Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 1.367 views
  • 615 votes
  • 615 voters
  • 9%
Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time

More about Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time:

Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time has gotten 1.367 views and has gathered 615 votes from 615 voters. O O

Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time is a top list in the General category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of General or Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about General on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1

    Claude Autant-Lara

    Claude Autant-Lara (5 August 1901, Luzarches, Val-d’Oise – 5 February 2000, Antibes, Alpes-Maritimes), was a French film director and later Member of the European Parliament (MEP). Autant-Lara was educated in France and at London's Mill Hill School during his mother's exile as a pacifist. Early in his career, he worked as an art director and costume designer, his best known work in this vein was possibly for Nana (1926), a silent film directed by Jean Renoir. Autant-Lara also acted in the film. As a director, he frequently created provocative movies, saying "if a film does not have venom, it is worthless". In the 1960s, he turned his back on the New Wave movement, and from then on he had no popular successes. On 18 June 1989, he came to public notice again, controversially, when he was elected to the European Parliament as a member of the National Front and the oldest member of the assembly. In his maiden speech, in July, he caused a scandal by expressing his "concerns about the American cultural threat", provoking a walkout by the majority of the deputies. In an interview granted to the monthly magazine Globe in September 1989, he engaged in what Minister of Justice Pierre
    8.57
    7 votes
    2

    Val Guest

    Val Guest (11 December 1911 – 10 May 2006) was a British film director, best known for his science-fiction films for Hammer Film Productions in the 1950s, but who also enjoyed a long, varied and active career in the film industry from the early 1930s up until the early 1980s. He was born Valmond Maurice Grossmann in London, England, and educated at Seaford College. Guest's initial career was as an actor, appearing in various productions in London theatres. He also appeared in a few early sound film roles, before he gave up an acting career and moved into writing. For a time in the early 1930s he was the London correspondent for the Hollywood Reporter trade paper, before he began working on film screenplays for Gainsborough Pictures, his first being No Monkey Business in 1935. He wrote screenplays for the rest of the decade, including working on scripts for Will Hay, as well as some film scores, before in the early 1940s becoming a director, with his debut feature in this role being Miss London Ltd. in 1943. He went on to direct, produce and script a huge number of films over the following forty years, with perhaps his best known work being on the first two Hammer Films Quatermass
    6.88
    8 votes
    3

    Vincente Minnelli

    Vincente Minnelli (February 28, 1903 – July 25, 1986) was an American stage director and film director, famous for directing such classic movie musicals as Meet Me in St. Louis, The Band Wagon, and An American in Paris. In addition to having directed some of the most famous and well-remembered musicals of his time, Minnelli made many comedies and melodramas. He was married to Judy Garland from 1945 until 1951; they were the parents of Liza Minnelli. Born as Lester Anthony Minnelli in Chicago, he was the youngest of four known sons, only two of whom survived to adulthood, born to Marie Émilie Odile Lebeau (stage name: Mina Gennell) and Vincent Charles Minnelli. His father was musical conductor of Minnelli Brothers' Tent Theater. Minnelli's Chicago-born mother was of French Canadian descent with a strong probability of Native American (Anishinaabe) lineage included via her Mackinac Island, Michigan born mother. The family toured small towns primarily in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois before settling permanently in Delaware, Ohio. Paternal grandfather Vincenzo Minnelli and great-uncle Domenico Minnelli, both Sicilian revolutionaries, were forced to leave Sicily after the collapse of the
    7.14
    7 votes
    4

    Fran Walsh

    Frances "Fran" Walsh, (born January 10, 1959) is a screenwriter, film producer, lyricist, and occasional musician. She is the partner of filmmaker Peter Jackson. They have two children: Billy and Katie. Fran Walsh has contributed to all of Jackson's films since Meet the Feebles. She won three Academy Awards in 2003, for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Original Song, all for The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. She has received a total of seven Oscar nominations. Walsh was born into a family of Irish descent in Wellington, New Zealand, and attended Wellington Girls' College intent on becoming a fashion designer, but eventually became interested in music instead. Occasionally taking time off to perform in a punk band named The Wallsockets, she attended Victoria University of Wellington majoring in English literature and graduated in 1981. Walsh got her screen break writing material for Kiwi producer Grahame McLean on 1983 television film A Woman of Good Character/It's Lizzie to those Close. Later she wrote scripts for his TV show Worzel Gummidge Down Under. Walsh met Peter Jackson in the mid 80s during the final stages of production on his low-budget movie
    8.00
    6 votes
    5
    John Cassavetes

    John Cassavetes

    John Nicholas Cassavetes (in Greek: Γιάννης Νικόλαος Κασσαβέτης; December 9, 1929 – February 3, 1989) was an American actor, screenwriter and filmmaker. He acted in many Hollywood films, notably Rosemary's Baby (1968) and The Dirty Dozen (1967). Cassevetes was also a pioneer of American independent film by writing and directing over a dozen movies, which he financed in part with his Hollywood paychecks, and which pioneered the use of improvisation and a realistic cinéma vérité style. He studied acting with the legendary Don Richardson, using an acting technique based on muscle memory. He was the father of Nick Cassavetes. Cassavetes was born in New York as the son of Greek American Katherine Cassavetes (who was to be featured in some of his films) and Greek immigrant Nicholas John Cassavetes. His early years were spent with his family in Greece; when he returned at age seven, he spoke no English. He grew up on Long Island, New York. He attended Port Washington High School from 1945 to 1947, participating in Port Weekly (the school paper), Red Domino (interclass play), football, and the Port Light (yearbook). Next to his photo on page 55 of his 1947 year book is written: "'Cassy' is
    7.67
    6 votes
    6

    Tony Thomas

    Charles Anthony "Tony" Thomas (born December 7, 1948) is an American television and film producer, who has produced TV series Nurses, Herman's Head, Blossom, Empty Nest, Benson, Beauty and the Beast, The Golden Girls, It's a Living, as well as Dead Poets Society. Thomas is the son of Danny Thomas, and the younger brother of actresses Terre Thomas and Marlo Thomas. He married Ann Souder in 2005 in Montecito, California. Thomas was born in Hollywood, California.
    6.57
    7 votes
    7
    Richard Fleischer

    Richard Fleischer

    Richard O. Fleischer (December 8, 1916 – March 25, 2006) was an American film director. Fleischer was born in Brooklyn, the son of Essie (née Goldstein) and animator/producer Max Fleischer. He started in motion pictures as director of animated shorts produced by his father including entries in the Betty Boop, Popeye and Superman series. His live-action film career began in 1942 at the RKO studio, directing shorts, documentaries, and compilations of forgotten silent features, which he called Flicker Flashbacks. He won an Academy Award as producer of the 1947 documentary Design for Death, co-written by Theodor Geisel (later known as Dr. Seuss), which examined the cultural forces that led to Japan's imperial expansion through World War II. Fleischer directed his first feature in 1946. His other early films were taut film noir thrillers such as Bodyguard (1948), The Clay Pigeon (1949), Follow Me Quietly (1949), Armored Car Robbery (1950), and The Narrow Margin (1952). In 1948, Fleischer also directed So This Is New York, a cynically sophisticated comedy starring acerbic humorist Henry Morgan based upon a Ring Lardner novel. In 1954, he was chosen by Walt Disney (his father's former
    8.60
    5 votes
    8

    Lewis Gilbert

    Lewis Gilbert CBE (born 6 March 1920 in Hackney, London) is a prolific British film director, producer and screenwriter, who has directed more than 40 films during six decades; among them such varied titles as Reach for the Sky (1956), Sink the Bismarck! (1960), Alfie (1966), Educating Rita (1983), and Shirley Valentine (1989), as well as three of the classic James Bond films: You Only Live Twice (1967), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979). In 2001 he was made a Fellow of the British Film Institute, the highest accolade given in the British film industry. Lewis Gilbert was born in Hackney, London on 6 March 1920 as the son to a second-generation family of music hall performers, and spent his early years travelling with his parents, and watching the shows from the side of the stage. He first performed on-stage at the age of 5, when asked to drive a trick car around the stage. This pleased the audience, so this became the end of his parents' act. When travelling on trains, his parents frequently hid him in the luggage rack, to avoid paying a fare for him. His father contracted tuberculosis when he was a young man. He died aged 34, when Gilbert was seven. As a child actor
    5.75
    8 votes
    9

    Anatole Dauman

    Anatole Dauman (1925 in Warsaw – 8 April 1998 in Paris) was a French film producer. He produced films by Jean-Luc Godard, Robert Bresson, Wim Wenders, Nagisa Oshima, Andrei Tarkovsky, Chris Marker, Volker Schlöndorff, Walerian Borowczyk, and Alain Resnais. He was a principal figure in Argos Films, a company that was a very important vehicle in creating opportunities for the "Left bank" filmmakers to emerge from the overall Nouvelle Vague. Anatole Dauman was born in Warsaw in 1925 to a Russian Jewish family and later emigrated to France. In 1951, he formed Argos Films with Philippe Lifchitz. It was a niche production company with the aim of making films on art which were inspired by the work of the Italian documentary filmmaker Luciano Emmer. Dauman produced the first films of Pierre Kast, Jean Aurel and Chris Marker. In 1953, they gained an advance from a distributor that enabled them to produce Alexander Astruc's Crimson Curtain, which received a prime a la qualite. After that they produced Alain Resnais' Night and Fog and two films by Chris Marker, Sunday in Peking and Letter from Siberia. In 1959, Argos initiated the production of Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour. They also produced
    9.75
    4 votes
    10
    William Friedkin

    William Friedkin

    William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935) is an American film director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The French Connection in 1971 and The Exorcist in 1973; for the former, he won the Academy Award for Best Director. Some of his other films include Sorcerer, Cruising, To Live and Die in L.A., The Guardian, Jade, Bug, and Killer Joe. Friedkin was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Rae (née Green) and Louis Friedkin, a semi-professional softball player, merchant seaman, and men's clothing salesman. His parents were Jewish immigrants from the Ukraine. After seeing the movie Citizen Kane as a boy, Friedkin became fascinated with movies. He began working for WGN-TV immediately after high school. He eventually started his directorial career doing live television shows and documentaries, including The People vs. Paul Crump which won several awards and contributed to the commutation of Crump's death sentence. As mentioned in Friedkin's voice-over commentary on the DVD re-release of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, Friedkin directed one of the last episodes of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour in 1965, called "Off Season". Hitchcock admonished Friedkin for not wearing a tie while
    7.17
    6 votes
    11
    Lee Daniels

    Lee Daniels

    Lee Louis Daniels (born December 24, 1959) is an American actor, film producer, and director. He produced Monster's Ball and directed the film Precious, which received six Academy Award nominations, including Best Director; the film won two of the awards. Daniels was born on December 24, 1959, in Philadelphia and attended Radnor High School. After graduating, Daniels attended Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri. He began his career in entertainment as a casting director and manager after a chance meeting with a Hollywood producer, working on such projects as Under the Cherry Moon and Purple Rain. He continued managing talent, including several Academy Award nominees and winners. The documentary My Big Break features Daniels early in his career when he was managing actor Wes Bentley who starred as Ricky Fitts in American Beauty. In the documentary a dynamic Daniels animatedly comments on Bentley's reluctance to capitalize on his newfound celebrity status. Lee has a sister Joyce Daniels Fennell from Philadelphia. Daniels and Joyce's father, Officer William Daniels, is from West Philadelphia. When he arrived in Hollywood, Daniels first worked for a nursing agency, then
    8.20
    5 votes
    12

    Michael Anderson

    Michael Joseph Anderson, Sr. (born 30 January 1920) is an English film director, best known for directing The Dam Busters (1955), Around the World in 80 Days (1956) and Logan's Run (1976). He was born in London, England: Anderson's was a theatrical family. His parents were the actors Lawrence and Beatrice Anderson. His great-aunt was Mary Anderson of Louisville, Kentucky, who became one of the first American Shakespearian actresses; the Mary Anderson Theatre in Louisville was dedicated to her. After serving in the Second World War, Anderson first developed his career in British films, becoming a director in 1949 and enjoying his first success with the war film The Dam Busters (1955). The Dam Busters made good use of limited special effects and is often cited as an inspiration for the climax of the first Star Wars film. He directed the first cinema adaptation of George Orwell's 1984 (1956) and Around the World in 80 Days (1956), for which he was nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe for his direction. He also directed the 1968 film The Shoes of the Fisherman starring Anthony Quinn, Laurence Olivier and John Gielgud. He settled in Hollywood, California, making such
    7.00
    6 votes
    13

    Alf Sjöberg

    Sven Erik Alf Sjöberg (21 June 1903, Stockholm – 17 April 1980) was a Swedish theatre and film director. He won the Grand Prix du Festival at the Cannes Film Festival twice: in 1946 for Iris and the Lieutenant (Swedish: Iris och löjtnantshjärta) (part of an eleven-way tie), and in 1951 for his film Miss Julie (Swedish: Fröken Julie) (an adaption of the August Strindberg's play which tied with Vittorio De Sica's Miracle in Milan). Despite his success with films Torment (1944) and Miss Julie, Sjöberg was above all, and foremost, a stage director; perhaps the greatest at Dramaten (alongside, first, Olof Molander and, later, Ingmar Bergman). He was a First Director of Sweden's Royal Dramatic Theatre in the years 1930-1980, where he staged a large number of remarkable and historic productions. Sjöberg was also a pioneer director for early Swedish TV theatre (his 1955 TV theatre production of Hamlet is a national milestone). Sjöberg died in a car accident on his way to rehearsal at the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm.
    8.00
    5 votes
    14
    Jean Cocteau

    Jean Cocteau

    Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (French pronunciation: [ʒɑ̃ kɔkto]; 5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, playwright, artist and filmmaker. Cocteau is best known for his novel Les Enfants terribles (1929), and the films Blood of a Poet (1930), Les Parents terribles (1948), Beauty and the Beast (1946), and Orpheus (1949). His circle of associates, friends and lovers included Kenneth Anger, Pablo Picasso, Jean Hugo, Jean Marais, Henri Bernstein, Yul Brynner, Marlene Dietrich, Coco Chanel, Erik Satie, María Félix, Édith Piaf and Raymond Radiguet. Cocteau was born in Maisons-Laffitte, Yvelines, a village near Paris, to Georges Cocteau and his wife, Eugénie Lecomte; a socially prominent Parisian family. His father was a lawyer and amateur painter who committed suicide when Cocteau was nine. He left home at fifteen. He published his first volume of poems, Aladdin's Lamp, at nineteen. Cocteau soon became known in Bohemian artistic circles as The Frivolous Prince, the title of a volume he published at twenty-two. Edith Wharton described him as a man "to whom every great line of poetry was a sunrise, every sunset the foundation of the Heavenly
    7.60
    5 votes
    15

    John and Roy Boulting

    John Edward Boulting (21 November 1913 – 17 June 1985) and Roy Alfred Clarence Boulting (21 November 1913 – 5 November 2001), known collectively as the Boulting brothers, were English filmmakers and identical twins who became known for their popular series of satirical comedies in the 1950s and 1960s. The twin brothers were born in Bray, Berkshire, England, on 21 November 1913, to Arthur Boulting and Rose Bennet. They worked together as producer and director whenever they could, and often alternated these duties depending on the nature of the film they were working on, although they also made films separately. The two worked as screenwriters on their own films. They began with serious, tight, economical drama films such as Seven Days to Noon (1950) and Graham Greene's Brighton Rock (1947), both with Roy producing and John directing. They then became known for a series of satirical comedy films, such as Private's Progress (1956), Lucky Jim (1957) and I'm All Right Jack (1959). John Boulting contributed as co-writer for the films. The Boultings used the same actors in a lot of their films, including Ian Carmichael, Richard Attenborough, Terry-Thomas, Dennis Price, John Le Mesurier,
    8.75
    4 votes
    16

    Mark Shivas

    Mark Shivas (24 April 1938 – 11 October 2008) was a British television producer, film producer and executive. He began his career at BBC Television in the 1960s, and quickly became one of the department's noted producers. He achieved particular success with the costume drama The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1970) and Dennis Potter's Casanova (1971), the former of which earned three Emmy Award nominations in 1972. Other notable productions he oversaw included the anthology series Black and Blue (1973), which included the play Secrets by Michael Palin and Terry Jones. The play was wiped from the archives, as was common practice at the time, but a recording made by Shivas on an early domestic video format from the mastertape at the BBC and transferred onto VHS in the 1980s preserved a copy, later allowing it to be released as an extra feature on the Ripping Yarns DVD set. In 1981 Shivas produced The Borgias, which was poorly received by critics. In 1988 Shivas became Head of Drama at the BBC, a position he occupied until 1993 when he moved across to head up the Corporation's fledgling film arm. In later years, he returned to producing as a freelancer. Some of his most noted later
    8.75
    4 votes
    17
    Michelangelo Antonioni

    Michelangelo Antonioni

    Michelangelo Antonioni, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI (29 September 1912 – 30 July 2007) was an Italian film director, screenwriter, editor, and short story writer. Best known for his "trilogy on modernity and its discontents"—L'Avventura (1960), La Notte (1961), and Eclipse (1962)—Antonioni "redefined the concept of narrative cinema" and challenged traditional approaches to storytelling, realism, drama, and the world at large. He produced "enigmatic and intricate mood pieces" and rejected action in favor of contemplation, focusing on image and design over character and story. His films defined a "cinema of possibilities". Antonioni received numerous awards and nominations throughout his career, including the Cannes Film Festival Jury Prize (1960, 1962), Palme d'Or (1966), and 35th Anniversary Prize (1982); the Venice Film Festival Silver Lion (1955), Golden Lion (1964), FIPRESCI Prize (1964, 1995), and Pietro Bianchi Award (1998); the Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists Silver Ribbon eight times; and an honorary Academy Award in 1995. He and Ingmar Bergman died both the same day. Antonioni was born into a prosperous family of landowners in Ferrara, Emilia Romagna, in
    6.50
    6 votes
    18
    Richard Attenborough

    Richard Attenborough

    Richard Samuel Attenborough, Baron Attenborough ( /ˈætənbərə/), CBE (born 29 August 1923) is a British actor, director, producer and entrepreneur. He is the current President of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA). As a film director and producer, he won two Academy Awards for Gandhi in 1982. He has also won four BAFTA Awards and three Golden Globe Awards. As an actor he is perhaps best known for his roles in Brighton Rock, The Great Escape, 10 Rillington Place, Miracle on 34th Street and Jurassic Park. He is the elder brother of naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough and John Attenborough, an Executive at Alfa Romeo. Attenborough was born in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, the eldest of three sons of Mary Attenborough (née Clegg) a founding member of the Marriage Guidance Council and Frederick Levi Attenborough, a scholar and academic administrator who was a don at Emmanuel College, Cambridge and wrote a standard text on Anglo-Saxon law. Attenborough was educated at Wyggeston Grammar School for Boys in Leicester and studied at RADA. In September 1939, the Attenboroughs took in two German-Jewish refugee girls, Helga and Irene Bejach (aged 9 & 11), who lived with
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Sofia Coppola

    Sofia Coppola

    Sofia Carmina Coppola ( /ˈkoʊpələ/ KOH-pə-lə; born May 14, 1971) is an American screenwriter, film director, producer and actress. In 2003, she received the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for Lost in Translation, and became the third woman (and first American woman) to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Director. In 2010, with Somewhere, she became the first American woman (and fourth American filmmaker) to win the Golden Lion, the top prize at the Venice Film Festival. Coppola was born in New York City, New York, the youngest child and only daughter of set decorator/artist Eleanor Coppola (née Neil) and director Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather and Apocalypse Now), granddaughter of the composer Carmine Coppola, sister of Roman Coppola and Gian-Carlo Coppola, niece of her father's siblings August Coppola and Talia Shire, and a cousin of Nicolas Cage, Jason Schwartzman and Robert Carmine. When she was fourteen years old, her brother Gian-Carlo was killed in a boating accident. She attended high school at St. Helena High School and graduated in the class of 1990. She later went to Mills College and the California Institute of the Arts, and interned with Chanel
    7.40
    5 votes
    20

    Damien O'Donnell

    Damien O'Donnell (born 1967 in Dublin) is an Irish film director and writer. He has directed East is East (1999), Heartlands (2002) and Inside I'm Dancing (2004), amongst others. He is from Beaumont, Dublin. He has also directed advertisements for Bulmers Original Dry Irish Cider, which is brewed in Thurles Co. Tipperary. He won the Empire Award for Best Newcomer and received a British Independent Film Awards nomination for East is East.
    7.20
    5 votes
    21

    Richard Lester

    Richard Lester (born 19 January 1932) is an American film director based in Britain. Lester is notable for his work with The Beatles in the 1960s and his work on the Superman film series in the 1980s. Lester was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A child prodigy, he began studies at the University of Pennsylvania at the age of 15. He started in television in 1950, working as a stage hand, floor manager, assistant director, and then to director in less than a year, because no one else was around that knew how to do the work. In 1953, Lester moved to London and began work as a director in independent television, working for the legendary low cost television producers The Danziger Brothers on episodes of Mark Saber, a half-hour detective series. A variety show he produced caught the eye of Peter Sellers, who enlisted Lester's help in translating The Goon Show to television as The Idiot Weekly, Price 2d. It was a hit, as were two follow-up shows, A Show Called Fred and Son of Fred. Lester recalls that A Show Called Fred was "broadcast live and that's why I went into film directing where you can do a second take!" A short film Lester made with Spike Milligan and Peter Sellers, The
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    Alain Resnais

    Alain Resnais

    Alain Resnais (French pronunciation: [alɛ̃ ʁɛnɛ]; born 3 June 1922) is a French film director whose career has extended over more than six decades. After training as a film editor in the mid-1940s, he went on to direct a number of short films which included Nuit et Brouillard (Night and Fog) (1955), an influential documentary about the Nazi concentration camps. He began making feature films in the late 1950s and consolidated his early reputation with Hiroshima mon amour (1959), Last Year at Marienbad (1961), and Muriel (1963), all of which adopted unconventional narrative techniques to deal with themes of troubled memory and the imagined past. These films were contemporary with, and associated with, the French New Wave or nouvelle vague, though Resnais did not regard himself as being fully part of that movement. He had closer links to the 'Left Bank group' of authors and filmmakers who shared a commitment to modernism and an interest in left-wing politics. He also established a regular practice of working on his films in collaboration with writers usually unconnected with the cinema, such as Marguerite Duras, Alain Robbe-Grillet and Jorge Semprún. In later films Resnais moved away
    6.17
    6 votes
    23

    Grigori Kozintsev

    Grigori Mikhaylovich Kozintsev (Russian: Григо́рий Миха́йлович Ко́зинцев; Kiev, 22 March [O.S. 9 March] 1905 – Leningrad, now Saint Petersburg, 11 May 1973) was a Jewish Ukrainian, Soviet Russian theatre and film director. He was named People's Artist of the USSR in 1964. He studied in the Imperial Academy of Arts. As a theatre director he was part of Eccentricism, a modernist avant garde movement that spanned Russian futurism and constructivism, which included the theatre of Vsevolod Meyerhold and Sergei Eisenstein. Kozintsev contributed the "Salvation in the Trousers" section to the Eccentric Manifesto, published on 9 July 1922 (the other contributors were Leonid Trauberg, Sergei Yutkevich and Georgii Kryzhitskii) and was involved with the Factory of the Eccentric Actor group. Some of his early films were launched under the FEKS label. He began making films in 1921. His silent features, including The Overcoat (1926) and The New Babylon (1929), had a ring of Expressionism, while the early sound film Alone (1931) used experimental montage sound techniques. Kozintsev is most renowned by his adaptations of William Shakespeare (King Lear and Hamlet) and Miguel de Cervantes' Don
    7.00
    5 votes
    24

    Karel Reisz

    Karel Reisz (21 July 1926 – 25 November 2002) was a Czech-born British filmmaker who was active in post–war Britain, and one of the pioneers of the new realist strain in 1950s and 1960s British cinema. Reisz was a Jewish refugee, one of the 669 rescued by Sir Nicholas Winton. His father was a lawyer. He came to England in 1938, speaking almost no English, but eradicated his foreign accent as quickly as possible. After attending Leighton Park School, he joined the Royal Air Force towards the end of the war; his parents died at Auschwitz. Following his war service, he read Natural Sciences at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and began to write for film journals, including Sight and Sound. He co-founded Sequence with Lindsay Anderson and Gavin Lambert in 1947. Reisz was a founder member of the Free Cinema documentary film movement. His first short film, Momma Don't Allow (1955), co-directed with Tony Richardson, was included in the first Free Cinema programme shown at the National Film Theatre in February 1956. His film We Are the Lambeth Boys (1958) was a naturalistic depiction of the members of a South London boys' club, which was unusual in showing the leisure life of working-class
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    Michael Nozik

    Michael Nozik

    Michael Nozik is an American film producer. He won a BAFTA award for The Motorcycle Diaries in the category of 'Best Film Not In The English Language' in 2004. His credits also include Love in the Time of Cholera, Syriana, Quiz Show, and The Legend of Bagger Vance.
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    Mark Boal

    Mark Boal

    Mark Boal (born 1973) is an American journalist, screenwriter and film producer. He won Academy Awards for Best Original Screenplay and Best Picture for The Hurt Locker (2009). His screenplay won six other major awards as well. Mark Boal was born in 1973 in New York City. He attended Bronx High School of Science and was on the high school's Speech and Debate Team. He earned his undergraduate degree in Philosophy from Oberlin College in 1995. Boal has worked as a freelance journalist and screenwriter. He has contributed articles to such magazines as The Village Voice, Rolling Stone, and Playboy. Boal's 2004 article "Death and Dishonor", about the 2003 murder of veteran Richard T. Davis after his return to the United States, was published in Playboy magazine. It inspired writer/director Paul Haggis, who adapted it for his fictional screenplay for the film In the Valley of Elah, which he also directed. Boal and Haggis have writing credit for the story. As a journalist, Boal was embedded with troops and bomb squads in 2004 during the Iraq War. He wrote an article about one of the bomb experts, Sergeant Jeffrey S. Sarver, in an article entitled "The Man in the Bomb Suit" , published in
    8.00
    4 votes
    27

    Robert Rossen

    Robert Rossen (March 16, 1908 – February 18, 1966) was an American screenwriter, film director, and producer whose film career spanned almost three decades. His 1949 film All the King's Men won Oscars for Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress, while Rossen was nominated for an Oscar as Best Director. He won the Golden Globe for Best Director and the film won the Golden Globe Award for Best Picture. In 1961 he made The Hustler, which was nominated for nine Oscars and won two. Rossen was nominated as Best Director and with Sidney Carroll for Best Adapted Screenplay but did not win either award. After directing and writing for the stage in New York, Rossen moved to Hollywood in 1937. There he worked as a screenwriter for Warner Bros. until 1941, and then interrupted his career to serve until 1944 as the chairman of the Hollywood Writers Mobilization Against the War, a body to organize writers for the effort in World War II. In 1945 he joined a picket line against Warner Bros., making an enemy of Jack Warner. After making one film for Hal Wallis's new-formed production company, Rossen made one for Columbia Pictures, another for Wallis and most of his later films for his
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    James Cameron

    James Cameron

    James Francis Cameron (born August 16, 1954) is a Canadian film director, film producer, deep-sea explorer, screenwriter, visual artist and editor. His writing and directing work includes The Terminator (1984), Aliens (1986), The Abyss (1989), Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991), True Lies (1994), Titanic (1997), Dark Angel (2000–02), and Avatar (2009). In the time between making Titanic and Avatar, Cameron spent several years creating many documentary films (specifically underwater documentaries) and co-developed the digital 3D Fusion Camera System. Described by a biographer as part-scientist and part-artist, Cameron has also contributed to underwater filming and remote vehicle technologies. On March 26, 2012, Cameron reached the bottom of the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean, in the Deepsea Challenger submersible. He was the first person to do this in a solo descent, and only the third person to do so ever. He has been nominated for six Academy Awards overall and won three for Titanic. In total, Cameron's directorial efforts have grossed approximately US$2 billion in North America and US$6 billion worldwide. Not adjusted for inflation, Cameron's Titanic and Avatar are
    7.75
    4 votes
    29

    Julien Duvivier

    Julien Duvivier (8 October 1896, Lille – 29 October 1967, Paris) was a French film director. He was prominent in French cinema in the years 1930-1960. Amongst his most original films, chiefly notable are La Bandera, Pépé le Moko, Panique, Voici le temps des assassins and Marianne de ma jeunesse. Jean Renoir called him, a " great technician, [a] rigorist , a poet". It was as an actor, in 1916 at the Théâtre de l'Odéon under the direction of André Antoine, that Duvivier's career began. In 1918 he moved on to Gaumont, as a writer and assistant of, amongst others, André Antoine, Louis Feuillade and Marcel L'Herbier. In 1919 he directed his first film. In the 1920s several of his films had a religious concern; - Credo ou la tragédie de Lourdes, L'abbé Constantin and La Vie miraculeuse de Thérèse Martin - a film about the Carmelite saint Thérèse of Lisieux. In the 1930s Duvivier was part of the production company, 'Film d'Art', founded by Marcel Vandal and Charles Delac and he worked as part of a team. He stayed with them for nine years. David Golder (1930), was his first success. It was also his first 'talkie', as it was of the actor Harry Baur. They worked together many more times in
    7.75
    4 votes
    30

    Joseph Losey

    Joseph Walton Losey (January 14, 1909, La Crosse, Wisconsin – June 22, 1984, London) was an American theater and film director. After studying in Germany with Bertolt Brecht, Losey returned to the United States, eventually making his way to Hollywood. In the 1950s Losey was blacklisted in the United States and moved to Europe where he made the remainder of his films, mostly in the United Kingdom. During the McCarthy Era, Losey was named during hearings of the HUAC for his supposed ties with the Communist Party. Although he was never officially blacklisted, his career in the US declined, and he moved to England to continue working as a director. Even in the UK, he experienced problems: his first British film, The Sleeping Tiger, a 1954 film noir crime thriller, bore the pseudonym Victor Hanbury, rather than his own name, in the credits as director, as the stars of the film, Alexis Smith and Alexander Knox, feared being blacklisted in Hollywood due to working on a film he directed. He was also originally slated to direct the 1956 Hammer Films production X the Unknown; however, after a few days work on the project, star Dean Jagger refused to work with a supposed Communist sympathiser
    6.60
    5 votes
    31

    Mike Leigh

    Mike Leigh, OBE (born 20 February 1943) is a British writer and director of film and theatre. He studied theatre at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and studied further at the Camberwell School of Art and the Central School of Art and Design. He began as a theatre director and playwright in the mid 1960s. In the 1970s and 1980s his career moved between work for the theatre and making films for BBC Television, many of which were characterized by a gritty "kitchen sink realism" style. His well-known films include Life is Sweet (1990), the comedy-drama Career Girls (1997), the Gilbert and Sullivan biopic Topsy-Turvy (1999), and the bleak working-class drama All or Nothing (2002). His most notable works are arguably Naked (1993) for which he won the Best Director Award at Cannes, the BAFTA-winning (and Oscar-nominated) Palme d'Or winner Secrets & Lies (1996) and Golden Lion winner Vera Drake (2004). His films and stage plays, according to the critic Michael Coveney, "comprise a distinctive, homogenous body of work which stands comparison with anyone's in the British theatre and cinema over the same period." Coveney further noted Leigh's role in helping to create stars – Liz Smith in
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Quentin Tarantino

