Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 248 views
  • 35 votes
  • 35 voters
  • 3%
Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time

More about Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time:

Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time has gotten 248 views and has gathered 35 votes from 35 voters. O O

Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time is a top list in the General category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of General or Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about General on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Whirlyball

    Whirlyball

    • Wham-O product used: Trac Ball
    Whirlyball is a team sport invented by Stan Mangum that combines elements of basketball and jai alai, or rather a combination of lacrosse and bumper cars, with the players riding Whirlybugs, small electric vehicles similar to bumper cars. Because play requires a special court, it is played in only a handful of locations in the United States and Canada. A Whirlyball team consists of five players. Each player rides a Whirlybug and carries a scoop, with which he or she can pass the ball, usually a Wiffle ball, to teammates and shoot at the goal, a circular target above the two opposite ends of the court. A score in Whirlyball is called a "Whirlic". Players are not allowed to leave their cars or to touch the ball with their hands. Other than that, almost anything is allowed, within certain bounds of safety, e.g., one is not allowed to ram a player from behind (four-point penalty). Games played by veterans at a national level can get particularly vicious, although it is extremely rare for a serious injury to occur. The scoops provided for recreational use are manufactured by Mangum's company, Flo-Tron Enterprises, while many players at the national level prefer to use a Trac Ball scoop
    7.40
    5 votes
    2

    Dodge Frisbee

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Dodge disc (or dodge Frisbee after the trademarked brand name) is a flying disc game, based on dodgeball but using a disc in place of the ball or balls. As in dodgeball, if a player is hit by a disc and fails to catch it, then the player is "out" and exits the field of play. If a player catches the thrown disc without its touching the ground, either before or after being hit by it, or before or after it hits another player, then the player who threw the disc is out instead. The game ends when there is only one player left. The game usually ends with a "shootout" between two players, each with several discs. The final players tend to execute several simultaneous "attacks" until one is hit without catching a disc thrown by the opponent. A variant of the game, Dodgebee, is a trademark of Hero Discs. The Dodgebee disc is very soft, and thus can be thrown very fast without injuring any of the players.
    8.50
    4 votes
    3
    Goaltimate

    Goaltimate

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Goaltimate is a half-court disc game derived from ultimate, similar to hot box. The object is to score points by throwing a flying disc to a teammate in a small scoring area, through a large semicircular hoop called the goal. The name is a portmanteau of "goal" and "ultimate". Goaltimate was invented by players of ultimate at Wellesley High School. It was invented on Christmas Day around 1980, on hard-pack snow, after not enough players for ultimate showed up. It was originally played between the lower spars of a set H-shaped football uprights. A Boston player brought the game to San Diego, where it was further developed and replaced the uprights with a large hoop made with PVC pipes. In 1999, Rick Conner, a San Diego entrepreneur with interest in the sport, subsidized a goaltimate tournament with a US$30,000 purse for the winners, inviting top players from competitive ultimate teams. The San Diego team took the prize, defeating a team from Boston in the finals. Through this introduction, the sport rapidly spread across the US as a pickup alternative to ultimate. Play consists of two teams of four players each, competing in a large ovoid area with the goal at one end and a clear
    8.00
    4 votes
    4
    Disc dog

    Disc dog

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Disc dog is the more generic name for what is commonly called Frisbee dog. In disc dog competitions, dogs and their human flying disc throwers compete in events such as distance catching and somewhat choreographed freestyle catching. The sport celebrates the bond between handler and dog, by allowing them to work together. The term "disc" is preferred because "Frisbee" is a trademark (held by Wham-O) for a brand of flying disc. The sport got its start in the early 1970s, paralleling the rise in popularity of Frisbee sport. The definitive moment came on August 5, 1974 when Alex Stein, a 19-year-old college student from Ohio, and his dog, Ashley Whippet, jumped the fence at a nationally broadcast baseball game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Cincinnati Reds. Stein had with him a couple of flying discs, which he threw for the dog. Ashley astonished the crowd with his disc-catching, as he ran up to 35 miles per hour (56 km/h) and leaped 9 feet (2.7 m) in the air to snag the disc. The stunt was so novel that the game was stopped and Joe Garagiola continued to announce the flying disc action on the field. Finally, after eight minutes, Stein was escorted off the field and arrested.
    7.50
    4 votes
    5

