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Best Engineering Project of All Time

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Best Engineering Project of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Engineering Project of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Engineering Project of All Time has gotten 239 views and has gathered 618 votes from 618 voters. O O

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    16
    Design and construction of the World Trade Center

    Design and construction of the World Trade Center

    The project was developed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which hired architect Minoru Yamasaki who came up with the specific idea for twin towers. After extensive negotiations, the New Jersey and New York State governments, which oversee the Port Authority, agreed to support the World Trade Center project at the Radio Row site on the lower-west side of Manhattan. To make the agreement acceptable to New Jersey, the Port Authority agreed to take over the bankrupt Hudson & Manhattan Railroad (renamed as PATH), which brought commuters from New Jersey to the Lower Manhattan site. The towers were designed as framed tube structures, which provided tenants with open floor plans, uninterrupted by columns or walls. This was accomplished using numerous closely spaced perimeter columns to provide much of the strength to the structure, along with gravity load shared with the core columns. The elevator system, which made use of sky lobbies and a system of express and local elevators, allowed substantial floor space to be freed up for use as office space by making the structural core smaller. The design and construction of the World Trade Center twin towers involved many other
    6.83
    6 votes
    25

    Design and Construction of Skylon

    The design and construction of Skylon preceded the opening of the Festival of Britain in 1951.  It was designed by Hidalgo Moya, Philip Powell and Felix Samuely, and fabricated by Painter Brothers of Hereford, England, before being constructed on London's South Bank between Westminster Bridge and Hungerford Bridge.  The architects' design consisted of a steel cigar shape which appeared to float above the ground, due to thin cables.  The design was made structurally feasible by the engineer Felix Samuely who, at the time, was a lecturer at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in Bedford Square, Bloomsbury.
    7.20
    5 votes
    28
    Design and Construction of The Dome of Discovery

    Design and Construction of The Dome of Discovery

    The Dome of Discovery was designed and constructed for the 1951 Festival of Britain.  It was designed by architect Ralph Tubbs in the Modernist Style and the consulting structural engineers were Freeman, Fox and Partners, of which employees Oleg Kerensky (later Dr. Oleg) and Gilbert Roberts (later Sir Gilbert) played a predominant role.
    8.25
    4 votes
    36

    Stockholm City Station

    Stockholm City Station is a railway station which is under construction in downtown Stockholm, Sweden. Scheduled to open in 2017, the station is located on the Stockholm City Line and will be located directly below T-Centralen, the central station of the Stockholm Metro, and with interchange with Stockholm Central Station. The station will serve all Stockholm Commuter Rail trains. The station will be located directly below T-Centralen, and will allow quicker transfer between metro and commuter rail than the current solution, with the commuter trains stopping at the central station. City will have two entrances, which will be common with the metro station. One exits at Vasaplan in with access to the Arlanda Express, which will be common for the commuter rail and metro, and the other at Centralplan beside Scandic Continental. The station will be located between 35 and 40 metres (115 and 130 ft) below ground level. At ground level, the station will have a glass facade to allow as much sunlight as possible to penetrate down to the track level. An ascent from the station will be built to the metro's Green Line platforms towards Hagsätra, Skarpnäck and Farsta, and the Red Line's
    6.80
    5 votes
    58
    Caledonian Canal

    Caledonian Canal

    • Discipline: Hydraulic engineering
    The Caledonian Canal is a canal in Scotland that connects the Scottish east coast at Inverness with the west coast at Corpach near Fort William. It was constructed in the early nineteenth century by engineer Thomas Telford, and is a sister canal of the Göta Canal in Sweden, also constructed by Telford. The canal runs some 62 miles (100 km) from northeast to southwest. Only one third of the entire length is man-made, the rest being formed by Loch Dochfour, Loch Ness, Loch Oich, and Loch Lochy. These lochs are part of the Great Glen, a geological fault in the Earth's crust. There are 29 locks (including eight at Neptune's Staircase, Banavie), four aqueducts and 10 bridges in the course of the canal. The canal was conceived as a way of providing much-needed employment to the Highland region. The area was depressed as a result of the Highland Clearances, which had deprived many of their homes and jobs, and faced with laws which sought to eradicate their culture, including the right to wear tartan, to play bagpipes, and to speak Gaelic, many were emigrating to Canada or to the Scottish lowlands. The canal would also provide a safer passage for wooden sailing ships from the north east of
    8.00
    3 votes
    70
    Wind farm

