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Best Commune of French Polynesia of All Time

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    1
    Faaa

    Faaa

    Faaa is a commune in the suburbs of Papeete in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. Faaa is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. Faaa has a population of 29,851, making it the largest commune in Tahiti and French Polynesia. Faaa has many mountains inland that can reach 5,000 ft (1,500 m). Mount Orohena is an extinct volcano in the inland limits and can be seen from nearby Moorea. Big swells form in nearby Teahupoo and the ASP World Tour holds a surf contest there every year. The area of Faaa is 30 ft (9.1 m) above mean sea level on average. Faaa has a long history. Captain James Cook came to Tahiti on his expedition. The commune is the political stronghold of independence leader Oscar Temaru who served three times as president. In 1988 Faaa supplanted Papeete as the most populated commune in the urban area of Papeete and in French Polynesia. Despite having more inhabitants than Papeete, the urban area is named after Papeete and Faaa is considered a suburb of Papeete due to Papeete's historical importance and status as administrative capital of French
    6.57
    7 votes
    2
    Hao

    Hao

    Hao, or Haorangi, is a large coral atoll in the central part of the Tuamotu Archipelago. Because of its shape, French explorer Louis Antoine de Bougainville named it Harp Island. Hao is located 920 km (575 mi.) to the east of Tahiti and is 55 km (34.5 mi) in length. The lagoon is one of the longest in French Polynesia and has only one navigable passage, at Kaki, on the north end of the atoll. The chief town is the village of Otepa, where the main economic activity is the cultivation of pearls. The first recorded European arriving on Hao was Pedro Fernández de Quirós in 1606. He was followed by José Andía y Varela in 1774. Because of its shape, French explorer Louis Antoine de Bougainville named it Harp Island. In some maps it also appears as Bow Island. Hao was the first atoll of the Tuamotus that Russian explorer Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen visited in 1820 on the ships Vostok and Mirni. In the late 1980s, two French intelligence (DGSE) operatives were briefly confined to the military base on the island after France obtained their release from a New Zealand prison for sinking the Greenpeace ship, Rainbow Warrior. Their earlier-than-agreed upon repatriation from the island by
    7.40
    5 votes
    3
    Nuku-Hiva

    Nuku-Hiva

    Nuku-Hiva is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune is in the administrative subdivision of the Marquesas Islands. The commune of Nuku-Hiva is made up of the island of Nuku Hiva proper (339 km (131 sq mi)), which contains the entire population of the commune, and the uninhabited islands of: The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Taiohae, on the southern side of the island of Nuku Hiva.
    7.20
    5 votes
    4
    Tubuai

    Tubuai

    Tubuai (Polynesian: Tupua'i) is the name of a group of islands and also the name of its main island, being part of the Austral Islands, French Polynesia, in the Pacific Ocean. Tubuai, the main island of the Tubuai Island group, is located at 23°23′00″S 149°27′00″W / 23.3833333°S 149.45°W / -23.3833333; -149.45. It is 640 km (400 mi) south of Tahiti. It sustains a population of 2,049 people on 45 km (17 sq mi) of land. Due to its southerly position, Tubuai has notably cooler weather than Tahiti. The island is ringed by a lagoon formed by an encircling coral reef. A break in the reef that enables passage for ships is located on the North side of the island. Tubuai has two volcanic domes, with its highest point, Mt Taita'a, being 422 meters (1380 feet). A number of small islets or keys called motus in Polynesian, lie along the reef that enclose the island. These were described in the late 1700s as having an abundance of Toa trees, which the native islanders used in housebuilding and in making war clubs and spears due to the wood's density. The island has been inhabited for more than 2000 years. Anciently a road was built that encircled the island. There exists on the island today
    7.50
    4 votes
    5
    Tureia

    Tureia

    Tureia (also called Papahena) is an atoll in the Tuamotu Archipelago in French Polynesia. Tureia atoll is 15 km long and has a maximum width of 8 km. A very long island covers completely its eastern reef. The lagoon has no entrance. The village of Hakamaru (or Fakamaru), population 261, is the only settlement on Tureia, at the northern tip of the atoll. Almost all of the arable land on Tureia is dedicated to growing coconuts. The population in this atoll has risen; in 1977 there were only 121 inhabitants. The first recorded European to arrive to Tureia was Captain Edward Edwards in 1791, during his search for the Bounty mutineers. Edwards called the atoll "Carysfort", after John Proby, 1st Earl of Carysfort. From 1966 to 1999, Tureia hosted an outpost of the Centre d'Expérimentation du Pacifique, the French authority supervising nuclear tests on the nearby atolls of Moruroa and Fangataufa, which lie about 70 miles/115 kilometres south of Tureia. There was also a weather station on Tureia during those years. Currently, both installations have been abandoned. This atoll has a 3,000 feet (900 meters)-long airstrip (IATA: ZTA, ICAO: NTGY). Tureia Airport was inaugurated in
    7.50
    4 votes
    6
    Papara

