Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 181 views
  • 85 votes
  • 85 voters
  • 9%
Best Conservation project lead of All Time

More about Best Conservation project lead of All Time:

Best Conservation project lead of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Conservation project lead of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Conservation project lead of All Time has gotten 181 views and has gathered 85 votes from 85 voters. O O

Best Conservation project lead of All Time is a top list in the General category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of General or Best Conservation project lead of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about General on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Conservation project lead of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Conservation project lead of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1

    North Carolina State University

    • Projects led: Effects of Atmospheric Pollution on High Elevation Fauna in Great Smoky Mountains National Park
    North Carolina State University at Raleigh (NCSU) is a public, coeducational, research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. Commonly known as NC State, the university is part of the University of North Carolina system and is a land, sea, and space grant institution. The university forms one of the corners of the Research Triangle together with Duke University in Durham and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The North Carolina General Assembly founded the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, now NC State, on March 7, 1887, as a land-grant college. Today, NC State has an enrollment of more than 34,000 students, making it the largest university in North Carolina. NC State has historical strengths in agriculture, life sciences, design, engineering and textiles and now offers 106 bachelor's degrees. The graduate school offers 104 master's degrees, 61 doctoral degrees, and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. The North Carolina General Assembly founded NC State on March 7, 1887 as a land-grant college under the name "North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts." As a land-grant college, NC State would provide a liberal
    8.40
    5 votes
    2
    7.60
    5 votes
    3
    9.50
    4 votes
    4
    7.20
    5 votes
    5
    7.20
    5 votes
    6

    Western Carolina University

    • Projects led: Comparison of Black-capped and Carolina Chickadee
    Western Carolina University (WCU) is a coeducational public university located in Cullowhee, North Carolina, United States. The university is a constituent campus of the University of North Carolina system. The fifth oldest institution of the sixteen four-year universities in the UNC system, the university was founded to educate the people of the western North Carolina mountains. The university has expanded its mission to serve the entire state and the nation and has grown to become a major cultural, scientific, and educational force in the state and region. WCU now serves more than 9,500 full time undergraduate and post graduate students, providing an education to students from 46 states and 39 countries. Enrollment for fall 2012 was 9,608. Western Carolina University is located in Jackson County, in the unincorporated village of Cullowhee, North Carolina. The university operates learning centers in both Asheville and Cherokee with programs offered online and at various community colleges. The main campus is located in a valley of the Tuckasegee River between the Blue Ridge and Great Smoky Mountains, 52 miles (84 km) west of Asheville, North Carolina and 5 miles south of Sylva,
    6.80
    5 votes
    7
    8.50
    4 votes
    8
    United States Geological Survey

    United States Geological Survey

    • Projects led: Ecology and Conservation of Neotropical Migrants in the Southern Appalachians
    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. A bureau of the United States Department of the Interior, it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia. The USGS also has major offices near Lakewood, Colorado (Denver Federal Center), and Menlo Park, California. The motto of the USGS is "Science for a changing world." Prompted by a report from the National Academy of Sciences the USGS was created by an act of Congress on March 3, 1879. It was charged with the "classification of the public lands, and examination of the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain." This task was driven by the need to inventory the vast lands added to the United States by the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 and the
    7.75
    4 votes
    9

    New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

    • Projects led: Regional Monitoring and Performance Reporting Framework
    The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC or DEC) is responsible for the conservation, improvement, and protection of natural resources within the U.S. state of New York. It was founded in 1970, replacing the previous Conservation Department. The Department manages the Adirondack and Catskill Forest Preserve lands, state forest lands, wildlife management areas and various other state owned public lands of New York. The Department is also responsible for regulating sport fishing, hunting and trapping within the state, and enforcing the State's environmental laws and regulations. NYSDEC has an annual budget of approximately $1 billion and employs 3,378 people across the state. It manages over 4 million acres (16,000 km²) of protected state-owned land (including all Forest Preserve holdings in the Adirondack and Catskill parks) and another 690,000 acres (2,760 km²) of privately owned land on which it holds conservation easements. The Department's activities go beyond land management and environmental enforcement to include the publication of a magazine and a state bird atlas, and the operation of a major ski area. The core of DEC is the conservation
    7.00
    4 votes
    10

    Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries

    • Projects led: VA Department of Game and Inland Fisheries Wildlife Management Area (WMA) Breeding Bird Surveys
    The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, or VDGIF, regulates fish and wildlife in Virginia. It is managed by the Director of Game and Inland Fisheries and overseen by the Virginia Board of Game and Inland Fisheries. VDGIF's goals are to: The Director of Game and Inland Fisheries has the power to: The law enforcement officers of VDGIF carry the official title of Conservation Police Officer. The official title was Game Warden prior to July 1, 2007. Conservation police officers from the Law Enforcement Division of VDGIF have full police powers but focus on enforcing Virginia's wildlife and boating laws in the state's numerous fields, forests, and waterways. Usually a single officer is assigned to work in a county or city. There are some exceptions, depending on the needs of the community. Conservation officers assist each other in adjacent counties within their work areas. They also work with local law enforcement agencies when performing manhunts, search and rescue, and other endeavors. With the addition of 19 new Conservation Police Officers the force now numbers 166 Officers. Since the establishment of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, 8 officers
    6.75
    4 votes
    11

    Maryland Department of Natural Resources

    • Projects led: Monongahela National Forest Northern Saw-whet Owl Surveys
    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is a government agency in the state of Maryland charged with maintaining natural resources such as the 66 state parks, public lands, state forests, state waterways, wildlife and recreation areas. Its headquarters are in Annapolis. DNR was established in 1969 as part of a reorganization of the Maryland executive branch initiated by Governor Marvin Mandel. DNR assumed the responsibilities formerly held by the Maryland Board of Natural Resources (established in 1941), and consolidated the agency's authority under a single department secretary. The first DNR secretary was former Maryland Governor J. Millard Tawes, who served in that capacity until 1971. Other notable DNR secretaries have included James Coulter (1971–1983) and Torrey C. Brown (1983–1995). The department is headquartered in the Tawes State Office building at 580 Taylor Avenue in Annapolis. The Secretary of the Department of Natural Resources is, for all intents and purposes, the head of the DNR. John R. Griffin is the current Secretary of the Department of Natural Resources. He directly heads the Matrix Teams and the Office for a Sustainable Future. He also leads the
    8.67
    3 votes
    12

    North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

    • Projects led: Breeding biology of the Southern Appalachian Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
    The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (NCMNS) is located in Raleigh, North Carolina. This museum is the oldest established museum in North Carolina and the largest museum of its kind in the Southeast. It has about 700,000 visitors annually, making it the most visited attraction in the state. Glow: Living Lights, an exhibit on bioluminescence, is currently on exhibit through September 12, 2010. Past traveling exhibits include fantastic exhibits of artifacts including the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Titanic, annual nature photography shows, Jane Goodall's work with chimpanzees, SuperCroc, the Hubble Space Telescope, a Megalodon exhibit, Wild Music, Hunters of the Sky, and others. The Nature Research Center is a new 80,000 sq ft (7,400 m), three-story wing across the street from the current museum. The center is funded in part by the State Employees Credit Union (SECU) of Raleigh. The $54 million addition, which opened April 20th, 2012, allows children visiting the museum to play a hands-on role in new research. It includes a spherical theater called the SECU Daily Planet. Bugfest is the museum's largest and most popular special event. Visitors can taste bug-filled dishes, enjoy
    6.25
    4 votes
    13
    7.33
    3 votes
    14
    Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

    Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

    • Projects led: Atlantic Sea Duck Project
    The Patuxent Wildlife Research Center is a biological research center in Maryland. It is one of 17 research centers in the United States run by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The center is located on the grounds of the 12,841-acre (51.97 km) Patuxent Research Refuge, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This is the only National Wildlife Refuge with the purpose of supporting wildlife research. Since its establishment in 1936 as the first wildlife experiment station in the United States, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center has been a leading international research institute for wildlife and applied environmental research, for transmitting research findings to those responsible for managing the United States's natural resources, and for providing technical assistance in implementing research findings so as to improve natural resource management. Patuxent's scientists have been responsible for many important advances in natural resource conservation, especially in such areas as migratory birds, national monitoring programs for amphibians and birds, wildlife population analysis, waterfowl harvest, habitat management, wetlands, coastal zone and flood plain management,
    6.67
    3 votes
    15

