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  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 118 views
  • 90 votes
  • 90 voters
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Best drink of All Time

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Best drink of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best drink of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best drink of All Time has gotten 118 views and has gathered 90 votes from 90 voters. O O

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    1
    Survivor

    Survivor

    Survivor is a team based drinking game. It is very similar to Flip Cup. There are two teams of four, each lined up on either side of a table (usually the same table used for Beer Pong. This game is a relay race with a twist. The first two people must bounce two ping pong balls into their own cup, once both balls are in, they must drink the beer in the cup, place the balls on the towel in the center of the table (usually done by just dumping them out of your cup) and then by placing the cup on the edge of the table (right-side up), slightly overlapping, flip the cup so that it is upside-down. Once the cup has landed upside down, the next person on your team can go. The winning team is the first to have all four (or less depending on the round) complete all of their team’s cups. The beer in the cups must be no lower then one quarter inch below the indented line on the Survivor cups. However, you will most likely be ridiculed if you attempt to go for the lowest. The judges have final say as to the cups being filled. YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED to bat balls away from the other team. If a ball comes to your side of the table, it is yours, and your teammates responsibility to keep the balls on
    6.50
    6 votes
    2
    21

    21

    21 (sometimes called Bagram or Twenty Plus One) is a drinking game. The game progresses by counting up from 1 to 21, with the player who calls "21" suffering a drinking penalty before the next round starts. The loser may add one new rule to the game, and starts the new round. Players are arranged in a circle, facing inwards. The game begins with one player calling the direction of play by saying, "I propose a game of XXXX! To my left..." or "To my right..." followed by a sequential series of numbers beginning with one. Variations exist for the proposal of the game depending on personal rules; this is due to some variants calling for any person who says the number "21" to drink. For example: The game is never under any circumstances referred to as "twenty plus". As the game progresses, each player in turn must recite one to three numbers, counting in sequence from where the previous player left off: If a player makes a mistake, then they suffer a small to moderate drinking penalty (e.g. 2 fingers of drink) and then restart the game from 1. Mistakes include: Assuming there are no mistakes, the game will continue in sequence up to 21. The player who calls 21 suffers a heavy drinking
    7.60
    5 votes
    3

    Buffalo

    Buffalo or Buffalo Club is a drinking game popular around the world. People who play the game refer to themselves as "Buffalos". The Buffalo Club is a lifelong commitment with a strict code to honor the rules at all times in perpetuity. The history and origin of the Buffalo Club are obscure and many versions are in existence. A folk origin of the game states that Buffalo Club stems from the gunslinging days of the Wild West where the use of one's right hand (the shooting hand) was at times a matter of life or death. Thus, recreational activities such as playing cards or drinking were done with the left hand only to avoid severe consequences. The rules are fairly simple, though widely varying, and involve which hand a player may use to drink. One version of how to play the game is as follows: Nobody needs to declare that the game is on. At least in principle, if rarely actually done, if the player spots a complete stranger drinking with what the player thinks to be their dominant hand, and the player calls Buffalo on them, they will either be confused or immediately know that they have transgressed the rules in the presence of another Buffalo player and are obligated to finish their
    8.00
    4 votes
    4

    Crazy 8's

    Crazy 8's is a drinking game involving the use of playing cards. The predominant beverage of choice involves beer, but any type of liquor can be used. To begin, all of the 8's are taken out of the deck and laid in a vertical column on a flat surface. The rest of the cards are dealt out to the players. Typically, this game is suited best for four people, but there really is no set number necessary. The game consists of laying your card down to create numerical straights. The length of this is equal to how many seconds of drinking you may assign to a fellow player. For example, playing a 9 of Hearts after the 6, 7 and obviously 8 have been laid down would result in four seconds of drinking to be divvied up. Players can assign all of the time to one player, or divide them however they see fit. The one catch involves playing a card that does not connect a straight. This results in the player consuming their own drink for a number of seconds, determined by the length of the broken straight. For example, if a Jack of Clubs is laid, but only the 7 and 8 have been played, then that player consumes their own drink for five seconds (7-8-9-10-J). The entire length must be accounted for. This
    8.00
    4 votes
    5
    Edward Forty-Hands