    Papara

    Papara is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. Papara is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands.
    9.00
    3 votes
    7
    Ua Huka

    Ua Huka

    Ua Huka is one of the Marquesas Islands, in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. It is situated in the northern group of the archipelago, approximately 25 mi (40 km). (42 km) to the east of Nuku Hiva, at 8°54′S 139°33′W / 8.9°S 139.55°W / -8.9; -139.55. Ua Huka is sometimes also found spelled Roohka or Ua Huna. The first Western navigator to sight the island was U.S. Navy Capt. Joseph Ingraham in 1791. He named the island "Washington Island" in honor of U. S. President George Washington, a name which was eventually extended to include all of the northern group of the Marquesas Islands. Other names for the island include Riou and Solide. See also Names of the Marquesas Islands. The island is shaped approximately like a crescent, with its concave edge facing the south. The land area is approximately 83 km² (32 sq. mi.). The center of the island is a high plateau, deeply indented in places by narrow river valleys. The highest peak, Hitikau reaches an elevation of 857 m (2,812 ft). Much of the island's native plant cover, which outside the valleys consists primarily of dryland scrub, has been devastated by herds of feral goats and horses, which are
    7.00
    4 votes
    8
    Rimatara

    Rimatara

    Rimatara is the westernmost inhabited island in the Austral Islands of French Polynesia. It has a total surface area of 8.6 km (3.3 sq mi) and a population of 786 inhabitants (as of 2007 census). It is located 550 km (340 mi) south of Tahiti and 150 km (93 mi) west of Rurutu. The commune of Rimatara includes the small and uninhabited Maria Islands. Rimatara is a circular volcanic plateau surrounded by a reef with a height of 8 to 10 meters (26 to 32 feet). The highest point, at the peak of Mount Uhau, is 83 meters (272 feet). The main villages are Amaru (the capital), Anapoto and Mutuaura. Rimatara was one of the last Polynesia islands to welcome European visitors. Captain Samuel Pinder Henry discovered the island in 1821. Two missionaries arrived in 1822 and established a Protestant mission. France established a protectorate in 1889 and annexed Rimatara in 1900. The commune of Rimatara consists of the island of Rimatara, and the Maria Islets (Îlots Maria). Associated communes are Amaru, Mutuaura and Anapoto.
    6.75
    4 votes
    9
    Rangiroa

    Rangiroa

    Rangiroa is a commune of French Polynesia in the archipelago of the Tuamotu Islands. The commune includes 4 islands: Rangiroa, Tikehau, Mataiva and Makatea. The chef-lieu is the atoll of Rangiroa and the chief-town is Avatoru. The commune is composed of three atolls and one island: Commune associée
    6.25
    4 votes
    10
    Hikueru

    Hikueru

    Hikueru, Tiveru, or Te Kārena, is one of the Central Tuamotu atolls. The closest land to Hikueru is Tekokota Atoll, located 22 km to the north. Hikueru Atoll's shape is roughly oval and it is 15 km in length and 9.5 km in width. It covers a total surface of 107 km². There are many motu on its reef with a combined land area of about 25 km². Its lagoon is deep, with numerous coral heads. It has no pass to enter it. The most important village on Hikueru is Tupapati, located in an island at the north-western end of the atoll. There is a territorial airport on Hikueru which was opened in 2000. Hikueru was the setting for Armstrong Sperry's novel Call It Courage, which won the Newbery Medal in 1940. Hikueru Atoll was discovered by Bougainville in 1768. Spanish navigator Domingo de Boenechea sighted Hikueru in 1774 on ship Aguila. He named this atoll "San Juan". Like Marokau, Hikueru used to be a large natural pearl oyster reserve. The 1903 cyclone wrought considerable damage, however, and caused the death of 377 people, including 261 from the island of Hao. In his "South Sea Tales", Jack London gives a vivid description of this disastrous hurricane. In the 1988 census, only 123
    10.00
    2 votes
    11
    Pirae

    Pirae

    Pirae is a commune in the suburbs of Papeete in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. Pirae is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. It borders Papeete in the west and Arue in the east. The Stade Pater Te Hono Nui is a stadium located in the commune.
    7.67
    3 votes
    12
    Taputapuatea

    Taputapuatea

    Taputapuatea is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune of Taputapuatea is located on the island of Raiatea, in the administrative subdivision of the Leeward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Avera. The commune was named after a large marae complex which was once considered the religious center of eastern Polynesia. The archaeological site of Taputapuatea marae is still today the most famous landmark of Raiatea.
    7.67
    3 votes
    13
    Ua Pu