    Guts frisbee

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Guts or guts disc (sometimes guts Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a disc game inspired by dodgeball, involving teams throwing a flying disc (rather than balls) at members of the opposing team. One to five team members stand in a line facing the opposing team across the court, with the two teams lined up parallel to each other. Which team begins play is determined "flipping the disc", an action similar to a coin toss, but using the disc itself. One member of the team is then selected to start play. That member then raises an arm to indicate readiness to throw, at which point the members of the opposing team freeze in position. The thrower then throws the disc as hard as possible at someone on the opposing team. If the thrower misses the "scoring area" (a demarcated area a bit larger than the space occupied by the opposing team), the receiving team scores a point. If a member of the receiving team catches the disc cleanly, neither team scores a point. If the throw is within the scoring area and the receiving team fails to catch, or catches but drops the disc, the throwing team gets a point. The receiving team then picks up the disc and becomes the throwing
    7.67
    3 votes
    6
    Fricket

    Fricket

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Fricket or disc cricket is a disc game generally played by two teams of two players each (two-on-two), though it is possible to play one-on-one. The game is roughly derived from cricket (though in some ways having more in common with horseshoes), and played with flying discs. Fricket is also sometimes called catchy-throwy, cups or crispy wickets or stickupski. The name "fricket" is derived from a combination of the words "Frisbee" (a trademarked flying disc brand name) and "cricket". Fricket is a non-contact game, and therefore no protective equipment is necessary. Four 4- or 5-foot (1.5 m)-long wickets are needed for this game, though bamboo garden stakes, wooden dowels and steel or plastic rods also make suitable substitutes for wickets. A 12-ounce plastic cup is needed to set atop each of the four wickets, along with a flying disc within the specifications for the disc game ultimate (sport). The wickets are set into the ground in the shape of a long rectangle, with one pair approximately 15 inches (380 mm) apart (or "a disc and a fist") and the second pair approximately 40 feet (12 m) away, directly opposite the first pair, with the field forming right angles at each
    7.33
    3 votes
    7

    Friskee

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Friskee (into Disc games) Friskee is a sport played with a flying disc, two gates and two teams. One team has to throw the disk through the other team's gate. The person currently holding the disc cannot run until it leaves his hand. There is no arbitrator and everyone is permitted to stop any opposing player in any way. But the gentlemanly spirit of the game must be maintained, so heavy injuries are few. Friskee is a young sport, played for the first time in 2000, but every week there are more friskee players. It is similar to Ultimate except with fewer players and fewer rules. A similar game is Stop the Chump.
    7.33
    3 votes
    8

    Hot Box

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Hot box (or simply box) is a non-contact team sport which is similar to ultimate, but played on a smaller field and with fewer players. Like ultimate, the object of the game is to score points by passing the disc into the end zone; however, in Hot Box there is generally only one end zone and it is of much smaller size than an Ultimate end zone. In this way, hot box is a "half-court" (see basketball) variant of ultimate. Because of these reduced requirements, it is often played when not enough players are available to play ultimate. For the most part, hot box follows the rules of play of ultimate. The major differences are: Many variations on the rules of hot box exist. Common variants include changing the dimensions of the field, using a circle instead of a square for the clear line, a stall count of 5 or 7 (instead of 10), and a "no poaching" clause which prevents defenders from guarding the endzone instead of their assigned player. Some variant games also exist. Double box involves a short rectangular field with two small end zones rather than one; there is no clearing line, but when a team gains possession of the disc after a turnover they must attack the end zone that their
    6.33
    3 votes
    9

    Double Disc Court

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Double Disc Court (into Disc games) Double Disc Court (DDC) is a sport played with two flying disc. It is played between two teams of two players each. Teammates stand in the same court. The goal is to defend a court from an attack by the opponents. Two identical square courts are located on a level playing field of grass measuring 13 meters on a side. The distance between the courts is 17 meters. Attacks are made in two ways: by throwing a disc in play into the opponents' court in an attempt to have the disc come to rest within that court without ever having touched out-of-bounds, or by causing both discs to be touched by a player or players on the opposing team at the same time (called a "double"). A team scores a point whenever they make a successful attack or whenever an opponent throws a disc out-of-bounds. The first team to score the requisite number of points as determined by the competitive format wins the game.
    7.50
    2 votes
    10
    Durango Boot

    Durango Boot

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Durango boot (or simply Durango or Boot) is a competitive, non-contact sport that makes use of a flying disc (known popularly by the trademark Frisbee), somewhat similar to Ultimate. The name Durango comes from the fact that the sport was first played in Durango, Colorado. The first players used boots to mark the field, so "boot" was added to the name. The game is played by two teams on a field with two cones set close together at either end. It is optimally played with three players on each side. A disc is flipped, heads or tails is called, and the winner starts on offense. The objective of the offense is to try to get into position to knock over a cone. If the player fails to complete a throw, or a stall count of 6 is reached, it is a turnover. The thrower does not need to be marked for the stall count to occur. On a turnover, the defense becomes the offense, but has to take the disc to the "take-back zone" before they can attempt to score. Games are generally played to 3 points, with three games in a series. Most of the original rules are intact, with the following exceptions/amendments: There is only one scoring cone per side, generally a Nalgene bottle. To score you must knock
    10.00
    1 votes
    11
    Ultimate