    Edward Forty-Hands

    Edward Fortyhands (also known as 80 Ounces to Freedom, The 40 Challenge) is a drinking game in which each player duct tapes a 40-ounce or 1.14 liter bottle of alcohol (usually malt liquor, but sometimes cider, scrumpy, or wine) to each of their hands and may not remove them until they're consumed. The name is a reference to Edward Scissorhands. The game was played on the episode "The Naked Truth" of How I Met Your Mother and in the episode "Super Milo" of Men at Work. House rules differ as to whether one may finish and remove one 40 oz. at a time, but before the alcohol in both hands has been completely ingested. The drinking party will typically need use of their hands to, for example, urinate, smoke a cigarette, or answer a phone call, so each participant has an incentive to finish their alcohol as quickly as possible. It can also be used as a "goal" for the game: to see who can abstain from these activities until they are finished with their drinks. Vomiting is sometimes considered an immediate disqualification. Joseph Califano, chairman of the Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University and former United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare,
    6.20
    5 votes
    6

    FizzBuzz

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    7.50
    4 votes
    7
    Ladyboy

    Ladyboy

    A ladyboy is a combination of drinks invented by fictional TV personality, Alan Partridge. The set of bar drinks are a pint of lager with chasers of a small Baileys and a gin and tonic.
    7.25
    4 votes
    8
    Bouncing coins

    Bouncing coins

    The bouncing coin game is a drinking game apparently related to Quarters, played in the UK. It is best played with six to eight people, ideally seated around a round table with a certain amount of space around it. Each player should be equipped with a pint of beer, cider or similar drink, and four whisky tumblers and two coins will also be required. The two coins begin in the possession of two players on opposite sides of the table. Two of the glasses are filled with drink, and they are arranged, as shown in diagram A, in the centre of the table. Each player's goal is to throw his coin at the table so that it rebounds and lands in an empty glass. Once this is achieved, the coin is passed on to the next person. The thrower may take as many tries as necessary, but it is in his interest to work fast. This is because, if the two coins "catch each other up" on their journeys round the table, the person so caught is in trouble (see below). Thus a thrower will wish to pass the coin on quickly, either to "escape" from a fast-approaching other coin, or to make his own coin that "fast-approaching" one for someone else having difficulty with the throw. If the two throwing players are
    7.00
    4 votes
    9

    Matchboxes

    Matchbox is a drinking game of skill played around a table. It can be played by any number of people. The aim is to throw a matchbox such that it lands on its edge or end. A "finger" is the amount of beer, in a straight or "conical" pint glass, covered by one finger on the outside of the glass. Play proceeds around a circle. The player whose turn it is takes the matchbox and throws it. What happens next depends on how the box lands: The matchbox may be labelled as a reminder of the numbers. Also an 'R' on one end and one edge may be used to signify that the direction of play should be reversed (if play it was moving anti-clockwise, passing to the right, the box now moves to the left). As with many drinking games extra or different rules may be used by specific groups. Some are:
    7.00
    4 votes
    10

    Quarters

    Quarters is a popular drinking game which involves players bouncing a quarter off a table in an attempt to have the quarter land in a certain place, usually into a shotglass (or cup) on that table. The game is popular at parties, especially in colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, as well as in Germany. It is also played in South America, where its called "monedita", Spanish for little coin. The player bouncing the quarter is referred to as the "shooter." In some variations the glass is empty and each player has a separate glass to drink from, while in other variations the glass that the shooter is aiming for contains an alcoholic beverage. The quarter is customarily bounced on the face whether heads or tails. Some games may allow a player to bounce the quarter on the edge, particularly by rolling it down their nose. Any shot where the shooter does not bounce the quarter off of the table at least once counts as a miss. The most common beverage used is beer, since it makes the continued drinking more filling, while diminishing the shooter's accuracy, thus increasing the difficulty further. The players must determine beforehand how much is to be consumed each
    8.67
    3 votes
    11
    Carbomb