    Ua Pu

    Ua Pu (French: Ua Pou, North Marquesan: ’uapou) is the third largest of the Marquesas Islands, in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. It is located about 50 km (30 mi.) south of Nuku Hiva, in the northern Marquesas. Until the beginning of the 1980s, it was the most populous of the Marquesas Islands, because when the other islands were being ravaged by diseases introduced by European explorers and traders, the Catholic priests on the island finally took to quarantining the remnant of the native population inside their churches whenever visiting ships approached the island, thereby reducing their exposure to external diseases. The center of the island is characterized by four high basalt pillars that reach high above the surrounding mountains. The highest of these pillars, Mount Oave (French: Mont Oave), reaches to 1,230 m (4,035 ft.) above sea level and is the highest elevation in the Marquesas. The island covers an area of 106 km (41 sq. mi.), and is located just northwest of the small island of Motu Oa. The population in 2007 was 2,157. The largest settlement is Hakahau, on Hakahau Bay, on the northeast coast. Administratively Ua Pu forms the
    6.00
    4 votes
    14
    Tahuata

    Tahuata

    Tahuata is the smallest of the inhabited Marquesas Islands, in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. It is located 4 km (2.5 mi.) to the south of the western end of Hiva Oa, across the Canal du Bordelais, called Ha‘ava in Marquesan. Administratively, Tahuata forms the commune (municipality) of Tahuata, part of the administrative subdivision of the Marquesas Islands. This commune consists solely of the island of Tahuata itself. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Vaitahu, on the western side of the island. Tahuata is approx. 69 km² (26.6 sq. mi.) The highest point on the island is Mount Amatea (French: Mont Amatea), rising to an elevation of 1,050 m (3,445 ft.). The 2007 census population was 671. Archæological evidence indicates that Tahuata was inhabited by Polynesians as early as 200 CE. In later pre-European times, the tribes of Tahuata were allied with the tribes from the Nuku province of Hiva Oa, and the island was considered a dependency of that province. The first European explorers disembarked on Tahuata in 1595, beginning with the Spanish navigator Álvaro de Mendaña de Neira at Vaitahu, followed by Captain James
    9.50
    2 votes
    15
    Anaa

    Anaa

    Anaa, Nganaa-nui (or Ara-ura) is an atoll in the Tuamotu archipelago, in French Polynesia. It is located in the north-west of the archipelago, 350 km to the east of Tahiti. It oval in shape, 29.5 km in length and 6.5 km wide, with a total area 38 km². The atoll is made up by eleven small barren islands with deeper and more fertile soil than other atolls in the Tuamotus. The lagoon is shallow, without entrance, and formed by three main basins. Although it does not have any navigable entrance, the water of the lagoon renews by several small channels that can be crossed walking. The main village is Tukuhora, also called Anaa, with a total population of 435 according to the census of 2002. The other small villages like Temarie, Otepipi, Mania and Tematahoa were uninhabited according to the census. The population subsists mainly on the fishing, the cultivation of nacre and the production of copra. The atoll of Anaa was known by the legendary cruelty of its soldiers who in the seventeenth century, dominated the north-west of the Tuamotus. The first recorded European to sight the atoll was Louis Antoine de Bougainville in 1768. James Cook sighted it in 1769. Because of its shape, he
    7.33
    3 votes
    16
    Huahine

    Huahine

    Huahine is an island located among the Society Islands, in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. It is part of the Leeward Islands group (Îles sous le Vent). The island has a population of about 6,000. Huahine measures 16 km (9.9 mi) in length, with a maximum width of 13 km (8.1 mi). It is made up of two main islands surrounded by a fringing coral reef with several motu. Huahine Nui (Big Huahine) lies to the north and Huahine Iti (Little Huahine) to the south. The two islands are separated by a few hundred yards of water and joined by a sandspit at low tide. A small bridge was built to connect Huahine Nui and Huahine Iti. Northwest of Huahine Iti lies a 375 ha brackish lake known as Lac Fauna Nui (Lac Maeva). This lake is all that remains of the ancient atoll lagoon. Air transportation is available via Huahine airport, located on the northern shore of Huahine Nui. Administratively Huahine is a commune (municipality) part of the administrative subdivision of the Leeward Islands. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Fare, on Huahine Nui. One of the famousattractions on Huahine is a bridge that crosses over a stream with 3- to
    7.33
    3 votes
    17
    Puka-Puka

    Puka-Puka

    Puka-Puka is a small coral atoll in the north-eastern Tuamotu Archipelago, sometimes included as a member of the Disappointment Islands. This atoll is quite isolated, the nearest land being Fakahina, located 182 km to the southwest. Puka-Puka Atoll has an elliptical shape. Its length is 6 km and its maximum width 3.3 km. The lagoon is filled with silt and has become very small. The low coral islands are dry and sparsely populated. According to the 2002 census, the total population was 197. The chief town is Te One Mahina, with about 110 inhabitants. Unlike the rest of the Tuamotus, the language of the islands, Pukapukan, is Marquesic. Puka-Puka was the first of the Tuamotus sighted by Ferdinand Magellan in 1521. Dutch explorers Jacob le Maire and Willem Schouten arrived at Puka-Puka on April 10, 1616 during their Pacific journey. They called this atoll "Honden Island" ("Dog Island"). On 30 July 1947, Thor Heyerdahl and his six-man expedition aboard the raft Kon Tiki made their first sighting of land since departing Callao, Peru when they passed by Puka-Puka. The islands were devastated by a typhoon in 1996, however, with French assistance, Te One Mahina has been rebuilt. Puka-Puka
    7.33
    3 votes
    18
    Punaauia

