) is a national forest located in north central Utah, USA. It was originally part of the Uinta Forest Reserve, created by Grover Cleveland on 02 February 1897. The name is derived from the Ute word Yoov-we-teuh which means pine forest. Because of changes to the boundaries over the years, the Uinta Mountains are now located in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. In August 2007 it was announced that the Uinta National Forest would merge with the Wasatch-Cache National Forest based in Salt Lake City, Utah, 50 miles (80 km) north of Provo, Utah. The Uinta National Forest was headquartered in Provo, Utah with four outlying district offices located in Pleasant Grove, Heber, Spanish Fork, and Nephi, Utah until August 2007. The Uinta National Forest is now managed as one unit along with the Wasatch-Cache National Forest as the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Managing 880,719 acres (1,376.1 sq mi; 356,414.3 ha), the Uinta National Forest is less than 45 minutes south of Salt Lake City and only minutes away from Provo, Utah. In descending order of land area it is located in parts of Utah, Wasatch, Juab, and Sanpete counties. One of the most prominent
    9.00
    1 votes
    69

    Mariscal Cáceres National Forest

    The Mariscal Caceres National Forest is in the Mariscal Caceres province of Peru. It is subject to deforestation. A 1995 projection was that 2.17% of the area was deforested and by 2000 2.55% would be.
    7.50
    2 votes
    70
    Arapaho National Forest

    Arapaho National Forest

    Arapaho National Forest is a National Forest located in north-central Colorado, United States. The facility is managed jointly with the Roosevelt National Forest and the Pawnee National Grassland from the United States Forest Service office in Fort Collins, Colorado. The combined facility of 1,730,603 acres (2,704.07 sq mi, or 7,420.35 km²) is denoted as ARP (Arapaho, Roosevelt, Pawnee) by the Forest Service. Separately, Arapaho National Forest consists of 723,744 acres (1,130.85 sq mi, or 2,928.89 km²). The forest is located in the Rocky Mountains, straddling the continental divide in the Front Range west of Denver. It was established on July 1, 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt and named for the Arapaho tribe of Native Americans which previously inhabited the Colorado Eastern Plains. The forest includes part of the high Rockies and river valleys in the upper watershed of the Colorado River and South Platte River. The forest is largely in Grand and Clear Creek counties, but spills over into neighboring (in descending order of land area) Gilpin, Park, Routt, Jackson, and Jefferson counties. There are local ranger district offices located in Granby and Idaho Springs. There are
    6.00
    3 votes
    71
    Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest

    Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest

    The Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest in northern Georgia comprises two United States National Forests, the Oconee National Forest and Chattahoochee National Forest. The combined total area of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest is 866,468 acres (3,506 km), of which the Chattahoochee National Forest comprises 750,145 acres (3,036 km) and the Oconee National Forest comprises 116,232 acres (470 km). The county with the largest portion of the forest is Rabun County, Georgia, which has 148,684 acres (601.7 km) within its boundaries. The Chattahoochee National Forest takes its name from the Chattahoochee River whose headwaters begin in the North Georgia mountains. The River and the area were given the name by the English settlers who took the name from the Indians living here. The Cherokee and Creek Indians inhabited North Georgia. In one dialect of the Muskogean languages, Chatta means stone; ho chee, marked or flowered. These marked or flowered stones were in the Chattahoochee River at a settlement near Columbus, Georgia. In 1911, the United States Forest Service purchased 31,000 acres (125 km) of land in Fannin, Gilmer, Lumpkin and Union Counties from the Gennett family for
    6.00
    3 votes
    72
    Monongahela National Forest

    Monongahela National Forest

    The Monongahela National Forest is a national forest located in the Allegheny Mountains of eastern West Virginia, USA. It protects over 921,000 acres (3,727 km; 1,439 sq mi) of federally owned land within a 1,700,000 acres (6,880 km; 2,656 sq mi) proclamation boundary that includes much of the Potomac Highlands Region and portions of 10 counties. The MNF includes some major landform features such as the Allegheny Front and the western portion of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians. Within the Forest are most of the highest mountain peaks in the state, including the highest, Spruce Knob (4,863 ft), also the highest point in the Alleghenies. Approximately 75 tree species are found in the Forest. Almost all of the trees are a second growth forest, grown back after the land was heavily cutover around the turn of the 19th to 20th century. Species for which the Forest is important include red spruce (Picea rubens), balsam fir (Abies balsamea), and mountain ash (Sorbus americana). The MNF includes eight U.S. Wilderness Areas and several special-use areas, notably the Spruce Knob-Seneca Rocks National Recreation Area. The forest is administered from the main headquarters in Elkins, West
    5.00
    4 votes
    73

    Beartooth National Forest

    Beartooth National Forest was established in Montana on July 1, 1908 by the U.S. Forest Service with 685,293 acres (2,773.28 km) from part of Yellowstone National Forest and all of Pryor Mountains National Forest. On February 17, 1932 the forest was divided between Absaroka National Forest and Custer National Forest and the name preserved as the Beartooth Ranger District of Custer National Forest.
    7.00
    2 votes
    74
    Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest

    Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest

    The Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest is the largest of the National Forests in Montana, United States. Covering 3.36 million acres (13,600 km), the forest is broken into nine separate sections and stretches across eight counties in the southwestern area of the state. President Theodore Roosevelt named the two forests in 1908 and they were merged in 1996. Forest headquarters are located in Dillon, Montana. In Roosevelt's original legislation, the Deerlodge National Forest was called the Big Hole Forest Reserve. He created this reserve because the Anaconda Copper Mining Company, based in Butte, Montana, had begun to clearcut the upper Big Hole River watershed. The subsequent erosion, exacerbated by smoke pollution from the Anaconda smelter, was devastating the region. Ranchers and conservationists alike complained to Roosevelt, who made several trips to the area. (Munday 2001) The greatest part of the Anaconda-Pintler Wilderness is located in the larger Beaverhead National Forest portion of 2,130,671 acres (8,622.52 km), which is 64% of the total area of the forest. The rest of this wilderness extends into the neighboring Deerlodge and Bitterroot National Forests. The Beaverhead
    7.00
    2 votes
    75

    Gunnison National Forest

    The Gunnison National Forest is a U.S. National Forest covering 1,672,136 acres (2,612.71 sq mi, or 6,766.89 km²) in Mesa, Gunnison, Hinsdale and Saguache Counties in Western part of the U.S. state of Colorado. It borders the White River National Forest to the north, the Grand Mesa and Uncompahgre National Forests to the west, the San Isabel National Forest to the east and the Rio Grande National Forest to south. It lies in parts of five counties. In descending order of land area within the forest they are Gunnison, Saguache, Hinsdale, Delta, and Montrose counties. It shares the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness with the White River and San Isabel National Forests, and the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness Area with the San Isabel National Forest. The forest was created by Theodore Roosevelt on June 13, 1905 as the Cochetopa Forest Reserve, and named after explorer John W. Gunnison. Today it is administered jointly with the Grand Mesa and Uncompahgre National Forests from offices in Delta. There are local ranger district offices located in Gunnison and Paonia. There are seven officially designated wilderness areas lying within Gunnison National Forest that are part of the National
    7.00
    2 votes
    76
    Plumas National Forest

