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Best College Preparatory School of All Time

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    1

    St. Faiths School

    St Faith's School is an independent preparatory day school on Trumpington Road, Cambridge, England, for boys and girls aged four to thirteen. The present headmaster is Nigel Helliwell, and the school has in excess of five hundred children. It is affiliated with The Leys School and many pupils continue their secondary education there. The school was founded by a Mr Goodchild in 1884. It features under that name in Gwen Raverat's autobiographical account of her childhood, Period Piece. With The Leys, the school now forms the junior division of The Leys and St Faith's Foundation and shares the motto (In fide fiducia) and coat of arms of The Leys. Until the 1990s, most classrooms were in converted Victorian houses. Since then, the school has built Ashburton, opened in 1999, a large red brick building. This contains the School Hall, where assemblies and plays take place, two purpose-built, fully equipped science laboratories, and other classrooms. The naming of the school's Ashburton Hall commemorates the evacuation of some of the boarders during the Second World War to the Golden Lion Hotel in Ashburton, on Dartmoor in Devon. In June 2006, the school opened a new building for Music and
    8.17
    6 votes
    2

    Blundell's School

    Blundell's School is a co-educational day and boarding independent school located in the town of Tiverton in the county of Devon, England. The school was founded in 1604 by the will of Peter Blundell, one of the richest men in England at the time, and relocated to its present location on the outskirts of the town in May 1882. Whilst the annual full boarding fees are £27,120 per year, the school offers a range of scholarships and bursaries, and provides flexi-boarding. The school has 350 boys and 225 girls, including 107 boys and 65 girls in the Sixth Form, and is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. The Good Schools Guide calls Blundell's a "distinguished rural school of ancient lineage." Peter Blundell, one of the wealthiest merchants of Elizabethan England, died in 1601 having made his fortune principally in the cloth industry. His will set aside considerable money and land to establish a school in his home town “to maintain sound learning and true religion”. Blundell asked his friend Sir John Popham, the Lord Chief Justice of England, to carry out his wishes, and appointed a number of local merchants and gentry as his first trustees (known as feoffees).
    7.67
    6 votes
    3

    The New Beacon Preparatory School

    The New Beacon Preparatory School is a fee-paying preparatory school, or prep school, located in Sevenoaks, Kent, United Kingdom, which caters both for day-boys and boarders, in the age range 4-13. Currently there are about 400 pupils. The school was founded in 1882 at St John's Hill in Sevenoaks and was known as the Beacon. In 1900 it was relocated to its current location on Britains Lane and renamed the New Beacon. The New Beacon is situated in 21 acres (85,000 m) of gardens and playing fields. Upon starting at The New Beacon, pupils are put into one of four "Companies"; Nelson (blue), Drake (Yellow), Marlborough (green) and Wellington (red). There is a strong Company tradition at New Beacon, with competition between the companies including Company rugby, cross country, shooting, cricket, football art Athletics and quiz competitions. Junior prep boys wear a grey shirt, grey shorts (a recent development has been that in winter, the Junior boys do not have to wear shorts and may wear trousers), a red and blue tie,this however can be replaced with other ties which are awarded for numerous reasons: librarian, captain of shooting, 1stXI, 2ndXI, Middle and senior school choir, etc.
    8.00
    5 votes
    4
    Cheadle Hulme School

    Cheadle Hulme School

    Cheadle Hulme School is an independent day school in Cheadle Hulme, Stockport, England for boys and girls aged 4–18 years old. It was formed as The Manchester Warehousemen and Clerks' Orphan Schools in 1855 and is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. In the early 1850s, life expectancy for those working in the inner-cities was extremely poor and Manchester was no exception. Many of these workers were worried about the fate of their children should they die. A school for the orphans of warehousemen and clerks, which later became the Royal Russell School, had already been set up in London in 1853, and on 20 September 1854, a representative from the London school met with the Manchester men (One of whom was "Ezekiel Browne) in the Albion Hotel to gather support for it. During the discussion, support for a local school became clear, and following this meeting a committee was formed to develop the idea. The school was to be called "The Manchester District Schools for Orphans and Necessitious Children of Warehousemen and Clerks", and it was to be open to all children, regardless of gender or religious background. The proposal was advertised to warehousemen and
    7.60
    5 votes
    5

