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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Conservation project of All Time

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    1
    7.83
    6 votes
    2
    8.20
    5 votes
    3
    Encyclopedia of Life

    Encyclopedia of Life

    • Project location(s): Earth
    The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) is a free, online collaborative encyclopedia intended to document all of the 1.9 million living species known to science. It is compiled from existing databases and from contributions by experts and non-experts throughout the world. It aims to build one "infinitely expandable" page for each species, including video, sound, images, graphics, as well as text. In addition, the Encyclopedia incorporates content from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, which digitizes millions of pages of printed literature from the world's major natural history libraries. The project was initially backed by a US$50 million funding commitment, led by the MacArthur Foundation and the Sloan Foundation, who provided US$20 million and US$5 million, respectively. The additional US$25 million came from five cornerstone institutions - the Field Museum, Harvard University, the Marine Biological Laboratory, the Missouri Botanical Garden, and the Smithsonian Institution. Today, participating institutions and individual donors continue to support EOL through financial contributions. EOL went live on 26 February 2008 with 30,000 entries. The site immediately proved to be extremely
    9.00
    4 votes
    4
    7.20
    5 votes
    5

    Comparison of Black-capped and Carolina Chickadee

    • Focal taxa: Black-capped Chickadee
    • Lead agency/organization: Western Carolina University
    • Project location(s): Appalachian Mountains
    An extensive project (my MS Thesis) to map the ranges of Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees and their hybrids over the full extent of the the former's range in North Carolina. Method was by mapping their calls (the "chick-a-dee-dee-dee") and songs. At that time, Black-capped Chickadees occurred ONLY in the Great Smokies, the Plott Balsams and Richland Balsams. In the Smokies, there was no overlap in populations during the breeding season and there was no evidence of hybridization (no mixing of vocal characters and no pattern of intermediate or abberrent vocalizations). In the Balsams, the breeding ranges adjoined or overlapped and there were distinct elevational bands (zones) where vocal characters were blended and where there was mixing of vocal types (Black-capped songs and Carolina calls from the same bird). Findings were entirely consistent with those of Jim Tanner who surveyed the same areas some 25-30 years eariler.
    8.50
    4 votes
    6

    Ecology and Conservation of Neotropical Migrants in the Southern Appalachians

    • Focal taxa: Bird
    • Lead agency/organization: United States Geological Survey
    • Project location(s): Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    This study seeks to develop an ecosystem level approach to understanding the conservation needs of Neotropical migratory birds in the southern Appalachians. Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) is being established as a control site for comparing trends in the distribution and abundance of forest bird populations compared with those from more disturbed habitats in the southern Appalachians. This study will contribute to an evaluation of the effects of land use practices on the diversity and abundance of these birds at a regional scale.
    6.80
    5 votes
    7
    8.25
    4 votes
    8
    6.60
    5 votes
    9
    6.40
    5 votes
    10

    Purchase Knob MAPS Station

    • Focal taxa: Gray Catbird
    • Lead agency/organization: U.S. National Park Service
    • Project location(s): Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    Objective: monitor bird productivity and survivorship in northern hardwood/red oak habitat, along with regenerating field species (4,700’ elevation)
    6.20
    5 votes
    11
    6.00
    5 votes
    13
    8.67
    3 votes
    14
    8.67
    3 votes
    15
    5.60
    5 votes
    16
    OpenStreetMap

    OpenStreetMap

    OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a collaborative project to create a free editable map of the world. Two major driving forces behind the establishment and growth of OSM have been restrictions on use or availability of map information across much of the world and the advent of inexpensive portable satellite navigation devices. The maps are created using data from portable GPS devices, aerial photography, other free sources or simply from local knowledge. The data is available under the Open Database License. The OpenStreetMap approach to mapping was inspired by sites such as Wikipedia; the map display features a prominent "Edit" link and a full revision history is maintained. Registered users can upload GPS track logs and edit the vector data using the site's online map editor or free GIS editing tools like JOSM. Various mobile applications also allow contribution of GPX tracks to the OSM project. OpenStreetMap (OSM) was founded in July 2004 by Steve Coast. In April 2006, the OpenStreetMap Foundation (OSMF) was established to encourage the growth, development and distribution of free geospatial data and provide geospatial data for anybody to use and share. In December 2006, Yahoo confirmed
    8.33
    3 votes
    17
    6.25
    4 votes
    18
    7.67
    3 votes
    19
    6.00
    4 votes
    20