    Plumas National Forest

    Plumas National Forest is a 1,146,000-acre (4,638 km) United States National Forest located in the Sierra Nevada, in northern California. About 85% of Plumas National Forest lies in Plumas County, but smaller portions are found in eastern Butte, northern Sierra, southern Lassen, and northeastern Yuba counties. The Plumas National Forest Supervisor's office is located in Quincy, California. There are local ranger district offices in Blairsden, Oroville, and Quincy. Plumas was established as the Plumas Forest Reserve by the General Land Office on March 27, 1905. In 1906 the forest was transferred to the U.S. Forest Service, and on March 4, 1907 it became a National Forest. On July 1, 1908 a portion of Diamond Mountain National Forest was added. The Bucks Lake Wilderness was officially designated in 1984 as a part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. A 2002 study by the Forest Service identified 127,000 acres (51,000 ha) of the forest as old growth. The most common old-growth forest types are:
    7.00
    2 votes
    77
    Coconino National Forest

    Coconino National Forest

    The Coconino National Forest is a 1.856-million acre (7,511 km) United States National Forest located in northern Arizona in the vicinity of Flagstaff. Originally established in 1898 as the "San Francisco Mountains National Forest Reserve", the area was designated a U.S. National Forest in 1908 when the San Francisco Mountains National Forest Reserve was merged with lands from other surrounding forest reserves to create the Coconino National Forest. Today, the Coconino National Forest contains diverse landscapes, including deserts, ponderosa pine forests, flatlands, mesas, alpine tundra, and ancient volcanic peaks. The forest surrounds the towns of Sedona and Flagstaff and borders four other national forests; the Kaibab National Forest to the west and northwest, the Prescott National Forest to the southwest, the Tonto National Forest to the south, and the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest to the southeast. The forest contains all or parts of ten designated wilderness areas, including the Kachina Peaks Wilderness, which includes the summit of the San Francisco Peaks. The headquarters are in Flagstaff. There are local ranger district offices in Flagstaff, Happy Jack, and Sedona. The
    5.67
    3 votes
    78

    Choctawhatchee National Forest

    Choctawhatchee National Forest is a United States National Forest established by President Theodore Roosevelt on November 27, 1908. The supervisory headquarters was established at DeFuniak Springs and moved to Pensacola in September 1910. It remained there until 1936 when it was relocated to Tallahassee. The Choctawhatchee's two districts (Easy Bay-Camp Pinchot and Niceville) were separated by what is now State Road 85. But the national defense needs of a changing world prompted Congress to transfer the national forest to the War Department just prior to World War II. Congress transferred the 340,890 acres (1380 km²) of the Choctawhatchee from the Forest Service to the War Department (and subsequently to its successor's constituent United States Department of the Air Force) for military purposes on June 27, 1940. The law provided that the land may be restored to national forest status by proclamation or order of the President when it was no longer needed for military purposes. It has been home to Eglin Air Force Base ever since. In descending order of land area the forest is located in parts of southern Okaloosa, Walton, and Santa Rosa counties. During the early years, Camp Pinchot
    8.00
    1 votes
    79
    Mendocino National Forest

    Mendocino National Forest

    The Mendocino National Forest is located in the Coastal Mountain Range in northwestern California and comprises 913,306 acres (3,696 km). It is the only national forest in the state of California without a major paved road entering it. There are a variety of recreational opportunities — camping, hiking, backpacking, boating, fishing, hunting, nature study, photography, and off-highway vehicle travel. The forest lies in parts of six counties. In descending order of forestland area they are Lake, Glenn, Mendocino, Tehama, Trinity, and Colusa counties. Forest headquarters are located in Willows, California. There are local ranger district offices in Covelo, Upper Lake, and Willows. The forest includes four wilderness areas: The Sanhedrin and Yuki wildernesses were signed into law on October 17, 2006. This legislation, entitled "Northern California Coastal Wild Heritage Wilderness Act," added areas to both the Yolla Bolly - Middle Eel Wilderness and Snow Mountain Wilderness, and established the two new wilderness areas in the Mendocino National Forest. Rivers include: Eel River, Rice Fork Eel River, Middle Fork Eel River, Black Butte River, and Stony Creek (Sacramento River). Lake
    8.00
    1 votes
    80

    Pryor Mountains National Forest

    Pryor Mountains National Forest was established as the Pryor Mountains Forest Reserve by the U.S. Forest Service in Montana on November 6, 1906 by the U.S. Forest Service with 78,732 acres (318.62 km). It became a National Forest on March 4, 1907. On July 1, 1908 it was combined with part of Yellowstone National Forest to establish Beartooth National Forest. The name was discontinued. The forest today comprises the Pryor Mountain unit of the Beartooth Ranger District of Custer National Forest, in Carbon County, Montana.
    8.00
    1 votes
    81
    Salmon-Challis National Forest

    Salmon-Challis National Forest

    Salmon-Challis National Forest is located in east central sections of the U.S. state of Idaho. At 4,235,940 acres (6,618.66 sq mi, or 17,142.24 km) it is one of the largest national forests in the lower 48 states and also has most of the land area of the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, which is the largest wilderness area south of Alaska. Borah Peak, the tallest mountain in Idaho, is also found here. The Wild and Scenic Salmon River weaves through the rugged terrain of the Sawtooth Mountains and Sawtooth National Recreation Area, while it flows for over 75 miles (121 km) through the forest. The Big Lost River has its headwaters within the national forest. Challis National Forest, the more southerly of its two parts, lies primarily in Custer County, but also has major areas in Lemhi and Butte counties, as well as smaller areas in Clark and Blaine counties. It has a total area of 2,463,471 acres (3,849.17 sq mi, or 9,969.31 km). There are local ranger district offices located in Challis, Clayton, and Mackay. Salmon National Forest, which lies to the north, is primarily located in Lemhi County, with spillover into Valley and Idaho counties. It has a total area of 1,772,469
    8.00
    1 votes
    82
    Dixie National Forest

    Dixie National Forest

    Dixie National Forest is a United States National Forest in Utah with headquarters in Cedar City. It occupies almost two million acres (8,000 km²) and stretches for about 170 miles (270 km) across southern Utah. The largest national forest in Utah, it straddles the divide between the Great Basin and the Colorado River. In descending order of forestland area it is located in parts of Garfield, Washington, Iron, Kane, Wayne, and Piute counties. The majority (over 55%) of forest acreage lies in Garfield County. There are local ranger district offices in Cedar City, Escalante, Panguitch, St. George, and Teasdale. Elevations vary from 2,800 feet (850 m) above sea level near St. George, Utah to 11,322 feet (3,451 m) at Blue Bell Knoll on Boulder Mountain. The southern rim of the Great Basin, near the Colorado River, provides spectacular scenery. Colorado River canyons are made up of multi-colored cliffs and steep-walled gorges. The Forest is divided into four geographic areas. High altitude forests in gently rolling hills characterize the Markagunt, Paunsagunt, and Aquarius Plateaus. Boulder Mountain, one of the largest high-elevation plateaus in the United States, is dotted with
    6.50
    2 votes
    83
    Lincoln National Forest

    Lincoln National Forest

    The Lincoln National Forest is a protected national forest in the State of New Mexico in the southwestern United States. It was established in 1902 and covers 1,103,897 acres (450,000 ha). It was named in honor of Abraham Lincoln, who was 16th president of the United States and is the birthplace of Smokey Bear, the living symbol of the campaign to prevent forest fires. Forest headquarters are in Alamogordo, New Mexico. There are local ranger district offices in Carlsbad, Cloudcroft, and Ruidoso. The Lincoln National Forest borders the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation and stretches across several New Mexico counties, including: It is also home to the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak at the village of Sunspot. The Lincoln Forest Reserve was established by the General Land Office on July 26, 1902 with 500,000 acres (2,000 km). On July 1, 1908 Gallinas National Forest was absorbed, and on July 1, 1917, Alamo National Forest as well. Alamo had previously consisted of Sacramento National Forest and Guadalupe National Forest, which still exist as the Sacramento and Guadalupe Districts of Lincoln. The Lincoln National Forest comprises portions of four mountain
    6.50
    2 votes
    84
    Eldorado National Forest