    St Leonards School

    St Leonards School, formerly St Leonards and St Katherines School, is an independent school, founded by the University of St Andrews in the nineteenth century. It is located in St Andrews, Fife, on the east coast of Scotland, today situated on one site in private grounds, just south of the town's historic cathedral and within the walls of the medieval Priory. Although originally established in 1877 by University of St Andrews professors and their wives amid the increased demand for women's education, the school is now fully co-educational, taking boys and girls aged 4 to 19, with the option of boarding from age 12. In 2005, The Sunday Times named St Leonards its "Scottish Independent School of the Year". St Leonards has approximately 530 pupils between the ages of 4⁄2 and 19. St Leonards was one of the first schools in Scotland to offer the IB Diploma Programme and is the only one in the country to have an all-IB Sixth Form. Dame Louisa Lumsden was appointed the School's first Headmistress in 1877. The belief of the School was that "a girl should receive an education that is as good as her brother's, if not better." In 1999 St Leonards Sixth Form and St Katharines Prep School
    7.60
    5 votes
    6
    The College Preparatory School

    The College Preparatory School

    The College Preparatory School (CPS), often referred to as College Prep, is a four-year private coeducational day high school in Oakland, California. The school's motto is mens conscia recti, a Latin phrase borrowed from Vergil's Aeneid that means "a mind aware of what is right." The school's strict academics and small size have translated into an admissions rate lower than many American colleges and universities. In turn many students from College Prep go on to study at America's top universities, and approximately one-third of each graduating class matriculates into Ivy League schools, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or Stanford University. College Prep has received a number of accolades for the quality of its faculty and its academic rigor. A 2007 Wall Street Journal article ranked College Prep as the sixth best high school in the world in terms of its students' "success rate" in enrolling in America's most selective universities, a statistic calculated by collecting information from college admissions offices records of their freshmen classes. In April 2010, Forbes Magazine ranked College Prep as the seventeenth best private school in the United States in terms of
    7.60
    5 votes
    7

    Hall School Wimbledon

    Hall School Wimbledon (HSW) is a co-educational independent school in Wimbledon, London for children aged 4 to 16. The school was founded in 1990, by current headmaster Mr Timothy Hobbs, with only nine pupils. As of December 2011, it had 483 pupils on role. The Junior School, known as Beavers Holt, is located in Putney Vale (SW15) and has a gate leading directly onto Wimbledon Common. A new Reception playground with ponds, seating and a bike track has recently been added to the grounds. The Senior School is located on The Downs in Wimbledon (SW19), about 12 minutes' walk from both Wimbledon Chase and Raynes Park overland stations and a 19 minute walk from Wimbledon overland station. The school operates a bus service within the local Wimbledon / Raynes Park area and offers collections and drop-offs further afield in North and East Sheen, Kingston Hill, Mortlake and Barnes. The 2009 Ofsted Inspection Report states that: "Hall School Wimbledon provides a good quality education with outstanding features such as an emphasis on learning to learn. The curriculum is good with exemplary opportunities for pupils to experience learning first hand, including a range of field studies. Good
    7.20
    5 votes
    8

    Honors student

    An honors student is a person recognized for achieving high grades or high marks in their course work. Honors students may refer to Honors students are often recognized for their achievements. A student who has made numerous appearances on the honor roll may be awarded with some form of academic letter, or any other form of notification. A similar concept to honor rolls exists in colleges and universities in the United States, known as the Dean's List. Some researchers have questioned the validity of the honor roll as an effective form of positive reinforcement. It is argued that the pursuit of extrinsic reward is not an accurate reflection of intrinsic interest in course material. There are also questions on the effectiveness of separating high-achieving students from their peers, in the form of magnet schools or honors courses. An honors couse is a class in which the most advanced students are placed. Most students placed in honors courses are highly motivated and dedicated to their educational experience. Motivation is the main quality that characterizes an honors student. In addition to being committed to academics, they are encouraged and many participate in volunteer work,
    7.20
    5 votes
    9