    Punaauia

    Punaauia is a commune in the suburbs of Papeete in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. Punaauia is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. In the late 1890s, the French painter Paul Gauguin lived in Punaauia. Here he painted his masterpiece, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?. The commune borders Faaa on the north and Paea on the south. Like many of the other communes and islands of French Polynesia, the area was first settled by early Polynesians from Asia around 30,000 years ago. These people have already settled on the Marquesas Islands and then they traveled on their sea canoes to the Society Islands. They had lived off of fish and other early creatures of Tahiti. Most of the early Polynesians had built houses on the beach. Later on, they had built houses further inland because of high tide. Captain James Cook came on his expedition to chart the Pacific islands during 1770. He also came with exploror Englishman Samuel Wallis to explore. James Cook later went to Australia. Charles Darwin came to the Society Islands in the 1800s from
    7.33
    3 votes
    19
    Teva I Uta

    Teva I Uta

    Teva I Uta is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune of Teva I Uta is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Mataiea.
    7.33
    3 votes
    20
    Paea

    Paea

    Paea is a commune in the suburbs of Papeete in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the southern Pacific Ocean. Paea is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. Tahiti's west coast freeway runs through Paea and ends in Teahupoo down south. Going northbound would take drivers toward Papeete. The area of Paea was first settled by travelers from Asia. Captain James Cook had arrrived later on. Paea was part of the Kingdom of Tahiti until France claimed the islands of French Polynesia. The Faaa International Airport was built in 1962 and opened later on. The now defunct Air Moorea crashed while it was flying to Moorea. Close to where the crashsite is a rock with all the names of the people. Moorea is north of Paea and is seen as a gray mound sticking out of the Pacific Ocean. Mount Orohena is a major mountain nearby 7,330 feet tall.
    7.00
    3 votes
    21
    Fakarava

    Fakarava

    Fakarava, Havaiki-te-araro, Havai'i or Farea is an atoll in the west of the Tuamotu group in French Polynesia. It is the second largest of the Tuamotu atolls. The nearest land is Toau Atoll, which lies 14 km to the northwest. The shape of Fakarava Atoll is roughly rectangular and its length is 60 km and its width 21 km. Fakarava has a wide and deep lagoon with a surface of 1,112 km² and two passes. The main pass to enter the lagoon, located in its north-western end, is known as Passe Garuae and it is the largest pass in French Polynesia; the southern pass is called Tumakohua. Fakarava has 701 inhabitants; the main village is called Rotoava. The Pōmare Dynasty originated here before ruling the island of Tahiti. The first recorded European to arrive to Fakarava Atoll was Russian oceanic explorer Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen on July 17, 1820 on ships Vostok and Mirni. He named this atoll "Wittgenstein". Fakarava's inhabitants were evangelized by Belgian Jesuit priest Honoré Laval in 1849. The church at Rotoava was dedicated in 1850. There is a territorial (domestic) airfield in Fakarava which was inaugurated in 1995. Fakarava is presently being classified by UNESCO as a
    5.50
    4 votes
    22
    Tahaa

    Tahaa

    Tahaa (see footnote for variant spellings) is an island located among the Society Islands, in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The islands of Tahaa and neighboring Raiatea are enclosed by the same coral reef, and may once have been a single island. Administratively, Tahaa and the surrounding islets emerging from the coral reef form a commune (municipality) part of the administrative subdivision of the Leeward Islands. The administrative centre of the commune of Tahaa is the settlement of Patio. Tahaa produces 70-80% of all French Polynesia's vanilla. Because of the pervasive aroma of vanilla, Tahaa is known as the "Vanilla Island". Tahaa's pearls are of exceptional quality. Taha'a and its small islets can be reached by boat and outrigger from Raiatea. The short sail drops visitors on an islet beach with a small lagoon, and in the near distance, a view of Bora Bora. These parts of the Society Islands are less modernized. The name Tahaa is sometimes spelled Taha’a in Tahitian, using the apostrophe (in fact a variant of it hard to differentiate from the regular apostrophe when using small fonts) to represent the glottal stop, as promoted by the
    5.25
    4 votes
    23
    Hiva-Oa

    Hiva-Oa

    Hiva-Oa is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune is in the administrative subdivision of the Marquesas Islands. The commune of Hiva-Oa is made up of the island of Hiva Oa proper (316 km (122 sq mi)), which contains the entire population of the commune, and the uninhabited islands of: The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Atuona, on the southern side of the island of Hiva Oa.
    10.00
    1 votes
    24
    Taiarapu-Est