    Carbomb

    An Irish Car Bomb is an American beer cocktail that is drunk as a bomb shot, similar to a boilermaker. It is made with Irish stout, Irish cream, and Irish whiskey. To make the drink, whiskey is floated on top of Irish Cream in a shot glass, and the shot glass is then dropped into the stout. Once mixed, it must be drunk quickly because it will curdle. While Kahlúa was part of the original recipe, it is often excluded from the drink today. Some refer to that original recipe as a Belfast Car Bomb. The "Irish" in the name refers to the drink's Irish ingredients; typically Guinness stout, Baileys Irish Cream, and Jameson Irish Whiskey. The "car bomb" refers to the fact that the drink is a "bomb shot" and also to the many car bombings that took place during the Troubles in Ireland. For this reason, the name is sometimes deemed offensive and some bartenders refuse to serve it. The drink is popular in the United States, but virtually unknown in Ireland, and ordering it there is likely to cause confusion or offense. This Irish Car Bomb is thought to have been invented in 1979 at Wilson's Saloon in Norwich, Connecticut. MMA fighter Todd Duffee uses The Irish Car Bomb as his nickname.
    7.67
    3 votes
    12
    Dartmouth pong

    Dartmouth pong

    Pong is a drinking game played at Dartmouth College that is loosely based on ping pong. A 2005 survey conducted by former Dartmouth College Statistician John Pryor and reported on in The Dartmouth found that 80% of Dartmouth students had played the game. By the early 21st century, newspapers frequently attributed the origin of beer pong to Dartmouth College: "Legend has it that the game, which can be played with paddles..., started years ago at a Dartmouth College fraternity party." The version of beer pong played at Dartmouth differs from that played at many U.S. colleges and universities. Other than at Dartmouth, a few schools in Pennsylvania and some in California, the phrase "beer pong" generally refers to the game of "Beirut" or "Lebanon," a popular drinking game in which players take turns throwing a ping pong ball by hand at an opponent's beer-filled cups located opposite. No paddles are involved, and the element of defense or any kind of back-and-forth volleying is absent. As it emerged at Dartmouth, however, pong is played with paddles and retains the basic service-volley-score form of table tennis. In its general form, pong has been traced back to at least the 1950s as a
    7.67
    3 votes
    13

    Captain Paf

    Captain Paf (also known as Cardinal Puff or Cardinal Chunder in Britain and Cardinal Puff the United States, Cardinal Huff in New Zealand) is a French drinking game based on a script that must be executed in order for play to move to the next person. Any interruption or error in the script causes the player to start over from the beginning. Therefore, a player only stops drinking when the script can be perfectly executed. Due to possible long wait times between when you are allowed to drink, this game is more suited for a small group. It can also be played backwards to make it harder. The game (as "Cardinal Puff") was featured in Fallen Idol, an episode of the British sitcom Dad's Army. Note that when picking up your glass the number of fingers used (except thumb) is the number of the iteration through the script. This is the most common mistake. An entire can or bottle of beer must be consumed (in x sips) when performing the actions. Any deviation from the requirements automatically prevents the player from playing until the offending container of beer has been consumed. A new beverage is required every time a player attempts the script. If a player is successful, they are
    5.75
    4 votes
    14