    Educational Records Bureau

    Educational Records Bureau (ERB) is the only not-for-profit educational services organization offering assessments for both admission and achievement for independent and selective public schools for Pre K-grade 12. Founded in 1927, ERB's mission is to create testing and learning solutions that help schools develop improved curriculum, teaching, and learning through diagnosis of assessment results that address essential learning standards. ERB is headquartered in New York City and has over 2000 independent school and public school members globally. Membership is available to Public and Private schools (see www.erblearn.org for information about becoming a member). The organization is governed by a board of trustees who are ultimately responsible for the organization. Members in 2011 were: Dr. David Magill, Director, University of Chicago Laboratory Schools Marlene Shaw, Head of School, St. Mary’s Episcopal School Dr. Daniel E. Waters, Superintendent, Tredyffrin-Easttown School District Reveta Bowers, Head of School, Center for Early Education Miguel J. Brito, Headmaster, St. Philip’s Academy Dr. Lourdes Cowgill, President, Pine Crest School Dr. Thomas Kelly, Head of School, Horace
    8.25
    4 votes
    10

    Pangbourne College

    Pangbourne College is a coeducational independent school located in the civil parish of Pangbourne, just south-west of the village, in the English county of Berkshire. Pangbourne College provides day and boarding provision for boys and girls aged 11-18 years. The educational experience on offer includes a sound academic programme through to the completion of A Levels in the Sixth Form, with an emphasis on providing co-curricular opportunities—Music, Drama, Sport and Leadership Training—to enable all students to discover and develop individual potential and future enthusiasms. Values promoted by the college include: kindness, moral courage, selflessness, integrity, industry, initiative, resilience and open-mindedness. The school has won the Princess Elizabeth Challenge Cup four times at the Henley Royal Regatta, a record exceeded only by Eton. Despite the size of the college, the performance of its rowing crews towards the upper years is exceptional. The College held the record for the Princess Elizabeth Challenge Cup from 1992 to 2011, when the record was beaten by Abingdon College. The headmaster, Mr Thomas Garnier, served in the Royal Navy before switching to a career in
    8.25
    4 votes
    11
    Wolverhampton Grammar School

    Wolverhampton Grammar School

    Wolverhampton Grammar School is a co-educational independent school located in the city of Wolverhampton. Initially Wolverhampton Boys Grammar School, it was founded in 1512 by Sir Stephen Jenyns, a master of the ancient guild of Merchant Taylors, who was also Lord Mayor of London in the year of Henry VIII's coronation. Jenyns was born in the city of Wolverhampton circa 1448. In 1875, the school moved to its present site on the Compton Road from its previous site on John Street in the centre of Wolverhampton. This move was overseen by the Chairman of Governors, Sir Rupert Kettle. In September 1984, after 472 years as an all-boys school, the school admitted girls to the sixth form and in other embraces of modernity was the largest single user of assisted places funds, with over 40% of pupils in the 1980s and early 1990s reliant upon assisted places funding. This resulted in the school adopting its current name of Wolverhampton Grammar School. In September 1992, the school became fully co-educational, admitting girls from the age of 11, a move seen as somewhat controversial at the time; however, other mixed grammar schools had existed for many years previously, while other single sex
    8.00
    4 votes
    12
    College application

    College application

    A college application is part of the competitive college admissions system. Admissions departments usually require students to complete an application for admission that generally consists of academic records, personal essays (as well as samples of high school work), letters of recommendation, and a list of extracurricular activities. Some schools require the SAT or ACT, while others make it optional. Deadlines for admission applications are established and published by each college or university. Most college bound students receive application assistance and advice from their high school guidance counselor. Students who are transferring from a community college to a four-year college obtain guidance from their college counselor. Recently, aided by marketing firms, colleges have begun sending out "fast-track" applications. These applications typically waive the application fee, don't require essays, and assured an admittance decision within a shortened time-frame. Critics warn that these types of applications are misleading, because they give the impression that the student is pre-approved to be admitted and may not explore other colleges because this easy option is provided to
    6.60
    5 votes
    13