    Taiarapu-Est

    Taiarapu-Est (literally "Taiarapu East") is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune of Taiarapu-Est is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. The commune extends over a part of Tahiti Nui ("big Tahiti") and half of the peninsula of Tahiti Iti ("small Tahiti", aka Taiarapu). The commune also includes the uninhabited island of Mehetia (2.3 km²/0.9 sq. miles), located 112 kilometres (70 mi) east of Tahiti Iti. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Taravao, on the isthmus linking Tahiti Nui and Tahiti Iti.
    10.00
    1 votes
    25
    Moorea-Maiao

    Moorea-Maiao

    Moorea-Maiao is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune is in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands. The commune of Moorea-Maiao is made up of the island of Moorea (133 km²/51 sq. miles; 16,191 inhabitants at the 2007 census) and the much smaller atoll of Maiao (8.8 km²/3.4 sq. miles; 299 inhabitants at the 2007 census), located 78 km (48 mi) southwest of Moorea. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Afareaitu, on the island of Moorea.
    6.00
    3 votes
    26
    Arutua

    Arutua

    Arutua, or Ngaru-atua is an atoll in the Tuamotu group in French Polynesia. It is located 40 km SW of Rangiroa. The closest land is Apataki Atoll, only 16 km to the East. Arutua Atoll has a roughly pentagonal shape. Length 31 km, width 24 km. Its lagoon is wide and deep with one navigable passage. Arutua has a population of 554 inhabitants. The main village is Rautini. There is a small airport at Arutua which was opened in 1984. Geographically Arutua belongs to the Palliser Islands (Îles Palliser) subgroup of the Tuamotus. The first recorded European to visit Arutua Atoll was Jakob Roggeveen (who also first sighted Easter Island) in 1722. British mariner Frederick Beechey touched at Arutua in 1826. He named this atoll "Cockburn Island". This atoll is the capital of the commune of Arutua, which consists of Arutua, as well as the atolls of Apataki and Kaukura.
    7.50
    2 votes
    27
    Hitiaa O Te Ra

    Hitiaa O Te Ra

    Hitiaa O Te Ra is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune of Hitiaa O Te Ra is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Hitiaa.
    7.00
    2 votes
    28
    Papeete

    Papeete

    Papeete (pronounced [papeˈʔete]) is the capital of French Polynesia, an overseas collectivity of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune (municipality) of Papeete is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, of which Papeete is the administrative capital. The French High Commissioner also resides in Papeete. It is the primary center of Tahitian and French Polynesian public and private governmental, commercial, industrial and financial services, the hub of French Polynesian tourism and a commonly used port of call. The Windward Islands are themselves part of the Society Islands. The name Papeete means "water from a basket". The urban area of Papeete had a total population of 131,695 inhabitants at the August 2007 census, 26,017 of whom lived in the commune of Papeete proper. The growth of the city was boosted by the decision to move the nuclear weapon test range from Algeria to the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa, some 1,500 km (930 mi) at the east of Tahiti; this originated in particular in the construction of the Faa'a airport next to Pape'ete, the only international airport in French Polynesia. In 1983, The Church of Jesus
    7.00
    2 votes
    29
    Tumaraa

    Tumaraa

    Tumaraa is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune of Tumaraa is located on the island of Raiatea, in the administrative subdivision of the Leeward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Tevaitoa.
    7.00
    2 votes
    30
    Uturoa

    Uturoa

    Uturoa is a commune (municipality) of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune of Uturoa is located on the island of Raiatea, in the administrative subdivision of the Leeward Islands of which Uturoa is the administrative capital. The Leeward Islands are themselves part of the Society Islands. Uturoa is the main port of Raiatea Island. At the August 2007 census the urban area of Uturoa had 8,735 inhabitants, 3,778 of which lived in the commune of Uturoa proper. Uturoa is about 200 km (120 mi) northwest of Papeete, the Tahitian capital. Raiatea Airport serves the island of Raiatea. The airport is located in eastern Uturoa and many of the islanders come here to travel to different islands. Raiatea Airport has one runway and Air Tahiti is the main airline at the airport. The runway is asphalt and stretches all the way to the eastern side of the island. If the residents want to make an international flight, they would take Air Tahiti to Faa'a International Airport in Faaa. Sometimes ferries leave Raiatea and sail northward toward nearby Tahaa. Other ferries sail to Vaitape, Bora Bora or Tahiti. Uturoa was first settled by early Polynesians
    7.00
    2 votes
    31
    Fangatau

    Fangatau

    Fangatau, or Nakai-erua, is a small atoll in the Tuamotu group in French Polynesia. The nearest land is Fakahina Atoll, located 72 km to the ESE. This small atoll has an elongated shape. Its length is 8 km, maximum width 3.5 km. Its reef encloses its lagoon completely. Anchorage is difficult. Fangatau Atoll has 165 inhabitants. Teana is the main village. The first recorded European to arrive to Fangatau was Russian oceanic explorer Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen on the 10 July 1820 on ships Vostok and Mirni. He named this atoll "Arakcheev". There is a territorial (domestic) airfield in Fangatau which was inaugurated in 1978. The commune of Fangatau consists of Fangatau Atoll, as well as the atoll and associated commune of Fakahina.
    9.00
    1 votes
    32
    Manihi