    Eldorado National Forest

    Eldorado National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in the central Sierra Nevada mountain range, in eastern California. Most of the forest (72.8%) lies in El Dorado County. In descending order of land area the others counties are: Amador, Alpine, and Placer counties in California; and Douglas County in Nevada with 78 acres (320,000 m). The forest is bordered on the north by the Tahoe National Forest, on the east by the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, on the southeast by the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, and to the south by the Stanislaus National Forest. Eldorado National Forest headquarters are located in Placerville, California. There are local ranger district offices in Camino, Georgetown, Pioneer, and Pollock Pines. A complicated ownership pattern exists. The parcels of Other Ownership (private or other Agency land) are mostly isolated and surrounded on all sides by government land. An opposite pattern occurs outside of the Forest Boundary where several small scattered pieces of National Forest lands are separated from the main body and surrounded by lands of Other Ownership. The Forest ranges in elevation from 1,000 feet (300 m) in the foothills to more than
    5.33
    3 votes
    85

    Payette National Forest

    The Payette National Forest, is a U.S. National Forest located in central western Idaho, in parts of Valley, Idaho, Adams, and Washington counties. The land area consists of approximately 2.3 million acres (9,300 km) of federally managed lands. It is bordered by Hells Canyon National Recreation Area and the Hells Canyon to the west, Challis National Forest to the east, Boise National Forest to the south, and the Nez Perce National Forest to the north. The Payette National Forest is a part of the Intermountain Region (Region 4). It is under the jurisdiction of a forest supervisor in McCall and is divided into five ranger districts: McCall, Krassel, New Meadows, Council, and Weiser. The Payette also provides the largest component of the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, the second-largest designated wilderness area outside of Alaska. Approximately 790,000 acres (3,200 km) of it is within the wilderness, comprising one-third of its total acreage. (Five other National Forests also contribute to the River of No Return Wilderness, in addition to a small plot of land from the Bureau of Land Management.) It also provides the third-largest component of the Hells Canyon
    6.00
    2 votes
    86
    Black Hills National Forest

    Black Hills National Forest

    Black Hills National Forest is located in southwestern South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming. The forest has an area of over 1.25 million acres (5,066 km²) and is managed by the Forest Service. Forest headquarters are located in Custer, South Dakota. There are local ranger district offices in Custer, Rapid City, and Spearfish in South Dakota, and in Sundance, Wyoming. Predominantly ponderosa pine, the forest also includes hard woods like aspen, bur oak, and birch. The lower elevations include grassland prairie, but the National Forest System lands encompass most of the mountainous region known as the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. Within the forest is Harney Peak which is the tallest mountain in South Dakota and the highest peak east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States. After a series of devastating wildfires in 1893, U.S. President Grover Cleveland created the Black Hills Forest Reserve on February 22, 1897. Upon the creation of the Forest Service in 1905, the reserve was transferred to the new agency under the United States Department of Agriculture and redesignated as a National Forest two years later. Lakota words Paha Sapa meaning "hills that are black" may
    7.00
    1 votes
    87
    Green Mountain National Forest

    Green Mountain National Forest

    Green Mountain National Forest is a national forest located in Vermont, a forest area typical of the New England/Acadian forests ecoregion. The forest supports a variety of wildlife, including beaver, moose, coyote, black bear, and white tailed deer. It also supports an abundant variety of bird species, such as wild turkey and ruffed grouse. The forest, being situated in Vermont's Green Mountains, has been referred to as the 'granite backbone' of the state. The forest was established in 1932, as a result of uncontrolled overlogging, fire and flooding. It consists of 399,151 acres (1,615.31 km); and is the biggest contiguous land mass in the state. If Finger Lakes National Forest, which is managed as a unit of the Green Mountain National Forest, is included within it, GMNF is one of only two national forest northeast of the Pennsylvania-New Jersey barrier; the other being the White Mountain National Forest. Split into the southwest and central areas, GMNF has a total of eight wilderness areas. These were designated by Congress beginning with the Wilderness Act of 1964 to be areas off limits to mechanized gear down to and including bicycles. In descending order of land area it is
    7.00
    1 votes
    88
    Lassen National Forest

    Lassen National Forest

    Lassen National Forest is a national forest of 1,700 square miles (4,300 km) in northeastern California. It is named after pioneer Peter Lassen, who mined, ranched and promoted the area to emigrant parties in the 1850s. Lassen National Forest is located about 80 miles (130 km) east of Red Bluff, California. It is generally bounded by Sierra Nevada mountain range to the south, the Modoc Plateau to the east and California's Central Valley to the west. The forest is in parts of Lassen, Shasta, Tehama, Plumas, and Butte counties. Forest headquarters is located in Susanville, California. There are local ranger district offices in Chester, Fall River Mills, and Susanville. The forest was formed in 1905 when it was named one of the National Forest Reserves, which evolved into the National Forest system. The forest was first named the Lassen Peak Forest Reserve because of Lassen Peak, a volcano which is in the southernmost portion of the Cascade Range volcanoes. Mt. Lassen erupted with explosive force in 1915. The forest surrounds Lassen Volcanic National Park. The forest has two major river systems as well as many lakes, cinder cones and lava flows. Surveys estimate the forest contains
    7.00
    1 votes
    89
    Lolo National Forest

    Lolo National Forest

    Lolo National Forest is located in western Montana, United States with the western boundary being the state of Idaho. The forest spans 2 million acres (8,000 km) and includes four wilderness areas; the Scapegoat and the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness are partially within the forest while the Welcome Creek and Rattlesnake Wildernesses are solely in Lolo National Forest. The forest was created in 1906 from 4 different previous forests which were combined for administrative purposes. Lolo National Forest is west of the Continental divide and has a biodiversity influenced by both continental and maritime weather creating a transitional forest that has a high number of different plant and tree species. Western red cedar, larch and whitebark pine share the forest with a variety of spruce and fir tree species. Western red cedars grow larger in Lolo National Forest than any other tree species does anywhere in Montana, attaining over 8 feet (250 cm) in diameter and almost 200 feet (60 m) in height. In total, 1,500 plant species exist in the forest as well as 60 species of mammals, 20 varieties of fish and 300 species of birds. Large mammals found in Lolo National Forest include the grizzly,
    7.00
    1 votes
    90
    Nez Perce National Forest

    Nez Perce National Forest

    The Nez Perce National Forest is located in Idaho County in central western Idaho in the northwestern United States. The forest is bounded on the east by the state of Montana, on the north by the Palouse region, and on the south and west by the Clearwater National Forest. It has a total area of 2,224,091 acres (3,475.14 sq mi or 9,000.58 km). Forest headquarters are located in Grangeville, Idaho. There are local ranger district offices in Elk City, Grangeville, Kooskia, and White Bird. It is the largest of the six National Forests that are contained entirely within a single county. Nez Perce was established on July 1, 1908 by the U.S. Forest Service with 1,946,340 acres (7,876.6 km) from parts of Bitter Root National Forest and Weiser National Forest. On October 29, 1934 part of Selway National Forest was added. There are four officially designated wilderness areas within Nez Perce National Forest that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Three of these are partly or mostly in neighboring National Forests (as indicated).
    7.00
    1 votes
    91