    Dover College

    Dover College is a co-educational private school in Dover in southeast England. It was founded in 1871, and takes both day pupils and boarders. The school occupies some of the medieval buildings of Dover Priory, on a site just east of the eponymous railway station. In 1869 Robert Chignell, who had a private school at Westmount, in Folkestone Road, leased part of the Dover Priory buildings for a private school. He passed on his interest, however, to a group of leading citizens and local businessmen in Dover, led by the Mayor of Dover, Dr. Astley, who had formed the Dover College Company to promote the foundation of a public school for the town on what remained of the Priory site with the dual intention of providing a public school education for local boys and of using and thus preserving the Priory's remaining ancient buildings. It is set in the grounds and ruins of the Priory of St.Martin, which was ransacked by King Henry VIII as part of his dissolution of the monasteries. The priory gives its name to Dover's main railway station which was built on the western part of the priory site. Some of the original medieval buildings remain. The 12th century Strangers' Refectory is still
    6.60
    5 votes
    14
    Felsted School

    Felsted School

    Felsted School, an English co-educational day and boarding independent school, situated in Felsted, Essex. It is in the British Public School tradition, and was founded in 1564 by Richard Rich, 1st Baron Rich (also known as Riche) who, as Lord Chancellor and Chancellor of the Court of Augmentations, acquired considerable wealth from the spoils of the Dissolution of the Monasteries including the nearby Leez Priory, which he enlarged and made his own home. Felsted is one of the 12 founder members of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference, and is also a full member of the Round Square Conference of world schools. Felsted School has been awarded the Good Schools Guide award twice and is regularly featured in Tatler's Schools Guide. The school became a notable educational centre for Puritan families in the 17th century, numbering a hundred or more pupils, under Martin Holbeach, Headmaster from 1627–1649, and his successors (see below). John Wallis and Isaac Barrow were educated at Felsted in this period, as were four of Oliver Cromwell's sons. Another era of prosperity set in under the headmastership of William Trivett between 1778 and 1794; but under his successors numbers
    6.20
    5 votes
    15

    Dean Close School

    }} Dean Close School is a co-educational independent day and boarding school in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. The School is divided into pre-prep, preparatory and senior schools located on separate but adjacent sites outside Cheltenham town centre, occupying the largest private land area in the town. Pupils may be enrolled as young as 3 in the pre-preparatory school, and continue through to 18 at the senior school. Dean Close is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. The School, originally "The Dean Close Memorial School", was founded in 1886 in memory of local former Rector of Cheltenham and Dean of Carlisle Cathedral, Rev Francis Close (1797–1882). Alumni include the poet James Elroy Flecker, whose father was the School's first headmaster (the old Flecker Hall was named after him), and the artist Francis Bacon. In the First World War more than 120 former pupils were killed; their names, along with the names of young men killed during the Second World War, are recorded in the School's memorial chapel which was consecrated in 1923. The school buildings were requisitioned by the Home Office during World War II and the staff and pupils were relocated to
    9.00
    3 votes
    16
    Coventry Preparatory School

    Coventry Preparatory School

    King Henry VIII Preparatory School (KHPS) is an independent school in Coventry, England with 210 pupils (approx) aged from 5 to 11 years old. It also has a Nursery, Bright Futures Playclub, for an additional 40 children (approx) aged from three to four years old. Its main building and playing field overlook the War Memorial Park, and its main gates are on The Firs, a street off Kenilworth Road. The school is part of the Coventry School Foundation, a registered charity which also owns King Henry VIII School, Bablake School and Cheshunt School. The school was re-formed in September 2008 when Coventry Preparatory School merged with King Henry VIII Junior School to form the new King Henry VIII Preparatory School. The two school sites were maintained and the current Coventry Preparatory School site takes pupils from three to eight years old and the King Henry VIII site takes the older children from 8 to 11 years old. Coventry Preparatory School is also known as "The Swallows", after Rev. Kenelm Swallow, who founded the school in 1920. The main building of the school was previously a large house, built in 1720. It has been owed by the Coventry School Foundation since 1992. In September
    7.25
    4 votes
    17