    Manihi

    Manihi, or Paeua, is a coral atoll in the Tuamotu Archipelago, part of French Polynesia. It is one of the northernmost of the Tuamotus, located in the King George subgroup. The closest land to Manihi is Ahe Atoll, located 14 km to the west. The total population is 816 inhabitants. Manihi is a relatively large elongated atoll, Its oval-shaped lagoon measures about 10 km (6 mi.) across and 20 km (12 mi.) long, and is ringed by innumerable islets. The lagoon is well-known among snorkelers for its beautiful and diverse marine fauna, including, among other species, the manta ray. There is only one pass to enter the lagoon, located close to the atoll's southern end. It is known as Passe de Tairapa. 14°27′31″S 146°03′40″W / 14.4585°S 146.0610°W / -14.4585; -146.0610 The chief village is Paeua. Another important village, Turipaoa, is located in the south-western part of the atoll, and is home to about 400 inhabitants. Several of the islands are inhabited, by populations ranging from single individuals to as many as 400. The first recorded Europeans to arrive to Manihi were Dutch explorers Jacob le Maire and Willem Schouten on their 1615-1616 Pacific journey. They called this atoll
    9.00
    1 votes
    33
    Taiarapu-Ouest

    Taiarapu-Ouest

    Taiarapu-Ouest (literally "Taiarapu West") is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune of Taiarapu-Ouest is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. The commune extends over half of the peninsula of Tahiti Iti ("small Tahiti", aka Taiarapu). The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Vairao.
    9.00
    1 votes
    34
    Makemo

    Makemo

    Makemo, Rangi-kemo or Te Paritua, is one of the larger of the Tuamotu atolls in French Polynesia. Makemo Atoll measures 70 km in length with an average width of 5–8 km. It is the fourth largest atoll of the Tuamotu Archipelago in terms of lagoon surface, with a lagoon of over 600 km² in area. Despite its size, Makemo's lagoon has only two navigable passes. Makemo Atoll has 914 inhabitants; the main village is named Pouheva with a population of 300. The village has a wharf and a boarding school of 150 children from neighbouring islands. It also hosts Makemo Airport, located to the west of Pouheva. Makemo is the home of legendary Polynesian hero Moeava. The first recorded European to arrive to Makemo Atoll was English pearl merchant John Buyers commanding the Margaret (brig) on 10 March 1803 on the same day he discovered Taenga. He named the atoll "Phillips Island", after a late sheriff of London, Sir Richard Phillips. In some maps Makemo appears as "Kutusov". Makemo territorial (domestic) airport was opened in 1976. The commune of Makemo consists of the atolls of Makemo, Haraiki, Marutea Nord, Katiu, Tuanake, Hiti, Tepoto Sud, Raroia, Takume, Taenga and Nihiru.
    5.33
    3 votes
    35
    Maupiti

    Maupiti

    Maupiti is a commune of French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. The commune is in the administrative subdivision of the Leeward Islands. The commune of Maupiti is made up of the island of Maupiti proper with its surrounding islets emerging from the coral reef, with an area of 13.5 km² (5.2 sq mi) in total, and of three distant atolls: Almost all the inhabitants live on Maupiti island itself. The atolls of Maupihaa and Manuae have about 15 inhabitants each, while Motu One is not inhabited anymore. The administrative centre of the commune is the settlement of Vaiea, on the island of Maupiti.
    6.50
    2 votes
    36
    Reao

    Reao

    Reao or Natūpe is an atoll in the eastern expanses of the Tuamotu group in French Polynesia. The closest land is Pukarua Atoll, located 48 km to the WNW. Reao is 24.5 km long and its maximum width is 5 km. The whole length of its north-eastern rim is occupied by a single long island. There is no navigable pass into the lagoon. Reao Atoll's population is 344 inhabitants. The first recorded European to sight Reao Atoll was French explorer Louis Isidore Duperrey in 1823. He named this atoll "Clermont Tonnerre". Reao was visited by the United States Exploring Expedition led by Charles Wilkes on August 13, 1839. Wilkes called this atoll "Minerva". Reao Airport was inaugurated in 1979. The commune of Reao consists of Reao, as well as the atoll of Pukarua.
    6.50
    2 votes
    37
    Tatakoto