    One Fat Hen

    One Fat Hen (also called One Red Hen or Turtle) is a drinking game. It is based on the difficulty people often have in repeating exactly what the leader says, and the amusing possibilities when they get it wrong. The normal mode of play is that the leader recites the first line of the game and then all the players take it in turns to First - Sip the drink; Second - repeat the line; and Third - take another sip; if anyone makes a mistake, he or she must take a drink (or pay a forfeit) and ask the Leader to repeat. They then repeat the turn (Sip-Repeat-Sip). When everyone has got it right, the leader starts again, and adds the second line. Each player must now say the first and second lines, and so on, like this: ...and so on, with increasing mirth. The Marine Corps/Navy version: The Austrukinfailian Version: Philadelphia Version: If someone asks if you're a turtle, you MUST say "You bet your sweet ass I am!" and can then be challenged on any/all of the numbers. The Lock Haven University Version: If then Theophilus, the Successful Thistle Sifter, Thrust Three Thousand Thistles through the Thick of his Thumb, See that Thou, in Sifting a Sieve Full of Unsifted Thistles, Thrust Three
    7.33
    3 votes
    15

    Beer pong

    Beer pong is a drinking game loosely based on ping pong, that involves use of paddles to hit a ping pong ball into obstacles on the opposing side. The origin of beer pong is generally credited to Dartmouth College. The name "beer pong" also refers to a similar game sometimes called Beirut, in which players throw a ping pong ball by hand at an opponent's cups located across a table. Beer pong in its general form has been traced back to at least the 1950s as a casual attempt to combine the popular activities of drinking and ping pong. By the early 21st century, newspapers frequently attributed the origin of beer pong to Dartmouth College. History professor Jere Daniell '55 stated that he played the game as a student, and Bob Shirley '57 stated that he began playing in 1956. (Shirley suggests that the game began when spectators rested their cups of beer on a table during a ping-pong game). One of the earliest published photographs depicting a game of pong appeared in Dartmouth's 1968 yearbook Aegis (page 304). According to a 1999 New York Times article, pong "has been part of fraternity life for at least 40 years, as hallowed as rush or Winter Carnival". Other Ivy League newspapers
    9.00
    2 votes
    16
    Fuck the dealer

    Fuck the dealer

    Fuck the Dealer (also known as Over Under) is a card game that is often used as a drinking game and can be played by as few as two people. The name refers to the end of the game, when most of the cards have been used and the players can easily "fuck the dealer" by guessing correctly.
    6.33
    3 votes
    17

    Duo and trio cocktails

    A stinger is a Duo cocktail made by adding crème de menthe to a spirit. The classic recipe is based on brandy and white crème de menthe, shaken and served in a cocktail glass. The origins of this drink are unclear, but it is mentioned in bartender's recipe books as far back as Tom Bullock's Ideal Bartender, published in 1917. Mixing brandy with green crème de menthe, in place of white, yields a Green Hornet. During the heyday of its popularity, it was considered an ideal "nightcap" for a night out in New York. Dudly, the Angel, orders a round of Stingers while lunching with ladies from the church in "A Bishop's Wife". The 1957 film Kiss Them For Me features several scenes where the main characters enjoy Stinger cocktails. The Stinger also gets mentioned in various scenes during the 1960 film The Apartment. The drink is also featured in the Mad Men episode "Love Among the Ruins," set in 1963, when a man buys Peggy Olson a stinger at a bar. In Gorky Park (film), detective Arkady Renko refers to the Stinger as a "whore's drink" and later in the film, orders a Stinger and says, "I am a whore." In High Society (1956) Gordon Richards in his role as Dexter-Haven's butler, makes stingers
    8.00
    2 votes
    18
    Highball

    Highball

    Highball is the name for a family of mixed drinks that are composed of an alcoholic base spirit and a larger proportion of a non-alcoholic mixer. Originally, the most common highball was made with Scotch whisky and carbonated water, which is today called a "Scotch and Soda". There are many rivals for the fame of mixing the first highball, including the Adams House in Boston. New York barman Patrick Duffy claimed the highball was brought to the U.S. in 1894 from England by actor E. J. Ratcliffe. The Online Etymology Dictionary suggests that the name originated around 1898 and probably derives from ball meaning a "drink of whiskey" and high because it is served in a tall glass. The name may refer to the practice of serving drinks in the dining cars of trains powered by steam locomotives, when the engine would get up to speed and the ball that showed boiler pressure was at its high level, known as "highballing". Or the name may have come from the railroad signal meaning "clear track ahead." Well-known examples of highballs include Bourbon and Coke, Cuba Libre, Scotch and Soda, Seven and Seven, the Moscow Mule, and gin and tonic. A highball is typically served in large straight-sided
    6.00
    3 votes
    19
    Boat race