    Framlingham College

    Framlingham College is an independent, coeducational boarding and day school in the town of Framlingham, near Woodbridge, Suffolk, England. Together with its preparatory school, Brandeston Hall and Little Bears Nursery it serves pupils from 2½ to eighteen years of age. Framlingham College was originally called the Albert Memorial College in memory of Prince Albert and was founded in 1864 by public subscription as the Suffolk County Memorial to Queen Victoria's husband, Albert, Prince Consort, and was incorporated by Royal Charter. Framlingham College are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the death of Prince Albert over the course of the next five years. Prince Albert's statue takes pride of place in front of the College, which is set in 85 acres (340,000 m) in the historic market town of Framlingham, with stunning views of the Mere and the twelfth-century castle Framlingham Castle. The College grounds are maintained by an award winning grounds team and the original mock-Gothic buildings have been developed over the years, as a result of significant building initiatives. The building is Grade II listed. Nearby is Brandeston Hall Preparatory School, located in the village of
    7.25
    4 votes
    18
    Hipperholme Grammar School

    Hipperholme Grammar School

    Hipperholme Grammar School is an independent grammar school in Hipperholme (near Halifax), West Yorkshire, England. It educates pupils between the ages of 3 and 18. The Hipperholme Grammar Junior School was formerly known as Lightcliffe Preparatory School It is believed the school was founded in 1530 within the chantry chapel of the nearby village of Coley. In 1648 (the date the school classes as its founding year) Matthew Broadley, paymaster to Charles I, endowed a large sum of money to build a school on land donated by Samuel Sunderland of Coley Hall; the school opened its doors on its current site in 1661.. Two current school houses are named after founders. In 1783 a new school hall was constructed, designed by Longbottom. Originally a boys school, it became independent (ISA, AGBIS) in the 1980s and began admitting girls at the same time.. The Headmaster, Mr Jack Williams, gained a third class degree in Chemistry from the University of Sheffield. The Previous Headmaster, Dr. John Scarth, held a doctorate from the University of Lancaster in Education. Now, Dr. Scarth is Principal of the British School in Colombo. The school does not enrole physically disabled students on the
    7.25
    4 votes
    19

    St John's College, Cardiff

    St John's College in Cardiff is an independent co-educational day school educating girls and boys aged 3 to 18 (nursery & infants, junior school, senior school and sixth form college).
    7.25
    4 votes
    20

    Tuition

    Tuition payments, known primarily as tuition in American English and as tuition fees in British English, Canadian English, Australian English, New Zealand English and Indian English, refers to a fee charged for educational instruction during higher education. Tuition payments are charged by educational institutions in some countries to assist with funding of staff and faculty, course offerings, lab equipment, computer systems, libraries, facility upkeep and to provide a comfortable student learning experience. In most countries, especially in non-English-speaking countries, there are no or only nominal tuition fees for all forms of education, including university and other higher education. Nearly 84% of American college students need financial aid to help pay for the rising tuition prices that are taking place all across the United States. Some 50% of these students rely almost fully on aid of some kind. Some methods students use to pay for the cost of tuition include: Tuition is one of the costs of a post-secondary education in the U.S. The total cost of college in the U.S. is called the cost of attendance or the "sticker price" and in addition to tuition it can include room and
    8.67
    3 votes
    21
    Millfield

    Millfield

    Millfield is a co-educational independent school in the town of Street in Somerset, in south-west England. The school currently has a roll of 1,200 pupils, of whom 935 are boarders. The school's selection criteria are non-academic and the school offers a number of academic and sports scholarships, along with a number of bursaries. A charitable trust, the Millfield Foundation, has been set up to raise funds to fund scholarships and bursaries - this is seen as being important to maintain the 'Millfield mix' - an important part of the school's life and ethos, where pupils of all backgrounds benefit from being at school together. The school is a member of the G20 Schools Group. Millfield School has its own Preparatory school - Millfield Preparatory School at Edgarley Hall, based in nearby Glastonbury. Millfield was founded in 1935 by RJO Meyer (always affectionately referred to at Millfield just as "Boss") in the mansion originally owned by the Clark family, who owned and ran the major shoe manufacturer Clarks. In 1939 the school became one of the first independent schools to be co-educational. Over the years the school acquired land and houses around the locale, and a result there
    7.00
    4 votes
    22
    Wells Cathedral School