    Monongahela National Forest Northern Goshawk Surveys

    • Focal taxa: Bird
    • Lead agency/organization: United States Forest Service
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    Goshawk surveys conducted for: 1) clearance of project areas, 2) historical nest site checks, 3) high potential habitat forestwide surveys
    6.00
    4 votes
    21

    Status Assessment of Golden-winged Warblers and Bewick’s Wrens in Virginia

    • Focal taxa: Blue-winged Warbler
    • Lead agency/organization: Center for Conservation Biology
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    The purpose of this report is to provide a rapid assessment of Golden-winged Warblers and Bewick’s Wren in Virginia. Specifically we determined 1) species’ distributions, 2) habitat use and requirements, and 3) the amount of geographic and habitat overlap between Golden-winged and Blue-winged Warblers.
    7.33
    3 votes
    22
    7.00
    3 votes
    23

    Walker Library Spotlight Blog on Convergence Recipes (Blogspot)

    This blog is to seek social identity of librarianship in age of convergence where boundaries of contents, media, carriers and platforms in Web-scaled infrastructure are blurred; and where the info is aggregated and disaggregated at the lowest meaningful and atomic level of granularity, distributed and consumed by library users and applications in social media or whichever virtual spaces of users' choices in compliance with info security, and Web-standards, technologies and services.
    7.00
    3 votes
    24
    8.50
    2 votes
    25

    Balsam Mountain MAPS Station

    • Focal taxa: Canada Warbler
    • Lead agency/organization: U.S. National Park Service
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    Objective: monitor bird productivity and survivorship in spruce-fir forest on Blue Ridge Parkway
    10.00
    1 votes
    26
    10.00
    1 votes
    27

    Little Ouse Headwaters Project

    The Little Ouse Headwaters Project (LOHP) was set up in 2002 by local residents to promote conservation and enjoyment of the fenland habitats bordering the upper reaches of the River Little Ouse, which lies on the Norfolk-Suffolk border. The site lies between Blo' Norton and Thelnetham. The project encompases a number of areas including: Hinderclay Fen, Blo' Norton Fen, Betty's Fen, The Frith, Blo' Norton Lowes, Blo' Norton Little Fen and Parker's Piece. The area also includes two Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). The project is a registered charity and holds monthly work parties to manage the habitat of the various fens. The Little Ouse Headwaters Project won the CIWEM/RSPB Living Wetlands Award in 2006. Both the River Waveney and the River Little Ouse have their sources at Redgrave Fen. The Waveney runs eastwards - forming the border between Norfolk and Suffolk - while the Little Ouse flows westwards and eventually joins the River Great Ouse at Denver Sluice. The LOHP has won awards for its work as a conservation organisation. These include the prestigious Living Wetlands award, and Suffolk's 'greenest county' award for community action. After the Second World War the
    10.00
    1 votes
    28
    8.00
    2 votes
    29

    Cerulean Warbler Atlas Project

    • Focal taxa: Cerulean Warbler
    In order to to determine the number of breeding pairs and productivity, describe nesting habitat, and identify potential threats to the population and its habitat, the Cerulean Warbler Atlas Project (CEWAP) employed enthusiastic birders and biologists to survey known and potential Cerulean Warbler breeding sites from 1997 to 2000. Results from CEWAP will be used to produce management guidelines for Cerulean Warblers.  As of December 2000 you can download the final report, "An Atlas of Cerulean Warbler Populations."
    8.00
    2 votes
    30
    8.00
    2 votes
    31

    Hummingbird Conservation Symposium

    The first step of the WHP is to sponsor a workshop/symposium that creates a forum for focused discussions on issues related to hummingbird conservation. The workshop will create a common understanding of the state of knowledge and conservation of hummingbirds and identify key actions and projects that will best use the available resources to advance hummingbird conservation issues. Products of this workshop will be the formation of a working group that will develop an action plan to address the project goals and the publication of the workshop proceedings.

    The WHP workshop will be held in conjunction with the Cooper Ornithological Society (COS) annual meeting/conference in Tucson, Arizona from April 16-18. The WHP workshop will be held on April 16. During the morning, a hummingbird symposium will be held to create a common understanding of the state of knowledge of hummingbirds. In the afternoon, breakout session will be held to focus attention on conservation needs / issues of North American hummingbirds. On Friday April 17, we will synthesize the afternoon discussions and then present the information at an informal lunch meeting on Saturday, April 18.
    8.00
    2 votes
    32