    Wind farm

    • Discipline: Aeolic Engineering
    A wind farm is a group of wind turbines in the same location used to produce electric power. A large wind farm may consist of several hundred individual wind turbines, and cover an extended area of hundreds of square miles, but the land between the turbines may be used for agricultural or other purposes. A wind farm may also be located offshore. Many of the largest operational onshore wind farms are located in the USA and China. The Gansu Wind Farm in China has over 5,000 MW installed with a goal of 20,000 MW by 2020. China has several other "wind power bases" of similar size. The Alta Wind Energy Center in California is the largest onshore wind farm outside of China, with a capacity of 1020 MW of power. As of February 2012, the Walney Wind Farm in United Kingdom is the largest offshore wind farm in the world at 367 MW, followed by Thanet Offshore Wind Project (300 MW), also in the UK. There are many large wind farms under construction and these include Anholt Offshore Wind Farm (400 MW), BARD Offshore 1 (400 MW), Clyde Wind Farm (350 MW), Greater Gabbard wind farm (500 MW), Lincs Wind Farm (270 MW), London Array (1000 MW), Lower Snake River Wind Project (343 MW), Macarthur Wind
    9.00
    2 votes
    74

    Briton Ferry Docks

    Britin Ferry Dock is a minor port in South Wales, designed by Isabard Kingdom Brunel. The dock gate which he also designed was a wrought iron boyant gate with 5 vertical bulkheads and 6 decks which was last repaired in 1929. The dock was served by the South Wales Railway which Brunel had also designed, but which was completed after his death by his assistant, Robert Pearson Brereton and opened in 1861. The dock served principally the South Wales Coalfields.
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Initial Design and Construction of the Royal Festival Hall

    Initial Design and Construction of the Royal Festival Hall

    The Royal Festival Hall, in London's South Bank, was initially designed to be part of the 1951 Festival of Britain.  The commisioning architect was Hugh Casson, the Director of Architecture for the Festival of Britain, who appointed the design of the Royal Festival Hall to architects Leslie Martin, Peter Moro and Robert Matthew, all employees of the London County Council's Architects' Department.  
    The hall's design is unashamedly Modernist, the Festival's commissioning architect (Hugh Casson) having taken the decision to appoint only young architects.  Leslie Martin was just 39 when he was appointed to lead the design team in late 1948.  Martin designed the structure as an 'egg in a box', a term he used to describe the separation of the curved auditorium space from the surrounding building and the noise and vibration of the adjacent railway viaduct.  Later Sir Thomas Beecham used similar imagery, calling the building a 'giant chicken coop'
    The foundation stone was laid by Clement Attlee, then Prime Minister, in 1949 on the site of the former Lion Brewery, built in 1837.
    6.50
    4 votes
    88
    Menai Suspension Bridge

    Menai Suspension Bridge

    The Menai Suspension Bridge (Welsh: Pont Grog y Borth) is a suspension bridge between the island of Anglesey and the mainland of Wales. Designed by Thomas Telford and completed in 1826, it was the first modern suspension bridge in the world. Before the bridge was completed in 1826, the island had no fixed connection to the mainland and all movements to and from Anglesey were by ferry (or, with difficulty, on foot at low tide). The main source of income on Anglesey was from the sale of cattle, and to move them to the markets of the inland counties or London, they had to be driven into the water and swum across the Menai Straits. The Act of Union 1800 increased the need for transport to Ireland, and with Holyhead as one of the principal terminals to Dublin it was decided to build a bridge. Thomas Telford was assigned the task of improving the route from London to Holyhead, and one of the key improvements was his design of the suspension bridge over the Menai Strait between a point near Bangor on the mainland and the village of Porthaethwy (which is now also known as Menai Bridge) on Anglesey. The design of the bridge had to allow for Royal Navy sailing ships 100 feet (30 m) tall to
    5.60
    5 votes
    91
    Plymouth Breakwater

    Plymouth Breakwater

    • Discipline: Marine engineering
    Plymouth Breakwater is a 1,560-metre (1,710 yd) stone breakwater protecting Plymouth Sound and the anchorages near Plymouth, Devon, England. It is 13 metres (43 ft) wide at the top and the base is 65 metres (213 ft). It lies in about 10 metres (33 ft) of water. Around 4 million tons of rock were used in its construction in 1812 at the then-colossal cost of £1.5 million (equivalent to £74.7 million today). In 1806, as the Napoleonic Wars impended, Lord St. Vincent commissioned John Rennie and Joseph Whidbey to plan a means of making Plymouth Bay a safe anchorage for the Channel Fleet. In 1811 came the order to begin construction; Whidbey was appointed Acting Superintending Engineer. This task required great engineering, organizational and political skills, as the many strictly technical challenges were complicated by the significant resources devoted to the project, from which various parties evidenced a desire for advantage. Nearly 4,000,000 (four million) tons of stone were quarried and transported, using about a dozen ships innovatively designed by the two engineers. A paper to the Royal Society suggests that Whidbey found many fossils as a result of the quarrying necessary to
    8.50
    2 votes
    120
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Göta Canal