    Quentin Tarantino

    Quentin Jerome Tarantino (pronunciation: /ˌtærənˈtiːnoʊ/; born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, cinematographer and actor. He has received many industry awards, including an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award, a BAFTA and the Palme d'Or and has been nominated for an Emmy and Grammy. Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, Tarantino was an avid film fan. His career began in the late 1980s, when he wrote and directed My Best Friend's Birthday. Its screenplay would form the basis for True Romance. In the early 1990s, he began his career as an independent filmmaker with films employing nonlinear storylines and the aestheticization of violence. His films include Reservoir Dogs (1992), Pulp Fiction (1994), Jackie Brown (1997), Kill Bill (2003, 2004), Death Proof (2007), and Inglourious Basterds (2009). His movies are generally characterized by stylistic influences from grindhouse, kung fu, and spaghetti western films. Tarantino also frequently collaborates with his friend and fellow filmmaker Robert Rodriguez. Tarantino was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, the son of Tony Tarantino, an actor and amateur musician who was born in Queens, New York, and Connie
    7.50
    4 votes
    33

    Barrie M. Osborne

    Barrie M. Osborne (born February 7, 1944) is an American film producer, executive producer, production manager and director. The son of Hertha Schwarz and William Osborne, Barrie was born in New York City and grew up in New Rochelle, New York where he graduated New Rochelle High School. He is an alumnus of Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota and currently lives in Wellington, New Zealand. Osborne's most notable work is The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King for which he was the recipient of the Academy Award for Best Picture, which he shares with Peter Jackson and Fran Walsh. Osborne has recently received the backing of AlNoor Holdings, a Qatar media company for the production of a $200 million feature film about the Prophet Mohammed. As of February 2012, Barrie is finishing post-production of The Great Gatsby remake, starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Jay Gatsby. Along with Christian Keller as film director and Mexican entrepreneur Max Appedole, Osborne is preparing a major Latin hit with the production of "Trevi" a biopic about the life of Mexican star Gloria Trevi. As of June 2012, Osborne has joined popular Indian Tamil actor, Kamal Hassan for a new hollywood venture.
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Brian Desmond Hurst

    Brian Desmond Hurst

    Brian Desmond Hurst (12 February 1895 – 26 September 1986) was a Belfast-born film director. Responsible for over 30 movies as director, Hurst was Ireland's most prolific movie director during the 20th century. Hurst was born Hans Hurst in Ribble Street, East Belfast"". into a working class family. Hurst attended the New Road School, a Public Elementary School, on the junction of the Newtownards Road and Hemp Street in East Belfast. The building still exists today and further information on this and the houses he lived in are detailed in the Belfast media legacy website "Black City" . Brian Desmond Hurst's father (Robert, senior) and brother (Robert, junior) were iron-workers in the Harland and Wolff shipyard. In August 1914, at the outbreak of World War I Hurst enlisted as a private in the British Army and changed his name from Hans to Brian soon afterwards. He saw service with the 6th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles at the battle of Chunuk Bair in Gallipoli, the Balkans and the Middle East. At the battle of Chunuk Bair his regiment were "battle virgins when they were thrown into the Turkish machine gun fire for the first time on 10th August 1915". "They had set out a few hours
    8.67
    3 votes
    35
    Rob Reiner

    Rob Reiner

    Robert Reiner (born March 6, 1947) is an American actor, director, and producer. As an actor, Reiner first came to national prominence as Michael "Meathead" Stivic, son-in-law of Archie and Edith Bunker (played by Carroll O'Connor and Jean Stapleton), on All in the Family. That role earned him two Emmy Awards during the 1970s. As a director, Reiner was recognized by the Directors Guild of America (DGA) with nominations for Stand by Me, When Harry Met Sally..., and A Few Good Men. He also directed Misery. He studied at the UCLA Film School. Reiner was born to a Jewish family in The Bronx, New York, and is the son of Estelle Reiner (née Lebost), an actress, and Carl Reiner, a comedian, actor, writer, producer, and director. As a child, Reiner lived in New Rochelle, New York, where his family lived at 48 Bonnie Meadow Road. This is similar to 148 Bonnie Meadow Road, the fictional address of the Petries on The Dick Van Dyke Show, the 1960s CBS sitcom created by his father. Also, his latest film Flipped takes place at the corner of Bonnie Meadow Lane and Renfrew Street. At the age of 13, Rob moved with his family to the Los Angeles area, where he attended Beverly Hills High School with
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    Neil Jordan

    Neil Jordan

    Neil Patrick Jordan (born 25 February 1950) is an Irish filmmaker and novelist. He won an Academy Award (Best Original Screenplay) for The Crying Game. He also won the Silver Bear for Best Director at the Berlin International Film Festival for The Butcher Boy. Jordan was born in County Sligo, the son of Angela (née O'Brien), a painter, and Michael Jordan, a professor. He was educated at St. Paul's College, Raheny. Of his religious background, Jordan said in a 1999 Salon interview: "I was brought up a Catholic and was quite religious at one stage in my life, when I was young. But it left me with no scars whatever; it just sort of vanished." He said about his current beliefs that "God is the greatest imaginary being of all time. Along with Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, the invention of God is probably the greatest creation of human thought." Later, Jordan attended University College Dublin, where he studied Irish history and English literature. When John Boorman was filming Excalibur in Ireland, he recruited Jordan as a script consultant, which led to his doing second unit work. His first feature Angel, a tale of a musician caught up in the Troubles, starred Stephen Rea
    10.00
    2 votes
    37

    Robert Mulligan

    Robert Mulligan (August 23, 1925 – December 20, 2008) was an American film and television director best known as the director of humanistic American dramas, including To Kill A Mockingbird (1962), Summer of '42 (1971), The Other (1972), Same Time, Next Year (1978) and The Man in the Moon (1991). He was also known in the 1960s for his extensive collaborations with producer Alan J. Pakula. Mulligan studied at Fordham University before serving with the United States Marine Corps during World War II. At war's end, he obtained work in the editorial department of The New York Times, but left to pursue a career in television. Employed by the CBS network, Mulligan began his television career at the bottom of the ladder as a messenger boy. He worked his way up, learned the business and by 1948 was directing important dramatic television shows. In 1959 he won an Emmy Award for directing The Moon and Sixpence, a made-for-television production that marked the American small-screen debut of Laurence Olivier. In 1957 Mulligan directed his first motion picture, Fear Strikes Out, starring Anthony Perkins as tormented baseball player Jimmy Piersall. The film was the first feature he would direct
    10.00
    2 votes
    38

    Clarence Brown

    Clarence Brown (May 10, 1890 – August 17, 1987) was an American film director. Born in Clinton, Massachusetts, to a cotton manufacturer, Brown moved to the South when he was 11. He attended Knoxville High School and the University of Tennessee, both in Knoxville, Tennessee, graduating from the university at the age of 19 with two degrees in engineering. An early fascination in automobiles led Brown to a job with the Stevens-Duryea Company, then to his own Brown Motor Car Company in Alabama. He later abandoned the car dealership after developing an interest in motion pictures around 1913. He was hired by the Peerless Studio at Fort Lee, New Jersey, and became an assistant to the French-born director Maurice Tourneur. After serving in World War I, Brown was given his first co-directing credit (with Tourneur) for The Great Redeemer (1920). Later that year, he directed a major portion of The Last of the Mohicans after Tourneur was injured in a fall. Brown moved to Universal in 1924, and then to MGM, where he stayed until the mid-1950s. At MGM he was one of the main directors of their female stars–he directed Joan Crawford six times and Greta Garbo seven. Garbo called Brown her favorite
    7.25
    4 votes
    39

    Hal Ashby

    Hal Ashby (September 2, 1929 – December 27, 1988) was an American film director and film editor. Born William Hal Ashby in Ogden, Utah, the son of a dairy owner father, Ashby grew up in a Mormon household and had a tumultuous childhood as part of a dysfunctional family which included the divorce of his parents, his father's suicide and his dropping out of high school. Ashby was married and divorced by the time he was 19. As Ashby was entering adult life, he moved from Utah to California where he quickly became an assistant film editor. His big break occurred in 1967 when he won the Academy Award for Film Editing for In the Heat of the Night. Ashby has often stated that film editing provided him with the best film school background outside of traditional university study and he carried the techniques learned as an editor with him when he began directing. At the urging of its producer, Norman Jewison, Ashby directed his first film, The Landlord, in 1970. While his birth date placed him squarely within the realm of the prewar generation, the filmmaker quickly embraced the hippie lifestyle, adopting vegetarianism and growing his hair long before it became de rigueur amongst the
    7.25
    4 votes
    40

    Louis Malle

    Louis Malle (30 October 1932 – 23 November 1995) was an award-winning French film director, screenwriter, and producer. His film, Le Monde du silence, won the Palme d'Or and Academy Award for Best Documentary in 1956. He was also nominated multiple times for Academy Awards later in his career. Malle worked in both French cinema and Hollywood, and he produced both French and English language films. His most famous films include Ascenseur pour l'échafaud (1958), Atlantic City (1981), and Au revoir, les enfants (1987). Malle was born into a wealthy industrialist family in Thumeries, Nord, France. He initially studied political science at the Sciences-Po before turning to film studies at IDHEC instead. He worked as the co-director and cameraman to Jacques Cousteau on the Oscar and Palme d'Or-winning (at the 1956 Academy Awards and Cannes Film Festival respectively) documentary The Silent World (1956) and assisted Robert Bresson on A Man Escaped (French title: Un condamné à mort s'est échappé ou Le vent souffle où il veut, 1956) before making his first feature, Ascenseur pour l'échafaud (released in the U.K. as Lift to the Scaffold and in the U.S. originally as Frantic, later as
    7.25
    4 votes
    41

    Wendy Finerman

    Wendy Finerman (born 1960) is an American producer of nearly a dozen feature films. She was one of three producers who won the Academy Award for Best Picture for Forrest Gump in 1994 and a BAFTA Award for Fairy Tale in 1998. She has also produced such popular films as The Fan, Stepmom, Drumline, and The Devil Wears Prada. Finerman was formerly married to producer Mark Canton and now is married to David Peterson. The mother of four children, she is a graduate of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and runs her own company, Wendy Finerman Productions. Finerman's sister, Karen Finerman, is a hedgefund owner/trader in New York City and appears on CNBC's Fast Money. Her brother is real estate financier Mark Finerman of Greenwich, Connecticut.
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Jonathan Demme

    Jonathan Demme

    Robert Jonathan Demme (born February 22, 1944) is an American filmmaker, producer and screenwriter. Best known for directing The Silence of the Lambs, which won him the Academy Award for Best Director, he has also directed the acclaimed movies Philadelphia, Rachel Getting Married, the Talking Heads concert movie Stop Making Sense and a trilogy of Neil Young documentary/concert movies. Demme broke into feature film working for exploitation film producer Roger Corman from 1971 to 1976, co-writing and producing Angels Hard as They Come and The Hot Box. He then moved on to directing, with three films (Caged Heat, Crazy Mama, Fighting Mad) for Corman's studio New World Pictures. After Fighting Mad, Demme directed the comedy film Handle with Care for Paramount Pictures in 1977. The film was well-reviewed by critics, but received little promotion, and performed poorly at the box office. Demme's next film, 1980's Melvin and Howard, did not get a wide release, but received a groundswell of critical acclaim, and led to the signing of Demme to direct the Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell star vehicle Swing Shift. Intended as a prestige picture for Warner Bros. as well as a major commercial vehicle
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Robert Redford

    Robert Redford

    Charles Robert Redford, Jr. (born August 18, 1936), better known as Robert Redford, is an American actor, film director, producer, businessman, environmentalist, philanthropist, and founder of the Sundance Film Festival. He has received two Oscars: one in 1981 for directing Ordinary People, and one for Lifetime Achievement in 2002. In 2010 he was awarded French Knighthood in the Legion d'Honneur. At the height of his fame in the 1970s and 1980s, he was often described as one of the world's most attractive men and remains one of the most popular movie stars. Redford was born in Santa Monica, California. His mother, Martha W. (née Hart), was born in Texas, to Archibald Hart and Sallie Pate Green, and his father, Charles Robert Redford, Sr. (November 19, 1914 – April 2, 1991), was a milkman-turned-accountant from Pawtucket, Rhode Island, son of Charles Elijah Redford and Lena Taylor. He has a step-brother, William, from his father's re-marriage. Redford is of English, Irish, Scottish, and Scots-Irish ancestry (his surname originates in England). Redford's family moved to Van Nuys, California while his father worked in El Segundo. He attended Van Nuys High School, where he was
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Woody Allen

    Woody Allen

    Woody Allen (born Allan Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is an American screenwriter, director, actor, comedian, author, playwright, and musician whose career spans over half a century. He began as a comedy writer in the 1950s, penning jokes and scripts for television and also publishing several books of short humor pieces. In the early 1960s, Allen started performing as a stand-up comic, emphasizing monologues rather than traditional jokes. As a comic, he developed the persona of an insecure, intellectual, fretful nebbish, which he insists is quite different from his real-life personality. In 2004, Comedy Central ranked Allen in fourth place on a list of the 100 greatest stand-up comics, while a UK survey ranked Allen as the third greatest comedian. By the mid-1960s Allen was writing and directing films, first specializing in slapstick comedies before moving into more dramatic material influenced by European art films during the 1970s. He is often identified as part of the New Hollywood wave of filmmakers of the mid-1960s to late '70s. Allen often stars in his own films, typically in the persona he developed as a standup. Some of the best-known of his over 40 films are Annie
    8.33
    3 votes
    45

    Jan Chapman

    Jan Chapman (born on 28 March 1950 in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian film producer. Films produced by Chapman include The Last Days of Chez Nous, The Piano, Love Serenade, Holy Smoke, and Lantana. Chapman met her first husband, film director Phillip Noyce, whilst studying English and Fine Arts at university in the late 1960s. It was during this period that she began working on small, independent films, as part of the Sydney Filmmakers Co-op. In the early 1970s she directed short fiction films and documentaries. Later, she worked in the Education department of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and began producing television series, including Sweet and Sour. Chapman was nominated for the AFI Best Picture award in 1992 for "The Last Days of Chez Nous". In 1994, she was nominated for an Academy Award for "The Piano".
    6.20
    5 votes
    46

    László Benedek

    László Benedek, sometimes credited as Laslo Benedek (March 5, 1905 – March 11, 1992), was a Hungarian-born film director. Born in Budapest, he worked as a writer and editor in Hungarian cinema until World War II. Louis B. Mayer helped the Jewish Benedek escape and brought him to Hollywood where he directed his first film for MGM in 1944 as a stand-in. He gained wide recognition for his direction of 1951's Death of a Salesman, for which he won the Golden Globe Award for Best Director and a Best Director nomination from the Directors Guild of America. However, it was for his directorial efforts on his next project that Benedek is best remembered. His 1953 motorcycle gang film The Wild One caused a storm of controversy and was banned in the United Kingdom until 1968. László Benedek spoke several languages and directed in Germany, making the 1955 film Kinder, Mütter und ein General and in France in 1960, directing Recours en grâce. In Hollywood, Benedek went on to make more motion pictures, but also became a significant director of television series, beginning with the Perry Mason series in 1957. He also directed episodes of other shows, including The Outer Limits, Mannix, Voyage to
    6.20
    5 votes
    47
    Robert Altman

    Robert Altman

    Robert Bernard Altman (February 20, 1925 – November 20, 2006) was an American film director and screenwriter known for making films that are highly naturalistic, but with a stylized perspective. In 2006, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences recognized his body of work with an Academy Honorary Award. His films MASH (1970), McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971), and Nashville (1975) have been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. Altman was born in Kansas City, Missouri, the son of Helen (née Matthews), a Mayflower descendant from Nebraska, and Bernard Clement Altman, a wealthy insurance salesman and amateur gambler, who came from an upper-class family. Altman's ancestry was German, English and Irish; his paternal grandfather, Frank Altman, Sr., anglicized the spelling of the family name from "Altmann" to "Altman". Altman had a Catholic upbringing, but he did not continue to practice as a Catholic as an adult, although he has been referred to as "a sort of Catholic" and a Catholic director. He was educated at Jesuit schools, including Rockhurst High School, in Kansas City. He graduated from Wentworth Military Academy in Lexington, Missouri in
    6.20
    5 votes
    48
    Jerome Robbins

    Jerome Robbins

    Jerome Robbins (October 11, 1918 – July 29, 1998) was an American theater producer, director, and choreographer known primarily for Broadway Theater and Ballet/Dance, but who also occasionally directed films and directed/produced for television. His work has included everything from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. Among the numerous stage productions he worked on were On the Town, Peter Pan, High Button Shoes, The King And I, The Pajama Game, Bells Are Ringing, West Side Story, Gypsy: A Musical Fable, and Fiddler on the Roof. Robbins is a five time Tony Award winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors. He also received two Academy Awards, including the 1961 Academy Award for Best Director with Robert Wise for West Side Story. A documentary about his life and work, Something to Dance About, featuring excerpts from his journals, archival performance and rehearsal footage and interviews with Robbins and his colleagues, premiered on PBS in 2009. Robbins was born Jerome Wilson Rabinowitz, exactly one month before the end of World War I, in the Jewish Maternity Hospital in the heart of Manhattan’s Lower East Side – a neighborhood populated by many immigrants.
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Tony Mark

    Tony Mark

    Tony Mark (also known as Anthony Mark) is an American film producer, director and screenwriter who has produced films by filmmakers such as Kathryn Bigelow and Robert Rodriguez. Tony Mark received an Emmy nomination for the HBO 2003 telefilm And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself which he shared with producers Larry Gelbart, Mark Gordon and a list of others. He won the 2004 Imagen Award for producing ("Best Movie for Television And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself") by the Imagen Foundation (established to encourage and recognize the positive portrayal of Latinos in media). Tony Mark grew up in Manhattan, New York where he would find work as a vacuum cleaner salesman, taxi driver, and line cook before he found his true passion, filmmaking. When Tony Mark first saw François Truffaut's Day for Night it was a sealed deal. Mark attended prestigious Carnegie-Mellon University and spent years working in regional theater as an actor and as a behind-the-scenes manager. The young thespian won the best actor award at the New England Theatre Festival for his performance in Girl on the Via Flaminia. /> Creative and scrappy, Tony Mark was also a photo journalist and fashion photographer who did
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Steven Spielberg

    Steven Spielberg

    Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, video game designer, and studio entrepreneur. In a career of more than four decades, Spielberg's films have covered many themes and genres. Spielberg's early science-fiction and adventure films were seen as archetypes of modern Hollywood blockbuster filmmaking. In later years, his films began addressing such issues as the Holocaust, slavery, war and terrorism. He is considered one of the most popular and influential filmmakers in the history of cinema. He is also one of the co-founders of DreamWorks movie studio. Spielberg won the Academy Award for Best Director for Schindler's List (1993) and Saving Private Ryan (1998). Three of Spielberg's films—Jaws (1975), E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982), and Jurassic Park (1993)—achieved box office records, each becoming the highest-grossing film made at the time. To date, the unadjusted gross of all Spielberg-directed films exceeds $8.5 billion worldwide. Forbes puts Spielberg's wealth at $3.0 billion. Spielberg was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, to a Jewish family. His mother, Leah Adler (née Posner, 1920- ), was a restaurateur and concert
    5.33
    6 votes
    51

    Otto Preminger

    Otto Ludwig Preminger (5 December 1905 – 23 April 1986) was an Austro–Hungarian-American theatre and film director. After moving from the theatre to Hollywood, he directed over 35 feature films in a five-decade career. He rose to prominence for stylish film noir mysteries such as Laura (1944) and Fallen Angel (1945). In the 1950s and 1960s, he directed a number of high-profile adaptations of popular novels and stage works. Several of these pushed the boundaries of censorship by dealing with topics which were then taboo in Hollywood, such as drug addiction (The Man with the Golden Arm, 1955), rape (Anatomy of a Murder, 1959) and homosexuality (Advise & Consent, 1962). He was twice nominated for the Best Director Academy Award. He also had a few acting roles. Preminger was born in 1905 in Wiznitz (Vyzhnytsia), a town west of Czernowitz, northern Bukovyna, in today's Ukraine, then part of the Austro–Hungarian Empire, into a Jewish family. His parents were Josefa (née Fraenkel) and Markus Preminger. Preminger's father was born in 1877 in Galicia, at a time when it was part of the Austro–Hungarian Empire. As an Attorney General of Austria–Hungary, Markus was a proud public prosecutor on
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Satyajit Ray

    Satyajit Ray

    Satyajit Ray ( Shottojit Rae (help·info); 2 May 1921 – 23 April 1992) was an Indian filmmaker. He is regarded as one of the greatest auteurs of 20th century cinema. Ray was born in the city of Calcutta into a Bengali family prominent in the world of arts and literature. Starting his career as a commercial artist, Ray was drawn into independent filmmaking after meeting French filmmaker Jean Renoir and viewing the Italian neorealist film Bicycle Thieves of Vittorio De Sica during a visit to London. Ray directed thirty-seven films, including feature films, documentaries and shorts. He was also a fiction writer, publisher, illustrator, graphic designer and film critic. Ray's first film, Pather Panchali (1955), won eleven international prizes, including Best Human Documentary at the Cannes film festival. This film, Aparajito (1956) and Apur Sansar (1959) form The Apu Trilogy. Ray did the scripting, casting, scoring, and editing, and designed his own credit titles and publicity material. Ray received many major awards in his career, including 32 Indian National Film Awards, a number of awards at international film festivals and award ceremonies, and an Academy Honorary Award in 1992. The
    6.00
    5 votes
    53

    David Lean

    Sir David Lean, CBE (25 March 1908 – 16 April 1991) was an English film director, producer, screenwriter and editor, best remembered for big-screen epics The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Doctor Zhivago (1965), and A Passage to India (1984); for bringing Charles Dickens' novels to the silver screen with films such as Great Expectations (1946) and Oliver Twist (1948); and for the renowned romantic drama Brief Encounter (1945). Acclaimed by directors including Steven Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick, Lean was voted 9th greatest film director of all time in the British Film Institute Sight & Sound "Directors' Top Directors" poll 2002. Lean has four films in the top eleven of the British Film Institute's Top 100 British Films. David Lean was born in Croydon, Surrey (now part of Greater London), to Francis William le Blount Lean and the former Helena Tangye (niece of Sir Richard Trevithick Tangye). His parents were Quakers and he was a pupil at the Quaker-founded Leighton Park School in Reading. His younger brother, Edward Tangye Lean (1911–1974), founded the original Inklings literary club when a student at Oxford University. Lean was a half-hearted schoolboy
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Documentary photography

    Documentary photography

    Documentary photography usually refers to a popular form of photography used to chronicle significant and historical events. It is typically covered in professional photojournalism, or real life reportage, but it may also be an amateur, artistic, or academic pursuit. The photographer attempts to produce truthful, objective, and usually candid photography of a particular subject, most often pictures of people. The term documentary applied to photography antedates the mode or genre itself. Photographs meant to accurately describe otherwise unknown, hidden, forbidden, or difficult-to-access places or circumstances date to the earliest daguerreotype and calotype "surveys" of the ruins of the Near East, Egypt, and the American wilderness areas. Nineteenth century archaeologist John Beasly Greene, for example, traveled to Nubia in the early 1850s to photograph the major ruins of the region; One early documentation project was the French Missions Heliographiques organized by the official Commission des Monuments historiques to develop an archive of France's rapidly-disappearing architectural and human heritage; the project included such photographic luminaries as Henri Le Secq, Edouard
    8.00
    3 votes
    55

    Philip Leacock

    Philip David Charles Leacock (8 October 1917 – 14 July 1990) was an English television and film director and producer. His brother was documentary filmmaker Richard Leacock. Born in London, England, Leacock spent his childhood in the Canary Islands. He started directing documentaries and later turned to fiction films. He was known for his films about children, particularly The Little Kidnappers (1953) and The Spanish Gardener (1956). Leacock, who made documentaries before taking on feature-length movies, had his first hit in 1950 with The Kidnappers, a family movie set in Nova Scotia. He also directed The Spanish Gardener, starring Dirk Bogarde; Innocent Sinners, with Flora Robson, and The Rabbit Trap, with Ernest Borgnine. In the early 1960's he moved to Hollywood, where he made The War Lover, starring Steve McQueen, based on John Hersey's novel about a World War II pilot. Other Leacock films were Take a Giant Step, about a black youth's encounter with racism, and Let No Man Write My Epitaph, about juvenile drug addiction. He also directed episodes of Gunsmoke, Route 66, The Waltons and The Defenders. As an in-house director noted for his gentle way with child performers, he also
    8.00
    3 votes
    56

    Sidney Gilliat

    Sidney Gilliat (15 February 1908 – 31 May 1994) was an English film director, producer and writer. He was born in the district of Edgeley in Stockport, Cheshire. In the 1930s he worked as a scriptwriter, most notably with Frank Launder on The Lady Vanishes (1938) for Alfred Hitchcock, and its sequel Night Train to Munich (1940), directed by Carol Reed. He and Launder made their directorial debut co-directing the home front drama Millions Like Us (1943). From 1945 he also worked as a producer, starting with The Rake's Progress, which he also wrote and directed. He and Launder made over 40 films together, founding their own production company Individual Pictures. While Launder concentrated on directing their comedies, most famously the four St Trinian's School films, Gilliat showed a preference for comedy-thrillers and dramas, including Green for Danger (1946), London Belongs to Me (1948) and State Secret (1950). He wrote the libretto for Malcolm Williamson's opera Our Man in Havana, based on the novel by Graham Greene. He had also worked on the film. He married Beryl Brewer in the early 30s. He had two children: Joanna Gilliat, who is a journalist and is married to Edward Russell, a
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Cameron Crowe

    Cameron Crowe

    • Web Link(s): http://www.discogs.com/artist/Cameron+Crowe
    Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. Before moving into the film industry, Crowe was a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine, for which he still frequently writes. Crowe has made his mark with character-driven, personal films that have been generally hailed as refreshingly original and devoid of cynicism. Michael Walker in The New York Times called Crowe "something of a cinematic spokesman for the post-baby boom generation" because his first few films focused on that specific age group, first as high schoolers and then as young adults making their way in the world. Crowe's debut screenwriting effort, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, grew out of a book he wrote while posing for one year undercover as a student at Clairemont High School in San Diego, California, where he met Geraldine Edwards, who was a student there while he was visiting mutual friends in 1975. He later based part of his Penny Lane character on her in Almost Famous after discovering that she had been going backstage to Rock and Roll concerts. Later, he wrote and directed one more high school saga, Say Anything, and then Singles, a story of Seattle
    6.75
    4 votes
    58

    George Marshall

    George E. Marshall (December 29, 1891 – February 17, 1975) was an American actor, screenwriter, producer, film and television director, active through the first six decades of movie history. Relatively few of Marshall's films are well-known today, with Destry Rides Again, The Sheepman, and How the West Was Won being the biggest exceptions. Marshall co-directed How the West Was Won with John Ford and Henry Hathaway, handling the railroad segment, which featured a celebrated buffalo stampede sequence. While Marshall worked on almost all kinds of films imaginable, he started his career in the early silent period doing mostly Westerns, a genre he never completely abandoned. Later in his career, he was particularly sought after for comedies. He did around half a dozen films each with Bob Hope and Jerry Lewis, and also worked with W.C. Fields, Jackie Gleason, Will Rogers and Laurel and Hardy. For his contribution to the film industry, George Marshall has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7048 Hollywood Boulevard.
    6.75
    4 votes
    59

    Henri-Georges Clouzot

    Henri-Georges Clouzot (French pronunciation: [ɑ̃ʁi ʒɔʁʒ kluzo]; (1907-08-18)August 18, 1907 – January 12, 1977(1977-01-12)) was a French film director, screenwriter and producer. He is best remembered for his work in the thriller film genre, having directed The Wages of Fear and Les Diaboliques, which are critically recognized to be among the greatest films from the 1950s. Clouzot also directed documentary films, including The Mystery of Picasso, which was declared a national treasure by the government of France. Clouzot was an early fan of the cinema and, desiring a career as a writer, moved to Paris. He was later hired by producer Adolphe Osso to work in Berlin, writing French-language versions of German films. After being fired from German studios due to his friendship with Jewish producers, Clouzot returned to France, where he spent years bedridden after contracting tuberculosis. Upon recovering, Clouzot found work in Nazi occupied France as a screenwriter for the German-owned company Continental Films. At Continental, Clouzot wrote and directed films that were very popular in France. His second film Le Corbeau drew controversy over its harsh look at provincial France and
    6.75
    4 votes
    60

    Mike Nichols

    Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky; November 6, 1931) is a German-born American television, stage and film director, writer, producer and comedian. He began his career in the 1950s as one half of the comedy duo Nichols and May, along with Elaine May. In 1968 he won the Academy Award for Best Director for the film The Graduate. His other noteworthy films include Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Carnal Knowledge, Working Girl, Closer and the TV mini-series Angels in America. He also staged the original theatrical productions of Barefoot in the Park, Luv, The Odd Couple and Spamalot. Nichols is one of a small group of people who have won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Award. His other honors include the Lincoln Center Gala Tribute in 1999, the National Medal of Arts in 2001, the Kennedy Center Honors in 2003 and the AFI Life Achievement Award in 2010. Mike Nichols was born Michael Igor Peschkowsky in Berlin, Germany, the son of Brigitte (née Landauer) and Paul Peschkowsky, a physician. His father was born in Vienna, Austria, to a Russian Jewish immigrant family; Nichols' father's family had been wealthy and lived in Siberia, leaving after the Russian Revolution, and
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Richard Brooks

    Richard Brooks

    Richard Brooks (May 18, 1912 – March 11, 1992) was an American screenwriter, film director, novelist and occasional film producer. His outstanding works as director are Blackboard Jungle (1955), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), Elmer Gantry (1960) — for which he won an Academy Award for Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay) — In Cold Blood (1967) and Looking for Mr. Goodbar (1977). His parents, Hyman and Esther Sax, were Russian Jews. Married teenagers when they immigrated to the United States in 1908, they found employment in Philadelphia’s textile and clothing industry. Their son, Reuben Sax, was born in 1912. He attended public schools and graduated from high school in 1929. Reuben took classes at Temple University for two years, studying journalism and playing on the school’s baseball team, but he dropped out and left home when he discovered that his parents were going into debt to pay for his tuition. He rode freight trains around the East and Midwest for a period of time but eventually returned to Philadelphia to seek work as a newspaper reporter. At some point in the 1930’s Reuben began using the name Richard Brooks professionally. He changed his name legally in 1943. Brooks wrote
    6.75
    4 votes
    62

    Samuel Goldwyn, Jr.

    Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. (born September 7, 1926) is an American film producer. Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. was born in Los Angeles, California. He is the son of actress Frances Howard and the pioneer motion picture mogul Samuel Goldwyn. Educated at Fountain Valley School in Colorado Springs, Colorado, he followed in his father's footsteps and founded the motion picture production companies The Samuel Goldwyn Company and Samuel Goldwyn Films. In 1950, Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. married Jennifer Howard (1925–1993), the daughter of prominent author and screenwriter Sidney Howard. The couple had four children including actor Tony Goldwyn and studio executive, John Goldwyn. They divorced in 1966 and he married a second time to Peggy Elliot with whom he had two children.
    6.75
    4 votes
    63

    Branko Lustig

    Branko Lustig (born June 10, 1932) is a prominent Croatian film producer. He is the only person born in Croatia (at the time Kingdom of Yugoslavia) to have won two Academy Awards. Lustig was born in Osijek, Croatia, (at that time Kingdom of Yugoslavia), to a Croatian Jewish family. His father, Mirko, was head-waiter at a Osijek Café Central, and his mother, Vilma, was a housewife. Lustig's grandparents, unlike his parents, were religious and he regularly attended town Synagogue with them. During World War II, as a child he was imprisoned for two years in Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen. Most members of his family perished in the death camps throughout Europe, including his grandmother who was killed in the gas chamber, while his father was killed in Čakovec by Hungarians on March 15, 1945. Lustig mother survived the Holocaust and was reunited with him after the war. On the day of the liberation Lustig weighted only 66 pounds. Lustig credited his survival in Auschwitz to a German officer that, coincidentally, was from the same Osijek suburb and knew Lustig's father. He overheard Lustig crying in Croatian and asked him who his father was. Lustig began his film career in 1955 as an
    9.00
    2 votes
    64

    Carol Reed

    Sir Carol Reed (30 December 1906 – 25 April 1976) was an English film director best known for Odd Man Out (1947), The Fallen Idol (1948), The Third Man (1949) and Oliver! (1968). He won the Palme d'Or for The Third Man and the 1968 Academy Award for Best Director for Oliver! The son of actor-producer Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree and his mistress, May Pinney Reed, Carol Reed was born in Putney, and educated at The King's School, Canterbury, an independent school. Reed served in the British Army during the Second World War, giving him many experiences which appeared in his later films. He embarked on an acting career while still in his teens, but soon went into the role of producer/director. He worked as an Assistant Director with Basil Dean on the films Autumn Crocus, Lorna Doone and Loyalties and with Thorold Dickinson on Java Head. As director he was responsible for The Stars Look Down (1939), Kipps (1941), Odd Man Out (1947), The Fallen Idol (1948), Outcast of the Islands (1952), Our Man in Havana (1959), and The Agony and the Ecstasy (1965). The Fallen Idol, The Third Man, and Our Man in Havana are based on the work of Graham Greene. From 1943 until 1947, he was married to the
    9.00
    2 votes
    65

    Duncan Kenworthy

    Duncan H. Kenworthy, OBE (born 1949) is a British film and television producer, and co-founder of the production company DNA Films. He is currently a producer at Toledo Productions. His producer credits include Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994), Lawn Dogs (1995), Notting Hill (1999), Love Actually (2003) and The Eagle (2011). His television productions include Jim Henson's The Storyteller and the 1996 version of Gulliver's Travels (1996). He was also co-creator of Fraggle Rock. He is currently the Vice President of BAFTA.
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Jeffrey Katzenberg

    Jeffrey Katzenberg

    Jeffrey Katzenberg (born December 21, 1950) is an American film producer and CEO of DreamWorks Animation. Katzenberg is perhaps most known for his period as chairman of The Walt Disney Studios when Disney produced some of its biggest hits, including The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin and The Lion King. As a founder and CEO of DreamWorks Animation, he has overseen the production of such animated franchises as Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, Monsters vs. Aliens and How to Train Your Dragon. Katzenberg was born in New York City, the son of Anne, an artist, and Walter, a stockbroker. He attended the Ethical Culture Fieldston School, graduating in 1969. Katzenberg began his career as an assistant to producer David Picker, then in 1974 he became an assistant to Barry Diller, the Chairman of Paramount Pictures. Diller moved Katzenberg to the marketing department, followed by other assignments within the studio, until he was assigned to revive the Star Trek franchise, which resulted in the hit film, Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979). He continued to work his way up and became President of Production under Paramount President Michael Eisner. In 1984, Michael Eisner
    9.00
    2 votes
    67

    John Knatchbull, 7th Baron Brabourne

    John Ulick Knatchbull, 7th Baron Brabourne, CBE (9 November 1924 – 23 September 2005), professionally known as John Brabourne, was a British peer, television producer and Academy-award nominated film producer. Brabourne was a TV producer from 1958 to 1988 and was a director of Mersham Productions in 1970, a director of Thames Television (later Chairman) and Euston Films from 1978 to 1995, and a director of Thorn EMI from 1981 to 1986. In 1979, he was invested as a Fellow of the British Film Institute and made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1993. John Brabourne received two Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, as producer of Romeo and Juliet (1968) and A Passage to India (1984). His filmography also includes Harry Black, Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile, Sink the Bismarck!, and Little Dorrit. Lord Brabourne was born in 1924, the son of Michael Knatchbull, 5th Baron Brabourne and his wife, the Lady Doreen Browne. He was educated at Eton College and Brasenose College, Oxford. He served in the Coldstream Guards, rising to the rank of Captain and fought in France in the Second World War from 1943. On 26 October 1946, at Romsey Abbey in Hampshire,
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Mikhail Kalatozov

    Mikhail Kalatozov

    Mikhail Konstantinovich Kalatozov (Georgian: მიხეილ კალატოზიშვილი, Russian: Михаи́л Константи́нович Калато́зов) (28 December 1903 – 27 March 1973), born Mikheil Kalatozishvili, was a Georgian/Russian film director. Born in Tiflis (now Tbilisi), he studied economics before starting his film career as an actor and later cinematographer. He directed several documentary films, including Salt for Svanetia (1930), but was forced to withdraw from his profession after his film Nail in the Boot (1931) was banned by Stalinist censors. During World War II he directed several propaganda films and worked as a cultural attaché at the Soviet embassy in the United States. During the 1950s he directed several other films. His four final features were The Cranes Are Flying (1957), The Unsent Letter (1959), I Am Cuba (1964), and The Red Tent (1971) are among his most famous works. He died in Moscow.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Miloš Forman

    Miloš Forman

    Jan Tomáš Forman (Czech pronunciation: [ˈjan ˈtomaːʃ ˈforman]; born February 18, 1932), known as Miloš Forman ([ˈmɪloʃ ˈforman], English /ˈmiːloʊʃ ˈfɔərmən/), is a Czech-American director, screenwriter, and professor, who since 1968 has lived and worked primarily outside the former Czechoslovakia and the present Czech Republic. Forman was one of the most important directors of the Czechoslovak New Wave. His 1967 film The Fireman's Ball, on the face of it a naturalistic representation of an ill-fated social event in a provincial town, has been viewed by both movie scholars and the then-authorities in Czechoslovakia as a biting satire on East European Communism, which resulted in it being banned for many years in Forman's home country. Since Forman left Czechoslovakia, two of his films, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Amadeus, have acquired particular renown, both gaining him an Academy Award for Best Director. He was also nominated for a Best Director Oscar for The People vs. Larry Flynt. He has also won Golden Globe, Cannes, Berlinale, BAFTA, Cesar, David di Donatello, European Film Academy, and Czech Lion awards. Forman was born in Čáslav, Czechoslovakia (present-day Czech
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Stanley Kramer

    Stanley Kramer

    Stanley Earl Kramer (September 29, 1913 – February 19, 2001) was an American film director and producer, responsible for making many of Hollywood's most famous "message movies", and becoming one of the nation's most respected filmmakers. As an independent producer and director, he distinguished himself and his films by bringing attention to topical social issues that most studios avoided. Among the subjects covered in his films were racism, nuclear war, greed, creationism vs. evolution and the causes and effects of fascism. Despite the controversial subjects of his films, many of which received mixed reviews, the film industry nonetheless recognized their importance and quality during most of his career, awarding his films sixteen Academy Awards and eighty nominations. He was nominated nine times as either producer or director. His notable films include High Noon (1952, as producer), The Defiant Ones (1958), On the Beach (1959), Inherit the Wind (1960), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963), Ship of Fools (1965) and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967). After a string of unsuccessful productions in the 1970s, he retired from films. Director Steven
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    George Miller

    George Miller

    George Miller (born 3 March 1945) is an Australian film director, screenwriter, producer, and former medical doctor. He is best known for his Mad Max trilogy, but has been involved in a wide range of projects. These include the Oscar-winning Happy Feet and Babe film series. Miller is the older brother of producer Bill Miller. He is also co-founder of the production houses Dr. D Studios and Kennedy Miller Mitchell, formerly known as Kennedy Miller. Miller was born in Brisbane, Queensland, to Greek immigrant parents: Dimitri (Jim) Castrisios Miliotis and Angela Balson. Dimitri Miliotis was from the Greek island of Kythira and he anglicised his surname to Miller when he emigrated to Australia; the Balson family were Greek refugees from Anatolia. The couple married and settled in Chinchilla and had four sons. The first two were the non-identical twins George and John. Chris and Bill Miller followed. George attended Ipswich Grammar School and later Sydney Boys High School, then studied medicine at the University of New South Wales with his twin brother John. While in his final year at medical school (1971), George and his younger brother Chris made a one minute short film that won them
    5.80
    5 votes
    72
    Andrzej Wajda

    Andrzej Wajda

    Andrzej Wajda (Polish pronunciation: [ˈandʐɛj ˈvajda]; born 6 March 1926) is a Polish film director. Recipient of an honorary Oscar, he is possibly the most prominent member of the unofficial "Polish Film School" (active c. 1955 to 1963). He is known especially for a trilogy of war films: A Generation (1954), Kanał (1956) and Ashes and Diamonds (1958). Four of his films have been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film: The Promised Land (1975), The Maids of Wilko (1979), Man of Iron (1981), and Katyń (2007). Wajda was born in Suwałki, Poland, the son of Aniela (née Biaxowas), a school teacher, and Jakub Wajda, an army officer. Wajda' father was murdered by the Soviets in 1940 in what came to be known as the Katyn massacre. In 1942 he joined the Polish resistance and served in the Armia Krajowa. After the war, he studied to be a painter at Kraków's Academy of Fine Arts before entering the Łódź Film School. After Wajda's apprenticeship to director Aleksander Ford, Wajda was given the opportunity to direct his own film. With A Generation (1955), the first-time director poured out his disillusionment over jingoism, using as his alter ego a young, James
    7.67
    3 votes
    73

    Anthony Asquith

    Anthony Asquith (9 November 1902 – 20 February 1968) was a leading English film director. He collaborated successfully with playwright Terence Rattigan on The Winslow Boy (1948) and The Browning Version (1951), among other adaptations. His other notable films include Pygmalion (1938), French Without Tears (1940), The Way to the Stars (1945), and a 1952 adaptation of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. Born in London, he was the son of H. H. Asquith, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the First World War, and Margot Asquith who was responsible for 'Puffin' as his family nickname. He was educated at Winchester College and Balliol College, Oxford. The film industry was viewed as disreputable when Asquith was young, and according to the actor Jonathan Cecil, a family friend, Asquith entered his profession in order to escape his background. At the end of the 1920s he began his career with the direction of four silent films the last of which, A Cottage on Dartmoor established his reputation with its meticulous and often emotionally moving frame composition. Pygmalion (1938) was based on the George Bernard Shaw play featuring Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller. He was
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    John Ford

    John Ford

    John Ford (February 1, 1894 – August 31, 1973) was an Irish-American film director. He was famous for both his Westerns such as Stagecoach, The Searchers, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and adaptations of such classic 20th-century American novels as The Grapes of Wrath. His four Academy Awards for Best Director (1935, 1940, 1941, 1952) is a record, and one of those films, How Green Was My Valley, also won Best Picture (in its famous win over Citizen Kane). In a career that spanned more than 50 years, Ford directed more than 140 films (although nearly all of his silent films are now lost) and he is widely regarded as one of the most important and influential filmmakers of his generation. Ford's films and personality were held in high regard by his colleagues, with Ingmar Bergman and Orson Welles among those who have named him as one of the greatest directors of all time. In particular, Ford was a pioneer of location shooting and the long shot which frames his characters against a vast, harsh and rugged natural terrain. Ford was born John Martin "Jack" Feeney (though he later often gave his given names as Sean Aloysius, sometimes with surname O'Feeny or O'Fearna; an Irish
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Ron Howard

    Ron Howard

    Ronald William "Ron" Howard (born March 1, 1954) is an American film director, producer and former child actor. He came to prominence playing Opie Taylor in the sitcom The Andy Griffith Show for eight years, and later the teenaged Richie Cunningham in the sitcom Happy Days for six years. He appeared in the films The Music Man in 1962, American Graffiti in 1973 and The Shootist in 1976, the latter during his run on Happy Days. Howard made his directorial debut with the 1977 comedy Grand Theft Auto, and left Happy Days in 1980 to focus on directing. His films include the Academy Award-winning Cocoon, Apollo 13, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and A Beautiful Mind. In 2003, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts. Asteroid 12561 Howard is named after him. Howard was born in Duncan, Oklahoma, the son of Jean Speegle Howard, an actress, and Rance Howard, a director, writer and actor. His father was born with the surname "Beckenholdt", and had taken the stage name "Howard" by 1948, for his acting career. Rance Howard was serving three years in the United States Air Force at the time of Ron's birth. The family moved to Hollywood in 1958, the year before the birth of his younger brother,
    7.67
    3 votes
    76

    Anthony Minghella

    Anthony Minghella, CBE (6 January 1954 – 18 March 2008) was an English film director, playwright and screenwriter. He was Chairman of the Board of Governors at the British Film Institute between 2003 and 2007. He won the Academy Award for Best Director for The English Patient (1996), which also won the Academy Award for Best Picture, the BAFTA Award for Best Film and Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Drama. Minghella was born in Ryde, Isle of Wight, the son of Gloria (née Arcari) and Edward Minghella, ice cream factory owners. His father was an Italian immigrant and his mother was born in Leeds to an Italian family; her ancestors originally came from Valvori, a small village in the Lazio region of central Italy. Minghella attended Sandown Grammar School and St. John's, Portsmouth. He graduated from the University of Hull, where he completed undergraduate and postgraduate courses, but eventually abandoned his doctoral thesis. His first piece of produced work was a 1975 stage adaptation of Gabriel Josipovici's Mobius the Stripper and it was his 1985 piece Whale Music that kickstarted his career. He made his directorial debut with a double bill of Samuel Beckett's Play and
    10.00
    1 votes
    77

    Delmer Daves

    Delmer Daves (July 24, 1904 – August 17, 1977) was an American screenwriter, director, and producer. Born in San Francisco, Delmer Daves first pursued a career as a lawyer. While attending Stanford University he became interested in the burgeoning film industry, first working as a prop boy on the Western The Covered Wagon (1923) and serving as a technical advisor on a number of films. After finishing his education in law, he continued his career in Hollywood. After moving to Hollywood in 1928, he began his career as a screenwriter, his first credit being the "talkie" comedy So This Is College released by MGM. Through the 1930s he made a name as a successful screenplay and story writer, while moonlighting as an actor in bit parts and uncredited roles. He penned the successful Dick Powell musicals Dames, Flirtation Walk, and Paging Miss Glory between 1934 and 1935. Daves' largest successes of the period, however, came with 1936's The Petrified Forest and Love Affair (1939). Almost twenty years later Leo McCarey, director of Love Affair, would helm the nearly identical An Affair to Remember (1957) using Daves' script. Daves made his directorial debut in the Cary Grant wartime
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    Ken Hughes

    Ken Hughes (19 January 1922, Liverpool – 28 April 2001, Los Angeles) was a British film director, writer, and producer. Wife Charlotte Hughes living in LA. His daughter is Melinda Hughes who is an opera singer and lives in London, UK
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Lindsay Anderson

    Lindsay Anderson

    Lindsay Gordon Anderson (17 April 1923 – 30 August 1994) was an Indian-born, British feature film, theatre and documentary director, film critic, and leading light of the Free Cinema movement and the British New Wave. He is most widely remembered for his 1968 film if...., which won the Grand Prix at Cannes Film Festival and was Malcolm McDowell's cinematic debut. He is also notable, though not a professional actor, for playing a minor role in the Academy Award winning film Chariots of Fire. Malcolm McDowell produced a stage presentation now available on DVD about his experiences with Lindsay Anderson, "Never Apologize." The title comes from dialogue of a John Ford film. Of Scottish parentage, Anderson was the son of a British Army officer. He was born in Bangalore, South India, and educated at Saint Ronan's School in Worthing, West Sussex, and at Cheltenham College, where he met his lifelong friend and biographer, the screenwriter and novelist Gavin Lambert; Wadham College, Oxford, where he studied classics; and Magdalen College, Oxford where he studied English literature. After graduating, Anderson worked for the final year of World War II as a cryptographer for the Intelligence
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    Nicholas Hytner

    Sir Nicholas Robert Hytner (born 7 May 1956) is an English film and theatre producer and director. He has been Director of London's National Theatre since 2003. Hytner was born in Manchester to a Jewish family, the son of barrister, Benet Hytner, QC, and his wife, Joyce. He attended Manchester Grammar School and read English at Trinity Hall, Cambridge. His first theatre productions were at the Northcott Theatre, Exeter. He then directed a series of productions at the Leeds Playhouse, and in 1985 became an Associate Director of the Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester. His productions included Shakespeare’s As You Like It, Marlowe’s Edward II, Schiller’s Don Carlos, Wycherley’s The Country Wife and Robin Glendinning’s Mumbo Jumbo. He directed three productions for the Royal Shakespeare Company: Measure For Measure (1987), The Tempest (1988) and King Lear (1990). From 1990 to 1997 he was an Associate Director of the National Theatre, where he directed Ghetto by Joshua Sobol (1989), The Wind in the Willows adapted by Alan Bennett (1990), The Madness of George III by Alan Bennett (1991), The Recruiting Officer by George Farquhar (1992), Carousel by Rodgers and Hammerstein (1992), The
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    Charles Walters

    Charles Walters (November 17, 1911 – August 13, 1982) was a Hollywood director and choreographer most noted for his work in MGM musicals and comedies in from the 1940s to the 1960s. He was born in Pasadena, California, and educated at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He is notable for directing Esther Williams' musicals involving underwater swimming and diving sequences, such as Dangerous When Wet, as well as several musicals starring Leslie Caron, such as Gigi (for which he is uncredited) and Lili. He has also directed musical remakes, including High Society, a remake of The Philadelphia Story (1940), and Bundle of Joy, a remake of Bachelor Mother (1939). Walters also directed the last pairing of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, The Barkleys of Broadway, as well as Cary Grant in the actor's last film Walk, Don't Run. Walters died from lung cancer at the age of 71. According to William J. Mann's book, "Behind the Screen", Walters was gay.
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Alan Parker

    Alan Parker

    Sir Alan William Parker, CBE (born 14 February 1944) is an English film director, producer, writer and actor. He has been active in both the British cinema and American cinema and was a founding member of the Directors Guild of Great Britain. Parker was born into a working class family in Islington, North London, the son of Elsie Ellen, a dressmaker, and William Leslie Parker, a house painter. He attended Dame Alice Owen's School. Parker started out as a copywriter for advertising agencies in the 1960s and 1970s and later began to write his own television commercial scripts. His most celebrated and enduring advertising work was when he worked for famed London agency Collett Dickenson Pearce where he directed many award winning commercials, including the famous Cinzano vermouth advertisement, starring Leonard Rossiter and Joan Collins, shown in the UK. His film career began through his association with producer David Puttnam, now Lord Puttnam, when he wrote the screenplay for the feature Melody (1971). Puttnam would later produce a number of Parker's films including Midnight Express (1978). This was a highly controversial film set in a Turkish prison that was lauded by critics and
    8.50
    2 votes
    83

    Daniel Mann

    Daniel Mann, also known as Daniel Chugerman (August 8, 1912 – November 21, 1991), was an American film and television director. Daniel Mann was born in Brooklyn, New York. He was a stage actor since childhood, and attended Erasmus Hall High School, New York's Professional Children's School and the Neighborhood Playhouse. He entered films in 1952 as a director, evincing very little flair for visual dynamics but an excellent ear for dialogue. Most of Mann's films were adaptations from the stage (Come Back Little Sheba, The Rose Tattoo, The Teahouse of the August Moon) and literature (BUtterfield 8, The Last Angry Man). Daniel Mann died of heart failure in Los Angeles, California in November 1991.
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    John Schlesinger

    John Richard Schlesinger, CBE (16 February 1926 – 25 July 2003) was an English film and stage director and actor. Schlesinger was born in London into a middle-class Jewish family, the son of Winifred Henrietta (née Regensburg) and Bernard Edward Schlesinger, a physician. After St Edmund's School, Hindhead, Uppingham School and Balliol College, Oxford, he worked as an actor. Schlesinger's acting career began in the 1950s and consisted of supporting roles in British films such as The Divided Heart and Oh... Rosalinda!!, and British television productions such as BBC Sunday Night Theatre and The Vise. He began his directorial career in 1956 with the short documentary Sunday in the Park about London's Hyde Park. In 1959 he was credited as exterior or second unit director on 23 episodes of the TV series The Four Just Men and four 30-minute episodes of the series Danger Man. By the 1960s, he had virtually given up acting to concentrate on a directing career, and another of his earlier directorial efforts, the British Transport Films' documentary Terminus (1961), gained a Venice Film Festival Gold Lion and a British Academy Award. His first two fiction movies, A Kind of Loving (1962) and
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    Michael Powell

    Michael Latham Powell (30 September 1905 – 19 February 1990) was a renowned English film director, celebrated for his partnership with Emeric Pressburger. They worked together under the name of "The Archers" and produced a series of classic British films, notably 49th Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (1946, also called Stairway to Heaven), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951). His controversial 1960 film Peeping Tom, however, was so vilified that his career was seriously damaged. Powell was the second son and youngest child of Thomas William Powell, a hop farmer, and Mabel, daughter of Frederick Corbett, of Worcester, England. Powell was born in Bekesbourne, Kent, and educated at The King's School, Canterbury and then at Dulwich College. He started work at the National Provincial Bank in 1922 but quickly realised he was not cut out to be a banker. Powell entered the film industry in 1925 through working with director Rex Ingram working at the Victorine Studios in Nice, France (the contact with Ingram was made through Powell's father, who owned a hotel in Nice). He first started out as a
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Michael Tolkin

    Michael Tolkin

    Michael L. Tolkin (born October 17, 1950) is an American filmmaker and novelist. He has written numerous screenplays, including The Player (1992), which he adapted from his 1988 book by the same name, and for which he received the 1993 Edgar Award for Best Motion Picture Screenplay. A follow-up book, The Return of the Player, was published in 2006. Tolkin was born in New York City, New York, the son of Edith (née Leibovitch), a studio executive and film industry lawyer, and the late comedy writer Mel Tolkin. Michael Tolkin is a graduate of Middlebury College. Tolkin lives in Los Angeles with his wife Wendy Mogel (parenting expert and author of bestseller The Blessing of a Skinned Knee). They have two daughters, Susanna and Emma.
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Peter Bogdanovich

    Peter Bogdanovich

    Peter Bogdanovich (Serbian: Петар Богдановић, Petar Bogdanović, born July 30, 1939) is an American film historian, director, writer, actor, producer, and critic. He was part of the wave of "New Hollywood" directors, which included William Friedkin, Brian De Palma, George Lucas, Martin Scorsese, Michael Cimino, and Francis Ford Coppola. His most critically acclaimed film is The Last Picture Show (1971). Bogdanovich was conceived in Europe and born in the United States in Kingston, New York, the son of Herma (née Robinson) and Borislav Bogdanovich, a painter and pianist. His Austrian-born mother was Jewish and his father was Serbian and an Eastern Orthodox Christian. He was an actor in the 1950s, studying his craft with acting teacher Stella Adler, and appeared on television and in summer stock. In the early 1960s, Bogdanovich was known as a film programmer at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. An obsessive cinema-goer, seeing up to 400 movies a year in his youth, Bogdanovich showcased the work of American directors such as Orson Welles and John Ford -- whom he later wrote a book about, based on the notes he had produced for the MoMA retrospective of the director -- and
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Peter Jackson

    Peter Jackson

    Sir Peter Robert Jackson, ONZ, KNZM (born 31 October 1961) is a New Zealand film director, producer, actor, and screenwriter, who is well known for his The Lord of the Rings film trilogy (2001 to 2003), adapted from the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien. He won international attention early in his career with his "splatstick" horror comedies beginning with Bad Taste (1987) before coming to mainstream prominence with Heavenly Creatures (1994), for which he shared an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay nomination with his wife, Fran Walsh. Jackson has been awarded three Academy Awards in his career, including the award for Best Director in 2003; he also won the BAFTA, Golden Globe and Saturn Award for Best Direction the same year. His films also include Meet the Feebles (1989), Braindead (1992), Forgotten Silver (1995), The Frighteners (1996), King Kong (2005), The Lovely Bones (2009), and the upcoming The Hobbit trilogy, which will include The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012), The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (2013), and The Hobbit: There and Back Again (2014). He also produced District 9 (2009) and The Adventures of Tintin (2011). Jackson was made a Companion of the New
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Robert Wise

    Robert Wise

    Robert Earl Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was an American film director, producer and editor. He twice won Academy Awards for Best Director and Best Picture, for West Side Story (1961) and The Sound of Music (1965). He was also nominated for Best Film Editing for Citizen Kane (1941) and Best Picture for The Sand Pebbles (1966). Among his other films are The Body Snatcher, Born to Kill, The Set-Up, The Day the Earth Stood Still, Destination Gobi, Run Silent, Run Deep, I Want to Live!, The Haunting, The Andromeda Strain, The Hindenburg, and Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Wise was the president of the Directors Guild of America from 1971 to 1975 and later became the president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Often contrasted with auteur directors such as Stanley Kubrick, who tended to bring a distinctive directorial "look" to a particular genre, Wise is famously viewed to have allowed his (sometimes studio assigned) story to dictate style. Later critics, such as Martin Scorsese, expanded that characterization, insisting that despite Wise's notorious workaday concentration on stylistic perfection within the confines of genre and budget, his choice of
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Teinosuke Kinugasa

    Teinosuke Kinugasa

    Teinosuke Kinugasa (衣笠 貞之助, Kinugasa Teinosuke) (1 January 1896 - 26 February 1982) was a Japanese actor and film director. He was born in Mie Prefecture and died in Kyoto. Kinugasa won the 1954 Palme d'or at Cannes for Jigokumon (The Gate of Hell). Kinugasa was among the pioneers of Japanese film, but began his career as an actor specializing in female roles (onnagata) at the Nikkatsu studio. When Japanese cinema began using actresses in the early 1920s, he switched to directing and worked for such producers as Shozo Makino before going independent to make his best known film, A Page of Madness (1926). Also called A Crazy Page, or A Page Out of Order, it was lost for fifty years before the director rediscovered it in his shed in 1971. A silent film, Kinugasa released it with a new print and score to world acclaim. He also directed the film Jujiro (known as Crossways, Crossroads, and Slums of Tokyo in English) in 1928. He directed jidaigeki at the Shochiku studios, where he helped establish the career of Chōjirō Hayashi (later known as Kazuo Hasegawa). After the war, he helmed big-budget costume productions for the Daiei studios.
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Costa-Gavras

    Costa-Gavras

    Costa-Gavras (short for Constantinos Gavras or Κωνσταντίνος Γαβράς; born 12 February 1933), is a Greek filmmaker, who lives and works in France, best known for films with overt political themes, most famously the fast-paced thriller, Z (1969). Most of his movies were made in French; starting with Missing (1982), several were made in English. Gavras was born in Loutra Iraias (Λουτρά Ηραίας), Arcadia. His family spent the Second World War in a village in the Peloponnese, and moved to Athens after the war. His father had been a member of the left-wing EAM branch of the Greek Resistance, and was imprisoned after the war as a suspected communist. His father's record made it impossible for him to attend university or emigrate to the United States, so after high school Costa Gavras went to France, where he began his studies of law in 1951. His father's political blacklisting not only barred him from Greek university, but, in the McCarthyite 1950s, denied Gavras a visa for US film school. In 1956, he left his university studies to study film at the French national film school, IDHEC. After film school, he apprenticed under Yves Allégret, and became an assistant director for Jean Giono and
    6.25
    4 votes
    92

    Garry Marshall

    Garry Kent Marshall (born November 13, 1934) is an American actor, director, writer, and producer. His notable credits include creating Happy Days and The Odd Couple and directing Nothing In Common, Pretty Woman, Runaway Bride, Valentine's Day, New Year's Eve, and The Princess Diaries and Beaches. Marshall was born in the New York City borough of The Bronx, the son of Marjorie Irene (née Ward), a tap dance teacher who ran a tap dance school, and the late Anthony Wallace Marshall (1906–99), a director of industrial films and later a producer. He is the brother of actress/director Penny Marshall and Ronny Marshall Hallin, a TV producer. His father was of Italian descent, his family having come from San Martino sulla Marrucina, Chieti, Abruzzo, and his mother was of English and Scottish ancestry; His father changed his last name from "Masciarelli" to "Marshall" before Garry was born. Marshall was baptized Presbyterian and also raised in the Lutheran religion for a time. He attended De Witt Clinton High School and Northwestern University, where he wrote a sports column for The Daily Northwestern, and is a member of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. Marshall began his career as a joke
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Jim Sheridan

    Jim Sheridan

    Jim Sheridan (born 6 February 1949) is an Irish film director. A six-time Academy Award nominee, Sheridan is perhaps best known for his films My Left Foot, In the Name of the Father, The Field and In America. Sheridan was born in Wicklow, the son of Anne and Pete Sheridan, an actor and railway worker. Sheridan was initially educated by the Irish Christian Brothers and later graduated from University College Dublin. He emigrated to Canada and then New York City in 1981. In 1989 Jim, or Shay Sheridan wrote five plays. The first, an Irish beggar's opera called "The Ha'penny Place", was staged in the Project Arts Centre, and the second, a piece of agitprop theatre called "The Last Post", was staged nearby in Connolly Hall. Interestingly, an actor called Jer O'Leary, a long time friend and political associate of Jim's, appeared in both these plays, and went on to appear in small parts in almost all of Sheridan's pictures. In 1989, he directed My Right Foot, which became a critical and commercial success and won Daniel Day-Lewis and Brenda Fricker Academy Awards. He followed that with The Field (with Richard Harris) in 2002; then with In the Name of the Father in 1993, a fictionalized
    6.25
    4 votes
    94
    Brad Pitt