    Investigation of Cliffs and Cliff-nesting Birds of the Southern Appalachians

    • Focal taxa: Turkey Vulture
    • Lead agency/organization: Center for Conservation Biology
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    A systematic aerial survey of cliffs and cliff use by birds was conducted throughout a significant portion of the southern Appalachian Mountains covering nearly all of the mountains of Virginia a small portion of Kentucky, and the spine of the Appalachians in West Virginia.  During the course of helicopter flights, 242 exposed rock surfaces were mapped, characterized, and surveyed for bird use.  Eleven bird species were observed using cliff faces during aerial surveys. 
    8.00
    2 votes
    33
    8.00
    2 votes
    34

    NCWRC Cold Mountain Game Land Bird Survey

    • Focal taxa: Bird
    • Lead agency/organization: North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission
    • Project location(s): Cold Mountain Game Land
    Objective: Inventory and monitoring of bird community on mid to high elevation game land (Cold Mountain Game Land, Haywood County, NC).
    6.33
    3 votes
    35
    9.00
    1 votes
    36
    5.67
    3 votes
    37
    7.00
    2 votes
    38

    Effects of Atmospheric Pollution on High Elevation Fauna in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    • Focal taxa: Dark-eyed Junco
    • Lead agency/organization: North Carolina State University
    • Project location(s): Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    The goal of this research is to examine the effects of atmospheric pollution on two groups of high elevation terrestrial animals. Air pollution such as acid precipitation and mercury toxicity remains high in eastern forests, and is considered a critical environmental stress (Driscoll et al. 2001, Evers et al. 2005). There may also be interactive effects between acid precipitation and mercury, as an acidified environment both enhances methylation of mercury and depletion of calcium (Harmon et al. 2003). Consequently, adverse effects may be complex (Evers et al. 2005). Thus, there is a strong need to better understand the long-term, landscape-level effects of both acid precipitation and mercury on high elevation populations.
    Our research will address two main objectives: 1.) Quantify the effects of acid deposition and subsequent calcium depletion on the reproductive success of high elevation songbirds and the diversity and abundance of terrestrial snail populations (the birds’ primary calcium source) in the southern Appalachians; and 2.) Determine the level of threat of mercury bioaccumulation in high elevation breeding songbirds in the southern Appalachians.
    7.00
    2 votes
    39

    Global Ant Community Database

    • Lead agency/organization: North Carolina State University
    • Project location(s): Earth
    In 2005, Rob Dunn, J. P. Lessard, Matt Fitzpatrick, Nate Sanders and Ed Laurent began the North American Ant Database with the goal of understanding patterns of diversity and distribution in North American ants. We have now broadened this database and associated research through a collaboration with more than twenty researchers from 6 continents and roughly a 13 countries.The new database now includes data from more than 3000 sites. Unlike the North American database, the global database will, for the time being, focus only on the diversity of ants rather than on the distribution of particular species. Using the global database we will thus focus on questions related to the global patterns of ant diversity, rather than species composition or distribution.
    7.00
    2 votes
    40

    South Atlantic Invasive Species Project

    • Project location(s): Saint Helena
    The South Atlantic Invasive Species Project is a three year project (December 2006 - December 2009) funded under the European Union EDF 9. The purpose of the project is to increase the capacity of the UK's South Atlantic Overseas Territories to deal with invasive species issues. The territories involved are Saint Helena, Tristan da Cunha, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, the Falkland Islands and Ascension Island. The project is managed by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) on behalf of the partner governments. In addition to the partner governments, two NGOs: Falklands Conservation and the Saint Helena National Trust are key stakeholders. The project started with the appointment of two project officers, Andrew Darlow, for Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha, and Brian Summers for the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands. During the course of the project, Dr Phil Lambdon discovered a living example of a type of sedge on Saint Helena, Bulbostylis neglecta, that had not been seen for over 200 years and was previously feared extinct. Clare Miller who manages the South Atlantic Invasive Species project said: Saint Helena’s
    7.00
    2 votes
    41
    7.00
    2 votes
    42

    Golden-winged Warbler Atlas Project

    • Focal taxa: Golden-winged Warbler
    The Golden-winged Warbler Atlas Project (GOWAP) is designed to determine the population status and habitat and area requirements of the Golden-winged Warbler and the Blue-winged Warbler as well as their hybrids.This study engages volunteer birders and professional biologists to survey and conduct point counts at known and potential breeding sites of Golden-winged Warblers from May through July.GOWAP results will be used to develop two detailed atlases: a Distribution map that shows boundaries for areas of high concentration of Golden-winged Warblers in sufficient detail to indicate potential sites for preservation and management, and a Hybrid Index Map that will help us locate key "safe haven" sites within the area of overlap where golden-wing and blue-wing hybridization is rare.
    5.33
    3 votes
    43
    6.50
    2 votes
    44