    Mars Hill College

    • Projects led: Breeding biology of the Southern Appalachian Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
    Mars Hill College is a private, coed, liberal arts college. It is affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina and the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship. The college is located in the small town of Mars Hill, North Carolina, United States, 15 miles (24 km) due north of Asheville, western North Carolina's largest city. Mars Hill College is easily accessible from Asheville via Interstate 26, which runs about a mile east of the college. Mars Hill College was founded in 1856, and it is the oldest college or university in western North Carolina. The college started as the French Broad Baptist Institute, sharing a name with the nearby French Broad River. In 1859, the college changed its name to Mars Hill, in honor of the hill in ancient Athens on which the Apostle Paul debated Christianity with the city's leading philosophers. During the American Civil War the college was closed for two years, but it reopened after the war. From 1897 to 1938 the college, under the leadership of Dr. Robert Moore, enjoyed substantial financial and physical growth. In 1921 Mars Hill became an accredited junior college. Dr. Hoyt Blackwell served as president from 1938 to 1966, and under his
    8.50
    2 votes
    16

    United States Forest Service

    • Projects led: Cherokee National Forest Fall Migrant Bird Banding
    The United States Forest Service is an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture that administers the nation's 155 national forests and 20 national grasslands, which encompass 193 million acres (780,000 km). Major divisions of the agency include the National Forest System, State and Private Forestry, and the Research and Development branch. In 1876, Congress created the office of Special Agent in the Department of Agriculture to assess the quality and conditions of forests in the United States. Franklin B. Hough was appointed the head of the office. In 1881, the office was expanded into the newly formed Division of Forestry. The Forest Reserve Act of 1891 authorized withdrawing land from the public domain as "forest reserves," managed by the Department of the Interior. In 1901, the Division of Forestry was renamed the Bureau of Forestry. The Transfer Act of 1905 transferred the management of forest reserves from the General Land Office of the Interior Department to the Bureau of Forestry, henceforth known as the United States Forest Service. Gifford Pinchot was the first Chief Forester of the United States Forest Service in the administration of President Theodore
    6.33
    3 votes
    17

    Audubon International

    Audubon International is a not for profit 501(c)(3) environmental education organization based in Selkirk, New York. Established in 1987, the organization has helped thousands of communities, developments, resorts and golf courses in 30 countries to plan and implement sustainable natural resource management practices, as well as receive public recognition (through rigorous certification processes) for employing sound environmental stewardship. It is the first organization to team up with the golf industry in educating members of the golf world about environmental issues and possible solutions that simultaneously advance ecological, economic and social goals. The organization is not affiliated with the National Audubon Society. Some have suggested that it is using the Audubon name to confuse consumers, potential donors and program members. However, proponents of the organization's work emphasize that Audubon International does not advocate transferring wildlife habitat (or other naturalized areas) into golf courses, residential areas, or other forms of development. Instead, Audubon International works with property managers to avoid or minimize the negative environmental impacts of
    10.00
    1 votes
    18
    5.67
    3 votes
    19

    East Tennessee State University

    • Projects led: Hermit Thrush, Catharus guttatus, and Veery, C. fuscescens, habitat associations in a dynamic Southern Appalachian Spruce-fir Forest
    East Tennessee State University (ETSU) is an accredited American university located in Johnson City, Tennessee. It is part of the Tennessee Board of Regents system of colleges and universities, the nation's sixth largest system of public education, and is the fourth largest university in the state. ETSU has off-campus centers in nearby Kingsport, Elizabethton, and Greeneville, Tennessee. Listed by The Princeton Review as one of America’s Best Value Colleges, ETSU has a host of programs that benefit both the region and nation, including the Quillen College of Medicine, consistently ranked as one of the top schools nationwide for rural medicine and primary care education, the Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, the College of Nursing, the College of Public Health, and the recently formed College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences. Unique programs include a nationally acclaimed and accredited program in Bluegrass, Old Time, and Country Music, the nation's lone master's degree in Storytelling, and the Appalachian Studies programs, focused on the surrounding Appalachian region. ETSU had a record enrollment of over 15,000 students in Fall 2010. In 2011, ETSU had its 100th
    5.33
    3 votes
    20

    Atlantic Flyway Council

    • Projects led: Atlantic Flyway Cooperative Banding Program
    The Atlantic Flyway Council is composed of the states of Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia; the Canadian territory of Nunavut and provinces of Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec; plus the U.S. territories of Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands.The Atlantic Flyway Council contains representatives (usually administrators) from all the agencies that have management responsibility for migratory bird resources in the Flyway.The Council determines actions required for sound migratory game bird management and makes recommendations to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
    7.00
    2 votes
    21
    9.00
    1 votes
    22
    8.00
    1 votes
    23
    8.00
    1 votes
    25
    U.S. National Park Service