    Sabine National Forest

    Sabine National Forest is located in East Texas near the Texas-Louisiana border. The forest is administered together with the other three United States National Forests and two National Grasslands located entirely in Texas, from common offices in Lufkin, Texas. The units include Angelina, Davy Crockett, Sabine, and Sam Houston National Forests, plus Caddo National Grassland and Lyndon B. Johnson National Grassland. There are local ranger district offices located in Hemphill. The forest covers a total of 160,873 acres (651.03 km) in five counties - Sabine (95,410 acres), Shelby (59,037 acres), San Augustine (4,317 acres), Newton (1,781 acres), and Jasper (64 acres). It includes the officially designated Indian Mounds Wilderness, which is a part of the National Wilderness Preservation System.
    7.00
    1 votes
    92
    Shawnee National Forest

    Shawnee National Forest

    Administered by the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, the Shawnee National Forest is one of 155 national forests nationwide. The Shawnee National Forest, located in the Ozark and Shawnee Hills of Southern Illinois, consists of approximately 280,000 acres (1,100 km²) of federally managed lands. In descending order of land area it is located in parts of Pope, Jackson, Union, Hardin, Alexander, Saline, Gallatin, Johnson, and Massac counties. Forest headquarters are located in Harrisburg, Illinois. There are local ranger district offices in Jonesboro and Vienna.The Shawnee National Forest is also the single largest publicly owned body of land in the state of Illinois. Whether your interests lie more in outdoor recreational activities, such as hiking or camping, or include learning about the unique natural and cultural heritage of southern Illinois, the fields, forests and streams of the Shawnee welcome you. To discover more about the Shawnee National Forest, visit http://www.fs.usda.gov/shawnee and follow us on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/shawnee. National information about the U.S. Forest Service can be found at: http://www.fs.fed.us/. Designated as the Illini and Shawnee Purchase Units,
    7.00
    1 votes
    93

    Angeles National Forest

    The Angeles National Forest (ANF) of the U.S. National Forest Service is located in the San Gabriel Mountains of Los Angeles County, southern California, United States. It was established on July 1, 1908, incorporating the first San Bernardino National Forest and parts of the former Santa Barbara and San Gabriel National Forests. It covers 655,387 acres (1,024.0 sq mi; 2,652.3 km) and is located just north of the densely inhabited metropolitan area of Los Angeles. A small part extends eastward into southwestern San Bernardino County, in the Mount San Antonio ("Mount Baldy") area. A tiny section also extends westward into northeastern Ventura County, in the Lake Piru area. Forest headquarters are in Arcadia, California. The Angeles National Forest manages the habitats, flora and fauna ecosystems, and watersheds. Some of the rivers with watersheds within its boundaries provide valuable non-groundwater recharge water for Southern California. The existing protected and restored native vegetation absorb and slow surface runoff of rainwater to minimize severe floods and landslides in adjacent communities. The land within the Forest is diverse, both in appearance and terrain. Elevations
    5.50
    2 votes
    94
    Holly Springs National Forest

    Holly Springs National Forest

    The Holly Springs National Forest (HSNF) was established by the United States Forest Service on June 15, 1936 during the tenure of United States Department of Agriculture Chief Forester Ferdinand A. Silcox. That same year, it was combined administratively with the Bienville, De Soto and Homochitto national forests, known collectively as "National Forests in Mississippi." The Holly Springs Ranger District controls 155,661 acres (243.2 sq mi) of Forest Service land, interspersed with 530,000 acres (828.1 sq mi) of privately owned properties, within the national forest's proclamation zone. Before the HSNF was established, much of the land was abandoned farmland with rapidly eroding soils. These rolling hills are now covered with loblolly and shortleaf pines, and upland hardwoods. The Civilian Conservation Corps used loblolly pine because it was easy to plant, was suitable for the depleted soils of the north central hills, and cast a large load of needles to help prevent further erosion. The land owned by the Forest Service is intermingled with private farms and woodlots. The district ranger for the HSNF is headquartered in Oxford, Mississippi. In 1983, the Reagan administration
    5.50
    2 votes
    95
    Inyo National Forest

    Inyo National Forest

    Inyo National Forest is a federally administered forest in the United States. The forest covers parts of the eastern Sierra Nevada of California, and the White Mountains of California and Nevada. It contains two wilderness areas: the John Muir Wilderness and the Ansel Adams Wilderness. The forest hosts several superlatives, including Mount Whitney, the highest point in the Contiguous United States; Boundary Peak, highest point in Nevada; and the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest that protects the oldest trees in the world. The forest covers 1,903,381 acres (2,974 sq mi; 7,703 km), and includes nine designated wilderness areas which protect over 800,000 acres (1,200 sq mi; 3,200 km). Most of the forest is in California, but it includes about 60,700 acres (95 sq mi; 246 km) in western Nevada. It stretches from the eastern side of Yosemite to south of Sequoia National Park. Geographically it is split in two, one on each side of the Long Valley Caldera and Owens Valley. The John Muir Wilderness is a part of the Inyo National Forest and abuts Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park along the crest of the Sierra. The northern part of the Inyo National Forest is preserved as a part of the
    5.50
    2 votes
    96

    Missoula National Forest

    Missoula National Forest was established as the Missoula Forest Reserve by the U.S. Forest Service in Montana on November 6, 1906 with 194,430 acres (786.8 km). It became a National Forest on March 4, 1907. On July 1, 1908 Missoula received a portion of Hell Gate National Forest. On December 16, 1931 the entire forest was divided between Lolo National Forest and Deerlodge National Forest and the name was discontinued.
    5.50
    2 votes
    97
    Rio Grande National Forest

    Rio Grande National Forest

    Rio Grande National Forest is a 1.86 million acre (7,530 km²) U.S. National Forest located in southwestern Colorado. The forest encompasses the San Luis Valley, which is the world's largest agricultural alpine valley, as well as one of the worlds largest high deserts located around mountains. The Continental Divide runs along most of the forest's western border. The forest lies in parts of nine counties. In descending order of land area within the forest they are Saguache, Mineral, Conejos, Rio Grande, Hinsdale, San Juan, Alamosa, Archuleta, and Custer counties. Forest headquarters are located in Monte Vista, Colorado. There are local ranger district offices in Del Norte, La Jara, and Saguache. There are four officially designated wilderness areas lying within Rio Grande National Forest that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. All of them extend partially into neighboring National Forests, and one of these also onto National Park Service land (as indicated).
    5.50
    2 votes
    98
    San Juan National Forest

    San Juan National Forest

    The San Juan National Forest is a U.S. National Forest covering over 1,878,846 acres (2,935.7 sq mi, or 7,603.42 km²) in Archuleta, Conjeos, Dolores, Hinsdale, La Plata, Mineral, Montezuma, Rio Grande, San Miguel and San Juan Counties in western Colorado. It borders the Uncompahgre National Forest to the north and the Rio Grande National Forest to the east. The forest covers most of the southern portion of the San Juan Mountains west of the Continental Divide. The forest contains two alpine wilderness areas; the Weminuche and South San Juan, as well as the Piedra Area. The Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad passes through the National Forest. Theodore Roosevelt created the forest by proclamation on June 3, 1905. Forest headquarters are located in Durango, Colorado. There are local ranger district offices in Bayfield, Dolores, and Pagosa Springs. President Barack Obama designated part of the forest as Chimney Rock National Monument by proclamation on September 21, 2012. There are three officially designated wilderness areas lying within San Juan National Forest that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. All of them extend partially into neighboring
    5.50
    2 votes
    99
    Daniel Boone National Forest