    Boat race

    A boat race (Beer On A Table Race), is a drinking game between (usually) two teams of equal numbers. Rules vary widely but normally involve a team drinking in series and aiming to finish first. Common rules include those regulating the number and gender of drinkers, the vessels from which the liquid must be consumed and punishments for spilling. The game is common in some university cultures and appeared in the Broken Lizard movie Beerfest. A race begins with all competitors placing their drinks on a mutual table. When a referee begins the race, the first drinker on each team is allowed to pick up their drink and begin drinking. Once a beverage is consumed, the drinker must invert the empty vessel on their head. This is done to ensure no cheating occurs. The next team mate cannot touch his or her drink until this has occurred. Empty vessels must be kept on the competitors head until the race is over. Boat races are a particular feature of university life in Australia, with competitions between different year levels, faculties and universities. In Australia, boat races are typically rowed with 285ml vessels.
    10.00
    1 votes
    20

    Bullshit

    Bullshit, also known as who shit? and somebody shit in the parlor, is a drinking game that requires a minimum of four players. At the start of the game, each player chooses a kind of shit to represent him. Typically, the shit is some sort of animal shit such as "dog shit", "monkey shit", and so forth. It is also possible to pick other kinds of shit such as "dumb shit", "no shit", "green shit", etc. When each player has chosen his desired shit, play begins with the first player announcing, "Somebody shit in the parlor!" All the other players respond by asking, "Who shit?" The first player then accuses another player using their designated shit to identify said player. The accused responds by saying, "Bullshit!" Once again, the other players respond by asking, "Who shit?" The accused then accuses a third player and so on. This continues until a player makes a mistake by calling out a non-existent shit, playing out of turn, passing play back to their accuser, or breaking the rhythm of the game. This player must then drink an agreed upon measure of an alcoholic beverage. Increasing intoxication makes concentration more difficult. After drinking, the player who made the mistake restarts
    7.50
    2 votes
    21
    5.67
    3 votes
    22

    Fuzzy Duck

    Fuzzy Duck is a drinking game. In turn, players alternately utter the phrases "fuzzy duck" and "ducky fuzz". A player may also opt to say, "does he?", in which case play resumes in the opposite direction. If a player says the wrong thing, plays out of turn, or breaks the rhythm of the game, he must drink an agreed-upon measure of an alcoholic beverage. This increases the chance of further mistakes. Increasing intoxication makes the game and other activities more challenging. Even when sober, it is easy to misspeak the words "fuzzy duck", "ducky fuzz", and "Does he?" because they are mild tongue-twisters which require a bit of concentration. Invariably, players render the proper words as the spoonerisms "fucky duzz" or "duzzy fuck", which sound like "fuck he does" and "does he fuck". Sometimes, an unsuspecting player is surprised when he or she has spoken a profanity, which can add to the fun of the game. One strategy is, when saying "Does he?", to look at the person who would have ordinarily been next. It usually causes this player to continue play and simultaneously causes the player whose turn it really is to say nothing. Both players must drink; one for playing out of turn and
    5.33
    3 votes
    23

    I Never

    "Never have I ever" (also known as "I've Never...", "I Never", or "Ten Fingers") is a popular party game that typically involves drinking. The verbal game is started with the players getting into a circle. Then, the first player says a simple statement starting with "Never have I ever". Anyone who has done what the first player has not must drink. Play then continues around the circle, and the next person makes a statement. There is an alternative form of the game in which the players drink indefinitely. An additional rule - uncommon, but beneficial to the game - is that if there is no one taking a drink, then the one who said the particular "I have never..." must take a drink. This rule often forces the players to strategise more and makes for less disposable/pointless suggestions. A further variation holds that whenever only one person is drinking, that person must give a detailed account of why they are drinking. Games such as never have I ever "reveal interesting things about the participants and help build friendships", according to one American college student. Players often admit to things that they previously had not. As with Truth or Dare, the game is often sexual in
    5.33
    3 votes
    24
    Beer pong