    Brad Pitt

    William Bradley "Brad" Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an American actor and film producer. Pitt has received four Academy Award nominations and five Golden Globe Award nominations, winning one Golden Globe. He has been described as one of the world's most attractive men, a label for which he has received substantial media attention. Pitt first gained recognition as a cowboy hitchhiker in the road movie Thelma & Louise (1991). His first leading roles in big-budget productions came with A River Runs Through It (1992), Interview with the Vampire (1994), and Legends of the Fall (1994). In 1995, he gave critically acclaimed performances in the crime thriller Seven and the science fiction film 12 Monkeys, the latter earning him a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor and an Academy Award nomination. Four years later, Pitt starred in the cult hit Fight Club. He then starred in the major international hit Ocean's Eleven (2001) and its sequels, Ocean's Twelve (2004) and Ocean's Thirteen (2007). His greatest commercial successes have been Troy (2004) and Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005). Pitt received his second and third Academy Award nominations for his leading performances in The Curious
    5.40
    5 votes
    95

    Baz Luhrmann

    Mark Anthony "Baz" Luhrmann (/ˈbæz ˈlʊərmən/; born 17 September 1962) is an Australian film director, screenwriter, and producer best known for The Red Curtain Trilogy, which includes his films Strictly Ballroom, William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge!. In 2008, he released his film Australia, starring Hugh Jackman and Nicole Kidman. Luhrmann was born in Sydney, Australia to a mother, Barbara, who was a ballroom dance teacher and dress shop owner, and Leonard Luhrmann, a farmer. He was raised in Herons Creek, a tiny rural settlement in northern New South Wales, where his father ran a petrol station and a movie theatre, both of which would influence his son's film-making career. He attended St. Joseph's Hasting Regional School, Port Macquarie 1975–1978 and Balgowlah Boys Campus in Sydney's North Beaches. He attended Year 11 at Narrabeen Sports High School in Sydney, performing in the school's version of Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1. His nickname was given to him because of a perceived resemblance to the character Basil Brush. Luhrmann first auditioned for the National Institute of Dramatic Art in 1980 but didn't get into the prestigious drama school. He successfully
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Ivan Reitman

    Ivan Reitman

    Ivan Reitman, OC (born October 27, 1946) is a Canadian film producer and director, best known for his comedy work, especially in the 1980s and 1990s. He is the owner of The Montecito Picture Company, founded in 2000. Reitman was born in Komárno, Czechoslovakia (now Slovakia), the son of Clara and Leslie Reitman. Reitman's parents were Jewish; his mother survived the Auschwitz concentration camp and his father was an underground resistance fighter. His family came to Canada as refugees in 1950. Reitman attended Oakwood Collegiate in Toronto and was a member of the Twintone Four singing group. He is the father of film director Jason Reitman. Reitman's first producing job was with the then-new station CITY-TV in Toronto. CITY was also the home of the first announcing job of his later friend and collaborator Dan Aykroyd. However, Reitman's tenure at CITY was short and he was fired during his first year by station owner Moses Znaimer. Spellbound (1972), directed by Ivan Reitman, with music by Howard Shore, magic by Doug Henning and co-starring actress Jennifer Dale, a musical that combined an intense storyline and Henning's magic tricks. The show opened in Toronto and broke box office
    7.00
    3 votes
    97

    James Schamus

    James Schamus is an award-winning screenwriter The Ice Storm and producer Brokeback Mountain, and is CEO of Focus Features, the motion picture production, financing, and worldwide distribution company whose films have included Lost in Translation, Milk, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Pianist, Coraline, and The Kids Are All Right. He is also Professor of Professional Practice in Columbia University’s School of the Arts, where he teaches film history and theory. He is the author of Carl Theodor Dreyer's Gertrud: The Moving Word, published by the University of Washington Press. He earned his BA, MA, and Ph.D. in English from U.C. Berkeley. Schamus also participates as a member of the Jury for the NYICFF, a local New York City Film Festival dedicated to screening films for children between the ages of 3 and 18.
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    René Clément

    René Clément

    René Clément (French pronunciation: [klemɑ̃]; March 18, 1913 – March 17, 1996) was a French film director and screenwriter. Clément studied architecture at the École des Beaux-Arts where he developed an interest in filmmaking. In 1936, he directed his first film, a 20 minute short written and featuring Jacques Tati. Clément spent the latter part of the 1930s making documentaries in parts of the Middle East and Africa. In 1937, he and archaeologist Jules Barthou were in Yemen making preparations to film a documentary, the first ever of that country and one that includes the only known film image of Imam Yahya. Almost ten years passed before Clément directed a feature but his French Resistance film, La Bataille du rail (1945), gained much critical and commercial success. From there René Clément became one of his country's most successful and respected directors, garnering numerous awards including two films that won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, the first in 1950 for The Walls of Malapaga (Au-delà des grilles) and the second time two years later for Forbidden Games (Jeux interdits). Clément had international success with several films but his star-studded 1966
    7.00
    3 votes
    99

    David Brown

    David Brown (July 28, 1916 – February 1, 2010) was an American film and theatre producer; he was also a writer. He was born in New York City, New York, the son of Lillian (née Baren) and Edward Fisher Brown. Brown was a graduate of Stanford University and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He began his professional career as a journalist, contributing to magazines including The Saturday Evening Post, Harper's and Collier's, before becoming an editor himself. He was a managing editor of Cosmopolitan before his wife, Helen Gurley Brown, joined the magazine. In 1951, the producer Darryl F. Zanuck hired Brown to head the story department at Zanuck's studio, 20th Century-Fox. Brown eventually rose to become executive vice president of creative operations. He and Richard D. Zanuck, Darryl's son, left Fox in 1971 for Warner Bros., but the following year they set out to form their own production company. The caper film The Sting (1973) starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford was a Zanuck/Brown "presentation". Thereafter, the pair were credited as producers or executive producers of more than a dozen films, including the courtroom drama The Verdict (1982), directed by
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    Curtis Hanson

    Curtis Hanson

    Curtis Lee Hanson (born March 24, 1945) is an American film director, film producer and screenwriter. His directing work includes The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992), L.A. Confidential (1997), Wonder Boys (2000), 8 Mile (2002), and In Her Shoes (2005). Hanson was born in Reno, Nevada and grew up in Los Angeles, the son of Beverly June, a real estate agent, and Wilbur Hale "Bill" Hanson, a teacher. Hanson dropped out of high school, finding work as a freelance photographer and editor for Cinema magazine. In 1970, Hanson co-wrote The Dunwich Horror, an adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft's short story. Hanson wrote and directed his next feature Sweet Kill in 1973, then in 1978 wrote and produced The Silent Partner, starring Elliott Gould and Christopher Plummer. As the 1980s and 1990s began, he directed a string of comedies and dramas. He did thrillers, too: many of them would deal with people who would lose a sense of control or security when facing danger and the threat of death. Some, like the financial executive in Bad Influence and the police officers in L.A. Confidential unexpectedly walk into violence and disaster. In the 1990s Hanson found box-office success with The Hand That
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Fashion photography

    Fashion photography

    Fashion photography has been in existence since 1839. There was always the existence of fashionable dress, but the idea of taking photographs to help sell clothing and accessories had just come into play. Fashion photography is a genre of photography devoted to displaying clothing and other fashion items. Fashion photography is most often conducted for advertisements or fashion magazines such as Vogue, Vanity Fair, or Elle. Over time, fashion photography has developed its own aesthetic in which the clothes and fashions are enhanced by the presence of exotic locations or accessories. Fashion Photography has been in existence since 1839. There was always the existence of fashionable dress, but the idea of taking photographs to help sell clothing and accessories had just come into play. The invention of the halftone printing process is what really helped fashion photography. The purpose of fashion photography was at one point to sell clothes. Today fashion photography has a story or a mood behind the picture. You just have to read behind the lines and the story will be very clear. "take off."History of Fashion Photography at In 1856, Adolphe Braun published a book containing 288
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Frank Marshall

    Frank Marshall

    Frank Wilton Marshall (born September 13, 1946) is an American film producer and director, often working in collaboration with his wife, Kathleen Kennedy. With Kennedy and Steven Spielberg, he was one of the founders of Amblin Entertainment. In 1991, he founded, with Kennedy, The Kennedy/Marshall Company, a film production company which has a contract with DreamWorks Studios. Since May 2012, with Kennedy taking on the role of co-chair at Lucasfilm, Marshall has been Kennedy/Marshall's sole principal. Marshall has consistently collaborated with directors Steven Spielberg, Peter Bogdanovich and M. Night Shyamalan. Marshall was born in Glendale, California, the son of composer Jack Marshall. His early years were spent in Van Nuys, California. In 1961, his family moved to Newport Beach, where he attended Newport Harbor High School. Marshall was active in music, drama, cross country, and track. He entered UCLA in 1964 as an engineering major, but that did not last long. Over the next 3 years, he explored many different majors, eventually graduating with a degree in Political Science. While at UCLA, he helped create its first NCAA soccer team, and played collegiate soccer there in 1966,
    8.00
    2 votes
    103

    Hugh Hudson

    Hugh Hudson (born 25 August 1936) is an English film director. His best-known international success is the 1981 multiple Academy Award-winning film, Chariots of Fire. Hudson was born in London, the second son of Jacynth (Ellerton), the second wife of Michael Donaldson-Hudson from Cheswardine in rural north Shropshire. His great-grandfather was Charles Donaldson-Hudson, a one-time member of Parliament for Newcastle under Lyme, Staffordshire. His paternal ancestors came from Scotland and Cumberland. He was sent to boarding school at the age of 6, and thereafter was educated at Eton College. He completed his National Service in the Royal Armoured Corps as a second lieutenant from the 28 January 1956, and remained as a lieutenant in the Army Reserve of Officers until he was discharged on January 16, 1960. In the 1960s, after three years of editing documentaries in Paris, Hudson headed a documentary film company with partners Robert Brownjohn and David Camell. The company produced, among others, the documentaries A for Apple, which won a Screenwriter's Guild Award, and The Tortoise and the Hare, which was nominated for a BAFTA award. The company emerged with much success in the 1960s,
    8.00
    2 votes
    104

    Irwin Winkler

    Irwin Winkler (born May 25, 1931) is an American film producer and director. He is the producer or director of 50 major motion pictures, dating back to 1967's Double Trouble, starring Elvis Presley. The fourth film he produced, They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969), starring Jane Fonda, was nominated for nine Academy Awards. In 1976, he won an Oscar for Best Picture for Rocky. As a producer, he has been nominated for Best Picture for three other films: Raging Bull, The Right Stuff, and Goodfellas. Winkler was born in New York, New York, to father Sol Winkler and mother Anna Winkler. He received a BA from New York University in 1955, after serving in the U.S. Army. In partnership with Robert Chartoff from the late 1960s, Irwin Winkler produced an impressive array of modern American gems, beginning with their first effort (along with Judd Bernard), John Boorman's taut thriller Point Blank (1967), largely ignored in its day but now regarded as a top film of the time. Adding Sydney Pollack to their production team for a one-shot-deal, they garnered critical acclaim for They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969). Their next film, The Strawberry Statement (1970), won the Jury Prize at Cannes
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Lewis Milestone

    Lewis Milestone

    Lewis Milestone (born Leib Milstein) (September 30, 1895 – September 25, 1980) was a Russian-born American motion picture director. He is known for directing Two Arabian Knights (1927) and All Quiet on the Western Front (1930), both of which received Academy Awards for Best Director. He also directed The Front Page (1931 - nomination), The General Died at Dawn (1936), Of Mice and Men (1940), Ocean's 11 (1960), and Mutiny on the Bounty (1962). Milestone was born in Kishinev, Bessarabia, Imperial Russia (now Chişinău), Moldova to a family of Jewish heritage. He came to the United States in 1912 just prior to World War I. Milestone held a number of odd jobs before enlisting in the U.S. Signal Corps, where he worked as an assistant director on Army training films during the war. In 1919 he became a naturalized citizen of the United States. After the war he went to Hollywood, where he first worked as a film cutter, and later as an assistant director. Howard Hughes promoted Milestone to director, and one of his early efforts, the 1928 film Two Arabian Knights, won him an Oscar in the first Academy Award ceremony. He also directed The Racket, an early gangster film, and later helped
    8.00
    2 votes
    106

    Ronald Neame

    Ronald Elwin Neame CBE BSC (23 April 1911 – 16 June 2010) was an English film cinematographer, producer, screenwriter and director. Neame's parents were the photographer Elwin Neame and the actress Ivy Close. He studied at the University College School and Hurstpierpoint College. His father died in 1923, and Neame took a job with the Anglo-Persian Oil Company as an office boy. Later, through his mother's contacts in the British film industry, Neame started at Elstree Studios as a messenger boy. He was fortunate enough to be hired as an assistant cameraman on Blackmail (1929), the first British talkie, directed by a young Alfred Hitchcock. Neame's own career as a cinematographer began with the musical comedy Happy (1933), and he continued to develop his skills in various "quota quickies" films for several years. His credits as cinematographer include Major Barbara (1941), In Which We Serve (1942), This Happy Breed (1944), and Blithe Spirit (1945). His camera work on One of Our Aircraft Is Missing got him an Academy Award nomination for Best Special Effects in 1943. Neame formed a production company, Cineguild, with David Lean and Anthony Havelock-Allan. During this partnership, he
    8.00
    2 votes
    107

    Billy Wilder

    Billy Wilder (22 June 1906 – 27 March 2002) was an Austrian-born American filmmaker, screenwriter, producer, artist, and journalist, whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. He is regarded as one of the most brilliant and versatile filmmakers of Hollywood's golden age. Wilder is one of only five people to have won Academy Awards as producer, director, and writer for the same film (The Apartment). Wilder became a screenwriter in the late 1920s while living in Berlin. After the rise of the Nazi Party, Wilder, who was Jewish, left for Paris, where he made his directorial debut. He relocated to Hollywood in 1933, and in 1939 he had a hit when he co-wrote the screenplay to the screwball comedy Ninotchka. Wilder established his directorial reputation after helming Double Indemnity (1944), a film noir he co-wrote with mystery novelist Raymond Chandler. Wilder earned the Best Director and Best Screenplay Academy Awards for the adaptation of a Charles R. Jackson story The Lost Weekend, about alcoholism. In 1950, Wilder co-wrote and directed the critically acclaimed Sunset Boulevard. From the mid-1950s on, Wilder made mostly comedies. Among the classics Wilder created in this
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    David Puttnam

    David Puttnam

    David Terence Puttnam, Baron Puttnam, CBE, FRSA (born 25 February 1941) is a British film producer. He sits on the Labour benches in the House of Lords, although he is not principally a politician. Puttnam was born in Southgate, London, England, the son of Marie Beatrix, a homemaker, and Leonard Arthur Puttnam, a photographer. Educated at Minchenden Grammar School in London Puttnam had an early career in advertising (see Collett Dickenson Pearce) and as agent acting for the photographer David Bailey and Brian Duffy He turned to film production in the late 1960s, working with Sanford Lieberson's production company Goodtimes Enterprises. His successes as a film producer include Bugsy Malone, Midnight Express, The Duellists (Ridley Scott's feature film debut), Chariots of Fire (which won the Academy Award for Best Picture), Local Hero, Memphis Belle, Meeting Venus and The Killing Fields and The Mission with Roland Joffé (which won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1986) mostly in association with Goldcrest. He was Chair and Chief Executive Officer of Columbia Pictures from 1986 to 1988. During his time at Columbia he was criticised for what some saw as a condescending
    9.00
    1 votes
    109

    James Ivory

    James Francis Ivory (born June 7, 1928) is an American film director, best known for the results of his long collaboration with Merchant Ivory Productions, which included both Indian-born film producer Ismail Merchant, and screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. Their films won six Academy Awards. Ivory was born in Berkeley, California, the son of Hallie Millicent (née De Loney) and Edward Patrick Ivory, a sawmill operator. He is of Irish and French descent, and grew up in Klamath Falls, Oregon. He was educated at the University of Oregon, majoring in Architecture and Fine Arts and then at the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts, where he directed the short film Four in the Morning (1953). Then he wrote, photographed, and produced Venice: Theme and Variations a half-hour documentary submitted as a thesis film for his degree in cinema at USC. The film was named by The New York Times in 1957 as one of the ten best non-theatrical films of the year. He graduated from USC in 1957. In 1961, Ivory created the film production company, Merchant Ivory Productions, with Indian-born producer Ismail Merchant and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, who served as the screenwriter for many of
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Norman Jewison

    Norman Jewison

    Norman Frederick Jewison, CC, O.Ont (born July 21, 1926) is a Canadian film director, producer, actor and founder of the Canadian Film Centre. Highlights of his directing career include In the Heat of the Night (1967), The Thomas Crown Affair (1968), Fiddler on the Roof (1971), Jesus Christ Superstar (1973), Moonstruck (1987), Other People's Money (1991), The Hurricane (1999) and The Statement (2003). Jewison has addressed important social and political issues throughout his directing and producing career, often making controversial or complicated subjects accessible to mainstream audiences. Jewison was born in Toronto, Ontario, the son of Dorothy Irene (née Weaver) and Percy Joseph Jewison, who managed a convenience store and post office. He attended Kew Beach School and Malvern Collegiate Institute, and while growing up in the 1930s displayed an aptitude for performing and theatre. Jewison was often mistaken for Jewish due to his surname, though he and his family were actually Protestant. He served in the Royal Canadian Navy (1944–1945) during World War II, and after being discharged traveled in the American South, where he encountered segregation, an experience that would
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    9.00
    1 votes
    112

    Basil Dearden

    Basil Dearden (born Basil Clive Dear; 1 January 1911 – 23 March 1971) was an English film director. Dearden was born at Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex. He graduated from theatre direction to film, working as an assistant to Basil Dean. He later changed his own name to Dearden to avoid confusion with his mentor. He first began working as a director at Ealing Studios, co-directing comedy films with Will Hay, including The Goose Steps Out (1942) and My Learned Friend (1943). He worked on the influential chiller compendium Dead of Night (1945) and directed the linking narrative and the "Hearse Driver" segment. He also directed The Captive Heart starring Michael Redgrave, a 1946 British war drama, produced by Ealing Studios. The film was entered into the 1946 Cannes Film Festival. The Blue Lamp (1950), probably the most frequently shown of Dearden's Ealing films, is a police drama which first introduced audiences to PC George Dixon, later resurrected for the long-running Dixon of Dock Green television series. His last Ealing film, Out of the Clouds, was released in 1955. In later years he became associated with the writer and producer Michael Relph, and the two men made films on subjects
    6.67
    3 votes
    113
    Robert Bresson

    Robert Bresson

    Robert Bresson (pronounced [ʁɔbɛʁ bʁɛˈsɔ̃] in French; 25 September 1901 – 18 December 1999) was a French film director known for his spiritual, ascetic style. He contributed notably to the art of film and influenced the French New Wave. He is often referred to as the most highly regarded French filmmaker after Jean Renoir. As Jean-Luc Godard said, "Robert Bresson is French cinema, as Dostoevsky is the Russian novel and Mozart is the German music." Bresson was born at Bromont-Lamothe, Puy-de-Dôme, the son of Marie-Élisabeth (née Clausels) and Léon Bresson. Little is known of his early life, and the year of his birth – 1901 or 1907 – varies depending on the source. He was educated at Lycée Lakanal in Sceaux, Hauts-de-Seine, close to Paris, and turned to painting after graduating. Three formative influences in his early life seem to have a mark on his films - Catholicism, art and his experiences as a prisoner of war. On his beliefs, Bresson had called himself a "Christian atheist". Initially also a photographer, Bresson made his first short film, Les affaires publiques (Public Affairs) in 1934. During World War II, he spent over a year in a prisoner-of-war camp - an experience which
    6.67
    3 votes
    114
    Ross Katz

    Ross Katz

    Ross Katz (born May 19, 1971 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a Jewish American film producer, screenwriter and film director. Prior to becoming a producer, Katz was a commercial rock DJ on 94 WYSP FM in Philadelphia. He got his start in movies working as a grip on Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs, then interned at Good Machine eventually becoming Ted Hope's assistant. It was Hope who encouraged Katz to try his hand at producing. His first effort was Jim Fall's Trick. The film was one of the early independents to explore homosexual cinema treated as romantic comedy. Next he co-executive produced, along with Ted Hope & Anne Carey, an HBO television mini-series of Moisés Kaufman's play The Laramie Project. The mini-series version of The Laramie Project was adapted by Kaufman and members of New York's Tectonic Theater Project who went to Laramie, Wyoming after the murder of Matthew Shepard. The piece is based on more than 200 interviews they conducted while there. It follows and in some cases re-enacts the chronology of Shepherd's visit to a local bar, his kidnap and beating, the discovery of him tied to a fence, the vigil at the hospital, his death and funeral, and the trial of
    6.67
    3 votes
    115

    Steve Golin

    Steve Golin (born March 6, 1955) is the founder and CEO of Anonymous Content LLP, a multimedia development, production and talent management company and co-founder and former CEO of Propaganda Films. Golin and partner Joni Sighvatsson launched Propaganda Films, a talent management and advertising and video-production company, in 1986. They built Propaganda into the largest music video and commercial production company in the world, winning more MTV Video Awards and Cannes Palme d'Or Awards than any other company and quickly became a home for the most sought-after young music video and commercial directors. One of its first discoveries was David Fincher, then an unknown video director. Not long afterward, a young filmmaker showed up with a reel containing a Donny Osmond video and a spec Coke commercial. Golin watched the clips and told Michael Bay, "Nice to meet you. You're hired." After seeing a couple of skateboard videos he liked, Golin brought Spike Jonze into the fold. Other discoveries included Antoine Fuqua, Gore Verbinski, and Alex Proyas. Golin and Sighvatsson sold the company to Polygram. But when Polygram was sold to Seagram in 1998, Golin lost control of the company and
    6.67
    3 votes
    116

    Andrew Niccol

    Andrew M. Niccol (born 10 June 1964) is a New Zealand screenwriter, producer, and director. He wrote and directed Gattaca, S1m0ne, In Time, and Lord of War. He also wrote and co-produced The Truman Show, which earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay in 1999 and won a BAFTA award for Best Screenplay. Many of his films, such as Gattaca, S1m0ne, and The Truman Show, view societal or political issues through a fantasy-science fiction lens. Lord of War, however, is a contemporary, matter-of-fact exploration of gunrunning. Niccol was born in Paraparaumu, New Zealand, and grew up in Auckland, where he attended Auckland Grammar School. He left New Zealand at age 21 and began directing TV ads in London. During production of S1m0ne, he met model Rachel Roberts, with whom he has two children, Jack (born 2003) and Ava (born 2008).
    7.50
    2 votes
    117

    Barry Mendel

    Barry Mendel is a film producer. The first film he produced was Rushmore, directed by Wes Anderson which won IFP Independent Spirit Awards for Best Director Anderson and Best Supporting Actor Bill Murray. This was followed by The Sixth Sense, directed by M. Night Shyamalan, which was nominated for 6 Academy Awards including Best Picture. Subsequently, he produced its follow-up, Unbreakable, then went back to work with Wes Anderson on the The Royal Tenenbaums, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for writers Anderson and Owen Wilson. This collaboration continued on The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, which was followed by Joss Whedon's directorial debut, the critically acclaimed Serenity. Mendel conceived and spent eight years putting together Munich, which was directed by Steven Spielberg and was nominated for 5 Academy Awards including Best Picture. He then went back to work with Shyamalan, producing the box-office hit The Happening. Next, Mendel produced Judd Apatow's film Funny People starring Adam Sandler, Seth Rogen, Leslie Mann, Jonah Hill, Eric Bana and Jason Schwartzman. Mendel also produced Drew Barrymore's debut as a feature director, the
    7.50
    2 votes
    118

    Bernardo Bertolucci

    Bernardo Bertolucci (Italian pronunciation: [berˈnardo bertoˈluttʃi]; born 16 March 1941) is an Italian film director and screenwriter, whose films include The Conformist, Last Tango in Paris, 1900, The Last Emperor, The Sheltering Sky and The Dreamers. In recognition of his work, he was presented with the inaugural Honorary Palme d'Or Award at the opening ceremony of the 2011 Cannes Film Festival. Bertolucci was born in the Italian city of Parma, in the region of Emilia-Romagna. He is the elder son of Ninetta, a teacher, and Attilio Bertolucci, who was a poet, a reputed art historian, anthologist and film critic. Having been raised in such an environment, Bertolucci began writing at the age of fifteen, and soon after received several prestigious literary prizes including the Premio Viareggio for his first book. His father's background helped his career: the elder Bertolucci had helped the Italian filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini publish his first novel, and Pasolini reciprocated by hiring Bertolucci as first assistant in Rome on Accattone (1961), where he met his first wife, Adriana Asti. Bertolucci has one brother, the theatre director and playwright Giuseppe (b. 27 February 1947).
    7.50
    2 votes
    119
    Brian Grazer

    Brian Grazer

    Brian Thomas Grazer (born July 12, 1951) is an American film and television producer who co-founded Imagine Entertainment in 1986 with Ron Howard. Together, they have produced many films, including Apollo 13 (1995) and A Beautiful Mind (2001). Grazer began his career as a producer developing television projects. While executive-producing TV pilots at Paramount Pictures in the early 1980s, Grazer met current long-time friend and business partner Ron Howard. He produced his first feature-film, Night Shift, in 1982, directed by Howard. Grazer and Howard teamed up again for Splash in 1984, which Grazer produced and co-wrote, the latter earning him an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay of 1984. In 1986, Grazer and Howard co-founded Imagine Entertainment, which continues to be one of Hollywood's most prolific and successful production companies. Over the years, Grazer’s films and TV shows have been nominated for a total of 43 Academy Awards and 131 Emmys. At the same time, his movies have generated more than $13.5 billion in worldwide theatrical, music and video grosses. Grazer’s early film successes include Parenthood (1989) and Backdraft (1991). He produced Apollo 13 (1995),
    7.50
    2 votes
    120

    Bruce Beresford

    Bruce Beresford (born 16 August 1940) is an Australian film director who has made more than 30 feature films over a 40-year career. Beresford was born in Paddington, Sydney, the son of Lona (née Warr) and Leslie Beresford, who sold electrical goods. He grew up in the then outer-western suburb of Toongabbie, and went to The King's School, Parramatta. He made several short films in his teens. He completed a bachelor's degree in humanities majoring in English at the University of Sydney, and then moved to England in 1962 in search of film work. He could not break into the British film scene, so he answered an advertisement for an editing job in Nigeria, where he worked for two years, in Enugu. He then returned to England and worked for the British Film Institute as a producer of short films by first-time directors. Beresford returned to Australia in 1970 to make his first feature film, The Adventures of Barry McKenzie, and spent the next 10 years working in Australia's developing film industry. He established his reputation as one of Australia's best directors with a series of notable films in the 1970s, including Don's Party, The Getting of Wisdom, The Club and Breaker
    7.50
    2 votes
    121

    Charles Crichton

    Charles Crichton (6 August 1910 in Wallasey, Merseyside – 14 September 1999 in South Kensington, London) was an English film director and film editor. He became best known for directing comedies produced at Ealing Studios. Crichton enjoyed an extremely long career, editing and directing many films and television programmes over a period exceeding 40 years. Crichton gained two Academy Award nominations for A Fish Called Wanda; one for Best Director and the second for Best Original Screenplay (which is shared with John Cleese).
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    7.50
    2 votes
    123

    David Parfitt

    David Parfitt (born 8 July 1958) is a film producer and actor. He won the Academy Award for Best Picture in 1998 for Shakespeare in Love. Parfitt was born in Sunderland. He was awarded a Honorary Doctorate of Arts from the University of Sunderland in 1999, retains strong links with his home city and is a supporter of Sunderland AFC. He vociferously endorses the city of Sunderland wherever he goes. He played Peter Harrison in the sitcoms ...And Mother Makes Three and its sequel ...And Mother Makes Five. He played the original Tim Beecham, an old friend of Nigel Pargetter in the BBC Radio 4 serial The Archers. Tim was a 'Hooray Henry' and was known for persistently failing his law exams. Parfitt began his stage career with Sunderland Empire Theatre Society in 1969 but he gave up acting in the late-1980's to concentrate on production, and has been working as an independent film producer for the past 25 years and is, at present, living in Brixton with his wife Liz Parfitt and his three children Bill, Thomas and Max Parfitt. He was Chairman of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) (2008-2010)and has produced (or associate produced) many British films including Henry V,
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Edward Dmytryk

    Edward Dmytryk

    Edward Dmytryk (September 4, 1908 – July 1, 1999) was an American film director of Ukrainian origins who was amongst the Hollywood Ten, a group of blacklisted film industry professionals who served time in prison for being in contempt of Congress during the McCarthy-era 'red scare'. Dmytryk was born in Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada, the son of Ukrainian parents. He grew up in San Francisco when his family moved to the United States. After his mother died, his father, Michael Dmytryk, remarried. At the age of 31, Dmytryk became a naturalized citizen. Dmytryk made his directorial debut with The Hawk in 1935. His best known films from the pre-McCarthy period of his career were film noirs Crossfire, for which he received a Best Director Oscar nomination, and Murder, My Sweet, the latter an adaptation of Raymond Chandler's Farewell My Lovely. In addition, he made two World War II films: Hitler's Children, the story of the Hitler youth and Back to Bataan starring John Wayne. The late 1940s was the time of the Second Red Scare, and Dmytryk was one of many filmmakers investigated. Summoned to appear before the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC), he refused to
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    François Truffaut

    François Truffaut

    François Roland Truffaut (6 February 1932 – 21 October 1984) was an influential filmmaker and film critic, one of the founders of the French New Wave. In a film career lasting over a quarter of a century, he remains an icon of the French film industry. He was also a screenwriter, producer, and actor, working on over twenty-five films. Truffaut was born in Paris on 6 February 1932. His mother was Janine de Montferrand. His mother's future husband, Roland Truffaut, accepted him as an adopted son and gave him his surname. He was passed around to live with various nannies and his grandmother for a number of years. It was his grandmother who instilled in him her love of books and music. He lived with his grandmother until her death when Truffaut was ten years old. It was only after his grandmother's death that he lived with his parents for the first time. The identity of Truffaut's biological father was unknown, though a private detective agency in 1968 revealed that their enquiry into the matter led to a Roland Levy, a Jewish dentist from Bayonne. Truffaut's mother's family disputed the findings but Truffaut himself believed and embraced them. Truffaut would often stay with friends and
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Jason Reitman