    Tatakoto

    Tatakoto is an atoll in the Tuamotu group in French Polynesia. Tatakoto is one of the more isolated atolls of the Tuamotus. It situated in the east of the archipelago, 1,182 km from Tahiti. This atoll is 14 km long and 3.5 km wide. It has one large island and 65 islets separated by numerous channels on the reef surrounding the lagoon. The islands are mostly located on its windward side (south). All the islands are flat, not much higher than the ocean level. The main settlement is Tumukuru, and the total population was 255 in the 2002 census. Tatakoto Atoll was sighted the same day by two Spaniards. In the second expedition of the Águila, the two captains, Domingo de Bonechea and José Andía y Varela, separated when leaving Peru and did not see each other until reaching Tahiti. On 29 October 1774 (the day of Saint Narcissus) the two disembarked on Tatakoto without meeting. They named the island "San Narciso". Historically the island was also known as "d'Augier". Chronicler José Andía described the atoll as "extremely agreeable to the eyes by being very populated by shrubs." At the beginning of the twentieth century France established a colony and replanted the island with coconut
    6.50
    2 votes
    38
    Rapa Iti

    Rapa Iti

    Rapa or Rapa Iti (Little Rapa) as it is sometimes called in more recent years (to distinguish it from "Rapa Nui" (Big Rapa), a name for Easter Island), is the largest and only inhabited island of the Bass Islands in French Polynesia. An older name for the island is Oparo Its area is 40 km with a population of almost 500 and a max elevation of 650 m. Its main town is Ahuréi. Rapa Iti is located at 27°35′00″S 144°20′00″W / 27.5833333°S 144.3333333°W / -27.5833333; -144.3333333. It is shaped roughly like a Greek final sigma (ς), with a well-protected central bay, surrounded by a ring of relatively high mountains. The whole island appears very much to be the peak of a sinking volcano, with the bay as the caldera. The area of the island is 40 km (15 sq mi). Its main town, Ahuréi (sometimes called Ahurei, Ha'urei or Ha'uréi, latter two also show how it is pronounced), lies on the southern shore of that bay, which is called the Baie d'Ahuréi. A smaller village, 'Area, is located on the northern shore of the bay. The people are Polynesian. Former times' warfare is indicated by 28 extant ridgetop forts. Today Rapa is home to the Tahitian Choir, in which a third of the island's population
    8.00
    1 votes
    39
    Gambier Islands

    Gambier Islands

    The Gambier Islands or Mangareva Islands (French: Îles Gambier or Archipel des Gambier) are a small group of islands in French Polynesia, located at the southeast terminus of the Tuamotu archipelago. They are generally considered a separate island group from Tuamotu both because their culture and language (Mangarevan) are much more closely related to those of the Marquesas Islands, and because, while the Tuamotus comprise several chains of coral atolls, the Gambiers are of volcanic origin. Because of their proximity, the Acteon Group, and the nearby atoll of Temoe (23°20′46″S 134°28′28″W / 23.34611°S 134.47444°W / -23.34611; -134.47444) are sometimes included among the Gambiers. The commune of Gambier is made up of the Gambier Islands (with uninhabited Temoe Atoll 40 km east of the main Gambier group), the uninhabited Acteon Group to the west (Matureivavao, Tenararo, Tenarunga, Vahanga), and the atolls of Marutea Sud, Maria Est and Morane. This group of islands and atolls covers an area of 35 km². Although these archipelagos are administered as a single municipality (commune), the main village is Rikitea, on the largest island of Mangareva. The Gambier Islands comprises: Apart
    5.00
    2 votes
    40
    Napuka

    Napuka

    Napuka, or Pukaroa, is a small coral atoll in the Disappointment Islands, in the north-eastern part of the Tuamotu Archipelago in French Polynesia. It is located only 15 km to the southeast of Tepoto Nord, its nearest neighbor, forming a small group. These two atolls are quite isolated, the nearest land being Fangatau Atoll 170 km to the south. Napuka Atoll is 10.5 km long and about 4 km wide. Its reef is quite broad, completely enclosing the lagoon. The total dry land area of the 30 islands on Napuka's reef is 8 km². The surface of the lagoon is 18 km². Napuka has 257 inhabitants according to the 2002 census. The main village is Tepukamaruia (Te Puka Maru Ia). The first recorded European to reach Napuka Atoll was British explorer John Byron in 1765. He named Napuka and Tepoto "Disappointment Islands" because the natives were of a hostile disposition. Napuka was visited by the historic United States Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842. This atoll was most probably the one that Charles Wilkes called "Wytoohee" or "Wutoohee". The airport on Napuka was inaugurated in 1977. Napuka Atoll is the head of the commune of Napuka, which consists of the atolls of Napuka and Tepoto Nord.
    5.00
    2 votes
    41
    Nukutavake