    Beer pong

    Beer pong, also known as Beirut, is a drinking game in which players throw a ping pong ball across a table with the intent of landing the ball in a cup of beer on the other end. The game typically consists of two two-to-four-player teams and multiple cups set up, in triangle formation, on each side. There are no official rules and rules may vary widely, though usually there are six or ten plastic cups arranged in a triangle on each side. Each team then takes turns attempting to shoot ping pong balls into the opponent's cups. If a ball lands in a cup, then the contents of that cup are consumed by the other team, and the cup is either placed aside or reinserted into the triangle. If the cup is reinserted and the other team knocks the cup over, it is removed. If the opposing team throws the ball into an empty cup, they must consume the contents of one of their cups. The first side to eliminate all of the opponent's cups is the winner. The order of play varies—both players on one team shoot followed by both players on the other team, or players on opposite teams can alternate back and forth. Today, beer pong is played at parties, colleges and universities bars, and elsewhere, such as
    7.00
    2 votes
    25
    Land Mine

    Land Mine

    Land mine is a drinking game of strategy, which involves players spinning a quarter and simultaneously drinking a beer. The game is popular on college and university campuses around the United States.
    9.00
    1 votes
    26
    Flip cup

    Flip cup

    Flip cup (Taps, Flippy Cup or Tippy Cup) is a team-based drinking game. Two teams of an equal number of players stand on opposite sides of a table, facing one another. The players directly facing are opponents. In front of each teammate is a disposable plastic cup filled with a set amount of beer. Generally, the first line inside a disposable cup is used as a marker. At the start, it is customary for the initiating players to make a toast, after which the first member of each team drinks the entirety of their beverage. When finished, the cup is placed open side up at the edge of the table, and the player who drank it attempts to flip the cup, by flicking or lifting the bottom until it flips and lands face down on the table, sitting on its mouth. The player may not use two hands, or blow on the cup to "guide" the cup to flip over. If player is unsuccessful on the first try, the cup is reset and re-flipped. Only after the first teammate is done flipping successfully can the next person proceed. Additionally, subsequent players may not touch or manipulate their cup until the previous player has successfully flipped their cup. Whichever team finishes drinking and flipping all its cups
    6.50
    2 votes
    27

    Beer Die

    Beer die is a table-based drinking game. Opposing players sit at opposite ends and throw a die over a certain height with the goal of either landing the die in their opponent's cup or having the die hit the table and bounce over the scoring area to the floor. The defending team attempts to catch the die one-handed after it hits the table, but before it touches a non-table surface. The game typically consists of two two-player teams with each of the four players having a designated cup on the table. There are three distinct attributes which define a beer die hurler: offensive, defense, and stamina. A good offensive player throws many legal throws, and often will put pressure on the defense by throwing near the opponents cups, and edge of the table. A good defensive player consistently catches routine throws, and often will snare "hot tosses." A player with good stamina is able to drink often and over a period of many games without his or her game diminishing. When constructing a beer die team it is advantageous to bring different facets to the table Like all drinking games, the rules vary greatly. Some common variations are: The game originated at Purdue University, specifically
    8.00
    1 votes
    28