    Jason Reitman

    Jason Reitman (born October 19, 1977) is a Canadian/American film director, screenwriter, and producer, best known for directing the films Thank You for Smoking (2005), Juno (2007), Up in the Air (2009), and Young Adult (2011). As of February 2, 2010, he has received four Academy Award nominations, two of which are for Best Director. Reitman is a dual citizen of Canada and the United States. Reitman was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, the son of Geneviève Robert, an actress sometimes billed as Geneviève Deloir, and comedy director Ivan Reitman. He has two younger sisters, Catherine, an actress, and Caroline. His father is Jewish and was born in Czechoslovakia to Holocaust survivors, and his mother is Christian and of French-Canadian descent. When he was still a child, his family moved to Los Angeles. His father, Ivan, directed the successful films Ghostbusters, Stripes, and Kindergarten Cop. Jason described his childhood self as "a loser... a movie geek... [and] shy." In the late 1980s, Reitman began appearing in small acting parts and serving as a production assistant on his father's films. He spent time in the editing rooms of his father's movies, learning the process.
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    John Boorman

    John Boorman

    John Boorman (born 18 January 1933) is a British filmmaker who is a longtime resident of Ireland and is best known for his feature films such as Point Blank, Deliverance, Zardoz, Excalibur, The Emerald Forest, Hope and Glory, The General and The Tailor of Panama. Boorman was born in Shepperton, Surrey, England, the son of Ivy (née Chapman) and George Boorman. He was educated at the Salesian School in Chertsey, Surrey, even though his family was not Roman Catholic. He has directed a total of 22 movies. Boorman first began by working as a drycleaner and journalist in the late 1950s. He ran the newsrooms at Southern Television in Southampton and Dover before moving into TV documentary filmmaking, eventually becoming the head of the BBC's Bristol-based Documentary Unit in 1962. Capturing the interest of producer David Deutsch, he was offered the chance to direct a film aimed at repeating the success of A Hard Day's Night (directed by Richard Lester in 1964): Catch Us If You Can (1965) is about competing pop group Dave Clark Five. While not as successful commercially as Lester's film, it drew good reviews from distinguished critics such as Pauline Kael and Dilys Powell and smoothed
    7.50
    2 votes
    128

    Just Betzer

    Just Betzer (June 11, 1944 - November 6, 2003) is a Danish Oscar winning producer. Born in Åbyhøj, Denmark. Betzer began his career managing the candy concession and as an alternate projectionist at his father's theater in Aarhus, Denmark, in 1955. In 1960, Betzer founded Panorama Film production/distribution company in Denmark, which has since made over 30 feature films. He later opened a chain of 13 theaters throughout Denmark. In 1985, Betzer moved to England, and started the London based Panorama Film International company with offices in Copenhagen, Denmark and Los Angeles, USA. In 1987, the film Babette's Feast, produced by Betzer, was released. It went on to win Betzer the Best Foreign Film Oscar, and the BAFTA Best Foreign Film award, in 1988. Two years later, he opened the Los Angeles based production company, Just Betzer Films. His other films include Winterborn, Assassination, And You Thought Your Parents Were Weird, Nobody’s Perfect, The Misfit Brigade and the erotic The Girl in a Swing, with Meg Tilly. Betzer died of a heart attack at age 59 on November 6, 2003, in Lumsaas, Denmark.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    Luchino Visconti

    Luchino Visconti di Modrone, Count of Lonate Pozzolo (2 November 1906 - 17 March 1976), was an Italian theatre, opera and cinema director, as well as a screenwriter. He is best known for his films The Leopard (1963) and Death in Venice (1971). One of seven children, Visconti was born in Milan into a noble and wealthy family, one of the region's richest. His father Giuseppe Visconti di Modrone was the Duke of Grazzano and Count of Lonate Pozzolo. In his early years he was exposed to art, music and theatre, and met the composer Giacomo Puccini, the conductor Arturo Toscanini and the writer Gabriele d'Annunzio. During World War II Visconti joined the Italian Communist Party. Visconti made no secret of his homosexuality. His last partner was the Austrian actor Helmut Berger, who played Martin in Visconti's film The Damned. Berger also appeared in Visconti's Ludwig in 1972 and Conversation Piece in 1974 along with Burt Lancaster. Other lovers included Franco Zeffirelli, who also worked as part of the crew in production design, as assistant director, and other roles in a number of Visconti's films and theatrical productions. He died in Rome of a stroke at age 69. There is a museum
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Peter Weir

    Peter Weir

    Peter Lindsay Weir, AM (born 21 August 1944) is an Australian film director. After playing a leading role in the Australian New Wave cinema with his films such as Picnic at Hanging Rock, The Last Wave and Gallipoli, Weir directed a diverse group of American and international films—many of them major box office hits—including the Academy Award nominees Witness, Dead Poets Society, Green Card, The Truman Show and Master and Commander. Weir was born in Sydney, the son of Peggy (née Barnsley) and Lindsay Weir, a real estate agent. Weir attended The Scots College and Vaucluse Boys' High School before studying arts and law at the University of Sydney. His interest in film was sparked by his meeting with fellow students, including Phillip Noyce and the future members of the Sydney filmmaking collective Ubu Films. After leaving university in the mid-1960s he joined Sydney television station ATN-7, where he worked as a production assistant on the groundbreaking satirical comedy program The Mavis Bramston Show. During this period, using station facilities, he made his first two experimental short films, Count Vim's Last Exercise and The Life and Flight of Reverend Buckshotte. Weir then took
    5.50
    4 votes
    131

    Bryan Forbes

    Bryan Forbes, CBE is an English film director, actor and writer. Bryan Forbes was born John Theobald Clarke on 22 July 1926 in Queen Mary's Hospital, Stratford, West Ham, Essex), and grew up at 43 Cranmer Road, Forest Gate, West Ham, Essex. Forbes trained as an actor at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts but did not complete his studies. After military service from 1945 to 1948, he played numerous supporting roles in British films including in 1955 The Colditz Story, alongside John Mills, as well as appearing on the stage, but was obliged to change his name by British Equity to avoid confusion with the adolescent actor John Clark. He began also to write for the screen, receiving his first full credit for The Cockleshell Heroes in 1955. Another noted screenplay of his from this period was for The League of Gentlemen in 1959, in which he also acted. He formed a production company with his frequent collaborator Richard Attenborough in 1959 (Beaver Films), which went on to make The Angry Silence in 1960, a screenplay by Forbes in which Attenborough took the lead role, and both shared production responsibilities. In 1961 he made his directorial debut Whistle Down the Wind, again
    6.33
    3 votes
    132

    Gerald R. Molen

    Gerald Robert Molen (born January 6, 1935) is an American film producer. He has worked closely with Steven Spielberg, having produced five of his films, and won an Academy Award for co-producing Schindler's List. Molen is now semi-retired and spends his time alternating between Montana and Las Vegas, Nevada. Molen was born in Great Falls, Montana, the son of Edith Lorraine (née Meyer) and Gerald Richard Molen. He grew up in North Hollywood, California, after moving from Montana, with a number of younger brothers and sisters. His mother ran a diner, "The Blue Onion", which was located across from one of the major studios. Molen got his start in the movie business by changing tires on studio trucks. Molen has appeared in cameos in several of the films he produced, including Rain Man, Days of Thunder, and Jurassic Park. The name 'Molen' can be seen painted on the front of a large black cauldron in the movie Hook as the camera pans across the pirate docks in Neverland. Molen produced a documentary film critical of Obama, 2016: Obama's America, during the 2012 presidential campaign. In 2012 Molen was prohibited from speaking to high school students in Montana by the principal who
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Jean Delannoy

    Jean Delannoy

    Jean Delannoy (12 January 1908 – 18 June 2008) was a French actor, film editor, screenwriter and film director. Although Delannoy was born in a Paris suburb, his family is from Haute-Normandie in the north of France. He was a Protestant, a descendant of Huguenots, some of whom fled the country during the French Wars of Religion first to settle in Wallonia then, after their name became De la Noye and then Delano, were on the second ship to emigrate to Plymouth, Massachusetts in America. Jean Delannoy was a student in Paris when he began acting in silent films. He eventually landed a job with Paramount Studios Parisian facilities, working his way up to head film editor. In 1934 he directed his first film and went on to a long career, both writing and directing. In 1946, his film about a Protestant minister titled La symphonie pastorale was awarded the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. In 1960, his film, Maigret tend un piège was nominated for a BAFTA award for "Best Film from any Source." In recognition of his long service to the French motion picture industry, in 1986 Jean Delannoy was given an Honorary César Award. Delannoy died of old age on 18 June 2008, at the age of 100.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134

    Ken Russell

    Henry Kenneth Alfred "Ken" Russell (3 July 1927 – 27 November 2011) was an English film director, known for his pioneering work in television and film and for his flamboyant and controversial style. He attracted criticism as being obsessed with sexuality and the church. His films often dealt with the lives of famous composers or were based on other works of art which he adapted loosely. Russell began directing for the BBC, where he made creative adaptations of composers' lives which were unusual for the time. He also directed many feature films independently and for studios. He is best known for his Oscar-winning film Women in Love (1969), The Devils (1971), The Who's Tommy (1975), and the science fiction film Altered States (1980). Classical musicians and conductors held him in high regard for his story-driven biopics of various composers, most famously Elgar, Delius, Liszt, Mahler and Tchaikovsky. British film critic Mark Kermode speaking in 2006, and attempting to sum up the director's achievement, called Russell, "somebody who proved that British cinema didn't have to be about kitchen-sink realism—it could be every bit as flamboyant as Fellini. Later in his life he turned to
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Martin Scorsese

    Martin Scorsese

    Martin Charles Scorsese ( /skɔrˈsɛsɛ/; born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, actor, and film historian. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest directors of all time. In 1990 he founded The Film Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to film preservation, and in 2007 he founded the World Cinema Foundation. He is a recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award for his contributions to the cinema, and has won an Academy Award, a Palme d'Or, Grammy Award, Emmys, Golden Globes, BAFTAs, and DGA Awards. Scorsese's body of work addresses such themes as Italian American identity, Roman Catholic concepts of guilt and redemption, machismo, modern crime, and violence. Scorsese is hailed as one of the most significant and influential filmmakers of all time, directing landmark films such as Mean Streets (1973), Taxi Driver (1976), Raging Bull (1980), and Goodfellas (1990) – all of which he collaborated on with actor and close friend Robert De Niro. He won the Academy Award for Best Director for The Departed (2006), having been nominated a previous six times. Martin Scorsese grew up in New York City. His father, Charles Scorsese (1913–1993),
    6.33
    3 votes
    136

    Bob Fosse

    Robert Louis “Bob” Fosse (June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987) was an American actor, dancer, musical theater choreographer, director, screenwriter, film editor and film director. He won an unprecedented eight Tony Awards for choreography, as well as one for direction. He was nominated for an Academy Award four times, winning for his direction of Cabaret (beating Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather). His third wife, Broadway legend Gwen Verdon, helped to define and perfect his unique and distinct style simply referred to today as "Fosse." Fosse was born in Chicago, Illinois, to a Norwegian American father, Cyril K. Fosse, and Irish-born mother, Sara Alice (Stanton), the second youngest of six . He teamed up with Charles Grass, another young dancer, and began a collaboration under the name The Riff Brothers. They toured theatres throughout the Chicago area. After being recruited, Fosse was placed in the variety show Tough Situation, which toured military and naval bases in the Pacific. Fosse moved to New York with the ambition of being the new Fred Astaire. His appearance with his first wife and dance partner Mary Ann Niles (1923–1987) in Call Me Mister brought him to the
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Charlie Chaplin

    Charlie Chaplin

    Sir Charles Spencer "Charlie" Chaplin, KBE (16 April 1889 – 25 December 1977) was an English comic actor, film director and composer best known for his work in the United States during the silent film era. He became the most famous film star in the world before the end of World War I. Chaplin used mime, slapstick and other visual comedy routines, and continued well into the era of the talkies, though his films decreased in frequency from the end of the 1920s. His most famous role was that of The Tramp, which he first played in the Keystone comedy Kid Auto Races at Venice in 1914. From the April 1914 one-reeler Twenty Minutes of Love onwards he was writing and directing most of his films, by 1916 he was also producing them, and from 1918 he was even composing the music for them. With Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and D. W. Griffith, he co-founded United Artists in 1919. Chaplin was one of the most creative and influential personalities of the silent-film era. He was influenced by his predecessor, the French silent film comedian Max Linder, to whom he dedicated one of his films. His working life in entertainment spanned over 75 years, from the Victorian stage and the music hall in
    8.00
    1 votes
    138

    Don Siegel

    Donald Siegel (October 26, 1912 – April 20, 1991) was an American film director and producer. His name variously appeared in the credits of his films as both Don Siegel and Donald Siegel. He was best known for the original Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) and five films with Clint Eastwood, including Dirty Harry (1971) and Escape from Alcatraz (1979). Born in Chicago, with Jewish origins, he attended schools in New York and later graduated from Jesus College, Cambridge in England. For a short time he studied at Beaux Arts in Paris, France, but left at age 20 and later made his way to Los Angeles. Siegel found work in the Warner Bros. film library after meeting producer Hal Wallis, and later rose to head of the Montage Department, where he directed thousands of montages, including the opening montage for Casablanca. In 1945 two shorts he directed, Hitler Lives? and Star in the Night, won Academy Awards, which launched his career as a feature director. He directed whatever material came his way, often transcending the limitations of budget and script to produce interesting and adept works. He made the original Invasion of the Body Snatchers in 1956. He directed two episodes of
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    George Lucas

    George Lucas

    George Walton Lucas, Jr. (born May 14, 1944) is an American film producer, screenwriter, director, and entrepreneur. He is the founder, chairman and chief executive of Lucasfilm. He is best known as the creator of the space opera franchise Star Wars and the archaeologist-adventurer character Indiana Jones. Lucas is one of the American film industry's most financially successful directors/producers, with an estimated net worth of $3.3 billion as of 2012. George Lucas was born in Modesto, California, the son of Dorothy Ellinore (née Bomberger) and George Walton Lucas, Sr. (1913–1991), who owned a stationery store. Lucas grew up in the Central Valley town of Modesto, and his early passion for cars and motor racing would eventually serve as inspiration for his USC student film 1:42.08, as well as his Oscar-nominated low-budget phenomenon, American Graffiti. Long before Lucas became obsessed with film making, he wanted to be a race-car driver, and he spent most of his high school years racing on the underground circuit at fairgrounds and hanging out at garages. On June 12, 1962, while driving his souped-up Autobianchi Bianchina, another driver broadsided him, flipping over his car, and
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Gian Carlo Menotti

    Gian Carlo Menotti

    Gian Carlo Menotti (pronounced [dʒan ˈkarlo meˈnɔtːi]) (July 7, 1911 – February 1, 2007) was an Italian-American composer and librettist. Although he often referred to himself as an American composer, he kept his Italian citizenship. He wrote the classic Christmas opera, Amahl and the Night Visitors, among about two dozen other operas intended to appeal to popular taste. He won the Pulitzer Prize for two of them: The Consul (1950) and The Saint of Bleecker Street (1955). He founded the noted Festival dei Due Mondi (Festival of the Two Worlds) in 1958 and its American counterpart, Spoleto Festival USA, in 1977. In 1986 he commenced a Melbourne Spoleto Festival in Australia, but he withdrew after three years. Born in Cadegliano-Viconago, Italy, near Lake Maggiore and the Swiss border, Menotti was the sixth of eight children of Alfonso and Ines Menotti, his father being a coffee merchant. Menotti began writing songs when he was seven years old, and at eleven wrote both the libretto and music for his first opera, The Death of Pierrot. He began his formal musical training at the Milan Conservatory in 1923. Following her husband's death, Ines Menotti went to Colombia in a futile attempt
    8.00
    1 votes
    141

    Michael Cacoyannis

    Michael Cacoyannis (Greek: Μιχάλης Κακογιάννης; 11 June 1922 – 25 July 2011) was a prominent Greek Cypriot filmmaker from Cyprus, best known for his 1964 film Zorba the Greek. He directed the 1983 Broadway revival of the musical based on the film. Much of his work was rooted in classical texts, especially those of the Greek tragedian Euripides. He was nominated for an Academy Award five times, a record for any Greek Cypriot film artist. He received Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Film nominations for Zorba the Greek, and two nominations in the Foreign Language Film category for Electra and Iphigenia. Michalis (or Mikhalis) Kakogiannis was born in 1922 in Limassol, Cyprus as Μιχάλης Κακογιάννης. In 1939, he was sent by his father, Sir Panayotis Loizou Cacoyannis, to London to become a lawyer. However, after producing Greek-language programs for the BBC World Service during World War II, He ended up at the Old Vic school, and enjoyed a brief stage career there under the name Michael Yannis before he began working on films. After having trouble finding a directing job in the British film industry, Cacoyannis moved to Greece, and in 1953 he made his first film, Windfall
    8.00
    1 votes
    142

    Alessandro Blasetti

    Alessandro Blasetti (3 July 1900 – 1 February 1987) was an Italian film director who influenced Italian neorealism with the film Quattro passi fra le nuvole. He played himself in Luchino Visconti's film Bellissima starred by Anna Magnani, a Roman mother who desires to make her daughter a filmstar in Cinecittà where Blasetti makes the screen test for the child actors. Blasetti was born in Rome, where he also died. He was President of the Jury at the 1967 Cannes Film Festival.
    7.00
    2 votes
    143
    Alfred Hitchcock

    Alfred Hitchcock

    Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, KBE (13 August 1899 – 29 April 1980) was an English film director and producer. He pioneered many techniques in the suspense and psychological thriller genres. After a successful career in British cinema in both silent films and early talkies, billed as England's best director, Hitchcock moved to Hollywood. Over a career spanning more than half a century, Hitchcock fashioned for himself a distinctive and recognisable directorial style. He pioneered the use of a camera made to move in a way that mimics a person's gaze, forcing viewers to engage in a form of voyeurism. He framed shots to maximise anxiety, fear, or empathy, and used innovative film editing. His stories frequently feature fugitives on the run from the law alongside "icy blonde" female characters. Many of Hitchcock's films have twist endings and thrilling plots featuring depictions of violence, murder, and crime, although many of the mysteries function as decoys or "MacGuffins" meant only to serve thematic elements in the film and the psychological examinations of the characters. Hitchcock's films also borrow many themes from psychoanalysis and feature strong sexual undertones. Through his
    7.00
    2 votes
    144

    Delbert Mann

    Delbert Martin Mann, Jr. (January 30, 1920 – November 11, 2007) was an American television and film director. He won the Palme d'Or (Golden Palm) at the Cannes Film Festival and the Academy Award for Best Director for the film Marty. It was the first Best Picture winner to be based on a television program, being adapted from a 1953 teleplay of the same name which he had also directed. Mann is also the only director other than Billy Wilder and Roman Polanski to win an Oscar for his direction and a Cannes Palme d'Or for the same film. From 1967 to 1971, he was president of the Directors Guild of America. Mann was born in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas, the son of Ora (née Patton), a civic worker and teacher, and Delbert Martin Mann, Sr., a college professor. Mann graduated from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. After school, he served with the U.S. Army Air Forces in WW II, as a combat pilot of a B-24 Liberator of the 467th Bomb Group of the Eighth Air Force in England. After his discharge he attended Yale Drama School, and graduated, followed by work in theater and eventually, TV and movies. He was married to Ann Caroline Mann from 1941 until his wife's death in 2001.
    7.00
    2 votes
    145

    J. Lee Thompson

    John Lee Thompson (1 August 1914 – 30 August 2002), better known as J. Lee Thompson, was an English film director, active in England and Hollywood. Thompson was born in Bristol, England to a theatrical family. After studying at Dover College, he briefly appeared on the stage and wrote crime plays in his spare time. Thompson first drew critical notice when his play Double Error was staged on the West End of London in 1935, upon which he was hired as a scriptwriter for British International Pictures, acquirer of the play's film rights. During this initial BIP stint, Thompson made his only film appearance in the Carol Reed-directed Midshipman Easy (1935) and worked as a dialogue coach for Alfred Hitchcock's production of Jamaica Inn (1939). The small-framed Englishman was occupied during World War II as a tailgunner and wireless operator for the Royal Air Force. He eventually returned to his scriptwriting duties at the Associated British Picture Corporation, a successor of BIP, in 1950. That year, Thompson was given his first film direction opportunity, Murder Without Crime. Murder Without Crime was mostly ignored upon release. Thompson's first movie success was one he directed and
    7.00
    2 votes
    146

    Jacques Becker

    Jacques Becker (15 September 1906 – 21 February 1960) was a French screenwriter and film director. Becker was born in Paris, in an upper-class background. During the 1930s he worked as an assistant to director Jean Renoir during his peak period, which produced such cinematic masterpieces as Grand Illusion and The Rules of the Game. Part of the Comité de libération du cinéma français, during the German occupation of France in World War II, the Nazis held him in prison for a year. During the occupation he also became a director in his own right and went on to direct the brilliant period romance Casque d'or, the influential gangster film Touchez pas au grisbi, and the masterful prison escape drama Le Trou. Long underrated, Becker is now regarded as one of the masters of French cinema. He married actress Françoise Fabian. Their son Jean Becker also became a film director. Becker died at the age of fifty-three in 1960 and was interred in the Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Jean Renoir

    Jean Renoir

    Jean Renoir (French: [ʁənwaʁ]; 15 September 1894 – 12 February 1979) was a French film director, screenwriter, actor, producer and author. As a film director and actor, he made more than forty films from the silent era to the end of the 1960s. His pictures Grand Illusion (1937) and The Rules of the Game (1939) are often cited by critics as among the greatest films ever made. As an author, he wrote the definitive biography of his father, the painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Renoir, My Father (1962). Jean Renoir was ranked by the BFI's Sight & Sound poll of critics as the fourth greatest director of all time. Renoir was born in the Montmartre district of Paris, France. He was the second son of Aline (née Charigot) and the French painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir. His elder brother was actor Pierre Renoir, while his younger brother Claude Renoir (1901-69) produced some of his films. Another Claude Renoir (1913/14-93), the son of Pierre, was a cinematographer who worked on some of some of his uncle's films. As a child, Renoir moved to the south of France with his family who were all the subjects of Pierre-Auguste's paintings. His father's financial success ensured that the young Renoir was
    7.00
    2 votes
    148

    John G. Avildsen

    John Guilbert Avildsen (born December 21, 1935) is an Academy Award winning American film director. Avildsen was born in Oak Park, Illinois, the son of Ivy (née Guilbert) and Clarence John Avildsen. After starting out as an assistant director on films by Arthur Penn and Otto Preminger, John Avildsen received his first success with the low budget feature Joe (1970) which received critical acclaim for star Peter Boyle and moderate box office business. This was followed by another critical success, Save the Tiger (1973), that was nominated for three Oscars, winning Best Actor for star Jack Lemmon. Avildsen's greatest success was Rocky (1976), garnering ten Academy Award nominations and winning three, including Best Picture and Best Director. He later directed what was expected to be the series' final installment, Rocky V (1990). His other films include Cry Uncle! (1970), Neighbors (1981), The Karate Kid (1984) The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), Lean on Me (1989), and 8 Seconds (1994). Avildsen was the original director for both Serpico (1973) and Saturday Night Fever (1977), but was fired over disputes with producers Martin Bregman and Robert Stigwood,
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Joshua Logan

    Joshua Logan

    Joshua Lockwood Logan III (October 5, 1908 – July 12, 1988) was an American stage and film director and writer. Logan was born in Texarkana, Texas, the son of Susan (née Nabors) and Joshua Lockwood Logan. When he was three years old his father committed suicide. Logan, his mother, and younger sister, Mary Lee, then moved to his maternal grandparents’ home in Mansfield, Louisiana, which Logan used forty years later as the setting for his play The Wisteria Trees. Logan's mother remarried six years after his father's death and he then attended Culver Military Academy in Culver, Indiana, where his stepfather served on the staff. At school, he experienced his first drama class and felt at home. After his high school graduation he attended Princeton University. At Princeton, he was involved with the intercollegiate summer stock company, known as the University Players, with fellow student James Stewart and also non-student Henry Fonda. During his senior year he served as president of the Princeton Triangle Club. Before his graduation he won a scholarship to study in Moscow with Constantin Stanislavsky, and Logan left school without a diploma. Logan began his Broadway career as an actor
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Kathryn Bigelow

    Kathryn Bigelow

    Kathryn Ann Bigelow (born November 27, 1951) is an American film director, film producer, screenwriter and television director. Her films include Near Dark (1987), Point Break (1991), Strange Days (1995), The Weight of Water (2000), and The Hurt Locker (2008). The Hurt Locker won the 2009 Academy Award for Best Picture, won the BAFTA Award for Best Film, and was nominated for the 2010 Golden Globe Award for Best Drama. With The Hurt Locker, Bigelow became the first woman to win the Academy Award for Best Director, the Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directing, the BAFTA Award for Best Direction, and the Critics' Choice Award for Best Director. She also became the first woman to win the Saturn Award for Best Director in 1995 for Strange Days. In April 2010, Bigelow was named to the Time 100 list of most influential people of the year. Bigelow was born in San Carlos, California, the only child of Ronald Elliot Bigelow (1915-1992), who was a paint factory manager, and Gertude Kathryn Larson (1917-1994), who was a librarian. Her early creative endeavors were as a student of painting. She enrolled at San Francisco Art Institute in the fall of 1970 and received her
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Panoramic photography

    Panoramic photography

    Panoramic photography is a technique of photography, using specialized equipment or software, that captures images with elongated fields of view. It is sometimes known as wide format photography. The term has also been applied to a photograph that is cropped to a relatively wide aspect ratio. While there is no formal division between "wide-angle" and "panoramic" photography, "wide-angle" normally refers to a type of lens, but using this lens type does not necessarily make an image a panorama. An image made with an ultra wide-angle fisheye lens covering the normal film frame of 1:1.33 is not automatically considered to be a panorama. An image showing a field of view approximating, or greater than, that of the human eye – about 160° by 75° – may be termed panoramic. This generally means it has an aspect ratio of 2:1 or larger, the image being at least twice as wide as it is high. The resulting images take the form of a wide strip. Some panoramic images have aspect ratios of 4:1 and sometimes 10:1, covering fields of view of up to 360 degrees. Both the aspect ratio and coverage of field are important factors in defining a true panoramic image. Photo-finishers and manufacturers of
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Sydney Pollack

    Sydney Pollack

    Sydney Irwin Pollack (July 1, 1934 – May 26, 2008) was an American film director, producer and actor. Pollack studied with Sanford Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York City, where he later taught acting. He began directing television shows in the 1960s before moving to films. Pollack directed more than 21 films and 10 television shows, acted in over 30 films or shows, and produced over 44 films. Some of his best known works include Jeremiah Johnson (1972), The Way We Were (1973), Three Days of the Condor (1975) and Absence of Malice (1981). His 1985 film Out of Africa won him Academy Awards for directing and producing; he was also nominated for Best Director Oscars for They Shoot Horses, Don't They? and Tootsie, in the latter of which he also appeared. His later films included Havana (1990), The Firm (1993), Sabrina (1995), The Interpreter (2005), and as producer for and actor in Michael Clayton (2007). Sydney Pollack was born in Lafayette, Indiana, to a family of Jewish immigrants from Ukraine, the son of Rebecca (née Miller) and David Pollack, a semi-professional boxer and pharmacist. The family relocated to South Bend and his parents divorced when he was young. His
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    Zoltán Korda

    Zoltan Korda (3 June 1895 – 13 October 1961) was a Hungarian-born motion picture screenwriter, director and producer. Born Zoltán Kellner, Kellner Zoltán in Hungarian name order, of Jewish heritage in Pusztatúrpásztó, Túrkeve in Hungary (Austria-Hungary), he was the middle brother of filmmakers Alexander Korda and Vincent Korda. Zoltan Korda went to work with his brother Alexander in their native Hungary and in the United Kingdom for his London Films production company. Initially Zoltan Korda functioned as a camera operator then for a time worked in film editing and as a screenwriter. In 1918 and 1920 in Hungary, he directed two silent film shorts and a feature-length silent film in Germany in 1927. In London, he made his English-language directorial debut with the sound drama Men of Tomorrow (1932) then gained wide respect for the adventure film Sanders of the River (1935), starring Paul Robeson and Leslie Banks. The film proved a significant commercial and critical success, giving Korda the first of his four nominations for "Best Film" at the Venice Film Festival. Korda and Robert Flaherty won the Venice festival's "Best Director" award for Elephant Boy (1937). A former cavalry
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Chris Noonan

    Chris Noonan

    Chris Noonan (born 14 November 1952) is a Sydney-based Australian filmmaker and actor best known for the pioneering live-action / CG film Babe, for which he received Academy Award nominations as both director and writer. Encouraged by his father, Noonan made his first short film, Could It Happen Here? when he was sixteen. It won a prize at the Sydney Film Festival and was later screened on Australian television. On leaving school in 1970 Noonan went to work for the Commonwealth Film Unit ( now Film Australia), as a production assistant, assistant editor, production manager and assistant director making short films and documentaries. In 1973 Noonan was in the inaugural intake on the directors' course (along with Gillian Armstrong and Phillip Noyce) at the Australian Film Television and Radio School. In 1974 he returned to Film Australia where he worked on a number of films and documentaries, including working as assistant director on the cult movie The Cars That Ate Paris. In 1979 he set up his own production company, and in 1980 documented the lives of a troupe of handicapped actors, in the acclaimed Stepping Out, which won the UNESCO prize in 1980 and an Australian Film Institute
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Grant Heslov

    Grant Heslov

    Grant Heslov (born May 15, 1963) is an American actor, film producer, screenwriter and director. Heslov was born in Los Angeles, into a Jewish family and was raised in the Palos Verdes area of Los Angeles. He attended Palos Verdes High School, the University of Southern California (USC) along with friend Tate Donovan. He is a member of Phi Kappa Psi. Heslov's acting credits include films like True Lies, Dante's Peak, Enemy of the State, The Scorpion King and Good Night, and Good Luck and several credits in TV series (Family Ties, L.A. Law, Catch Me If You Can, the 1989 directorial debut by Stephen Sommers, Matlock, Sleeper Cell). He also appeared in Congo as the hapless assistant Richard and in Black Sheep as a cop, who is a friend to Mike Donnelly (played by Chris Farley). He was the Academy Award–nominated producer of Good Night, and Good Luck. Together with George Clooney, he was also nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. Heslov also appears in the film as Don Hewitt, the director of the TV series See It Now, around which the movie is centered. In August 2006, he and George Clooney started a movie company, Smoke House. Heslov is currently writing screenplays with
    6.00
    3 votes
    156

    Ismail Merchant

    Ismail Merchant (Gujarati: ઈસ્માઈલ મર્ચન્ટ) (25 December 1936 – 25 May 2005) was an Indian-born film producer and director, best known for the results of his famously long collaboration with Merchant Ivory Productions which included director (and Merchant's longtime professional and personal partner) James Ivory as well as screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. Their films won six Academy Awards. Merchant succeeded as an independent producer in Hollywood for more than 40 years. His strength lay in funding his projects, particularly in his ability to produce films for several million dollars less than those of his contemporaries. Born Ismail Noormohamed Abdul Rehman (Gujarati: ઈસ્માઈલ નૂરમોહમદ અબ્દુલ રહમાન) in Bombay, he was the son of Hazra (née Memon) and Noormohamed Haji Abdul Rehman, a Mumbai Memon textile dealer. He grew up bilingual in Gujarati and Urdu, and learned Arabic and English at school. When he was 11, he and his family were caught up in the 1947 partitioning of India. His father was president of the Muslim League, and refused to move to Pakistan. Merchant later said that he carried memories of the "butchery and riots" into adulthood. He studied at St. Xavier's College,
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Clint Eastwood