    Göta Canal

    The Göta Canal (Swedish: Göta kanal) is a Swedish canal constructed in the early 19th century. It formed the backbone of a waterway stretching some 382 miles (614 km), linking a number of lakes and rivers to provide a route from Gothenburg (Swedish:Göteborg) on the west coast to Söderköping on the Baltic Sea via the river Göta älv and the Trollhätte kanal, through the large lakes Vänern and Vättern. The canal itself is 118 miles (190 km) long, of which 54 miles (87 km) were dug or blasted, with a width varying between 23–46 ft (7–14 m) and a maximum depth of about 9 ft (3 m). It has 58 locks and can accommodate vessels up to 105 ft (32 m) long, 21 ft (7 m) wide and 9 ft (2.8 m) in draft. Göta Canal is a sister canal of Caledonian Canal in Scotland, which was also constructed by Thomas Telford. The canal is nicknamed the "divorce ditch." It earned this nickname from the troubles that couples have to endure while trying to navigate the many locks by themselves. The idea of a canal across southern Sweden was first put forward as early as 1516, by Hans Brask, the bishop of Linköping. However, it was not until the start of the 19th century that Brask's proposals were put into action by
    5.75
    4 votes
    142
    Craigellachie Bridge

    Craigellachie Bridge

    The Craigellachie Bridge is a cast iron arch bridge located at Craigellachie which is near to the village of Aberlour in Moray, Scotland. It was designed by the renowned civil engineer Thomas Telford and built from 1812–1814. The bridge has a single span of approximately 46 metres (151 ft) and was revolutionary for its time, in that it used an extremely slender arch which was not possible using traditional masonry construction. The ironwork was cast at the Plas Kynaston iron foundry at Cefn Mawr, near Ruabon in Denbighshire by William Hazledine, who cast a number of Telford bridges. The ironwork was transported from the foundry through the Ellesmere Canal and Pontcysyllte Aqueduct then by sea to Speymouth, where it was loaded onto wagons and taken to the site. Testing in the 1960s revealed that the cast-iron had an unusually high tensile strength. This was likely specified by Telford because, unlike in traditional masonry arch bridges, some sections of the arch are not in compression under loading. At each end of the structure there are two 15 m (49 ft) high masonry mock-medieval towers, featuring arrow slits and miniature crenellated battlements. The bridge was in regular use
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Design and Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge

    Design and Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge

    The Golden Gate Bridge was the longest suspension bridge span in the world when it was completed in 1937, and has become one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and of the United States. Despite its span length being surpassed by eight other bridges since its completion, it still has the second longest suspension bridge main span in the United States, after the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York City. It has been declared one of the modern Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.
    8.00
    1 votes
    159
    7.00
    2 votes
    172
    Stockholm City Line

    Stockholm City Line

    The Stockholm City Line (Swedish: Citybanan) is a railway tunnel under construction beneath central Stockholm in Sweden which will be used by the Stockholm Commuter Rail. The line will be 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) long, double track and electrified. It will have two stations: Stockholm City Station will be located directly below T-Centralen, the central station of the Stockholm Metro. Stockholm Odenplan Station will be the other station, and will be located next to the Odenplan metro station. The line is scheduled to enter service in 2017. The tunnel will significantly improve the traffic throughput to and from south of Stockholm as there are only two tracks in that direction from Stockholm Central Station, the same number that were in place in 1871 when the railway was originally built. It has 24 scheduled trains per hour in each direction. The commuter trains pass Stockholm with up to 16 trains per hour per direction. The other eight are regional and long-distance trains. The tunnel will take all commuter trains, allowing more regional and intercity trains to operate along the old line. Placing the commuter rail traffic into a tunnel of its own will thus allow increased capacity for
    5.67
    3 votes
    206
    Port-au-Prince Cathedral

    Port-au-Prince Cathedral

    The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de L'Assomption), often called Port-au-Prince Cathedral (French: Cathédrale de Port-au-Prince), was a cathedral in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Built between 1884 and 1914, it was dedicated on December 13, 1928 (1928-12-13), and became the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Port-au-Prince. The cathedral was destroyed in the 12 January 2010 earthquake. Prior to its destruction, the cupola of the north tower of the Cathedral served as the front lighthouse of a pair guiding mariners into Port-au-Prince harbor. The roof and the towers flanking the main entrance collapsed in the 12 January 2010 earthquake, although the lower parts of the walls remain standing. The earthquake also destroyed the nunciature and the archdiocesan offices, killing Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot instantly and Vicar General Charles Benoit later. In March 2012, the Archdiocese of Port-au-Prince launched an international design competition inviting the architects of the world to submit ideas that will inform the reconstruction of the cathedral. A website www.ndapap.org was activated to promote and manage the competition.
    6.00
    1 votes
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