    Daniel Boone National Forest

    Daniel Boone National Forest is the only national forest completely within the boundary of Kentucky. Established in 1937, it was originally named the Cumberland National Forest, after the core region called the Cumberland Purchase Unit. About 2,100,000 acres (8,500 km) are contained within its current proclamation boundary, of which 706,000 acres (2,860 km) are owned and managed by the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service (as of April 2006), up from around 620,000 acres (2,500 km) in the early to mid-1990s. The forest was named after Daniel Boone, a frontiersman and explorer in the late 18th century who contributed greatly to the exploration and settlement of Kentucky. Daniel Boone National Forest surrounds or contains a variety of popular and notable features, including: There are two areas designated as Wilderness: In 1937, a national forest was established containing 1,338,214 acres (5,416 km) within its proclamation boundary. As of June 1937, the Forest Service had purchased only 336,692 acres (1,363 km). Most early purchases were large, isolated tracts owned by lumber and coal companies with but few inhabitants. The Forest Service has since had difficulty
    6.00
    1 votes
    100
    Deschutes National Forest

    Deschutes National Forest

    The Deschutes National Forest is a United States National Forest located in parts of Deschutes, Klamath, Lake, and Jefferson counties in central Oregon. It comprises 1.8 million acres (7,300 km²) along the east side of the Cascade mountains. In 1908, the Deschutes National Forest was established from parts of the Blue Mountains, Cascade, and Fremont National Forests. In 1911, parts of the Deschutes National Forest were split off to form the Ochoco and Paulina National Forests and parts of the Cascade and Oregon National Forests were added to the Deschutes. In 1915, the lands of the Paulina National Forest were rejoined to the Deschutes National Forest. A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the forest was 348,100 acres (140,900 ha). Within the boundaries of the Deschutes National Forest is the Newberry National Volcanic Monument, containing cinder cones, lava flows, and lava tubes. Deschutes National Forest as a whole contains in excess of 250 known caves. The Forest also contains five Wilderness areas, six National Wild and Scenic Rivers, the Oregon Cascade Recreation Area, and the Metolius Conservation Area. Forest headquarters are located in Bend,
    6.00
    1 votes
    101
    Flathead National Forest

    Flathead National Forest

    The Flathead National Forest is a national forest in the western part of the U.S. state of Montana. The forest covers 2,404,935 acres (3,758 sq mi; 9,732 km) of which about 1 million acres (4,000 km) is designated wilderness. It is named after the Flathead Indians who lived in the area. The forest is located in the Rocky Mountains with elevations ranging from 4,500 to 8,500 feet (1,400 to 2,600 m). The Forest provides habitat for approximately 250 species of wildlife and 22 species of fish. This includes the threatened grizzly bear, lynx, bald eagle, bull trout, a rare plant named water howellia, and the endangered gray wolf. The Flathead National Forest is bordered by Glacier National Park and Canada to the north, the Lewis and Clark National Forest and Glacier to the east, the Lolo National Forest to the south, and the Kootenai National Forest to the west. The wilderness areas in the forest are the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, Great Bear Wilderness Area, and Mission Mountains Wilderness Area. Other specially-designated areas in the forest include Flathead Wild and Scenic River, Jewel Basin Hiking Area, and the Coram Experimental Forest. Some 270,000 acres (1,100 km) of
    6.00
    1 votes
    102
    Sequoia National Forest

    Sequoia National Forest

    Sequoia National Forest is located in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The U.S. National Forest is named for the majestic Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) trees which populate 38 distinct groves within the boundaries of the forest. The Giant Sequoia National Monument is located in the national forest. Other notable features include glacier-carved landscapes and impressive granite monoliths. The Needles are a series of granite spires atop a narrow ridge above the Kern River. The Sequoia National Forest covers 1,193,315 acres (1,864.555 sq mi; 4,829.17 km), and ranges in elevation from 1,000 feet (300 m) in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to over 12,000 feet (3,700 m). Its Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves are part of its 196,000 acres (790 km) of old growth forests. Other tree species include: The Needles are a series of granite spires atop a narrow ridge above the Kern River.(36°07′17″N 118°30′16″W / 36.1214°N 118.5044°W / 36.1214; -118.5044) There are six wilderness areas within Sequoia NF that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Some of these extend into neighboring National Forests, as indicated. Two of them
    6.00
    1 votes
    103
    Tongass National Forest

    Tongass National Forest

    The Tongass National Forest ( /ˈtɒŋɡəs/) in southeastern Alaska is the largest national forest in the United States at 17 million acres (69,000 km²). Most of its area is part of the temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, itself part of the larger Pacific temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, and is remote enough to be home to many species of endangered and rare flora and fauna. Tongass encompasses islands of the Alexander Archipelago, fjords, glaciers, and peaks of the Coast Mountains. An international border with Canada (British Columbia) runs along the crest of the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains (see also: Alaska boundary dispute). The forest is administered from Forest Service offices in Ketchikan. There are local ranger district offices located in Craig, Hoonah, Juneau, Ketchikan, Petersburg, Sitka, Thorne Bay, Wrangell, and Yakutat. In July 2009, the Obama Administration approved clearcut logging on 381 acres (1.54 km) in the remaining old growth forests of the Tongass. The Alexander Archipelago Forest Reserve was established by Theodore Roosevelt in a presidential proclamation of 20 August 1902. Another presidential proclamation made by Roosevelt, on 10 September 1907,
    6.00
    1 votes
    104
    Umpqua National Forest

    Umpqua National Forest

    Umpqua National Forest, in southern Oregon's Cascade mountains, covers an area of one-million acres (4,000 km) in Douglas, Lane, and Jackson Counties, and borders Crater Lake National Park. The four ranger districts that comprise the Forest are Cottage Grove, Diamond Lake, North Umpqua, and Tiller Ranger Districts. The Forest is managed by the United States Forest Service, headquartered in Roseburg. Stands of hemlock, true fir, Douglas-fir and cedar transition to lower elevation forests of mixed conifers and hardwoods. Timbered valleys of old-growth ponderosa and groves of oak separate mountains like the 9,182-foot (2,799 m) Mount Thielsen and the 8,363-foot (2,549 m) Mount Bailey. Notable geologic features include volcanic basalt and andesite monolithic spires with descriptive names like Eagle Rock, Rattlesnake Rock, and Old Man. Ancestors of the Umpqua, Southern Molalla, Yoncalla, and Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians lived here before Mount Mazama erupted forming Crater Lake nearly 7,000 years ago. The Indians were moved to reservations in 1856. As Europeans bought reservation lands, the tribes further fragmented to become farmers and ranchers in the Umpqua Valley. Two
    6.00
    1 votes
    105
    Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

    Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

    The Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in Washington extends more than 140 miles (230 km) along the western slopes of the Cascade Range from the Canadian border to the northern boundary of Mount Rainier National Park. Forest headquarters are located in the city of Everett. Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest covers (in descending order of forestland area) portions of Snohomish, Whatcom, Skagit, King, Snohomish, Pierce, and Kittitas counties. It has a total area of 1,724,229 acres. The Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest consists of four Ranger Districts. The following are listed geographically from North to South: the Mt. Baker District has two ranger stations located in Glacier and Sedro-Woolley; the Darrington Ranger District has two ranger stations located in Darrington and Verlot; the Skykomish Ranger District has one ranger station located in Skykomish; and the Snoqualmie Ranger District has two ranger stations located in North Bend and Enumclaw. Together with the other central Puget Sound counties, 62% (3.63 million people) of the State's population lives within a 70-mile (110 km) drive of the Forests. Another 1.5 million in the Vancouver, British Columbia metro area
    5.00
    2 votes
    106
    Shoshone National Forest