    The effects of landscape pattern, core areas, and forest managment practices on avian communities in the Southern Appalachians

    • Focal taxa: Bird
    • Lead agency/organization: United States Forest Service
    • Project location(s): Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    This study expands an avian community study in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) to include U.S. Forest Service lands adjacent to the Park. GRSM will be used as a control site to examine breeding populations of forest birds in adjacent, managed forests. Together, these studies seek to develop an ecosystem level approach to understanding the conservation needs of breeding birds in the southern Appalachians.A total of 1,376 independent point locations have been censused in 1997-99 combined. Of these, 1,287 points were re-censused. Vegetation data were recorded at each census point, and the location of each point was determined using differentially corrected GPS. Census and vegetation sampling methods were standardized according to protocols established in GRSM (Simons and Shriner 1998). Census data are being analyzed to determine the relative importance of local versus landscape scale habitat features in predicting the spatial distribution of different bird species.To complement census data on breeding bird diversity and abundance, nest productivity data were collected in 1998 and 1999.To better understand the habitat requirements of breeding Neotropical migrant songbirds, a foraging behavior study was initiated in 1999.
    6.50
    2 votes
    45
    8.00
    1 votes
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    8.00
    1 votes
    47
    2010 Engineering Technology Open House

    2010 Engineering Technology Open House

    Student poster presentations, along with experimental vehicles/projects including the Baja, the Moon Buggy, and Solar Boat, and a lot more were exhibited during 2010 Engineering Technology Open House at Tom H. Jackson Building, MTSU.
    6.00
    2 votes
    48
    6.00
    2 votes
    49
    4.67
    3 votes
    50

    Virginia Avian Heritage

    • Focal taxa: Peregrine Falcon
    • Lead agency/organization: Center for Conservation Biology
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    Virginia is unique in that it is considered the birthplace of ornithology in this country.  It has become the incomparable benefactor for the most extensive collection of archives that describe avifaunal change.  Much of the ornithological information collected during the modern era exists in the form of scientific and popular publications, field diaries of noted ornithologists, museum collections, and unpublished databases.  Collectively, these accounts chronicle the recent history of range expansions, population fluctuations, and changes in distribution for a wide range of bird species.  Most importantly, this information serves as a valuable tool for conservation because it provides historical benchmarks to the spatial and temporal patterns of declines for Virginia’s imperiled species.  Despite the relative importance of this rich ornithological history, there has never been a comprehensive aggregation of these various archives.  The objectives of this project are to assemble the historical and contemporary accounts of Virginia’s avifauna into a geographically referenced database and to provide a historical account of avifaunal change that can be applied for conservation purposes.  This project is ongoing.
    4.67
    3 votes
    51

    Northern Saw-whet Owl Surveys

    • Focal taxa: Northern Saw-whet Owl
    • Lead agency/organization: U.S. National Park Service
    • Project location(s): Blue Ridge Parkway
    We surveyed sites where others (notably Mark Simpson) had found birds in years past and some new sites. Primary objective was to see if birds were still at same locations and to see if we could find any new locations.
    7.00
    1 votes
    53
    5.50
    2 votes
    54
    5.50
    2 votes
    55
    Biodiversity Heritage Library

    Biodiversity Heritage Library

    The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is a consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that cooperate to digitize and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global “biodiversity commons.” The BHL consortium works with the international taxonomic community, rights holders, and other interested parties to ensure that this biodiversity heritage is made available to a global audience through open access principles. In partnership with the Internet Archive and through local digitization efforts, the BHL has digitized millions of pages of taxonomic literature, representing tens of thousands of titles and over 100,000 volumes. After Gallica and AnimalBase, BHL (founded in 2005) is the third broad digitization project for biodiversity literature. In 2008 the size of Gallica and AnimalBase was passed and BHL is now by far the world's largest digitization project for biodiversity literature. It is a cornerstone organization of the Encyclopedia of Life. The Biodiversity Heritage Library was initially a collaboration of ten natural history and botanical
    6.00
    1 votes
    56
    6.00
    1 votes
    57
    Zealandia