    Clint Eastwood

    Clinton "Clint" Eastwood, Jr. (born May 31, 1930) is an American film actor, director, producer, composer, and politician. Eastwood first came to prominence as a supporting cast member in the TV series Rawhide (1959–1965). He rose to fame for playing the Man with No Name in Sergio Leone's Dollars trilogy of spaghetti westerns (A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly) during the late 1960s, and as Harry Callahan in the Dirty Harry films (Dirty Harry, Magnum Force, The Enforcer, Sudden Impact, and The Dead Pool) throughout the 1970s and 1980s. These roles, among others, have made him an enduring cultural icon of masculinity. For his work in the films Unforgiven (1992) and Million Dollar Baby (2004), Eastwood won Academy Awards for Best Director and Producer of the Best Picture, as well as receiving nominations for Best Actor. These films in particular, as well as others including Play Misty for Me (1971), Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974), The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976), Escape from Alcatraz (1979), Tightrope (1984), Pale Rider (1985), Heartbreak Ridge (1986), In the Line of Fire (1993), The Bridges of Madison County (1995), and Gran Torino
    5.00
    4 votes
    158

    Arthur Penn

    Arthur Hiller Penn (September 27, 1922 – September 28, 2010) was an American film director and producer with a career as a theater director as well. Penn amassed a critically acclaimed body of work throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Penn was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Sonia Greenberg, a nurse, and Harry Penn, a watchmaker. He was the younger brother of Irving Penn, the successful fashion photographer. During the 1920s, he moved in with his mother after she divorced Penn's father. Some time after, he came back to his sickly father, leading him to run his father's watch repair shop. At 19 he was drafted into the army. Stationed in Britain, he became interested in theater. He started to direct and take part in shows being put on for the soldiers around England at the time. As Penn grew up, he further became interested in film, especially after he saw the Orson Welles film Citizen Kane. After making a name for himself as a director of quality television dramas, Penn made his feature debut with a western, The Left Handed Gun (1958). A retelling of the Billy the Kid legend, it was distinguished by Paul Newman's sharp portrayal of the outlaw as a psychologically troubled
    5.67
    3 votes
    159
    Danny DeVito

    Danny DeVito

    Daniel Michael "Danny" DeVito, Jr. (born November 17, 1944) is an American actor, comedian, director and producer. He first gained prominence for his portrayal of short statured dispatcher Louie De Palma on the ABC and NBC television series Taxi (1978–1983), for which he won a Golden Globe and an Emmy. DeVito and his wife, Rhea Perlman, founded Jersey Films, a production company known for films such as Pulp Fiction, Garden State, and Freedom Writers. DeVito also owns Jersey Television, which produced the Comedy Central series Reno 911!. DeVito and Perlman also starred together in his 1996 film Matilda, based on Roald Dahl's children's novel. He currently stars as Frank Reynolds on the FX sitcom It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. He also directs and produces graphic short horror films for his Internet venture "The Blood Factory." He has appeared in several of them, as have friends of his and members of his family. DeVito was born in Neptune, New Jersey, the son of Julia, a homemaker, and Daniel Michael DeVito, Sr., who owned several small businesses, including a dry cleaning store, a dairy outlet, a luncheonette, and a pool hall. Devito grew up in a family of five, with his parents
    6.50
    2 votes
    160
    6.50
    2 votes
    161
    Elia Kazan

    Elia Kazan

    Elia Kazan (IPA: [eˈlia kaˈzan]; September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was an American director, producer, writer and actor, described by The New York Times as "one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history". He was born in Constantinople, Ottoman Empire, to Greek parents. After studying acting at Yale, he acted professionally for eight years, later joining the Group Theater in 1932, and co-founded the Actors Studio in 1947. With Lee Strasberg, he introduced Method acting to the American stage and cinema as a new form of self-expression and psychological "realism". Kazan acted in only a few films, including City for Conquest (1940). Kazan introduced a new generation of unknown young actors to the movie audiences, including Marlon Brando and James Dean. Noted for drawing out the best dramatic performances from his actors, he directed 21 actors to Oscar nominations, resulting in nine wins. He became "one of the consummate filmmakers of the 20th century" after directing a string of successful films, including, A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), On the Waterfront (1954), and East of Eden (1955). During his career, he won two Oscars as Best Director
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    Jeremy Thomas

    Jeremy Thomas

    Jeremy Jack Thomas, CBE (born 26 July 1949) is a British film producer, founder of the Recorded Picture Company. He was the producer of Bernardo Bertolucci's The Last Emperor, which won the 1988 Academy Award for Best Picture. In 2006 he received a European Film Award for Outstanding European Achievement in World Cinema. His father was director Ralph Thomas (director of many of the "Doctor" films), while his uncle Gerald Thomas directed all of the Carry On Films. Cinema has always been a part of Thomas' life. He was born in London, England into a filmmaking family with his father, Ralph Philip Thomas, and uncle, Gerald, both directors. His childhood ambition was to work in cinema. As soon as he left school he went to work in various positions, ending up in the cutting rooms working on films such as The Harder They Come, Family Life and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad, and worked through the ranks to become a film editor for Ken Loach on A Misfortune. After editing Philippe Mora's Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?, he produced his first film Mad Dog Morgan in 1974 in Australia. He then returned to England to produce Jerzy Skolimowski's The Shout, which won the Grand Prix de Jury at the
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Jiří Menzel

    Jiří Menzel

    Jiří Menzel (Czech: [ˈjɪr̝iː ˈmɛntsl̩] ( listen)) (born February 23, 1938, Prague) is a Czech film director, theatre director, actor, and screenwriter. His films often combine a humanistic view of the world with sarcasm and provocative cinematography. Some of these films are adapted from works by Czech writers such as Bohumil Hrabal and Vladislav Vančura. He became famous in 1967, when his first feature film, Closely Watched Trains, won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. His controversial film Larks on a String was filmed in 1969, but was initially banned by the [Czechoslovakia] government. It was finally released in 1990 after the fall of the Communist regime. The film won the Golden Bear at the 40th Berlin International Film Festival. Menzel was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film again in 1986 with his dark comedy My Sweet Little Village. In 1987, he was a member of the jury at the 37th Berlin International Film Festival.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164

    John Frankenheimer

    John Michael Frankenheimer (February 19, 1930 – July 6, 2002) was an American film and television director known for social dramas and action/suspense films. Among his credits were Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), The Manchurian Candidate (1962), Seven Days in May (1964), The Train, (1964), Grand Prix (1966), Black Sunday (1977) and Ronin (1998). Frankenheimer won four consecutive Emmy Awards in the 1990s for the television movies Against the Wall, The Burning Season, Andersonville, and George Wallace, which also received a Golden Globe award. He was considered one of the last remaining directors who insisted on having complete control over all elements of production, making his style unique in Hollywood. Frankenheimer's 30 feature films and over 50 plays for television were notable for their influence on contemporary thought. He became a pioneer of the "modern-day political thriller," having begun his career at the peak of the Cold War. Many of his films were noted for creating "psychological dilemmas" for his male protagonists along with having a strong "sense of environment," similar in style to films by director Sidney Lumet, for whom he had earlier worked as assistant director. He
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    John Huston

    John Huston

    John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director, screenwriter and actor. He wrote the screenplays for most of the 37 feature films he directed, many of which are today considered classics: The Maltese Falcon (1941), The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948), Key Largo (1948), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The African Queen (1951), Moulin Rouge (1952), The Misfits (1961), and The Man Who Would Be King (1975). During his 46-year career, Huston received 15 Oscar nominations, won twice, and directed both his father, Walter Huston, and daughter, Anjelica Huston, to Oscar wins in different films. Huston was known to direct with the vision of an artist, having studied and worked as a fine art painter in Paris in his early years. He continued to explore the visual aspects of his films throughout his career: sketching each scene on paper beforehand, then carefully framing his characters during the shooting. In addition, while most directors rely on post-production editing to shape their final work, Huston instead created his films while they were being shot, making his films both more economical and more cerebral, with little editing needed. Most of
    6.50
    2 votes
    166

    Jon Finn

    Jonathan M. Finn (born 1958) is an American rock musician and guitarist. He is the founder and leader of the Jon Finn Group, and is a professor at the Berklee College of Music; he joined the guitar faculty there in 1988. He is also the author of several books on the guitar, and was an instructional columnist for Guitar magazine for three years. Finn grew up in Westwood, Massachusetts and began playing guitar at the age of six. He later became a student at Berklee. When he was 14 years old he played with the group Cheap Thrills, which consisted of Finn, Steve Carro (Vocals), Bob Shain (Keyboard), Ron Dupres (Bass), Joel Sklar (Rhythm Guitar), and Greg Buckingham (Drums). He has been a guest performer with the Boston Pops, recording several albums with them, including the Grammy-nominated The Celtic Album (1997) and The Latin Album (1999). He has also performed with John Petrucci of Dream Theater, Carl Verheyen, Vinnie Moore, Andy Timmons, Steve Morse of the Dixie Dregs, New York Voices, Collin Raye, Dweezil Zappa, and Debbie Reynolds, among others. In addition he has toured with musical theater productions such as: Rent, Mamma Mia!, Aida, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    King Vidor

    King Vidor

    King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director, film producer, and screenwriter whose career spanned nearly seven decades. In 1979 he was awarded an Honorary Academy Award for his "incomparable achievements as a cinematic creator and innovator." He was nominated five times for a Best Director Oscar, and won eight international film awards during his career. He was born in Galveston, Texas, where he survived the great Galveston Hurricane of 1900. Based on that experience, he published a fictionalized account of that cyclone, titled "Southern Storm", for the May 1935 issue of Esquire magazine. Erik Larson excerpts a passage from that article in his 2005 book, Isaac's Storm: His grandfather, Charles Vidor, was a refugee of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848, who settled in Galveston in the early 1850s. A freelance newsreel cameraman and cinema projectionist, Vidor made his debut as a director in 1913 with The Grand Military Parade. In Hollywood from 1915, he worked as a screenwriter and as director of a series of six short juvenile-delinquency films for Judge Willis Brown before directing his first feature, The Turn in the Road, in 1919. A
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Paul Thomas Anderson

    Paul Thomas Anderson

    Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970) is an American film director, screenwriter, and producer. He has written and directed six feature films: Hard Eight (1996), Boogie Nights (1997), Magnolia (1999), Punch-Drunk Love (2002), There Will Be Blood (2007), and The Master (2012). He has been nominated for five Academy Awards — There Will Be Blood for Best Achievement in Directing, Best Motion Picture of the Year, and Best Adapted Screenplay; Magnolia for Best Original Screenplay; and Boogie Nights for Best Original Screenplay. Anderson has been hailed as being "one of the most exciting talents to come along in years" and "among the supreme talents of today." After the release of Boogie Nights and Magnolia, Anderson was praised as a wunderkind. In 2004, Anderson was ranked twenty-first on The Guardian's list of the forty best directors. In 2007, Total Film named him the twentieth greatest director of all time, while the American Film Institute regards him as "one of American film's modern masters." In 2011, Entertainment Weekly named him the tenth-greatest working director calling him "one of the most dynamic directors to emerge in the last twenty years." The following year, The
    6.50
    2 votes
    170

    Roberto Rossellini

    Roberto Gastone Zeffiro Rossellini (8 May 1906 – 3 June 1977) was an Italian film director and screenwriter. Rossellini was one of the directors of the Italian neorealist cinema, contributing films such as Roma città aperta (Rome, Open City 1945) to the movement. Rossellini was born in Rome. His mother, Elettra (née Bellan), was a housewife, and his father, Angiolo Giuseppe "Beppino" Rossellini, owned a construction firm. His mother was of part French descent, from immigrants who had arrived in Italy during the Napoleonic Wars. He lived on the Via Ludovisi, where Benito Mussolini had his first Roman hotel in 1922 when Fascism obtained power in Italy. Rossellini's father built the first cinema in Rome (Barberini's), granting his son an unlimited free pass; the young Rossellini started frequenting the cinema at an early age. When his father died, he worked as a soundmaker for films and for a certain time he experienced all the accessory jobs related to the creation of a film, gaining competence in each field. Rossellini had a brother, Renzo, who later scored many of his films. On 26 September 1936, he married Marcella De Marchis (17 January 1916, Rome – 25 February 2009, Sarteano), a
    6.50
    2 votes
    171

    Saul Zaentz

    Saul Zaentz ( /ˈzænts/; born February 28, 1921) is an American film producer and former record company executive. He has won the Academy Award for Best Picture three times and in 1996 was awarded the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award. Zaentz's film production career is marked by a dedication to the adaptation of the novel. A prolific reader, Zaentz typically does not produce original screenplays. His most recent production, Goya's Ghosts, is an exception, being an original story by Jean-Claude Carrière and Miloš Forman. Zaentz was born to immigrant Jewish parents in Passaic, New Jersey. After serving in the United States Army during World War II, Zaentz began realizing his passion for music as a distributor for Granz's Jazz Record company, a job that included managing concert tours for greats like Duke Ellington and Stan Getz. Zaentz went to William B.Cruz Memorial school number 11 in Passaic New Jersey as a child. In 1955 he joined Fantasy Records, for many years the largest independent jazz record label in the world. In 1967 Zaentz and other partners purchased the label from founders Max and Sol Weiss. The partners signed roots-rock group Creedence Clearwater Revival (CCR),
    6.50
    2 votes
    172

    Scott Hicks

    Robert Scott Hicks (born 4 March 1953) is a film director from Australia. He is best known as the screenwriter and director of Shine, the Oscar-winning biopic of pianist David Helfgott. Hicks's work has been nominated for an Academy Award as well as winning an Emmy Award. Hicks was born in Uganda, the son of a homemaker and a civil engineer. He lived in Kenya, just outside Nairobi, until the age of ten. His family then moved, first to England and, when he was 14, on to Adelaide, South Australia. Though British citizens, his father and grandfather were born in Burma and the West Indies respectively, and spent their lives in far-flung locales as civil engineers building railways, bridges and harbours. His mother is Scottish. Scott lives with his wife and collaborator/producer Kerry Heysen in Adelaide, where they maintain their own Yacca Paddock Vineyard on the Fleurieu Peninsula. Their two sons, Scott and Jethro, also live in Adelaide. Hicks graduated from Flinders University in South Australia (BA Honours) in 1975 and was awarded an honorary doctorate in 1997. He graduated into an industry which was emerging from decades of inactivity, stimulated by renewed government support for
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Sidney Lumet

    Sidney Lumet

    Sidney Arthur Lumet ( /luːˈmɛt/ loo-MET; June 25, 1924 - April 9, 2011) was an American director, producer and screenwriter with over 50 films to his credit. He was nominated for the Academy Award as Best Director for 12 Angry Men (1957), Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982). He did not win an individual Academy Award, but he did receive an Academy Honorary Award and 14 of his films were nominated for various Oscars, such as Network, which was nominated for 10, winning 4. The Encyclopedia of Hollywood states that Lumet was one of the most prolific directors of the modern era, making more than one movie per year on average since his directorial debut in 1957. He was noted by Turner Classic Movies for his "strong direction of actors", "vigorous storytelling" and the "social realism" in his best work. Film critic Roger Ebert described him as having been "one of the finest craftsmen and warmest humanitarians among all film directors." Lumet was also known as an "actor's director," having worked with the best of them during his career, probably more than "any other director." Sean Connery, who acted in five of his films, considered him one of his favorite
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    Tim Bevan

    Tim Bevan, CBE (born 1958) is a film producer. Bevan was born in Queenstown, New Zealand. Bevan was educated at Sidcot School, a Quaker boarding independent school in the Mendip Hills, near the village of Winscombe in North Somerset, in South West England. Bevan co-founded Working Title Films in London with Sarah Radclyffe and Graham Bradstreet in the 1980s. (Eric Fellner now partners Tim Bevan at Working Title Films). Among Bevan's more than 40 films as producer or executive producer are Moonlight and Valentino, Fargo, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Guru, Captain Corelli's Mandolin, Love Actually, Notting Hill, Elizabeth, Bridget Jones's Diary, Atonement, and Frost/Nixon. To date, the films he has co-produced have grossed a total of almost four billion dollars worldwide ($3,939 Million according to www.boxofficemojo.com) without adjusting for inflation. Working Title Films signed a deal with Universal Studios in 1999 for a reported $600 (USD) million, which gave Bevan and Fellner the power to commission projects with a budget of up to $35 (USD) million without having to consult their paymasters. Bevan is also the co-producer of the West End musical Billy Elliot. Bevan is divorced
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Bo Christensen

    Bo Christensen (born August 24, 1937) is an Oscar winning Danish film producer. Christensen is best known for producing Babette's Feast (1987), for which he won the Best Foreign Film Oscar and the BAFTA Best Foreign Film award in 1988. He has acted in five films, and produced or co-produced some 60 movies over the years and continues to be busy as a producer. He has produced most of the Olsen Gang movies and is the producer of Denmark most successful TV series "Matador" (1978–1982).
    5.33
    3 votes
    176

    Fred Zinnemann

    Fred Zinnemann (29 April 1907 – 14 March 1997) was an Austrian-American film director. He won two Academy Awards for directing films (From Here to Eternity and A Man for All Seasons) in many genres, including thrillers, westerns, film noir, and play adaptations. Nineteen actors appearing in Zinnemann's films received Academy Award nominations for their performances: among that number are Frank Sinatra, Audrey Hepburn, Glynis Johns, Paul Scofield, Robert Shaw, Wendy Hiller, Jason Robards, Vanessa Redgrave, Jane Fonda, Gary Cooper and Maximilian Schell. Zinnemann was born in Vienna, Austria, the son of Anna and Oskar Zinnemann, a doctor. His family was Jewish. While growing up in Austria, he wanted to become a musician, but went on to study law. While studying at the University of Vienna, he became drawn to films and eventually became a cameraman. He worked in Germany with several other beginners (Billy Wilder and Robert Siodmak also worked with him on the 1929 feature People on Sunday) before going to America to study film. Zinnemann's penchant for realism and authenticity is evident in his first feature The Wave (1935), shot on location in Mexico with mostly non-professional actors
    5.33
    3 votes
    177

    George Stevens

    George Stevens (December 18, 1904 – March 8, 1975) was an American film director, producer, screenwriter and cinematographer. Among his most notable films were Diary of Anne Frank (1959), nominated for Best Director, Giant (1956), winner of Oscar for Best Director, Shane (1953), Oscar nominated, and A Place in the Sun (1951), winner of six Academy Awards including Best Director. He was born in Oakland, California, and his family included his father Landers Stevens and his mother Georgie Cooper, both stage actors. His uncle was drama critic Ashton Stevens. He also had two brothers, Jack and writer Aston Stevens. He learned about the stage from his parents and worked and toured with them, on his way to filmmaking. He broke into the movie business as a cameraman, working on many Laurel and Hardy short films, such as Night Owls (1930). His first feature film was The Cohens and Kellys in Trouble in 1933. In 1934 he got his first directing job, the slapstick Kentucky Kernels. His big break came when he directed Katharine Hepburn in Alice Adams in 1935. He went on in the late 1930s to direct several Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire movies, not only with the two actors together, but on their
    5.33
    3 votes
    178

    Henry Hathaway

    Henry Hathaway (March 13, 1898 – February 11, 1985) was an American film director and producer. He is best known as a director of Westerns, especially starring Randolph Scott and John Wayne. Born Henri Leonard de Fiennes in Sacramento, California, he was the son of an American actor and stage manager, Rhody Hathaway (1868–1944), and a Hungarian-born Belgian aristocrat, Marquise Lillie de Fiennes (1876–1938), who acted under the name Jean Hathaway. This branch of the de Fiennes family came to America in the 19th century on behalf of King Leopold I of Belgium and was part of the negotiations with the Belgian Prime Minister, Charles Rogier (1800–1885), to secure the 1862 treaty between Belgium and what was then known as the Sandwich Islands and is now called Hawaii. In 1925, Hathaway began working in silent films as an assistant to notable directors such as Victor Fleming and Josef von Sternberg and made the transition to sound with them. He was the assistant director to Fred Niblo in the 1925 version of Ben-Hur starring Francis X. Bushman and Ramon Novarro. During the remainder of the 1920s, Hathaway learned his craft as an assistant, helping direct future stars such as Gary Cooper,
    5.33
    3 votes
    179
    Alejandro González Iñárritu

    Alejandro González Iñárritu

    Alejandro González Iñárritu (Spanish pronunciation: [aleˈxandɾo ɣonˈsales iˈɲaritu]; born August 15, 1963) is a Mexican film director. González Iñárritu is the first Mexican director to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director and by the Directors Guild of America for Best Director. He is also the first Mexican born director to have won the Prix de la mise en scene or best director award at Cannes (2006), the second one being Carlos Reygadas in 2012. His four feature films Amores perros (2000), 21 Grams (2003), Babel (2006) and Biutiful (2010) have gained critical acclaim worldwide including 12 Academy Award nominations. He was born in Mexico City to Hector González Gama and Luz María Iñárritu. He grew up in La Colonia Narvarte, a middle-class neighborhood near downtown Mexico City. His father used to be a rich banker, but when Alejandro was five or six years old, he went bankrupt and lost everything. Alejandro says his father has been his inspiration because he took care of his family "with the virtue of a warrior". His father started a business by himself, buying fruits and vegetables in the Central de Abasto market in order to sell them to restaurants during the day.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Brad Grey

    Brad Grey

    Brad Alan Grey (born December 29, 1957) is the chairman and CEO of Paramount Pictures, a position he has held since 2005. Under Grey’s leadership, Paramount finished No. 1 in global market share in 2011 and No. 2 domestically in 2008, 2009 and 2010 despite releasing significantly fewer films than its competitors. He also has produced 8 out of Paramount's 10 top-grossing pictures of all time since he succeeded Sherry Lansing in 2005. Since arriving at Paramount in 2005, Chairman and CEO Brad Grey has led a return to fortune at the box office. He has overseen the creation or revitalization of several major franchises, Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, Star Trek, and Paranormal Activity, which was made for $15,000 and generated $192 million at the global box office. Paranormal Activity 2 grossed $177 million worldwide, and the third installment in the franchise collected $205.7 million worldwide in 2011. A fourth installment is scheduled for release in October 2012. The studio’s industry-leading 2011 results included Transformers: Dark of the Moon, which grossed more than $1.1 billion worldwide, and Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, whose $600 million-plus global box office
    7.00
    1 votes
    181

    Diana Ossana

    Diana Lynn Ossana is an American writer who has collaborated on writing screenplays, teleplays, and novels with author Larry McMurtry since they first worked together in 1992, on the semi-fictionalized biography Pretty Boy Floyd. She is a published author in her own right of several short stories and essays. Ossana first read the Annie Proulx short story Brokeback Mountain in the October 13, 1997 issue of The New Yorker magazine. She immediately urged her writing partner McMurtry to read it and asked him if he felt they could write a screenplay based upon the story. McMurtry agreed they could. They wrote Proulx asking her for an option to the short story in order to write a screenplay. Proulx replied that although she did not see the potential for a movie in the story, she would agree to their option. Ossana and McMurtry proceeded to write the script, which they completed in early 1998. Ossana's and McMurtry's screenplay for Brokeback Mountain won the Academy Award for Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay) as well as the Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay and Writers Guild of America Award. Ossana, a producer on the film, also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Drama. The film was
    7.00
    1 votes
    182

    Frank Perry

    Frank J. Perry, Jr. (August 21, 1930 – August 29, 1995) was an American stage and film director, producer and screenwriter. His directorial debut, the 1962 film David and Lisa, earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Director. The film was written by Perry's first wife, Eleanor Perry. They would go on to collaborate on five further films, before their divorce in 1971. His later films include the Joan Crawford bio drama Mommie Dearest and the documentary On The Bridge, about his struggle with prostate cancer. Perry was born in New York City, of Portuguese and German ancestry, the son of Pauline E. (née Schwab), who worked at Alcoholics Anonymous, and Frank J. Perry, a stockbroker. His mother was a niece of Charles M. Schwab, who founded the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. As a teenager, Perry began pursuing his interest in the theater with a job as a parking lot attendant for the Westport Country Playhouse in nearby Westport, Connecticut. He attended the University of Miami. He produced several plays at Westport and then turned for a time to producing television documentaries. A veteran of the Korean War, he returned to the entertainment industry after being discharged and made
    7.00
    1 votes
    183

    Guy Green

    Guy Green OBE BSC (15 November 1913 – 15 September 2005) was an English film director, screenwriter, and cinematographer. In 1946 he won an Academy Award as cinematographer on the film of Great Expectations. In 2002 Green was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the BAFTA, and in 2004 was named an Officer of the Order of the British Empire for his lifetime contributions to British cinema. Green was born in Frome, Somerset, England. He began working in film in 1929, and became a noted film cinematographer, and a founding member of the British Society of Cinematographers. Green became a full-time director of photography in the mid-1940s working on such films as David Lean's Oliver Twist in 1948. In about 1955 Green switched to directing, and moved to Hollywood around 1962. In addition to directing A Patch of Blue (1965), Green also wrote and co-produced the film. After his death, his widow Josephine told AP that it was his proudest accomplishment. Among his other films as director are The Angry Silence (1960), The Mark (1961; nominated for the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival), and The Devil's Advocate (1977). Green died in his Beverly Hills home from kidney and heart failure,
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    Jack Clayton

    Jack Clayton (1 March 1921 – 26 February 1995) was a British film director, who specialised in bringing literary works to the screen. Born in Brighton, Clayton started his career as a child actor on the 1929 film Dark Red Roses. He later worked for Alexander Korda's Denham Film Studios and rose from tea boy to assistant director to film editor. While in service with the Royal Air Force during World War II, Clayton shot his first film, the documentary Naples is a Battlefield (1944), representing the problems in the reconstruction of Naples, the first great city liberated in World War II, ruined after Allied bombing and destruction caused by the retreating Nazis. After the war Clayton became an associate producer on many of Korda's films, then directed the Oscar-winning short The Bespoke Overcoat (1956) based on Wolf Mankowitz's theatrical version (1953) of Nikolai Gogol's short story The Overcoat (1842). In this film Gogol's story is re-located to a clothing warehouse in the East End of London and the ghostly protagonist is a poor Jew. His first feature was the internationally acclaimed Room at the Top (1959), a harsh indictment of the British class system, which won two Oscars,
    7.00
    1 votes
    185

    John Sturges

    John Eliot Sturges (January 3, 1910 – August 18, 1992) was an American film director. His movies include Bad Day at Black Rock (1955), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), The Magnificent Seven (1960), The Great Escape (1963) and Ice Station Zebra (1968). He started his career in Hollywood as an editor in 1932. During World War II, he directed documentaries and training films for the United States Army Air Corps. Sturges's mainstream directorial career began in 1946 with The Man Who Dared, the first of many B-movies. He made imaginative use of the widescreen CinemaScope format by placing Spencer Tracy alone against a vast desert panorama in the suspense film Bad Day at Black Rock for which he received a Best Director Oscar nomination in 1955. Over the course of his career, Sturges developed a reputation for elevated character-based drama within the confines of genre filmmaking. He was awarded the Golden Boot Award in 1992 for his lifetime contribution to Westerns. He once met with Akira Kurosawa, who told him that he loved The Magnificent Seven (which was a remake of Kurosawa's Seven Samurai) and presented him with a samurai sword. Sturges considered this the proudest moment of his
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Stanley Kubrick

    Stanley Kubrick

    Stanley Kubrick (/ˈkuːbrɪk/; July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an American film director, screenwriter, producer, cinematographer and editor. He is regarded as one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. His films, typically adaptations of novels or short stories, were noted for their "dazzling" and unique cinematography, attention to details to achieve realism and an inspired use of music scores. Kubrick's films covered a variety of genres, including war, crime, romantic and black comedies, horror, epic and science fiction. Kubrick was also noted for being a perfectionist, using painstaking care with scene staging and working closely with his actors. Starting out as a photographer in New York City, he taught himself all aspects of film production and directing after graduating from high school. His earliest films were made on a shoestring budget, followed by one Hollywood blockbuster, Spartacus, after which he spent most of the rest of his career living and filming in the United Kingdom. His home became his workplace where he did his writing, research, editing and management of production details. This allowed him to have almost complete artistic control, but with the rare
    7.00
    1 votes
    187

    Tony Richardson

    Cecil Antonio "Tony" Richardson (5 June 1928 – 14 November 1991) was an English theatre and film director and producer. He was married form 1962 to 1967 to Vanessa Redgrave, fathering actresses Natasha and Joely Richardson. He had a five-decade film career. He died from AIDS at 63 in 1991. Richardson was born in Shipley, Yorkshire in 1928, the son of Elsie Evans (Campion) and Clarence Albert Richardson, a chemist. He was Head Boy at Ashville College, Harrogate and attended Wadham College, Oxford, where his contemporaries included Kenneth Tynan, Lindsay Anderson and Gavin Lambert. He had the unprecedented distinction of being elected President of both the Oxford University Dramatic Society and the Experimental Theatre Club (the ETC), in addition to being theatre critic for the university magazine Isis. In 1955, in his directing début, Richardson produced Jean Giraudoux's The Apollo of Bellac for Television with Denholm Elliott and Natasha Parry in the main roles. Around the same time he began to be active in Britain's Free Cinema movement, co-directing the non-fiction short Momma Don't Allow (also 1955) with Karel Reisz. Part of the British "New Wave" of directors, he was involved
    4.50
    4 votes
    188
    Alan J. Pakula

    Alan J. Pakula

    Alan Jay Pakula (April 7, 1928 – November 19, 1998) was an American film director, writer and producer noted for his contributions to the conspiracy thriller genre. Pakula started his Hollywood career as an assistant in the cartoon department at Warner Brothers. In 1957, he undertook his first production role for Paramount Pictures. In 1962, he produced To Kill a Mockingbird, for which he was nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award. In 1969, he directed his first feature, The Sterile Cuckoo, starring Liza Minnelli. In 1971, Pakula released the first installment of what would informally come to be known as his "paranoia trilogy". Klute, the story of a relationship between a private eye (played by Donald Sutherland) and a call girl (played by Jane Fonda, who won an Oscar for her performance), was a commercial and critical success. This was followed in 1974 by The Parallax View starring Warren Beatty, a labyrinthine post-Watergate thriller involving political assassinations. The film has been noted for its experimental use of hypnotic imagery in a celebrated film-within-a-film sequence in which the protagonist is inducted into the Parallax Corporation, whose main, albeit
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Claude Lelouch