    U.S. National Park Service

    • Projects led: Northern Saw-whet Owl Surveys
    The National Park Service (NPS) is the U.S. federal agency that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service Organic Act. It is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior, a federal executive department whose head, the Secretary of the Interior, is a Cabinet officer nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Most of the direct management of the NPS is delegated by the Secretary to the National Park Service Director, who must also be confirmed by the Senate. The 21,989 employees of the NPS oversee 397 units, of which 58 are designated national parks. National parks and national monuments in the United States were originally individually managed under the auspices of the Department of the Interior. The movement for an independent agency to oversee these federal lands was spearheaded by business magnate and conservationist Stephen Mather, as well as J. Horace McFarland. With the help of journalist Robert Sterling Yard, Mather ran a publicity campaign for the Department of the Interior.
    7.00
    1 votes
    26

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    • Projects led: Effect of Military Overflights on Shorebirds of Cape Lookout National Seashore, NC
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, popularly known as Virginia Tech (VT), is a public land-grant university with the main campus in Blacksburg, Virginia, with other research and educational centers throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia, the National Capital Region, and international locations in Switzerland and the Dominican Republic. Founded in 1872 as an agricultural and mechanical land-grant college, Virginia Tech is a research university with the largest full-time student population in Virginia and one of the few public universities in the United States that maintains a corps of cadets. The university is one among a small group of polytechnic universities in the United States which tend to be primarily devoted to the instruction of technical arts and applied sciences. The university fulfills its land-grant mission of transforming knowledge to practice through technological leadership and by fueling economic growth and job creation locally, regionally, and across Virginia. Virginia Tech has the largest number of degree offerings in Virginia, more than 125 campus buildings, a 2,600-acre main campus, off-campus educational facilities in six regions, a
    7.00
    1 votes
    27
    Cleveland Museum of Natural History

    Cleveland Museum of Natural History

    • Projects led: Population genetics of selected Appalachian species
    The Cleveland Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum located approximately five miles (8 km) east of downtown Cleveland, Ohio in University Circle, a 550-acre (220 ha) concentration of educational, cultural and medical institutions. The museum was established in 1920 to perform research, education and development of collections in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, astronomy, botany, geology, paleontology, wildlife biology, and zoology. Donald Johanson was the curator of the museum when he discovered "Lucy," the skeletal remains of the ancient hominid Australopithecus afarensis. The current Curator and Head of the Physical Anthropology Department is Yohannes Haile-Selassie. In 2002, the new Fannye Shafran Planetarium was built near the entrance to the museum, containing displays on the planets in the Solar System, and historical instruments of exploration, such as compasses and astrolabes. Museum collections total more than four million specimens and include specimens of paleontology, zoology, archeology, mineralogy, ornithology, and a variety of other scientific subjects. A beloved full-scale model of a stegosaurus on the lawn delights Cleveland children. Some
    5.00
    2 votes
    28

    Hummingbird Monitoring Network

    • Projects led: The Western Hummingbird Project (WHP): Hummingbird Conservation in North America
    HMN is a science-based, project-driven, nonprofit organization dedicated to the conservation of hummingbird diversity and abundance throughout the Americas. HMN currently maintains over 30 study sites in Canada and the USA and is expanding into Mexico. Their field studies’ sites are chosen using geographic, habitat, and disturbance factors and are evaluated using hummingbird diversity and abundance patterns, levels of breeding activity, and migration stopover use.
    4.50
    2 votes
    29

    Smithsonian Institution Conservation and Research Center

    • Projects led: Inventory of Bird Communities within High Elevation Sites of Virginia
    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) is a unit of the Smithsonian Institution located on a 3,200-acre (13 km) campus located just outside the historic town of Front Royal, Virginia. An extension of the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., the SCBI has played a leading role in the fields of veterinary medicine, reproductive physiology and conservation biology since its founding in 1974. Previously named the Conservation and Research Center, the CRC became known as the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in 2010 as a symbol of its growing independence from the captive animals associated with the traditional images of zoos. The land on which the SCBI lies has a long and rich history dating back to 1909, when the United States Army leased some 42 area farms. In the years predating World War I, the land served as a series of U.S. Army Remount Service depots, supplying horses and mules to the military. The federal government ultimately purchased the land in 1911 and began construction on the Ayleshire Quartermaster Remount Depot. Completed in 1916, the Depot consisted of eleven barn and stable facilities, hundreds of miles of split-rail fencing, many miles of access
    4.00
    1 votes
    30