    Shoshone National Forest

    Shoshone National Forest ( /ʃoʊˈʃoʊniː/ shoh-SHOH-nee) is the first federally protected National Forest in the United States and covers nearly 2,500,000 acres (1,000,000 ha) in the state of Wyoming. Originally a part of the Yellowstone Timberland Reserve, the forest was created by an act of Congress and signed into law by U.S. President Benjamin Harrison in 1891. There are four wilderness areas within the forest, protecting more than half of the managed land area from development. From sagebrush plains through dense spruce and fir forest to craggy mountain peaks, Shoshone National Forest has a rich biodiversity rarely matched in any protected area. Three major mountain ranges are partially in the forest: the Absaroka, the Beartooth and the Wind River Range. Yellowstone National Park forms part of the boundary to the west; south of Yellowstone, the Continental Divide separates the forest from its neighbor, the Bridger-Teton National Forest, to the west. The eastern boundary includes privately owned property, lands managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the Wind River Indian Reservation, which belongs to the Shoshone and Arapahoe Indians. Custer National Forest along the
    5.00
    2 votes
    107
    Six Rivers National Forest

    Six Rivers National Forest

    Six Rivers National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in the northwestern corner of California. It was established on July 1, 1947 by U.S. President Harry S. Truman from portions of Klamath, Siskiyou and Trinity National Forests. Its over one million acres (4,000 km) of land contain a variety of ecosystems and 137,000 acres (550 km) of old growth forest. It lies in parts of four counties; in descending order of forestland area they are Del Norte, Humboldt, Trinity, and Siskiyou counties. Six Rivers is named after the six major rivers that pass near or through the forest and include: The forest has 366 miles (589 km) of wild and scenic rivers, six distinct botanical areas, and public-use areas for camping, hiking, and fishing. The northernmost section of the forest is known as the Smith River National Recreation Area. Forest headquarters are located in Eureka, California. There are local ranger district offices in Bridgeville, Gasquet, Orleans, and Willow Creek. Its old-growth forests include Coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii), Tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus), Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii), and White Fir (Abies concolor). There are five designated
    5.00
    2 votes
    108
    Allegheny National Forest

    Allegheny National Forest

    The Allegheny National Forest is a National Forest located in northwestern Pennsylvania. The forest covers 513,175 acres (801.8 sq mi; 2,076.7 km) of land. Within the forest is Kinzua Dam, which impounds the Allegheny River to form Allegheny Reservoir. The administrative headquarters for the Allegheny National Forest is located in Warren. The Allegheny National Forest has two ranger stations, one in Marienville, Forest County and the other in Bradford, McKean County. The Allegheny National Forest lies in the heart of Pennsylvania's oil and gas region. It is only 40 miles (64 km) from the site of the first commercial oil well in the United States at Titusville, Pennsylvania. In 1981, about 17 percent of the state's total crude oil production came from mineral rights owned by private individuals within the Forest boundary. Today the Allegheny Plateau is known for black cherry, maple and other hardwoods, but two hundred years ago these species were less numerous. Today's forest is largely the result of two things: the exploitation of timber at the turn of the 20th century and being managed by the Forest Service since 1923. In the 18th century, the forest in northwest Pennsylvania was
    4.00
    3 votes
    109
    De Soto National Forest

    De Soto National Forest

    De Soto National Forest is 518,587 acres (810 sq mi; 2,099 km) of pine forests in southern Mississippi. It is one of the most important protected areas for the biological diversity of the Gulf Coast ecoregion of North America . It is a nationally important site for protection of longleaf pine savannas, pine flatwoods, and longleaf pine forests. More than 90 percent of this ecosystem type has been lost in the United States . The wet pine savannas support rare and endangered plant and animal species, such as the orchid Calopogon multiflorus and gopher frogs. These habitats also have large numbers of carnivorous plants, particularly pitcher plants; Buttercup Flats has an international reputation in this regard. It also offers year-round opportunities for outdoor activities including camping, canoeing, bird-watching, photography, hunting, fishing, and more. There are two nationally significant wilderness areas within DeSoto: Black Creek Wilderness and Leaf River Wilderness. Black Creek is a popular stream for canoeing, camping, and fishing, and is Mississippi's only designated National Wild and Scenic River. Two National Recreational Trails, the Black Creek Trail and Tuxachanie Trail,
    4.50
    2 votes
    110
    Fishlake National Forest

    Fishlake National Forest

    Fishlake National Forest is located in south central Utah, USA. Its namesake is Fish Lake, the largest freshwater mountain lake in the state. Established in 1907, the forest covers 1.5 million acres (6,070 km²) and is split into four districts. The forest lies in parts of nine counties. In descending order of forestland area, they are Sevier, Millard, Piute, Beaver, Wayne, Juab, Garfield, Iron, and Sanpete counties. Forest headquarters are located in Richfield. There are local ranger district offices in Beaver, Fillmore, Loa, and Richfield. The national forest is the headwaters of Otter Creek, a tributary of the East Fork Sevier River. Native water rights to Fish Lake were sold to the Fremont Irrigation Company on March 10, 1889 for nine horses, 500 pounds of flour, one steer, and a suit of clothes. Ten years later President William McKinley created a Forest Reserve which included Fish Lake. Fishlake Scenic Byway
    4.50
    2 votes
    111
    Superior National Forest

    Superior National Forest

    Superior National Forest, part of the United States National Forest system, is located in the Arrowhead Region of the state of Minnesota between the Canada – United States border and the north shore of Lake Superior. The area is part of the greater Boundary Waters region along the border of Minnesota and the Canadian province of Ontario, a historic and important thoroughfare in the fur trading and exploring days of British North America. It is known for its large Boreal Forest ecosystem. Under the administration of the United States Forest Service, the Superior National Forest comprises over 3,900,000 acres (6,100 mi or 16,000 km) of woods and waters. The majority of the forest is multiple-use, including both logging and recreational activities such as camping, boating, and fishing. Slightly over a quarter of the forest however is set aside as a wilderness reserve known as the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA), where canoers can travel along interconnected lakes and rivers and over historic portages once used by the Native Americans and later by European explorers and traders. The forest is located in Cook, Lake, and St. Louis Counties in northeastern Minnesota. Forest headquarters
    4.50
    2 votes
    112

    Tombigbee National Forest

    Tombigbee National Forest is a U.S. National Forest in eastern and northeastern Mississippi. It is named for the nearby Tombigbee River. It is divided geographically into two non-contiguous sections. The larger southern section, about 60% of the total acreage, is located north of Louisville, in parts of Winston, Choctaw, and Oktibbeha counties in eastern Mississippi. The smaller northern section, about 40% of the total acreage, is located northeast of Houston, in parts of Chickasaw and Pontotoc counties in northeastern Mississippi. As a whole the forest lies, in descending order of land area, in Winston, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Pontotoc, and Oktibbeha counties. The forest has a total area of 67,005 acres (105 sq mi, or 271 km²). Headquarters of forest administration is in Jackson, as are those for all six National Forests in Mississippi, but local ranger district offices are located in Ackerman.
    4.50
    2 votes
    113
    Wasatch-Cache National Forest

    Wasatch-Cache National Forest

    Wasatch-Cache National Forest is a United States National Forest located primarily in northern Utah (81.23%), with smaller parts extending into southeastern Idaho (16.42%) and southwestern Wyoming (2.35%). The name is derived the Ute word Wasatch for a low place in high mountains, and the French word Cache meaning to hide. The term cache originally referred to fur trappers, the first Europeans to visit the land. The Wasatch-Cache National Forest boundaries include 1,607,177 acres (6,504.01 km) of land. The Wasatch-Cache was headquartered in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah until August 2007 when its management was combined with the Uinta National Forest and is currently being managed as the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest. The merged forest is based out of both Salt Lake City and Provo. The Kamas Ranger District will be merged with the Uinta National Forest's Heber Ranger District in Heber City. With the newly included Uinta National Forest the forest will expand to 2,487,896 acres (10,068.16 km). The Cache National Forest portion is located in northern Utah and southern Idaho. It has a land area of 701,453 acres (1,096 sq mi, or 2,838.7 km). In descending order of land area it is
    4.50
    2 votes
    114