    Ultimate

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Ultimate is a team sport played with a flying disc. The object of the game is to score points by passing the disc to a player in the opposing end zone, similar to an end zone in American football or the in-goal area in rugby. Players may not run with the disc, and may only move one foot (pivot) while holding the disc. While originally called ultimate frisbee, it is now officially called ultimate in many areas because Frisbee is registered as a trademark, albeit genericized, for the line of discs made by the Wham-O toy company. In 2008, there were 4.9 million Ultimate players in the US. The original "frisbee" was nothing more than a tin pie plate from the Frisbie Pie Company located in New Haven, CT. It was in the early 1920s that students from Yale started playing catch with these pie tins. Truck drivers for the Frisbie company began throwing the pie tins to passersby, and it eventually became a major activity introduced to soldiers around the country during WWII. In 1948, a man by the name of Fred Morrison developed a plastic version of the disc which he called the Flying Saucer, and then in 1951, created an improvised version known as the Pluto Platter. The Wham-O Manufacturing
    9.00
    1 votes
    12

    Flutterguts

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Flutterguts or Flutter Frisbee or Flubber Guts (in Europe) is a disc game used mainly as practice catching flying disc. It may have been derived from the game Guts frisbee. It is usually played by 2-6 players. The field is a small area, and varies on size depending on how many people are on each team. It is split into two halves, each about an armspan deep by several wide. The basic gameplay is as follows; The disc must leave the server's hand going up, but come down while it is in the area of the receiving team. If it lands out of the receiving team's area, near the border, or falls immediately, the receiving team may request a rethrow. To make it hard to catch, the disc is held upside down, supported by the thumb in the center and other fingers on the rim. It is then pushed forward and slightly up. This should cause it to flip backwards, making it challenging to catch. The disc must never rest on any part of the body, other than the hands, or else a 'trap' can be called, voiding the point. It can never be touched by both hands simultaneously, or else 'two hands' can be called, to the same effect as a 'trap' or dropped serve. There is no such thing as 'two one-handed catches
    7.00
    1 votes
    13
    Freestyle frisbee

    Freestyle frisbee

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Flying disc freestyle, also known as freestyle Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name, is a sport and performing art characterized by creative, acrobatic, and athletic maneuvers with a flying disc. Freestyle is performed individually or more commonly in groups, both competitively and recreationally. The Freestyle Players Association (FPA) is the governing body of freestyle, “dedicated to the growth of freestyle disc play as a lifetime recreation and competitive sport.” The organization is involved in international tournaments and rankings as well as education grants and promotional activities. Every year, the FPA holds a world championship with divisions in Open Pairs, Mixed Pairs, Open Co-op, and Women’s Pairs. Competitive freestyle is usually judged on execution, difficulty, and artistic impression by a panel of players. By the late 1960s and early 1970s, modern flying discs had become a popular pastime in the United States, developing into to various disciplines such as double disc court, guts, ultimate, disc golf, and freestyle. At the time, most disc players were overall players, participating in all the various disciplines. Freestyle began as a hobby among many
    4.00
    1 votes
    14
    Disc golf

    Disc golf

    • Wham-O product used: Frisbee
    Disc golf is a flying disc game in which individual players throw a flying disc at a target. According to the Professional Disc Golf Association, "The object of the game is to traverse a course from beginning to end in the fewest number of throws of the disc." Of the more than 3000 established disc golf courses as of 2010, approximately 87% are free. The number of disc golf courses has more than doubled in 8 years from 2000 to 2008. The game is played in about 40 countries around the world. The early history of disc golf is closely tied to the history of the recreational flying disc (especially as popularized by the trademarked Frisbee) and may have been invented in the early 1900s. Modern disc golf started in the early 1960s, when it seems to have been invented in many places and by many people independently. Students at Rice University in Houston, Texas, for example, held tournaments with trees as targets as early as 1964, and in the early 1960s players in Pendleton King Park in Augusta, Georgia would toss Frisbees in 50-gallon barrel trash cans designated as targets. The true pioneer of the sport of Frisbee Golf is Mr. Kevin Donnelly, who, until 2011, was unknown for his
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Games based on Wham-O products of All Time

    Top List Voters