    United States Fish and Wildlife Service

    • Projects led: Golden-winged Warbler Gulf of Maine Habitat Model
    The United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a federal government agency within the United States Department of the Interior dedicated to the management of fish, wildlife, and natural habitats. The mission of the agency reads as "working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people." The leader of FWS is the director of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. On Monday, December 6, 2010, President Barack Obama nominated Daniel M. Ashe, of Maryland, to the U.S. Senate to be the new Director, succeeding Samuel D. Hamilton. Units within the FWS include: The Fish and Wildlife Service originated in 1871 as the United States Commission on Fish and Fisheries, created by Congress with the purpose of studying and recommending solutions to a noted decline in the stocks of food fish. Spencer Fullerton Baird was appointed its first commissioner. In 1885, the Division of Economic Ornithology and Mammalogy was established in the United States Department of Agriculture, which in 1896 became the Division of Biological Survey. Its early work focused on the effect of birds in controlling
    4.00
    1 votes
    31
    National Audubon Society

    National Audubon Society

    • Projects led: Birds and Climate Change: On the Move
    The National Audubon Society (Audubon) is an American, non-profit, environmental organization dedicated to conservation. Incorporated in 1905, Audubon is one of the oldest of such organizations in the world and uses science, education and grassroots advocacy to advance its conservation mission. It is named in honor of John James Audubon, a Franco-American ornithologist and naturalist who painted, cataloged, and described the birds of North America in his famous book Birds of America published in sections between 1827 and 1838. The society has nearly 500 local chapters, each of which is an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit organization voluntarily affiliated with the National Audubon Society, which often organize birdwatching field trips and conservation-related activities. It also coordinates the Christmas Bird Count held each December in the U.S., a model of citizen science, in partnership with Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the Great Backyard Bird Count each February. Together with Cornell, Audubon created eBird, an online database for bird observation. The National Audubon Society also has many global partners to help birds that migrate beyond our borders, including BirdLife
    0.00
    0 votes
    32

    PacifiCorp

    • Projects led: Evaluating electrocution risks and the effectiveness of avian protection measures on power lines
    PacifiCorp is an electric power company in the northwestern United States. PacifiCorp has three primary subsidiaries: Since 2006, PacifiCorp has been a wholly owned subsidiary of MidAmerican Energy Holdings Company, itself an affiliate of Berkshire Hathaway. In 2001, PacifiCorp was purchased by Scottish Power, but later sold to MidAmerican. PacifiCorp is currently headquartered in the Lloyd Center Tower at 825 N.E. Multnomah Street, Portland, Oregon, in the Lloyd District. Pacific Power is also headquartered in the same building. Rocky Mountain Power and PacifiCorp Energy are headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah. Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power combined serve over 1.4 million residential customers, 202,000 commercial customers, and 34,000 industrial and irrigation customers - for a total of approximately 1,668,000 customers. The service area is 136,000 square miles (350,000 km). Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power own and maintain 15,622 miles (25,141 km) of long distance transmission lines, 43,850 miles (70,570 km) of overhead distribution lines, 14,510 miles (23,350 km) of underground distribution lines, and 900 substations. In 1977, PacifiCorp spun off its coal mining
    0.00
    0 votes
    33

    University of Tennessee

    • Projects led: Global Ant Community Database
    The University of Tennessee (also referred to as the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, UT Knoxville or UT or UTK) is a public sun-grant and land-grant university headquartered at Knoxville, Tennessee, United States. Founded in 1794, it is the flagship institution of the statewide University of Tennessee system with nine undergraduate colleges and eleven graduate colleges and hosts almost 28,000 students from all 50 states and more than 100 foreign countries. In its 2012 ranking of universities, U.S. News & World Report ranked UT 101st among all national universities and 46th among public institutions of higher learning. Its ties to Oak Ridge National Laboratory, established under UT President Andrew Holt and continued under the UT-Battelle partnership, allow for considerable research opportunities for faculty and students. Also affiliated with the University are the Howard H. Baker, Jr. Center for Public Policy, the University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility, and the University of Tennessee Arboretum, which occupies 250 acres (1.0 km) of nearby Oak Ridge and features hundreds of species of plants indigenous to the region. The University is a direct partner of the
    0.00
    0 votes
    34
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Conservation project lead of All Time

    Top List Voters