    Case race

    A case race is a drinking game involving a competition to see which team or individual can finish a case (most commonly a case of beer) first. Although it may not be as popular or as common as beer pong (Beirut) or Flip Cup, a Case Race offers a unique challenge based on one's ability to drink rather than ability to throw a ping pong ball or flip a cup. The outcome is based upon one's willingness to keep on drinking without vomiting. There are several items that need to be agreed upon between the competitors before a Case Race can begin. Deciding on these items before the game starts is a good way to avoid conflicts that may arise between the teams or individuals during the match. Duties of the official include calling penalties, accompanying players to the bathroom, and declaring a winner. Although it is not necessary, it is a good idea to have a sober or at least almost sober official. Participants may become inebriated to the point where they cannot see straight because of the extreme drinking that goes on in a Case Race. This is where an official becomes important because of their ability to declare a winner. In order to have a proper Case Race there should be at least two
    8.00
    1 votes
    29

    Pennying

    Pennying is a drinking game popular amongst students attending various universities throughout the United Kingdom. It is one of the International Drinking Rules, or Pub Rules. Unlike most drinking games, the rules of pennying are almost never explicitly declared to be in force; rather, by putting oneself in a social situation involving the consumption of alcohol, one is implicitly subjected to the rules should a "Pennying" situation occur. This state of affairs is most likely to be enforced at dinners known as Formal Halls where cheap wine is drunk and it is common for complete strangers to "Penny" each other. At Cambridge, pennying is especially prevalent at "formal hall swaps", or other dinner equivalent, between two dining societies- one female, one male. This is also true at Oxford, at a similar event named a "crewdate", deriving originally from rowing crews, but which has now expanded out to encompass other sporting teams. In most cases, sufficient wine will be provided so that there is enough to go round, and hence the aim is to get other people to drink as much as possible, or to avoid drinking oneself, due to the copious resources available. The occurrence is less common in
    5.50
    2 votes
    30
    Snap-dragon

    Snap-dragon

    Snap-dragon (also known as Flap-dragon, Snapdragon, or Flapdragon) was a parlour game popular from about the 16th to 19th centuries. It was played during the winter, particularly on Christmas Eve. Brandy was heated and placed in a wide shallow bowl; raisins were placed in the brandy which was then set alight. Typically, lights were extinguished or dimmed to increase the eerie effect of the blue flames playing across the liquor. The aim of the game was to pluck the raisins out of the burning brandy and eat them, at the risk of being burnt. Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language (1755) describes it as "a play in which they catch raisins out of burning brandy and, extinguishing them by closing the mouth, eat them". According to an eighteenth-century article in Richard Steele's Tatler magazine, "the wantonness of the thing was to see each other look like a demon, as we burnt ourselves, and snatched out the fruit." Snap-dragon was played in England, Canada, and the United States, but there is insufficient evidence of the practice in Scotland, or other countries. The words snap-dragon and flap-dragon can refer to the game, the raisins used in the game, or the bowl with
    6.00
    1 votes
    31
    Milk

    Milk

    Milk is a white liquid produced by the mammary glands of mammals. It is the primary source of nutrition for young mammals before they are able to digest other types of food. Early-lactation milk contains colostrum, which carries the mother's antibodies to the baby and can reduce the risk of many diseases in the baby. Milk is an important food with many nutrients. World's dairy farms produced about 730 million tonnes of milk in 2011. India is the world's largest producer and consumer of milk, yet neither exports nor imports milk. New Zealand, the European Union's 27 member states, Australia, and the United States are the world's largest exporters of milk and milk products. China and Russia are the world's largest importers of milk and milk products. Throughout the world, there are more than 6 billion consumers of milk and milk products, the majority of them in developing countries. Over 750 million people live within dairy farming households. Milk is a key contributor to improving nutrition and food security particularly in developing countries. Improvements in livestock and dairy technology offer significant promise in reducing poverty and malnutrition in the world. There are two
    4.50
    2 votes
    32