    Davy Crockett National Forest

    Davy Crockett National Forest is off U.S. Highway 69 lying west of Lufkin, Texas and east of Crockett. It is administered by the United States Department of Agriculture National Forest Service local headquarters in Lufkin. There are local ranger district offices located in Ratcliff. The forest covers a total of 160,647 acres (251.0 sq mi; 650.1 km) in two counties - Houston 94,481 acres (147.6 sq mi; 382.4 km) and Trinity 67,361 acres (105.3 sq mi; 272.6 km). The national forest is managed on a multiple-use philosophy and are used for lumbering, grazing, oil production, hunting, and recreation. In fiscal year 1994, 93.8 million board feet of timber was harvested from the national forests in Texas, providing 2,098 jobs and $73,108,000 in income to the surrounding Texas communities. In addition, Texas ranchers with special permits could graze their cattle in the national forests. At the Davy Crockett National Forest, 386 head of cattle grazed in fiscal year 1994. Davy Crockett National Forest, which is bordered on the northeast by the Neches River, includes the 45-acre (180,000 m) Ratcliff Lake. The area is pine-hardwood woodlands with flat to gently rolling terrain. Recreational
    5.00
    1 votes
    115

    Prescott National Forest

    The Prescott National Forest is a 1.25 million acre (5,100 km) United States National Forest located in north central Arizona in the vicinity of Prescott. The forest is located in the mountains southwest of Flagstaff and north of Phoenix in Yavapai County, with a small portion (about 3.5 percent) extending into southwestern Coconino County. Its administrative offices are in Prescott. There are local ranger district offices in Camp Verde, Chino Valley, and Prescott. The forest includes Lynx Creek where Sam Miller panned for gold and was wounded by a cougar. There are eight designated wilderness areas comprising more than 104,000 acres (421 km), located entirely or partially within the Prescott National Forest. These are: The following table(s) display all public campgrounds within the Prescott National Forest. Dispersed Campsites are undeveloped and no facilities such as trash collection, water and toilets are available. Recommended for experienced campers. Developed campsites designed to accommodate families of 5-10 (maximum) per site. * Pricing and Open Season information current as of Monday, 3 December 2007 at 18:27:06 EST; please refer to the official Forest Service website for
    5.00
    1 votes
    116
    Sierra National Forest

    Sierra National Forest

    Sierra National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located on the western slope of central Sierra Nevada in the state of California. The forest is known for its mountain scenery and natural resources. Forest headquarters are located in Clovis, California. There are local ranger district offices in North Fork and Prather. This was the second National Forest created in California and the largest at the time. It covered over six million acres (24,000 km) of the Sierra Nevada and was about four times the average area of typical California National Forests. Originally it embraced parts of eight counties from Tuolumne on the north to Kern on the south and Mono and Inyo on the east. Initially its name was descriptive, but later when the Sierra was divided into different units this was no longer the case. President Harrison proclaimed the Sierra Forest Reserve on February 14, 1893. Four years later the south half became a separate unit and was named Sierra South during the "forest reserves" era. This designation was dropped after the administrative transition to the National Forests on March 4, 1907. the Sequoia National Forest on July 1, 1908 Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks were
    5.00
    1 votes
    117

    Winema National Forest

    The Winema National Forest is a United States National Forest in Klamath County on the eastern slopes of the Cascade Range in south-central Oregon, and covers 1,045,548 acres (4,231 km). The forest borders Crater Lake National Park near the crest of the Cascades and stretches eastward into the Klamath Basin. Near the floor of the Basin the forest gives way to vast marshes and meadows associated with Upper Klamath Lake and the Williamson River drainage. To the north and east extensive stands of ponderosa and lodgepole pine grow on deep pumice and ash that blanketed the area during the eruption of Mount Mazama nearly 7,000 years ago. A 1993 Forest Service study estimated that the extent of old growth in the Forest was 711,674 acres (288,004 ha). There are local ranger district offices located in Chemult, Chiloquin, and Klamath Falls. The forest is named after Toby Riddle, a Modoc woman also known as "Winema". Founded in 1961, the Winema National Forest was initially protected as the Cascade Range Forest Reserve from 1893 to 1907, when it became the Cascade (South) National Forest. In 1908, it changed to the Mazama National Forest and then Crater Lake National Forest until 1932. The
    5.00
    1 votes
    118
    Custer National Forest

    Custer National Forest

    Custer National Forest is located primarily in the southern part of the U.S. state of Montana but also has separate sections in northwestern South Dakota. With a total area of 1,188,130 acres (4,808.2 km), the forest comprises over 10 separate sections. While in the westernmost sections, Custer National Forest is a part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the easternmost sections are a combination of forest "islands" and grasslands. A portion of the forest is also part of the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness and constitutes over a third of the wilderness land. South of Red Lodge, Montana, the Beartooth Highway (U.S. 212) passes through the forest in route to Yellowstone National Park. The eastern areas are dominated by large stands of ponderosa pine surrounded by grasslands, which are often leased to local ranchers for cattle grazing. A relatively rare type of small falcon known as the merlin is found here in greater concentrations than anywhere else in the U.S. Mule deer, antelope and elk are also found. There are few rivers and lakes and much of the eastern sections emphasize land conservation and work closely with logging and ranching interests. The western sections have a
    4.00
    2 votes
    119
    Manti-La Sal National Forest

    Manti-La Sal National Forest

    The Manti-La Sal National Forest covers more than 1.2 million acres (4,900 km) and is located in the central and southeastern parts of the U.S. state of Utah and the extreme western part of Colorado. The forest is divided into three districts: the La Sal District at Moab in the La Sal Range near Moab, in the La Sal District at Monticello in the Abajo Mountains west of Monticello, and the Manti Division on the Wasatch Plateau west of Price. The maximum elevation is Mount Peale in the La Sal Mountains, reaching 12,721 feet (3,877 m) above sea level. The La Sal's are the second highest mountain range in Utah after the Uintas. The La Sal Mountain loop road leads from Castle Valley to Geyser Pass and back down to Moab. Scenic Oowah Lake can be found within the forest. In descending order of land area, the forest is located in parts of San Juan, Sanpete, Emery, Utah, Grand, Carbon, and Sevier counties in Utah, as well as Montrose, and Mesa counties in Colorado. Only about 2.1% of the forest lies in Colorado.) Forest headquarters is located in Price, Utah. There are local ranger district offices in Ephraim, Ferron, Moab, Monticello, and Price. The forest was originally established as the
    4.00
    1 votes
    120

    Bienville National Forest

    Bienville National Forest is a United States National Forest in central Mississippi. It is named for Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville. In descending order of land area it lies in parts of Scott, Smith, Jasper, and Newton counties. It has an area of 178,541 acres (72,253 ha). The forest is headquartered in Jackson, as are all six National Forests in Mississippi, but there are local ranger district offices located in Forest. The Forest lies within the Southeastern mixed forests ecoregion and supports mixed forests of pine and oak. The upper courses of the Leaf and Strong Rivers flow through the forest. Visitors can enjoy boating and fishing for bass, bream, and crappie on Marathon Lake and Shongelo Lake, and campgrounds and trails are open for hiking and camping. There are three Wildlife Management Areas within Beinville National Forest: Bienville WMA; Tallahalla WMA; and Caney Creek WMA. Each of these WMAs offer excellent hunting opportunities for whitetail deer, wild turkey, and various small game. Recent years have seen an influx of invasive wild pigs, which can be legally taken with legal weapons for any open season.
    0.00
    0 votes
    121
    Clearwater National Forest