    Claude Lelouch

    Claude Barruck Joseph Lelouch (born October 30, 1937) is a French film director, writer, cinematographer, actor and producer. Lelouch was born in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, the son of Charlotte (née Abeilard) and Simon Lelouch. His father was an Algerian Jew and his mother was a convert to Judaism. His father gave him a camera to give him a fresh start after his failure in the baccalaureat. He started his career with reportage - one of the first to film daily life in the U.S.S.R., the camera hidden under his coat as he made his personal journey. He also filmed sporting events like the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the Tour de France. His first full length film as director, Le Propre de l'homme, was decried by the critics - 'Claude Lelouch, remember this name well, because you will not hear it again' - Cahiers du cinéma said. La Femme Spectacle (1963), following prostitutes, women shopping, going for nose-jobs, was censored for its misogynist tendency. Un homme et une femme changed his fortunes and was met with favour even by the Cahiers group. Legend has it that Lelouch found himself one morning on the beach at Deauville when he caught sight of a young woman and her child on the
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Harvey Weinstein

    Harvey Weinstein

    Harvey Weinstein (born March 19, 1952) is an American film producer and movie studio chairman. He is best known as co-founder of Miramax Films. He and his brother Bob have been co-chairmen of The Weinstein Company, their film production company, since 2005. He won an Academy Award for producing Shakespeare in Love, and garnered seven Tony Awards for producing a variety of winning plays and musicals including The Producers, Billy Elliot the Musical, and August: Osage County. Born in Flushing, New York, Weinstein and his younger brother, Bob, grew up in a Jewish family in New York City, residing in a housing co-op named Electchester. He graduated from John Bowne High School, and then the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York. Weinstein, along with his brother Bob Weinstein, and Corky Burger independently produced rock concerts as Harvey & Corky Productions in Buffalo through most of the 1970s. Both Weinstein brothers had grown up with a passion for movies and they nurtured a desire to enter the film industry. In the late 1970s, using profits from their concert promotion business, the brothers created a small independent film distribution company called Miramax,
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Jean Negulesco

    Jean Negulesco

    Jean Negulesco (born Jean Negulescu; 26 February 1900 – 18 July 1993) was a Romanian American film director and screenwriter. Born in Craiova, he attended Carol I High School. In 1915 he moved to Vienna, in 1919 to Bucharest, where he worked as a painter, before becoming a stage decorator in Paris. In 1927 he went to New York City for an exhibition of his paintings, and settled there. In 1934 he entered the film industry, first as a sketch artist, then as an assistant producer, second unit director and in the late 1930s he became a director and screenwriter. He made a reputation at Warner Brothers by directing short subjects, particularly a series of band shorts featuring unusual camera angles and dramatic use of shadows and silhouettes. Negulesco's first feature film as director was Singapore Woman (1941). In 1948 he was nominated for an Academy Award for Directing for Johnny Belinda. In 1955, he won the BAFTA Award for Best Film for How to Marry a Millionaire. His 1959 movie, The Best of Everything, was on Entertainment Weekly's Top 50 Cult Films of All-Time list. From the late 1960s, he lived in Marbella, Spain where he died there at age 93, of heart failure. During his
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Laurence Olivier

    Laurence Olivier

    Sir Laurence Kerr Olivier, The Baron Olivier, OM, Kt ( /ˈlɒrəns ɵˈlɪvi.eɪ/; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an English actor, director, and producer. One of the most famous and revered actors of the 20th century, he was the youngest actor to be knighted as a Knight Bachelor and the first to be elevated to the peerage. He was married three times, to actresses Jill Esmond, Vivien Leigh, and Joan Plowright. Actor Spencer Tracy once stated that Olivier was "the greatest actor in the English-speaking world". Olivier played a wide variety of roles on stage and screen from Greek tragedy, Shakespeare and Restoration comedy to modern American and British drama. He was the first artistic director of the National Theatre of Great Britain and its main stage is named in his honour. He is regarded by some to be the greatest actor of the 20th century, in the same category as David Garrick, Richard Burbage, Edmund Kean and Henry Irving in their own centuries. Olivier's AMPAS acknowledgments are considerable: twelve Oscar nominations, with two awards (for Best Actor and Best Picture for the 1948 film Hamlet), plus two honorary awards including a statuette and certificate. He was also awarded five
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Lawrence Bender

    Lawrence Bender

    Lawrence Bender (born October 17, 1957) is an American film producer. He rose to fame by producing Reservoir Dogs in 1992 and has since produced all of Quentin Tarantino's films with the exception of Death Proof and Django Unchained. In the 1980s, he worked as a grip on the syndicated anthology series Tales from the Darkside. In 1989, he produced the film Intruder, in which leading roles are Sam Raimi and Bruce Campbell. His films to date, including such hits as Inglourious Basterds, Pulp Fiction and Good Will Hunting, have been honored with 29 Academy Award nominations, including three for Best Picture, and have won 6. His film An Inconvenient Truth, which raised unprecedented awareness about climate change, won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. His latest documentary, Countdown to Zero, features Tony Blair, Presidents, Musharef, Gorbachev, De Klerk and Carter among others, details the urgent risk posed by proliferation, terrorism, and accidental use of nuclear weapons. Other films include, From Dusk Till Dawn (1996), Anna And The King (1999), The Mexican (2001), Innocent Voices (2004), and Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs (1992), Jackie Brown (1997), Kill Bill:
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Michael Mann

    Michael Mann

    Michael Kenneth Mann (born February 5, 1943) is an American film director, screenwriter, and producer. For his work, he has received nominations from international organizations and juries, including those at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, Cannes and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. He has produced the Academy Awards ceremony twice, first in 1999 with the 72nd annual Academy Awards and second in 2004 with the 77th annual ceremony. Total Film ranked Mann #28 on their 100 The Greatest Directors Ever and Sight and Sound ranked him #5 on their list of the 10 Best Directors of the Last 25 Years, Entertainment Weekly ranked Mann #8 on their 25 Greatest Active Film Directors list. Mann was born in Chicago of Jewish heritage, the son of grocers Esther and Jack Mann. He received a B.A. in English at the University of Wisconsin–Madison where he developed interests in history, philosophy and architecture. It was at this time that he first saw Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove and fell in love with movies. In a recent L.A. Weekly interview, he describes the film's impact on him: "It said to my whole generation of filmmakers that you could make an individual
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    René Clair

    René Clair

    René Clair (11 November 1898 – 15 March 1981) born René-Lucien Chomette, was a French filmmaker and writer. He first established his reputation in the 1920s as a director of silent films in which comedy was often mingled with fantasy. He went on to make some of the most innovative early sound films in France, before going abroad to work in the UK and USA for more than a decade. Returning to France after World War II, he continued to make films that were characterised by their elegance and wit, often presenting a nostalgic view of French life in earlier years. He was elected to the Académie française in 1960. René Clair was born and grew up in Paris in the district of Les Halles, whose lively and picturesque character made a lasting impression on him. His father was a soap merchant; he had an elder brother, Henri Chomette (born 1896). He attended the Lycée Montaigne and the Lycée Louis-le-Grand. In 1914 he was studying philosophy; his friends at that time included Raymond Payelle who became the actor and writer Philippe Hériat. In 1917, at the age of 18, he served as an ambulance driver in World War I, before being invalided out with a spinal injury. He was deeply affected by the
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Richard D. Zanuck

    Richard D. Zanuck

    Richard Darryl Zanuck (December 13, 1934 – July 13, 2012) was an American film producer. He won the Academy Award for Best Picture in 1989 for Driving Miss Daisy. Richard Darryl Zanuck was born in Los Angeles, California, to actress Virginia Fox and Darryl F. Zanuck, then head of 20th Century Fox. While studying at Stanford University, he began his career in the film industry working for the 20th Century Fox story department. In 1959, Zanuck had his first shot at producing with the film Compulsion. In the 1960s Zanuck became the president of 20th Century Fox; one year of his tenure, 1967, is chronicled in the John Gregory Dunne book The Studio. After disastrous failures like 1967's Doctor Dolittle, he was later fired by his father and joined Warner Bros. as Executive Vice President and one year later formed The Zanuck/Brown Company. In 1968 he married model and actress Linda Harrison; they later divorced in 1978. In 1972, Zanuck joined up with David Brown to form an independent production company called The Zanuck/Brown Company at Universal Pictures. The two men produced a pair of Steven Spielberg's early films, The Sugarland Express (1974) and Jaws (1975). They subsequently
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Luis Buñuel

    Luis Buñuel

    Luis Buñuel Portolés (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈlwis βuˈɲwel]; 22 February 1900 – 29 July 1983) was an Aragonese filmmaker who worked in Spain, Mexico and France When Luis Buñuel died at age 83, his obituary in The New York Times called him "an iconoclast, moralist and revolutionary who was a leader of avant-garde surrealism in his youth and a dominant international movie director half a century later." His first picture—made in the silent era—was called "the most famous short film ever made" by critic Roger Ebert, and his last film—made 48 years later—won him Best Director awards from the National Board of Review and the National Society of Film Critics. Writer Octavio Paz called Buñuel's work "the marriage of the film image to the poetic image, creating a new reality,... scandalous and subversive." Often associated with the Surrealist movement of the 1920s, Buñuel created films in six decades, from the 1920s through the 1970s. His work spans two continents, three languages, and nearly every film genre, including experimental film, documentary, melodrama, musical, erotica, comedy, romance, costume dramas, fantasy, crime film, adventure, and western. Despite this variety, filmmaker
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Robert Zemeckis

    Robert Zemeckis

    Robert Lee Zemeckis (born May 14, 1951) is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. Zemeckis first came to public attention in the 1980s as the director of the comedic time-travel Back to the Future film series, as well as the Academy Award-winning live-action/animation epic Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), though in the 1990s he diversified into more dramatic fare, including 1994's Forrest Gump, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Director. His films are characterized by an interest in state-of-the-art special effects, including the early use of match moving in Back to the Future Part II (1989) and the pioneering performance capture techniques seen in The Polar Express (2004), Beowulf (2007) and A Christmas Carol (2009). Though Zemeckis has often been pigeonholed as a director interested only in effects, his work has been defended by several critics, including David Thomson, who wrote that "No other contemporary director has used special effects to more dramatic and narrative purpose." Zemeckis was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Rose (née Nespeca) and Alphonse Zemeckis. His father was Greek American and his mother was Italian American. Zemeckis grew up on
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    George Cukor

    George Cukor

    George Dewey Cukor ( /ˈkjuːkər/; July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations. His career flourished at RKO when David O. Selznick, the studio's Head of Production, assigned Cukor to direct several of RKO's major films including What Price Hollywood? (1932), A Bill of Divorcement (1932), "Our Betters" (1933), and Little Women (1933). When Selznick moved to MGM in 1933 Cukor followed and directed Dinner at Eight (1933) and David Copperfield (1935) for Selznick and Romeo and Juliet (1936) and Camille (1936) for Irving Thalberg. He was replaced as the director of Gone with the Wind (1939), but he went on to direct The Philadelphia Story (1940), Adam's Rib (1949), Born Yesterday (1950), A Star Is Born (1954) and My Fair Lady (1964). He continued to work into the 1980s. Cukor was born on the Lower East Side of New York City, the younger child and only son of Hungarian Jewish immigrants Victor, an assistant district attorney, and Helen Ilona (née Gross) Cukor. His parents selected his middle name in honor of Spanish–American War hero George Dewey. Unlike the Jews of Poland and Russia whose first language was
    4.67
    3 votes
    200

    Blake Edwards

    Blake Edwards (William Blake Crump July 26, 1922 – December 15, 2010) was an American film director, screenwriter and producer. Edwards' career began in the 1940s as an actor, but he soon turned to writing radio scripts at Columbia Pictures. He used his writing skills to begin producing and directing, with some of his most well-known films including Experiment in Terror, The Great Race, and the hugely successful Pink Panther film series with the British comedian Peter Sellers. Often thought of as primarily a director of comedies, he also directed drama films, including Breakfast at Tiffany's and Days of Wine and Roses. His greatest successes, however, were his comedies, and most of his films were either musicals, melodramas, slapstick comedies, or thrillers. In 2004, he received an Honorary Academy Award in recognition of his writing, directing and producing an extraordinary body of work for the screen. Born William Blake Crump in Tulsa, Oklahoma. His grandfather was J. Gordon Edwards, a director of silent movies, and his stepfather, Jack McEdwards, became a film production manager after moving his family to Los Angeles in 1925. In an interview with Village Voice in 1971, he said
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Dan Jinks

    Dan Jinks

    Dan Jinks is an American film and television producer. In February 2010, Jinks launched his own film and television production company, the Dan Jinks Company. In July 2011, he signed an overall deal with CBS Television Studios. Previously, working with producing partner Bruce Cohen, Dan produced Milk, directed by Gus Van Sant and starring Sean Penn as Harvey Milk. The film was nominated for 8 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and won for Best Actor and Best Original Screenplay. Milk was named Best Picture of 2008 by the New York Film Critics Circle. The pair won the Best Picture Academy Award in 2000 for producing American Beauty. The film, which won a total of five Oscars, was the first film produced through The Jinks/Cohen Company. Their second film was the sex comedy Down with Love starring Renée Zellweger and Ewan McGregor. Next up was Tim Burton's Big Fish, which was nominated as Best Picture for both the Golden Globes and the BAFTAs. Other films include The Forgotten, starring Julianne Moore, and John August's directing debut, The Nines, starring Ryan Reynolds and Hope Davis. In television, Dan and Bruce executive produced the acclaimed ABC series Pushing Daisies, which
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Francis Ford Coppola

    Francis Ford Coppola

    Francis Ford Coppola (English pronunciation: /ˈkoʊpələ/, Italian pronunciation: [ˈkɔppola]; born April 7, 1939) is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. He is widely acclaimed as one of Hollywood's most innovative and influential film directors and he epitomized the group of filmmakers known as the New Hollywood, that includes Martin Scorsese, Terrence Malick, Robert Altman, Woody Allen, William Friedkin, Philip Kaufman and George Lucas, who emerged in the early 1970s with unconventional ideas that challenged contemporary film-making. He co-wrote the script for Patton (1970), which won him an Academy Award for Best Writing (Original Screenplay). His directorial fame escalated with the release of The Godfather (1972), a film which revolutionized movie-making in the gangster genre, earning praise from critics and public alike. It won three Academy Awards, including his second for Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay) (with Mario Puzo), Best Picture and Best Actor (for Marlon Brando) and a nomination for Best Director and was instrumental in cementing his position as a prominent American film director. Coppola followed it with a critically successful sequel, The Godfather
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Ridley Scott

    Ridley Scott

    Sir Ridley Scott (born 30 November 1937) is an English film director and producer. Following his commercial breakthrough with Alien (1979), his best-known works are sci-fi classic Blade Runner (1982), Thelma & Louise (1991), best picture Oscar-winner Gladiator (2000), Black Hawk Down (2001), Matchstick Men (2003), Kingdom of Heaven (2005), American Gangster (2007), Robin Hood (2010), and Prometheus (2012). Scott is known for his atmospheric, highly concentrated visual style, which has influenced many directors. Though his films range widely in setting and period, they frequently showcase memorable imagery of urban environments, whether 12th century Jerusalem (Kingdom of Heaven), contemporary Osaka (Black Rain) or Mogadishu (Black Hawk Down), or the future cityscapes of Blade Runner. Scott has been nominated for three Academy Awards for Directing (for Thelma and Louise, Gladiator and Black Hawk Down), plus two Golden Globe and two BAFTA Awards. He was knighted in the UK 2003 New Year Honours list. He is the elder brother of the late Tony Scott. Scott was born in the North East Tyneside coastal town of South Shields, England, the son of Elizabeth and Colonel Francis Percy Scott. He
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Steve Tisch

    Steve Tisch

    Steven "Steve" Tisch (born February 14, 1949) is an American businessman. He is the Chairman and Executive Vice President of the New York Giants, the NFL team co-owned by his family, as well as a film and television producer. He is the son of former Giants co-owner Bob Tisch. Tisch was born in Lakewood Township, New Jersey and attended Tufts University, during which he began his filmmaking career. During his youth, Tisch created a number of small films with backing by Columbia Pictures. In 1976, he left Columbia and created his first feature film, Outlaw Blues. He followed this up in 1983 with Risky Business, which gave Tom Cruise his first lead role. In 1984, Tisch produced a made-for-TV movie entitled The Burning Bed, which caused controversy but also received eleven Emmy nominations for Farrah Fawcett's depiction of a battered wife. Tisch launched his own production company in 1986, called the Steve Tisch Company, which has since specialized in small screen films. However, he also produced several critically acclaimed films including Forrest Gump, American History X, and Snatch. Tisch received a Best Motion Picture Academy Award and a Golden Globe for Forrest Gump, which was
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Andrea Calderwood

    Andrea Calderwood

    Andrea Calderwood is a British film and television producer. She won a British Academy of Film and Television Award for Best British Film for her work on The Last King of Scotland. She produced the HBO television mini-series Generation Kill. In 2012, Scottish newspaper The Herald put her as number 42 in it's list over Scotland's top 50 influential women of 2012.
    5.00
    2 votes
    206

    Jon Landau

    Jon Landau (born July 23, 1960) is an American film producer. Landau was born in New York City, New York, the son of Edie, a producer, and Ely A. Landau, a studio executive and producer. He is from a Jewish family. He is one of the "famous faces" due to being a regular player on the online poker website Hollywood Poker which is run in conjunction with Ongame Network. Landau attended the USC School of Cinematic Arts. He is best known for producing Titanic, a film which won him an Academy Award, and most recently, Avatar. Throughout the early '90s, Landau was Executive Vice President of Feature Film Production at Twentieth Century Fox. In 2009, Landau and James Cameron produced the science fiction blockbuster, Avatar, which has since become the highest-grossing film of all time, surpassing Titanic, which had previously held that position. Avatar earned Landau his second Academy Award nomination, which he lost to producers of The Hurt Locker.
    5.00
    2 votes
    207

    Michael Cimino

    Michael Cimino (/tʃɪˈmiːnoʊ/ chi-MEE-noh; born February 3, 1939) is an American film director. He is best known for co-writing, producing and directing the 1978 Academy Award-winning film The Deer Hunter and writing and directing the infamous 1980 film Heaven's Gate. His films are characterized by their striking visual style and controversial subject matter. Michael Cimino was born in New York City on February 3, 1939. A third-generation Italian-American, Cimino grew up in Old Westbury, Long Island. He was regarded as a prodigy at the private schools his parents sent him to, but rebelled against his parents by consorting with lowlifes, getting into fights and coming home drunk. Of this time, Cimino described himself as "always hanging around with kids my parents didn't approve of. Those guys were so alive. When I was fifteen I spent three weeks driving all over Brooklyn with a guy who was following his girlfriend. He was convinced she was cheating on him, and he had a gun, he was going to kill her. There was such passion and intensity about their lives. When the rich kids got together, the most we ever did was cross against a red light." His father was a music publisher. Cimino
    5.00
    2 votes
    208

    Alexander Mackendrick

    Alexander Mackendrick (September 8, 1912 - December 22, 1993) was a Scottish American director and teacher. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts and later moved to Scotland. He began making television commercials before moving into post-production editing and directing films, most notably for Ealing Studios where his films include Whisky Galore! (1949), The Man in the White Suit (1951), and The Ladykillers (1955). His films made a gradual decline after Ealing Studios closed and he returned to America to become a teacher of filmmaking. He was the cousin of the Scottish writer Roger MacDougall. He was born on 22 December 1912 and was the only child of Francis and Martha Mackendrick, who had emigrated to the United States from Glasgow in 1911. His father was a ship builder and a civil engineer. When Mackendrick was six, his father died of influenza as a result of an pandemic that swept the world just after World War I. His mother, in desperate need of work, decided to be a dress designer. In order to pursue that decision, it was necessary for Martha MacKendrick to hand her only son over to his grandfather, who took young MacKendrick back to Scotland when he was seven years old.
    4.50
    2 votes
    209
    Andy Harries

    Andy Harries

    Andrew D. M. Harries (born 7 April 1954) is a British television and film producer. After graduating from Hull University in the 1970s, Harries began his television career on the Granada Television current affairs series World in Action, before moving on to freelance work. He directed and produced programmes for Jonathan Ross's Channel X production company in the 1980s, before being appointed controller of the newly created comedy department at Granada in 1992. Over the next decade he produced and executive produced several critically acclaimed series, including The Royle Family, Cold Feet and The Grimleys. In 2000 his portfollio was expanded to include Granada's drama productions. He worked on the revivals of Prime Suspect and Cracker, as well as the BAFTA-winning television play The Deal. In 2004 he began work producing The Queen, which was released to critical acclaim in 2006. Though he had spent 14 years with Granada, part of the ITV network, he became increasingly dissatisfied with the management of ITV after its corporate merger in 2003, and publicly criticised the network in 2006. He announced he would not be renewing his contract and departed in 2007 to form Left Bank
    4.50
    2 votes
    210
    Peter Ustinov

    Peter Ustinov

    Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov CBE ( /ˈjuːstɪnɒf/ or /ˈuːstɪnɒf/; 16 April 1921 – 28 March 2004) was an English actor, writer and dramatist. He was also renowned as a filmmaker, theatre and opera director, stage designer, author, screenwriter, comedian, humourist, newspaper and magazine columnist, radio broadcaster and television presenter. A noted wit and raconteur, he was a fixture on television talk shows and lecture circuits for much of his career. He was also a respected intellectual and diplomat who, in addition to his various academic posts, served as a Goodwill Ambassador for UNICEF and President of the World Federalist Movement. Ustinov was the winner of numerous awards over his life, including two Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor, Emmy Awards, Golden Globes and BAFTA Awards for acting, a Grammy Award for best recording for children, as well the recipient of governmental honours from, amongst others, the United Kingdom, France and Germany. He displayed a unique cultural versatility that has frequently earned him the accolade of a Renaissance man. Miklós Rózsa, composer of the music for Quo Vadis and of numerous concert works, dedicated his String Quartet No. 1, Op. 22
    4.50
    2 votes
    211

    Anthony Mann

    Anthony Mann (June 30, 1906 – April 29, 1967) was an American actor and film director, most notably of film noirs and Westerns. As a director, he often collaborated with the cinematographer John Alton and with James Stewart in his Westerns. Born Emil Anton Bundsmann in the Point Loma area of San Diego, California, Mann was the son of Austrian immigrants Emile Theodore Bundsmann, and his wife Bertha Waxelbaum (original surname: Weichselbaum) of Macon, Georgia. Mann started out as an actor, appearing in plays off-Broadway in New York City. In 1938, he moved to Hollywood, where he joined the Selznick International Pictures. Mann became an assistant director in 1942, directing low-budget assignments for RKO and Republic Pictures. Mann was respected for his acute visual sensitivity toward the American Western landscape, effortlessly blending natural vistas with human drama. Mann's dramas verged on classical tragedy, often showing anguished heroes attempting to resolve personal pain and confusion. In 1964 he was head of the jury at the 14th Berlin International Film Festival. In 1967, Mann died from a heart attack in Berlin, Germany while filming the spy thriller A Dandy in Aspic. The
    5.00
    1 votes
    212

    Bob Gale

    Michael Robert "Bob" Gale (born May 21, 1951) is an American screenwriter who co-wrote the science fiction film Back to the Future with writing partner Robert Zemeckis, and the screenplays for the film's two sequels. Gale also co-produced all three films. Gale was born in University City, Missouri, the son of Maxine (née Kippel), an art dealer and violinist, and Mark R. Gale, an attorney. As a teen, he created his own comic book, The Green Vomit, using spirit duplication, and also co-founded a popular comic book club in St. Louis. Later, he and his brother, Charles Gale, made his own amateur three-film series parody of the Republic Pictures Commando Cody serials, using the character name "Commando Cus". The last two of these were made in collaboration with his friend the late Richard Rosenberg. (Rosenberg had taken over the series with the third, 1973's Commando Cus vs. Kung Fu Killers, in which Gale made a cameo appearance as the title character without his face-covering helmet, and was working on a fourth at the time of his death.) Gale received a B.A. in Cinema in 1973 from the University of Southern California, where he wrote fanzine reviews for classmate Mike Glyer's fanzine,
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Ingmar Bergman

    Ingmar Bergman

    Ernst Ingmar Bergman (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈɪŋmar ˈbærjman] ( listen); 14 July 1918 – 30 July 2007) was a Swedish director, writer and producer for film, stage and television. Described by Woody Allen as "probably the greatest film artist, all things considered, since the invention of the motion picture camera," he is recognized as one of the most accomplished and influential film directors of all time. He directed over sixty films and documentaries for cinematic release and for television, most of which he also wrote. He also directed over one hundred and seventy plays. Among his company of actors were Harriet Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Gunnar Björnstrand, Bibi Andersson, Erland Josephson, Ingrid Thulin and Max von Sydow. Most of his films were set in the landscape of Sweden. His major subjects were death, illness, faith, betrayal, and insanity. Bergman was active for more than six decades. In 1976 his career was seriously threatened as the result of a botched criminal investigation for alleged income tax evasion. Outraged, Bergman suspended a number of pending productions, closed his studios, and went into self-imposed exile in Germany for eight years. Ingmar Bergman was born in
    5.00
    1 votes
    214

    Jules Dassin

    Julius "Jules" Dassin (18 December 1911 – 31 March 2008) was an American film director, with Jewish-Russian origins. He was a subject of the Hollywood blacklist in the McCarthy era, and subsequently moved to France, where he revived his career. One of eight children of Berthe Vogel and Samuel Dassin, a Russian-Jewish barber in Middletown, Connecticut, Dassin grew up in Harlem and went to Morris High School in the Bronx. He joined the Communist Party USA in the 1930s and left it after the Hitler–Stalin Pact in 1939. He started as a Yiddish actor with the ARTEF (Yiddish Proletarian Theater) company in New York. He collaborated on a film with Jack Skurnick that was incomplete because of Skurnick's early death. In 1937 he married Beatrice Launer, with whom he had three children. In May 1955 he met Melina Mercouri at the Cannes Film Festival. At about the same time, he discovered the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. These two elements created a bond with Greece. He divorced Launer in 1962 and married Mercouri in 1966. The couple had to leave Greece after the colonels' coup in 1967. In 1970, they were accused of having financed an attempt to overthrow the dictatorship, but the
    5.00
    1 votes
    215

    Martin Ritt

    Martin Ritt (March 2, 1914 – December 8, 1990) was an American director, actor, and playwright who worked in both film and theater. He was born in New York City. Ritt originally attended and played football for Elon College in North Carolina. The stark contrasts of the depression-era South, against his New York City upbringing, instilled in him a passion for expressing the struggles of inequality, which is apparent in the films he directed. After leaving St. John's University, Ritt found work with a theater group, and began acting in plays. His first performance was as Crown in Porgy and Bess. After his performance drew favorable reviews, Ritt concluded that he could "only be happy in the theater." Ritt then went to work with the Roosevelt administration's New Deal Works Progress Administration as a playwright for the Federal Theater Project, a federal government-funded theater support program. With work hard to find and the Depression in full effect, many WPA theater performers, directors, and writers became heavily influenced by the radical left and Communism, and Ritt was no exception. Years later, Ritt would state that he had never been a member of the Communist Party, although
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Mike Newell

    Mike Newell

    Michael Cormac "Mike" Newell (born 28 March 1942) is an English director and producer of motion pictures for the screen and for television. Newell won the BAFTA Award for Best Direction in 1994 for Four Weddings and a Funeral. Newell was born in St Albans, Hertfordshire, the son of amateur actors. Newell was educated at St Albans School and Magdalene College, Cambridge. He then attended a three year training course at Granada Television, with the intention of entering the theatre. Newell directed various British TV shows from the 1960s onwards (Such as Spindoe (1968), credited as Cormac Newell, and Big Breadwinner Hog). However, he eventually graduated into film direction and then he went on to make the horror film The Awakening (1980) and Bad Blood (1981) about a New Zealand mass murderer. His first film was The Man in the Iron Mask (1977), made for TV. His first critically acclaimed movie was Dance with a Stranger (1985), a biographical drama starring Miranda Richardson as Ruth Ellis, the last woman to be hanged in Great Britain. For his directing efforts, Newell won the Award of the Youth at the 1985 Cannes Film Festival. Newell continued his successes in the film industry with
    5.00
    1 votes
    217

    Nicholas Ray

    Nicholas Ray (August 7, 1911 - June 16, 1979) was an American film director best known for the movie Rebel Without a Cause. Ray is also appreciated by a smaller audience of cinephiles for a large number of narrative features produced between 1947 and 1963 including Bigger Than Life, Johnny Guitar, They Live by Night, and In a Lonely Place, as well as an experimental work produced throughout the 1970s titled We Can't Go Home Again, which was unfinished at the time of Ray's death from lung cancer. Ray's compositions within the CinemaScope frame and use of color are particularly well-regarded. Ray was an important influence on the French New Wave, with Jean-Luc Godard famously writing in a review of Bitter Victory, "cinema is Nicholas Ray." He was born Raymond Nicholas Kienzle in Galesville, Wisconsin. In his early years, he went to school and did a brief stint at the University of Chicago: here he was exposed to the media world through radio. Here he also met two men who inspired his move to films: Frank Lloyd Wright and dramatist Thornton Wilder, then a professor. Ray received a Taliesin Fellowship from Wright to study under him as an apprentice. Ray directed his first and only
    5.00
    1 votes
    218

    Roland Joffé

    Roland Joffé (born 17 November 1945) is an English-French film director who is known for his Oscar nominated movies, The Killing Fields and The Mission. He began his career in television. His early television credits included episodes of Coronation Street and an adaptation of The Stars Look Down for Granada. He gained a reputation for hard-hitting political stories with the series Bill Brand and factual dramas for Play for Today. Joffé was educated at two independent schools: the Lycée Français Charles de Gaulle in London, and Carmel College in Wallingford, Oxfordshire, which was Europe's only Jewish boarding school, until it closed in 1997. He completed his formal education at the University of Manchester. In the early 1970s, Joffé had attended Workers' Revolutionary Party meetings, but he never became a party member, and by 1977 he had long severed his association with it: "I was very interested in politics at that time. But I was interested in what all the political parties were doing, not just the WRP, and I was never actively involved." In 1977, Joffé was commissioned by the BBC to direct a play The Spongers. However, Joffé had been blacklisted: the play's producer, Tony
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Stanley Donen

    Stanley Donen

    Stanley Donen (/ˈdɔːnən/DAWN-ən; born April 13, 1924) is an American film director and choreographer whose most celebrated works are Singin' in the Rain and On the Town, both of which he co-directed with actor and dancer Gene Kelly. His other noteworthy films include Royal Wedding, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Funny Face, Indiscreet, Damn Yankees!, Charade, and Two for the Road. He received an Honorary Academy Award in 1998 for his body of work and a Career Golden Lion from the Venice Film Festival in 2004. Donen has been hailed by film critic David Quinlan as "the King of the Hollywood musicals". He began his career in the chorus line on Broadway for director George Abbott, where he befriended Gene Kelly. In 1943 he went to Hollywood and worked as a choreographer for several years before he and Kelly made On the Town in 1949. He then worked as a contract director for MGM under producer Arthur Freed and continued to make hit films and gain critical acclaim, both as a solo director and for his work with Kelly. In 1952 Donen and Kelly co-directed the musical Singin' in the Rain, which went on to become regarded as one of the greatest films ever made. Donen's relationship with
    5.00
    1 votes
    220