    Beer Mile

    Beer Mile is a drinking game that combines beer-drinking with elements of track and field. Participants complete a mile, consuming four beers at the same time. The most common set of "rules" for a beer mile is the "Kingston Beer Mile", named after Kingston, Ontario, where the game became popular. The Kingston Beer Mile requires participants to consume one full beer, then run one quarter mile. This process is repeated three times, resulting in running one full mile, and consuming four beers. Rules include a defininition of the length of the course and the strength and volume of beer to be consumed. Beermile.com rules go as followed: The difficulty of running a beer mile is not in the beer, the chugging, or the running alone, but in the combination of these three skills. Even skilled runners may have difficulty completing the mile at speeds faster than a walking pace. The jolting of the person running causes the carbonation in the beer to come out of solution. This prevents the participant from being able to quickly finish their beers, since their stomach is full of gas. Frequent burping is needed to dispel the gas in order to prevent vomiting, which incurs an additional penalty
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    Kings

    Kings

    Kings (also known as Circle of Death, King's Cup, Donut, Oval of Fire or Ring of Fire) is a drinking game that uses playing cards. It is common among university students in Portugal, Canada, Mexico, South Africa, Chile, New Zealand, Australia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, the Netherlands, Lebanon, Denmark, Italy, Belgium and Spain. Players must drink and dispense drinks based on cards drawn, and Kings can also be mixed with other drinking games. Each card has a rule that is predetermined before the game starts. Many houses have their own variation of rules. In this game, players do certain actions that are associated with each card. Like many other drinking games, Kings is played with different "house rules" throughout the United States, Australia, Egypt, and Canada. Sometimes, rules on the cards "reveal interesting things about the participants." Usually, cards are shuffled and dealt into a circle around either an empty cup or a full can of beer (or a shot/cup of spirits or wine). Each player takes turn drawing cards, and the players must participate in the instructions corresponding to the drawn card. This game is highly open ended and all of the cards
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    Southern Slam Pong

    Southern Slam Pong is a college sport believed to have begun in fraternities more than a decade ago. Southern Slam Pong was at first merely an adaption of the widely popular Beer Pong, which is played by simply throwing ping pong balls into regulation solo cups of beer. In Beer Pong if you succeed in throwing the ping pong ball into the other team's cup of beer, the opposing team is punished by having to drink said beer. This is the greatest difference in the two sports. While in Beer Pong the punishment is to drink beer, in Slam Pong that is not only your reward, it is ultimately the goal of the game. Southern Slam Pong as we know it today can be played One VS One, Two VS Two, or for the brave One VS Two. Each players receives one beer with which he/she must play. The official beer of Southern Slam Pong is Keystone Light. The Keystone Light is purchased in thirty packs. Often more than 120 beers, or four thirty packs, are consumed by the Southern Slam Pong players in one tournament. The object of the game is to hit your opponent's (or your opposing team's) beer can and drink as much out of your beer before he can locate the ball and touch the ball to the table. Mason, L. (2007).
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    Three Man

    Three Man (a.k.a. Mr. Three, Hat Man) is a drinking game of skill and strategy, but essentially it's just two dice. The game can be played with a larger group (6-15) of people than other drinking games and is designed so as to not require a great deal of participation from the players not directly involved in the current dice roll. The rules presented here are a generalization. As with many drinking games, such as beer pong, there is no "official" set of rules, and certain rules may vary from house to house. Players begin the game taking turns in a rotation, normally clockwise, playing until their turn is expired. A player's turn begins by rolling two dice. After the initial three man has been chosen (usually a fresher), any time a player rolls a three on either die, or a total of (a 1 an a 2), the three man must take a drink. If the player rolls two threes, the three man takes two drinks. If the player rolls a total of five, the player behind them (the person to their right when playing clockwise) has to take a drink, and if the player rolls a seven, the person ahead of them drinks. If the player rolls doubles, there is a "roll off." In a roll off, the player who rolled doubles
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    Waterfall

    Rather than being a full drinking game, "Waterfall" is usually a game played within other games such as Kings or Bergen's Baseball. The game is set up so that all players are arranged in a circle and begin to drink beer at the same time. Players can only put down their cup when the person before them in the line puts down theirs (usually the person who draws the Waterfall card is considered first in line). While possible with just a few people, the game gets especially exciting as the number of participants increases.
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