    Zealandia

    Zealandia, formerly known as the Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, is a protected natural area in Wellington, New Zealand, where the biodiversity of 225 ha (just under a square mile) of forest is being restored. The sanctuary was previously part of the water catchment area for Wellington, between Wrights Hill (bordering Karori) and the Brooklyn wind turbine on Polhill. Most of New Zealand's ecosystems have been severely modified by the introduction of land mammals that were not present during the evolution of its ecosystems, and have had a devastating impact on both native flora and fauna. The sanctuary, surrounded by a pest-exclusion fence, is a good example of an ecological island, which allows the natural ecosystems to thrive by minimising those introduced pressures. The sanctuary has become a significant tourist attraction in Wellington and is responsible for the greatly increased number of sightings of species such as tui and kaka in city's suburbs. The sanctuary has inspired a raft of similar projects throughout New Zealand, with predator-proof fences now protecting the biodiversity of many other areas of forest. Examples include the 7.7 hectare lowland podocarp forest remnant of
    6.00
    1 votes
    58

    Birds and Climate Change: On the Move

    • Focal taxa: Bird
    • Lead agency/organization: National Audubon Society
    • Project location(s): North America
    Audubon scientists analyzed 40 years of citizen-science Christmas Bird Count data — and their findings provide new and powerful evidence that global warming is having a serious impact on natural systems. Northward movement was detected among species of every type, including more than 70 percent of highly adaptable forest and feeder birds.
    5.00
    1 votes
    59

    Monongahela National Forest Point Count Surveys

    • Focal taxa: Bird
    • Lead agency/organization: United States Forest Service
    • Project location(s): Monongahela National Forest
    Point count survey routes run annually for 1) long-term trend data and 2) to assess changes in breeding bird community as related to land management activities.
    5.00
    1 votes
    60

    Mountian to Sea Trail construction effects on Northern Saw-whet Owl

    • Focal taxa: Northern Saw-whet Owl
    • Lead agency/organization: U.S. National Park Service
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    Objective: To assess impacts to the local saw whet owl population caused by construction of the Mountains To Sea Trail and by increased levels of human activity as a result of trail use. Attempted to document population density, territory placement, and reproductive activity.
    5.00
    1 votes
    62
    4.00
    2 votes
    63

    Cherokee National Forest Fall Migrant Bird Banding

    • Focal taxa: Bird
    • Lead agency/organization: United States Forest Service
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    Objective: To pool the data of 3 volunteers from long-term high elevation banding stations and examine species trends, relate trends with habitat variables, and examine trends within individual species such as longevity, return data, differences in timing across sex and age.
    4.00
    1 votes
    64

    Effect of Military Overflights on Shorebirds of Cape Lookout National Seashore, NC

    • Focal taxa: Wilson's Plover
    • Lead agency/organization: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
    • Project location(s): Cape Lookout National Seashore
    This study will focus on the population dynamics and behavior of shorebirds nesting on Cape Lookout National Seashore, NC with special emphasis in understanding the effects, if any, of military flights over the study area.
    4.00
    1 votes
    65

    Population genetics of selected Appalachian species

    • Focal taxa: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
    • Lead agency/organization: Cleveland Museum of Natural History
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    Collecting specimens of selected taxa throughout the Appalachian chain, to assess genetic diversity.
    4.00
    1 votes
    66

    U.S. Nightjar Survey Network

    • Focal taxa: Nightjar
    • Lead agency/organization: Center for Conservation Biology
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    The Nightjar Survey Network is a new and statistically powerful monitoring program, coordinated by the Center for Conservation Biology, which is designed to collect information on the population status of Nightjar species across the United States.  The success of this program relies entirely on volunteer participation to adopt Nightjar survey routes to collect these data.  Each survey route is surveyed only one time per year but many years of data are needed from each route to provide any indication of population change.
    4.00
    1 votes
    67
    0.00
    0 votes
    68

    Allegheny Front Migration Observatory

    • Focal taxa: Bird
    • Lead agency/organization: Brooks Bird Club
    • Project location(s): Bird Conservation Region 28
    The Allegheny Front Migration Observatory (AFMO), located in Grant County, West Virginia, has completed its 49th year of bird banding.  The 50th season starts August 11, 2007 and ends October 13, 2007.
    0.00
    0 votes
    69

    The Western Hummingbird Project (WHP): Hummingbird Conservation in North America

    • Focal taxa: Hummingbird
    • Lead agency/organization: United States Forest Service
    • Project location(s): North America
    The US Forest Service (FS) as part of the Wings Across the Americas Program, and the Hummingbird Monitoring Network (HMN) are working together to develop and implement the Western Hummingbird Project (WHP), which will address hummingbird conservation issues in North America. This program will build partnerships and collaborations with FS regions across the west, non-profit organizations, universities and other governmental agencies at both the federal and state levels. The conservation programs developed will include habitat restoration and enhancement, monitoring, research, and education/outreach.
    0.00
    0 votes
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