    Nukutavake

    Nukutavake or Nukutuvake is an island in the Tuamotu group in French Polynesia. It lies 1,125 km from Tahiti. The closest land is small Pinaki Atoll, located 15 km to the southeast. Vairaatea Atoll lies 38 km to the west of Nukutavake. Nukutavake's length is 5 km and its width between 1.3 and 0.45 km. Nukutuvake is not a typical Tuamotu atoll, but a single island. It was formed when its lagoon filled up with silt, in a similar manner as Fua Mulaku in the Maldives, which has a similar size and shape. There are shallow remains of the lagoon filled with marshy vegetation. The higher ground has many coconut palms. Nukutavake has 139 inhabitants; Tavananui is the largest town. Many islanders have left the island in recent years, mainly to Tahiti, in search for work. There are a number of abandoned houses on the island. The people who remain live primarily on fish and copra production. There is a cyclone shelter on Nukutavake The first recorded European who arrived to Nukutavake was Englishman Samuel Wallis in 1767. He named it "Queen Charlotte Island" (Reine Charlotte). Wallis observed that the island was inhabited and well-stocked with coconut trees. But Captain Frederick Beechey, who
    6.00
    1 votes
    42
    Raivavae

    Raivavae

    Raivavae is an island that is part of the Austral Islands in French Polynesia. It sustains a population of 905 people (as of 2007 census) on 16 km (6.2 sq mi) of land. Its highest point is the top of a dead volcano which is 437 meters high. It was annexed by France in 1880.
    5.00
    1 votes
    43
    Arue

    Arue

    Arue is a commune in the suburbs of Papeete in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. Arue is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. The commune of Arue includes the atoll of Tetiaroa (5.85 km²/2.26 sq. miles; property of Marlon Brando's family), located 58 km (36 mi) north of Tahiti. The area of Arue was first settled by travelers from Asia during the year of 1000. They had built houses out of grass and mud. The Polynesians had hunted fish with spears. Captain James Cook had arrived at Tahiti to chart the coast. The commune of Arue lies at about 20 feet above mean sea level. The Papenoo River runs close to Arue in the east.
    0.00
    0 votes
    44
    Fatu Hiva

    Fatu Hiva

    Fatu Hiva (the "H" is not pronounced, see name section below) is the southernmost island of the Marquesas Islands, in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. With Motu Nao as its closest neighbor, it is also the most isolated of the inhabited islands. Fatu Hiva is also the title of a book by explorer and archaeologist Thor Heyerdahl, in which he describes his stay on the island in the 1930s. The name of the island in Marquesan is Fatu Iva (without "h": [ˈfatu ˈiva]). However, the name was recorded by Europeans as Fatu Hiva, perhaps under the influence of other Marquesan islands containing the element Hiva (Nuku Hiva and Hiva Oa) and also because in French the letter "h" is silent. The spelling Fatu Hiva has now become official. The island was named Isla Magdalena ("Magdalene Island") by Spanish explorers in the 16th century, a name rarely used. The eastern coastline of Fatu Hiva is characterized by a number of narrow valleys, carved by streams that lead to the interior. Between these valleys are headlands which terminate in cliffs that plunge directly into the sea, making travel between them possible only by travelling over the high mountain ridges
    0.00
    0 votes
    45
    Mahina

    Mahina

    Mahina is a commune in the suburbs of Papeete in French Polynesia, an overseas territory of France in the Pacific Ocean. Mahina is located on the island of Tahiti, in the administrative subdivision of the Windward Islands, themselves part of the Society Islands. Mahina is the 3rd largest city in French Polynesia with a population of 14,369. Mount Orohena is a nearby mountain. The area of Mahina was first settled by early Polynesians from Asia. Canoes out of tree trunks were used to transport to Tahiti. The Polynesians had built houses out of grass on the beach and lived off of Fish and Bananas. They had hunted fish with spears and rocks. They had also picked up bananas from the land high above mean sea level. Captain James Cook had arrived on his expedition to chart Pacific Islands. He later sailed off to nearby Moorea and a few years later, he sailed to New Zealand and Australia. Charles Darwin had later come to Tahiti on his expedition.Don the Beachcomber had lived in Tahiti until his house was destroyed by a cyclone. Later on, the Faaa International Airport in Faaa was built in 1962. Many people from Mahina had used the airport. In 2007, Air Moorea crashed when it went to
    0.00
    0 votes
    46
    Rurutu

    Rurutu

    Rurutu is the northernmost island in the Austral archipelago of French Polynesia, and the name of a commune consisting solely of that island. It is situated 572 km (355 mi) south of Tahiti. Geologically, Rurutu was initially formed 12 million years ago by the Macdonald hotspot, a hotspot associated with the Macdonald seamount. Over the next 10 million years, erosion shrank the island until it was almost an atoll. Then, just over a million years ago, Rurutu passed over the Arago hotspot, which lifted it roughly 150 meters (492 ft). Steep sea cliffs of ancient coral lifted by the event — called makatea — now largely encircle the island. These are riddled with caves filled with concretions — indeed, Rurutu is largely unique. among islands in French Polynesia in that its historic inhabitants were cave-dwelling. Because it is endowed with a fringing reef, Rurutu has in recent years become known for whale watching: Humpback whales come and reproduce here between July and October within easy sighting distance from the beach. Although its tiny community still subsists primarily on fishing and basic agriculture, tourism has been a growing industry, especially since François Mitterrand's
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