    Clearwater National Forest

    Clearwater National Forest is located in North Central Idaho in the northwestern United States. The forest is bounded on the east by the state of Montana, on the north by the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, and on the south and west by the Nez Perce National Forest and Palouse Prairie. The forest is 1.8 million acres (7,300 km²) and contains mountains and river drainage areas. The Lochsa and Clearwater Rivers flow through the forest region. Portions of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness are also located in the forest. In descending order of land area the forest is located in Idaho, Clearwater, and Shoshone counties. Forest Service headquarters are located in Orofino, Idaho. There are local ranger district offices in Kamiah, Kooskia, Lolo (Montana), Orofino, and Potlatch (all in Idaho, except as indicated). The Clearwater National Forest is home to the well-known Jerry Johnson Hot Springs and the smaller Weir Creek Hot Springs. Both springs are accessible via trails from U.S. Highway 12 and are popular tourist attractions, drawing visitors from Idaho and western Montana. Lewis and Clark travelled through the region in their journey westward in 1805-1806. Upon reaching Lolo Pass at
    0.00
    0 votes
    122

    Grand Mesa National Forest

    The Grand Mesa National Forest is a U.S. National Forest in Mesa, Delta and Garfield Counties in Western Colorado. It borders the White River National Forest to the north and the Gunnison National Forest to the east. The forest covers most of Grand Mesa and the south part of Battlement Mesa. It has a total area of 346,555 acres (541.49 sq mi, or 1,402.46 km²). It is managed by the United States Forest Service together with Gunnison National Forest and Uncompahgre National Forest from offices in Delta, Colorado. There are local ranger district offices located in Grand Junction. Originally called Battlement Mesa Forest Reserve, created by Benjamin Harrison on December 24, 1892, it was the third forest reserve created in United States. It is the largest flatop mountain in the world.
    0.00
    0 votes
    123
    Modoc National Forest

    Modoc National Forest

    Modoc National Forest is a 1,654,392-acre (6,695 km) national forest in northeastern California, covering parts of Modoc (82.9% of forest), Lassen (9.4%), and Siskiyou (7.7%) counties. Most of the forest was covered by an immense lava flow millions of years ago. The eastern part of the forest east of Alturas contains a spur of the Cascade Range to the north known as the Warner Mountains. The Warner Mountains drop steeply on the eastern slopes, whereas the western flank has a more gentle topography. Due to the elevation and precipitation differences, the forests hosts a large number of plant species. The western side of the brushy foothills consist mostly of bitterbrush and curl-leaf mahogany. As elevation increases, forests of ponderosa pine, white and red firs, incense cedar, and aspen give way to lodgepole and western white pines sprinkle towards the summit. Some 43,400 acres (176 km) of the forest have been identified as old growth, with lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine, white fir, incense cedar, and red fir being common constituents. Forest headquarters are located in Alturas, California. There are local ranger district offices located in Adin, Alturas, Cedarville, and Tulelake.
    0.00
    0 votes
    124

    Okanogan National Forest

    The Okanogan National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located in northern and western Okanogan County in north-central Washington State, United States. The 1,499,013-acre (2,342.2 sq mi, or 6066.3 km²) forest is bordered on the north by Canada, on the east by Colville National Forest, on the south by the divide between the Methow and the Stehekin-Lake Chelan valleys, and on the west by North Cascades National Park. The closest significant communities are Omak and Okanogan. Managed by the Forest Service together with Wenatchee National Forest, its headquarters is in Wenatchee. There are local ranger district offices located in Tonasket and Winthrop. It is the second-largest National Forest (after the Nez Perce National Forest in Idaho) that is contained entirely within one county. Most of the Pasayten Wilderness (excluding its westernmost part, which lies in Mount Baker National Forest), and the northeast portion (about 63%) of Lake-Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness are part of the forest, with the balance lying in Mount Baker NF. The western part of the forest is wetter than the dry and less temperate east. The vegetation varies similarly, from the western boreal forest, to the eastern
    0.00
    0 votes
    125
    Sawtooth National Forest

    Sawtooth National Forest

    Sawtooth National Forest (SAW-tooth) is a federally-protected area that covers 2,102,451 acres (850,832 ha) of the states of Idaho (~96%) and Utah (~4%). Managed by the U.S. Forest Service in the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it was originally named the Sawtooth Forest Reserve in a proclamation issued by President Theodore Roosevelt on May 29, 1905. On August 22, 1972 a portion of the forest was designated as the Sawtooth National Recreation Area (SNRA), which includes the Sawtooth Wilderness. The forest is managed as four units: the SNRA and the Fairfield, Ketchum, and Minidoka Ranger Districts. Sawtooth National Forest is managed to provide multiple uses, including recreation, wildlife habitat, and sustainable resource extraction, such as logging, mineral extraction, and cattle and sheep grazing. Sawtooth National Forest is named for the Sawtooth Mountains, which traverse part of the SNRA. The forest also contains the Albion, Black Pine, Boulder, Pioneer, Raft River, Smoky, Soldier, Sublett, and White Cloud mountain ranges, as well as Hyndman Peak, the ninth highest point in Idaho at 12,009 feet (3,660 m) above sea level. Sawtooth National Forest contains a variety of land
    0.00
    0 votes
    126
    Uncompahgre National Forest

    Uncompahgre National Forest

    Uncompahgre National Forest is a U.S. National Forest covering 955,229 acres (1,492.55 sq mi, or 3,865.68 km²) in (in descending order of land area) parts of Montrose, Mesa, San Miguel, Ouray, Gunnison, San Juan, and Delta Counties in western Colorado. (Only its headquarters is in Delta County, in the city of Delta.) It borders San Juan National Forest to the south. Within the national forest boundaries can be found the arid Uncompahgre Plateau and the northern portion of the San Juan Mountains. The forest contains three alpine wilderness areas, Uncompahgre (formally the Big Blue), Mount Sneffels and Lizard Head. The Uncompahgre National Forest is managed jointly with the Grand Mesa and Gunnison National Forests headquartered in Delta. There are local ranger district offices located in Montrose and Norwood. The varied climate, sparse population, and abundance of sun make Uncompahgre National Forest popular with jeepers, atv'ers, sight seers, and hikers. Probably the most common recreational activity within the Forest boundaries is scenic driving, thanks in part to the Million Dollar Highway. There are several dirt roads within the Uncompahgre; some are old mining roads left over
    0.00
    0 votes
    127
    White River National Forest

    White River National Forest

    White River National Forest is a National Forest in northwest Colorado. It is named after the White River that passes through it. It also contains the Flat Tops Wilderness Area, largely considered the birthplace of the U.S. Wilderness Area system. The following ski areas are located inside the forest: The Maroon Bells, a famous collection of Paleozoic sandstone and mudstone peaks near Aspen. The forest contains 2,285,970 acres (3,571.8 sq mi, or 9,250.99 km²). In descending order of land area it is located in parts of: The forest is managed from Forest Service offices in Glenwood Springs. There are local ranger district offices in Aspen, Carbondale, Eagle, Meeker, Minturn, Rifle, and Silverthorne. There are eight officially designated wilderness areas lying within White River National Forest that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Five of them extend into neighboring National Forests (as indicated).
    0.00
    0 votes
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