    Vittorio de Sica

    Vittorio De Sica (7 July 1901 or 1902 – 13 November 1974) was an Italian director and actor, a leading figure in the neorealist movement. Four of the films he directed won Academy Awards: Sciuscià and Bicycle Thieves were awarded honorary Oscars, while ieri, oggi, domani and Il giardino dei Finzi Contini won the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar. Indeed, the great critical success of Sciuscià (the first foreign film to be so recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) and Bicycle Thieves helped establish the permanent Best Foreign Film Oscar. These two films generally are considered part of the canon of classic cinema. Bicycle Thieves was cited by Turner Classic Movies as one of the 15 most influential films in cinema history. Ironically, for an artist considered one of the Italian cinema's greatest and most influential directors, De Sica's sole Academy Award nomination was for acting, when he received a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nod for playing Major Rinaldi in American director Charles Vidor's 1957 adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms, a movie that was panned by critics and proved a box office flop. De Sica's acting was considered the highlight
    5.00
    1 votes
    221

    Cy Endfield

    Cyril Raker Endfield (November 10, 1914 – April 16, 1995) was an American screenwriter, film director, theatre director, author, magician and inventor, based in Britain from 1953. Born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, after attending Yale University, Endfield began his career as a theatre director and drama coach, becoming an important figure in New York's progressive theatre scene. Despite this shared background, it was largely Endfield's skill as a card magician which brought him to the attention of Orson Welles, who recruited him as an apprentice for Mercury Productions (at that time based at RKO Pictures). Following the debacle surrounding the production of The Magnificent Ambersons (which ended with the expulsion of the Mercury team from the RKO lot) Endfield signed on as a contract director at MGM, directing a wide variety of shorts (including the last films in the long-running Our Gang series), before moving on to freelance on low-budget productions for Monogram and independents. It was with the 1950 film noir The Underworld Story, an independent production released through United Artists, that Endfield first came to critical and studio attention. The film was a major leap from
    4.00
    2 votes
    222

    Guy Hamilton

    Guy Hamilton (born 16 September 1922) is an English film director. Hamilton was born in Paris, France where his English parents were living. Remaining in France during the Nazi occupation, he was active in the French Resistance. After the end of the war, he worked as an assistant to Carol Reed on films including The Fallen Idol (1948) and The Third Man (1949), before turning to directing with his first film The Ringer in 1952. He made 22 films from the 1950s to the 1980s, including four installments of the James Bond series, based on the novels by Ian Fleming. He was married at one time to actress Naomi Chance. Hamilton was originally chosen to direct Superman: The Movie in 1978, but due to his status as a tax exile he was only allowed to be in England for thirty days, where production had moved at the last minute to Pinewood Studios. The job of director was then passed to Richard Donner, but Hamilton insisted he be paid in full. In the late 1980s Guy Hamilton was also approached to direct Batman. Hamilton was one of many directors who turned down Dr. No, but he entered the series after Terence Young's departure from Goldfinger. He left during pre-production of The Spy Who Loved
    4.00
    2 votes
    223
    Ang Lee

    Ang Lee

    Ang Lee (Chinese: 李安; Pinyin: Lǐ Ān; born October 23, 1954) is a Taiwanese-born American film director. Lee has directed a diverse set of films such as Eat Drink Man Woman (1994), Sense and Sensibility (1995), Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000, which won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film), Hulk (2003), and Brokeback Mountain (2005), for which he won an Academy Award for Best Director. He is the first person of Asian descent to win the Best Director Oscar. Ang Lee was born in the town of Chaochou in Pingtung, a southern agricultural county in Taiwan. He grew up in a household that put heavy emphasis on education and the Chinese classics. Both of Lee's parents moved to Taiwan from China following the Chinese Nationalists' defeat in the Chinese Civil War in 1949. Lee's father, a native of Jiangxi Province in southern China, imbued his children with studying Chinese culture and art, especially calligraphy. Lee studied in the Provincial Tainan First Senior High School (now National Tainan First Senior High School) where his father was the principal. He was expected to pass the annual Joint College/University Entrance Examination, the only route to a university
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Bruce Cohen

    Bruce Cohen

    Bruce Cohen is an American film producer. Cohen and his producing partner, Dan Jinks, run The Jinks/ Cohen Company. Cohen and Jinks produced American Beauty, winner of the 1999 Academy Award for Best Picture. Among other films that Cohen has produced are The Forgotten, Big Fish, To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar, and most recently, Milk, his second Best Picture nomination. In 2009, Cohen wore a White Knot to the Academy Awards ceremony as a show of support for the marriage equality movement. Since May 2005 he has been a contributing blogger at The Huffington Post. Cohen married his partner of five years, Gabriel Catone, on June 30, 2008, in a ceremony officiated by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa at Los Angeles City Hall. In December 2010, Cohen and actress Anne Hathaway went to Staten Island as surprise guests to a performance of the PS 22 Chorus, to invite them to the 83rd Academy Awards in February. They also announced that the Chorus will be performing in the awards ceremony. His father, George, was appointed the director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service in 2009.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Bryan Singer

    Bryan Singer

    Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director, writer and producer. Singer won critical acclaim for his work on The Usual Suspects, and is especially well-known among fans of the science fiction and superhero genres for his work on the X-Men films and Superman Returns. Singer was born in New York City, and was adopted by Grace Singer (née Sinden), an environmental activist, and Norbert Dave Singer, a corporate executive. He grew up in a Jewish household in West Windsor Township, New Jersey. He attended West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South (formerly just West Windsor-Plainsboro High School), graduating in 1984. For college, Singer studied filmmaking for two years at New York's School of Visual Arts and later transferred to the USC School of Cinematic Arts in Los Angeles. Actors Lori and Marc Singer are his cousins. He is openly gay and has said that his life experiences of growing up as a minority influenced his movies. He was diagnosed with dyslexia. After graduating, Singer directed a short film called Lion's Den involving a number of friends, including actor Ethan Hawke whom he knew from his childhood in New Jersey and editor John Ottman who he had met
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Edward Zwick

    Edward Zwick

    Edward M. Zwick (born October 8, 1952) is an American filmmaker and film producer noted for his epic films about social and racial issues. He has been described as a "throwback to an earlier era, an extremely cerebral director whose movies consistently feature fully rounded characters, difficult moral issues, and plots that thrive on the ambiguity of authority." Zwick was born into a Jewish family in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Ruth Ellen (née Reich) and Allen Zwick. He received an A.B from Harvard in 1974. He attended the AFI Conservatory and graduated with an M.F.A. degree in 1975. His films include Glory (1989), Legends of the Fall (1994), The Siege (1998), The Last Samurai (2003), Blood Diamond (2006), and Defiance (2008). Along with Marshall Herskovitz, Zwick runs a film production company called The Bedford Falls Company (inspired by the name of the town featured in Frank Capra's It's A Wonderful Life). This company has produced such notable films as Traffic and Shakespeare in Love and the TV shows Thirtysomething, Relativity, Once and Again, and My So-Called Life. He was one of the recipients of the Academy Award for Best Picture for Shakespeare in Love; he was also
    4.00
    1 votes
    227

    Marcel Camus

    Marcel Camus (21 April 1912 – 13 January 1982) was a French film director. He is best known for Orfeu Negro (Black Orpheus), which won the Golden Palm at the 1959 Cannes Film Festival and the 1960 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film Camus was born in Chappes, Ardennes, France and died in Paris. He studied art and intended to become an art teacher. However, World War II interrupted his plans. He spent part of the war in a German prisoner-of-war camp. Prior to directing films, Camus assisted filmmakers in France, including Jacques Feyder, Luis Buñuel, and Jacques Becker. He directed nearly a dozen films, including Orfeu Negro (also known as Black Orpheus), which won the Golden Palm at the 1959 Cannes Film Festival and the 1960 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film In 1960, Camus made a second Brazlilian-themed film, Os bandeirantes. Twenty years after Orfeu Negro, Camus returned to Brazilian themes for what would prove to be his last film, Bahia (also known as Otalia da Bahia and Os pastores da noite), based a novel by Brazilian novelist Jorge Amado. These films, however, failed to recapture the success of Orfeu Negro. In 1970, Camus had a moderate success with a
    4.00
    1 votes
    228

    Paul Rotha

    Paul Rotha (born Paul Thompson, 3 June 1907, London – 7 March 1984, Wallingford, Oxfordshire) was a British documentary film-maker, film historian and critic. He was educated at Highgate School. Rotha was a close collaborator of John Grierson. Wolfgang Suschitzky was one of his cinematographers. He directed the documentaries The World Is Rich (1947) and Cradle of Genius (1961), both of which were nominated for an Academy Award. Rotha married Irish actress Constance Smith in 1974.
    4.00
    1 votes
    229

    Richard N. Gladstein

    Richard N. Gladstein is a film producer based in Los Angeles. His production company is FilmColony. His films include Finding Neverland, The Bourne Identity, Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, Hurlyburly, and The Cider House Rules. His two Academy Award nominations came from Finding Neverland (2005) and The Cider House Rules (2000). Prior to the formation of FilmColony, Gladstein was executive vice president of production for Miramax Films from 1993 through 1995, Gladstein received his bachelor's degree in film from Boston University's College of Communication.
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Akira Kurosawa

    Akira Kurosawa

    Akira Kurosawa (黒澤 明, Kurosawa Akira, March 23, 1910 – September 6, 1998) was a Japanese film director, screenwriter, producer, and editor. Regarded as one of the most important and influential filmmakers in the history of cinema, Kurosawa directed 30 films in a career spanning 57 years. Kurosawa entered the Japanese film industry in 1936, following a brief stint as a painter. After years of working on numerous films as an assistant director and scriptwriter, he made his debut as a director in 1943, during World War II with the popular action film Sanshiro Sugata (a.k.a. Judo Saga). After the war, the critically acclaimed Drunken Angel (1948), in which Kurosawa cast then-unknown actor Toshiro Mifune in a starring role, cemented the director's reputation as one of the most important young filmmakers in Japan. The two men would go on to collaborate on another 15 films. Rashomon, which premiered in Tokyo in August 1950, and which also starred Mifune, became, on September 10, 1951, the surprise winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and was subsequently released in Europe and North America. The commercial and critical success of this film opened up Western film markets
    0.00
    0 votes
    231

    Arnon Milchan

    Arnon Milchan (Hebrew: ארנון מילצ'ן‎; December 6, 1944) is an Israeli Hollywood film producer who has produced over 120 full-length motion pictures. Mr. Milchan is also a former key Israeli intelligence operative from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s. Milchan's films include The War of the Roses, Once Upon a Time in America, Pretty Woman, Natural Born Killers, Under Siege, The Devil's Advocate, The Fountain, Unfaithful, L.A. Confidential and many others. He is an Israeli citizen, and a resident of Israel. Milchan was born in Rehovot, British Mandate for Palestine in 1944. His father owned a fertilizer company, which Milchan turned into a successful chemical business. He also earned a degree from the London School of Economics, before being recruited to LAKAM, a top secret Israeli intelligence organization responsible for obtaining technology and material for Israel's nuclear program, and other highly secretive programs. Milchan became involved in the American movie business in 1977, after an introduction to American producer Elliot Kastner. Most notable among Milchan's film collaborations was his early work with Martin Scorsese. He developed close friendships with Robert De Niro,
    0.00
    0 votes
    232

    Bill Forsyth

    Bill Forsyth (born 29 July 1946) is a Scottish film director and writer best known for his films Gregory's Girl (1981), Local Hero (1983), and Comfort and Joy (1984), as well as his commitment to national film-making. William David Forsyth was born 29 July 1946 in Glasgow, Scotland. After graduating Knightswood School at the age of 17, he spent eight years making short documentary films. Forsyth first came to attention with a low-budget film, That Sinking Feeling, made with youth theatre actors and featuring a cameo appearance by the Edinburgh gallery owner Richard Demarco. The relative success of the film was carried to a far higher level by his next film Gregory's Girl in 1981. This featured some of the same young actors, in particular John Gordon Sinclair, as well as the acting debut of Clare Grogan. The film was a major hit and won 'Best Screenplay' in that year's BAFTA Awards. In 1983 he wrote and directed the successful Local Hero, produced by David Puttnam, and featuring Burt Lancaster. It was rated in the top 100 films of the 1980s in a Premiere magazine recap of the decade. Forsyth's next film was the 1984 Comfort and Joy, about a Glasgow radio DJ caught in a rivalry
    0.00
    0 votes
    233

    Claude Berri

    Claude Berri (1 July 1934 – 12 January 2009), born Claude Berel Langmann, was a French actor, writer, producer, director and distributor. Berri was born in Paris, France, the son of Polish/Romanian Jewish parents Beila (née Bercu) and Hirsch Langmann, a furrier. His sister was the screenwriter and editor Arlette Langmann. Berri won the "Best Film" BAFTA for Jean de Florette, and was also nominated for twelve César Awards, though he never won. Berri also won the Oscar for Best Short Film for Le Poulet at the 39th Academy Awards in 1966, and produced Roman Polanski's Tess which was nominated for Best Picture in 1981. Internationally, however, two films in 1986 overshadow all his other achievements. Jean de Florette and its sequel Manon des Sources were huge hits. In 1991, his film Uranus was entered into the 41st Berlin International Film Festival. Six years later, his film Lucie Aubrac was entered into the 47th Berlin International Film Festival. In 2003, he was elected President of the Cinémathèque Française where he obtained enough state subsidies to cover the costs of its resurgence at its new site in the rue de Bercy. Berri died of a stroke on 12 January 2009, aged 74. He was
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    Digital photography

    Digital photography

    Digital photography uses an array of electronic photodetectors to capture the image focused by the lens, as opposed to an exposure on photographic film. The captured image is then digitzed and stored as a computer file ready for digital processing, viewing,digital publishing or printing. Until the advent of such technology, photographs were made by exposing light sensitive photographic film, and used chemical photographic processing to develop and stabilize the image. By contrast, digital photographs can be displayed, printed, stored, manipulated, transmitted, and archived using digital and computer techniques, without chemical processing. Digital photography is one of several forms of digital imaging. Digital images are also created by non-photographic equipment such as computer tomography scanners and radio telescopes. Digital images can also be made by scanning other photographic images. The first recorded attempt at building a digital camera was in 1975 by Steven Sasson, an engineer at Eastman Kodak. It used the then-new solid-state CCD image sensor chips developed by Fairchild Semiconductor in 1973. The camera weighed 8 pounds (3.6 kg), recorded black and white images to a
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Don Cheadle

    Don Cheadle

    Donald Frank "Don" Cheadle, Jr. (/ˈtʃiːdəl/; born November 29, 1964) is an American film actor and producer. Cheadle's breakout role came in Picket Fences and followed it with critically acclaimed performances in Devil in a Blue Dress, Rosewood and Boogie Nights. He then started a collaboration with director Steven Soderbergh that resulted in the movies Out of Sight, Traffic and Ocean's Eleven. Other memorable films include The Rat Pack, Things Behind the Sun, Academy Award for Best Picture winner Crash, Swordfish, Ocean's Twelve, Ocean's Thirteen, Reign Over Me, Talk to Me, Traitor and Iron Man 2. In 2004, his lead role as Rwandan hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina in the genocide drama film Hotel Rwanda earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. He also campaigns for the end of genocide in Darfur, Sudan, and co-authored a book concerning the issue titled Not On Our Watch: The Mission to End Genocide in Darfur and Beyond. Along with George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, David Pressman, and Jerry Weintraub, Cheadle co-founded the Not On Our Watch Project, an organization focusing global attention and resources to stop and prevent mass atrocities. In 2010, Cheadle was
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Federico Fellini

    Federico Fellini

    Federico Fellini (Italian pronunciation: [fedeˈriːko felˈliːni]; January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was an Italian film director and scriptwriter. Known for a distinct style that blends fantasy and baroque images, he is considered one of the most influential filmmakers of the 20th century, and is widely revered. He won five Academy Awards, becoming the person who won the highest number of Oscars for Best Foreign Language Film in history. Fellini was born on January 20, 1920 to middle-class parents in Rimini, then a small town on the Adriatic Sea. His father, Urbano Fellini (1894–1956), born to a family of Romagnol peasants and small landholders from Gambettola, moved to Rome in 1915 as a baker apprenticed to the Pantanella pasta factory. His mother, Ida Barbiani (1896–1984), came from a bourgeois Catholic family of Roman merchants. Despite her family’s vehement disapproval, she eloped with Urbano in 1917 to live at his parents' home in Gambettola. A civil marriage followed in 1918 with the religious ceremony held at Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome a year later. The couple settled in Rimini where Urbano became a traveling salesman and wholesale vendor. Fellini had two siblings:
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    0.00
    0 votes
    238

    George Roy Hill

    George Roy Hill (December 20, 1921 – December 27, 2002) was an American film director. He is most noted for directing such films as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting, which both starred the acting duo Paul Newman and Robert Redford. Other notable films are Slaughterhouse-Five, The World According to Garp, The World of Henry Orient, Hawaii, Thoroughly Modern Millie, The Great Waldo Pepper, Slap Shot, Funny Farm, A Little Romance with Laurence Olivier, and The Little Drummer Girl. He was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to George Roy and Helen Frances (Owens) Hill, part of a well-to-do Roman Catholic family with interests in the newspaper business; the family owned the Minneapolis Tribune. Hill was no relation to George W. Hill, director and cinematographer of numerous silent movies and early sound films in the 1920s and early 1930s. He was educated at The Blake School, one of Minnesota's most prestigious private schools. He had a love of flying. After school, he liked to visit the airport and his hobby was to memorize the records of World War I flying aces. He idolized U.S. pilot Speed Holman who, Hill once explained, "used to make his approach to the spectators at
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Grigori Chukhrai

    Grigori Chukhrai

    Grigori Naumovich Chukhrai (Russian: Григорий Наумович Чухрай, Ukrainian: Григорiй Наумович Чухрай; 23 May 1921 - 29 October 2001) was a prominent Soviet film director and screenwriter of Jewish origin. He is the father of director Pavel Chukhrai. He was born in Melitopol in the Zaporizhia Oblast of Ukraine. A decorated veteran of World War II, Chukhrai's wartime experiences profoundly affected him and the majority of his films were connected with events of the war. Drafted in 1939, he served in the 229th separate communications battalion of the 134th Infantry Division. From 1943 on, he served in airborne troops and took part in operation "Dnipro Troopers". At war's end, he studied filmmaking at the Soviet State Film School and then developed his craft as a director's assistant at the Kiev Film Studio. By the mid 1950s, he began writing and directing his own films, gaining cinematic recognition outside the Soviet Union at the 1957 Cannes Film Festival with his film Sorok pervyj (The Forty-first). In 1959, Chukhrai co-wrote and directed his greatest work, Ballad of a Soldier. A story of love and the tragedy of war made without the usual Soviet propaganda, the film received great
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    Jacques Demy

    Jacques Demy

    Jacques Demy (5 June 1931 – 27 October 1990) was one of the most approachable filmmakers to appear in the wake of the French New Wave. Uninterested in the formal experimentation of Alain Resnais, or the political agitation of Jean-Luc Godard, Demy instead created a self-contained fantasy world closer to that of François Truffaut, drawing on musicals, fairytales and the golden age of Hollywood. After working with the animator Paul Grimault and the filmmaker Georges Rouquier, Demy directed his first feature film, Lola, in 1961, with Anouk Aimée playing the eponymous cabaret singer. The Demy universe here emerges full-fledged. Characters burst into song (courtesy of composer and lifelong Demy-collaborator Michel Legrand); iconic Hollywood imagery is lovingly appropriated as in the opening scene with the man in a white Stetson in the Cadillac, daringly set to Beethoven's "Seventh Symphony"); plot is dictated by the director's fascination with fate, and stock themes of chance encounters and long-lost love; and the setting, as with so many of Demy's films, is the French Atlantic coast of his childhood, specifically the seaport town of Nantes. La Baie des Anges (The Bay of Angels, 1963),
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    Jane Campion

    Jane Campion

    Jane Campion (born 30 April 1954) is a New Zealand screenwriter, producer, and director based out of Australia. Campion is the second of four women ever nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director and is also the first female filmmaker in history to receive the Palme d'Or for directing the acclaimed film The Piano (1993). Campion was born in Wellington, New Zealand, the second daughter of Edith, an actress and writer and Richard Campion, a theater and opera director. With her older sister, Anna, born a year and half before her and brother, Michael, born seven years after, Campion grew up in the world of New Zealand theater.While initially rejecting the idea of a career in theater or acting she graduated with a bachelor's degree in Anthropology from Victoria University of Wellington in 1975. In 1976 Campion attended Chelsea Art School in London and travelled throughout Europe. She graduated with a bachelor's degree in painting at the Sydney College of the Arts in Australia in 1979. Based on her education at Chelsea Art School and the Sydney College of the Arts Campion cites surrealist painter Frida Kahlo and sculptor Joseph Beuys as major influences throughout her
    0.00
    0 votes
    242

    Joseph L. Mankiewicz

    Joseph Leo Mankiewicz (February 11, 1909 – February 5, 1993) was a film director, screenwriter, and producer. Mankiewicz had a long Hollywood career and is best known as the writer-director of All About Eve (1950), which was nominated for 14 Academy Awards and won six. He was brother to screenwriter and drama critic Herman J. Mankiewicz who also won an Oscar for co-writing Citizen Kane (1941). Joseph Mankiewicz was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania to Franz Mankiewicz (died 1941) and Johanna Blumenau, Jewish immigrants from Germany. He had a sister, Erna Mankiewicz (1901–1979), and a brother, Herman J. Mankiewicz, who became a screenwriter. At age four, Mankiewicz moved with his family to New York City where he graduated in 1924 from Stuyvesant High School. In 1928, he obtained a bachelor's degree from Columbia University. For a time he worked in Berlin, Germany, as a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune newspaper before entering the motion picture business. Comfortable in a variety of genres and able to elicit career performances from actors and actresses alike, Joseph L. Mankiewicz combined ironic, sophisticated scripts with a precise, sometimes stylised mise en scène.
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Kaneto Shindo

    Kaneto Shindo

    Kaneto Shindo (新藤 兼人, Shindō Kaneto, April 22, 1912 – May 29, 2012) was a Japanese film director, screenwriter, film producer, and author. He directed 48 and wrote scripts for 238 films. His best known films as a director include Children of Hiroshima, The Naked Island, Onibaba, Kuroneko and A Last Note. His scripts were filmed by such directors as Kon Ichikawa, Keisuke Kinoshita, Fumio Kamei and Tadashi Imai. Shindo was born in Hiroshima Prefecture, and he made several films about Hiroshima and the atomic bomb. Like his early mentor Kenji Mizoguchi, many of his films feature strong female characters. He was a pioneer of independent film production in Japan, founding a company called Kindai Eiga Kyokai. He continued working as a scriptwriter, director and latterly author until his death at the age of 100. Shindo made a series of autobiographical films, beginning with the first film he directed, 1951's Story of a Beloved Wife, about his struggle to become a screenwriter, through 1986's Tree Without Leaves, about his childhood, born into a wealthy family which became destitute, 2000's By Player, about his film company, seen through the eyes of his friend Taiji Tonoyama, and his last
    0.00
    0 votes
    244

    Kathleen Kennedy

    Kathleen Kennedy (born June 5, 1953) is an American film producer. In 1981 she co-founded Amblin Entertainment with her husband, Frank Marshall, and Steven Spielberg. She is known for producing the Jurassic Park films, and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Kennedy is the second-most successful film producer of all time (after Steven Spielberg) in terms of domestic box office receipts with totals at just over $5 billion. Kennedy was born in Berkeley, California, the daughter of Dione Marie "Dede" (née Dousseau), a one-time theater actress, and Donald R. Kennedy, a judge and attorney. Kennedy graduated from Shasta High School in Redding, California, in 1971. She continued her education at San Diego State University where she graduated, majoring in telecommunications and film. In her final year, Kennedy got a job at a local San Diego TV station, KCST, taking on various roles and posts including camera operator, video editor, floor director and finally KCST news production coordinator. After her employment with KCST, she then went on to produce a local talk show, entitled You're On, for the station for four years before moving to Los Angeles. In Los Angeles Kennedy secured her first film
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    Ken Loach

    Ken Loach

    Kenneth "Ken" Loach (born 17 June 1936) is a Palme D'Or winning English film and television director. He is known for his naturalistic, social realist directing style and for his socialist beliefs, which are evident in his film treatment of social issues such as homelessness (Cathy Come Home) and labour rights (Riff-Raff). Loach was born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, the son of Vivien (née Hamlin) and John Loach. He attended King Edward VI Grammar School and following two years in the Royal Air Force read law at St Peter's College, Oxford. There he performed in the now well-established comedy group, the Oxford Revue. He initially worked as an assistant director at Northampton repertory theatre (now known as Royal & Derngate), but in the early 1960s moved into television direction and was credited in this role on early episodes of Z-Cars in 1964. In 1966, Loach made the influential docudrama Cathy Come Home portraying working-class people affected by homelessness and unemployment, and presenting a powerful and influential critique of the workings of the Social Services. Soon afterwards with Poor Cow (1967) he started directing films for the cinema, and in 1969 made Kes, the story of a
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    Kevin Costner

    Kevin Costner

    Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is an American actor, singer, musician, producer, director, and businessman. He has won two Academy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, and one Emmy Award, and has been nominated for three BAFTA (British Academy of Film and Television Arts) Awards. Costner's roles include Lt. John J. Dunbar in the film Dances with Wolves, Jim Garrison in JFK, Ray Kinsella in Field of Dreams, Robin Hood in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, Crash Davis in Bull Durham, Robert "Butch" Haynes in A Perfect World, Frank Farmer in The Bodyguard, Lt. Cmdr. Tom Farrell in No Way Out, Mariner in Waterworld, Eliot Ness in The Untouchables and Devil Anse Hatfield in Hatfields & McCoys. Costner will be playing the role of Superman's adoptive father, Jonathan Kent, in the 2013 film, Man of Steel. Costner also founded the band Modern West, and has performed with the band since 2007. Costner was born in Lynwood, California, the youngest of three sons (the middle of whom died at birth). His mother, Sharon Rae (née Tedrick), was a welfare worker, and his father, William Costner, was an electrician and later utilities executive at Southern California Edison. Costner's
    0.00
    0 votes
    247

    Max Ophüls

    Maximillian Oppenheimer (6 May 1902, Saarbrücken, Germany – 26 March 1957, Hamburg, Germany) — known as Max Ophüls — was an influential German-born film director who worked in Germany (1931–33), France (1933–40), the United States (1947–50), and France again (1950–57). He made nearly 30 films altogether, those from the last period being especially noted: La Ronde (1950), Le Plaisir (1952), The Earrings of Madame de... (1953) and Lola Montès (1955). Max Ophüls was the son of Leopold Oppenheimer, a Jewish textile manufacturer from Saarbrücken and owner of several textile shops in Germany, and his wife Helen. He took the pseudonym Ophüls during the early part of his theatrical career so that, should he fail, it wouldn't embarrass his father. Initially envisioning an acting career, he started as a stage actor in 1919 and played at the Aachen Theatre from 1921 to 1923. He then worked as a theater director, becoming the first director at the city theater of Dortmund. Ophüls moved into theatre production in 1924. He became creative director of the Burgtheater in Vienna in 1926. Having had 200 plays to his credit, he turned to film production in 1929, when he became a dialogue director
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    Nicolas Roeg

    Nicolas Roeg

    Nicolas Jack Roeg, CBE, BSC (born 15 August 1928) is an English film director and cinematographer. Roeg was born in London, the son of Mabel Gertrude (née Silk) and Jack Nicolas Roeg. He started his film career by contributing to the visual look of Lawrence of Arabia and Roger Corman's The Masque of the Red Death, and co-directing Performance in 1970. He would later direct such landmark films as Walkabout, Don't Look Now and The Man Who Fell to Earth. Roeg's films are known for having scenes and images from the plot presented in a disarranged fashion, out of chronological and causal order, requiring the viewer to do the work of mentally rearranging them to comprehend the storyline. They seem, "to shatter reality into a thousand pieces" and are "unpredictable, fascinating, cryptic and liable to leave you wondering what the hell just happened. . . ." Roeg displays a "freedom from conventional film narration," and his films often consist of an "intriguing kaleidoscopic multiplication of images." A characteristic of Roeg's films is that they are edited in disjunctive and semi-coherent ways that make full sense only in the film's final moments, when a crucial piece of information
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    Roman Polański

    Roman Polański

    Roman Polanski (born Rajmund Roman Thierry Polański, 18 August 1933) is a Polish-French film director, producer, writer and actor. Having made films in Poland, Britain, France and the USA, he is considered one of the few "truly international filmmakers." Polanski's films have inspired diverse directors, including the Coen brothers, Atom Egoyan, Darren Aronofsky, Park Chan-wook, Abel Ferrara, and Wes Craven. Born in Paris to Polish parents, he moved with his family back to Poland in 1937, shortly before the outbreak of World War II. He survived the Holocaust and was educated in Poland and became a director of both art house and commercial films. Polanski's first feature-length film, Knife in the Water (1962), made in Poland, was nominated for a United States Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film but was beaten by Federico Fellini's 8½. He has since received five more Oscar nominations, along with two Baftas, four Césars, a Golden Globe Award and the Palme d'Or of the Cannes Film Festival in France. In the United Kingdom he directed three films, beginning with Repulsion (1965). In 1968 he moved to the United States, and cemented his status by directing the horror film
    0.00
    0 votes
    250

    William Wyler

    William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was an American film director, producer and screenwriter. Notable works included Ben-Hur (1959), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), and Mrs. Miniver (1942), all of which won Wyler Academy Awards for Best Director, as well as Best Picture in their respective years. Wyler won his first Oscar nomination for directing Dodsworth in 1936, starring Walter Huston, Ruth Chatterton and Mary Astor, "sparking a 20-year run of almost unbroken greatness." Film historian Ian Freer calls Wyler a "bona fide perfectionist", whose penchant for retakes and an attempt to hone every last nuance, "became the stuff of legend." His ability to direct a string of classic literary adaptations into huge box-office and critical successes made him one of "Hollywood's most bankable moviemakers" during the 1930s and 1940s. Other popular Wyler films include Funny Girl (1968), How to Steal a Million (1966), The Big Country (1958), Roman Holiday (1953), The Heiress (1949), The Letter (1940), The Westerner (1940), Wuthering Heights (1939), Jezebel (1938), Dodsworth (1936), and Hell's Heroes (1930). Wyler was born Willi Wyler to a Jewish family in Mulhouse, Alsace (part of
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Mark Robert Davey (photographer) of All Time

    Top List Voters