    Wells Cathedral School

    Wells Cathedral School is a co-educational independent school located in Wells, Somerset, England. The school is one of the five established musical schools for school-age children in the United Kingdom, along with Chetham's School of Music, the Yehudi Menuhin School, the Purcell School and St. Mary's Music School, Edinburgh. The head, Elizabeth Cairncross, is a member of the Headmasters` Conference. With links to a school founded in 909 AD, Wells is one of the oldest extant schools in the world. The school admitted girls in 1969 and has over 700 pupils aged between 3 and 18. The school has a musical emphasis and specialises in combining high-level musical tuition with a general academic education, as well as sports. Situated within the city of Wells, the school's boarding houses line the northern parts of the city and the music school retains close links with Wells Cathedral. The Vicar's Chapel and Library in Vicars' Close was built c1424-1430. The lower floor was a chapel, with a spiral stair leading up to the library. It is now used by the School. De Salis House and De Salis Cottage were built in the late 14th century. The Rib was built in the 15th century and is a Grade II*
    8.33
    3 votes
    23

    King Edward's School, Witley

    King Edward's School, Witley is an independent co-educational boarding and day school, founded in 1553 by King Edward VI and Nicholas Ridley. The School is located in the village of Wormley (near Witley), Surrey, England, having moved to its present location in 1867. The School became fully co-educational in 1952. As of September 2010, the school has joined the small number of independent schools in the UK which offer the IB Diploma Programme in place of A-Levels in the Sixth form. The School was originally founded as Bridewell Royal Hospital, after Nicholas Ridley preached to Edward VI to give some of his empty palaces over to the City of London (governed by the City of London Corporation) to house homeless women and children. The school was commandeered by the Royal Navy during the Second World War to test and develop the use of radar. The school still remembers this with a plaque in the central area, a junction of corridors known as 'Piccadilly'. The President of Bridewell Royal Hospital (the title was kept after the move of location) is now The Duchess of Gloucester, appointed from 1 January 2006. The Queen Mother held the title from 1953 to 2002. The school's creation was
    6.75
    4 votes
    24
    St Edmund's School

    St Edmund's School

    St Edmund’s School is an independent school (ages 3–18) in Canterbury, Kent, England, U.K. with over 500 pupils, including both day pupils and boarders. St Edmund's School Canterbury was first established in 1749 as the Clergy Orphan Society in Yorkshire. In 1812 the School moved to St John's Wood at the nursery end of Lord's Cricket Ground. An associated school for girls was located on the same site, but later moved to become St Margaret's School, Bushey in Hertfordshire. In 1855, the School moved to its current location in Canterbury. The school is located at the top of St Thomas' Hill, Canterbury, the site and building being paid for by Doctor Samuel Warneford; the chapel was completed in 1858. The main school building was designed by the architect Philip Charles Hardwick (1822–1892). In 1972 the choristers of Canterbury Cathedral joined the Junior School as the Choir House. In 1982 girls were admitted to the school. The first Headmistress, Mrs Louise Moelwyn-Hughes was appointed in 2011.
    5.60
    5 votes
    25

    Eastbourne College

    Eastbourne College is a British co-educational independent school for day and boarding pupils aged 13–18, situated on the south coast of England, included in the Tatler list of top public schools. The College's current headmaster is Simon Davies. The College was founded by the Duke of Devonshire and other prominent Eastbourne citizens in 1867 and has been growing ever since. The College is located in the Lower Meads area of Eastbourne, in a mainly residential area. Most of the school buildings are on a central campus area but many others are scattered in the immediate vicinity, such as the Beresford hockey and the links rugby pitches. The motto, Ex Oriente Salus, is a play on "Eastbourne", meaning "The haven[the bourne]from the East". Salus also means health. Dr Charles Hayman, an Eastbourne medical practitioner and member of the town's first Council, together with other prominent local citizens, decided that an independent school 'for the education of the sons of noblemen and gentlefolk' should be established and the support of the 7th Duke of Devonshire was sought. The Duke was supportive of the venture and provided 12 acres (30 mi) of land for purchase at a modest price. This
    6.50
    4 votes
    26
    Birkdale School

    Birkdale School

    Birkdale School is a Christian private secondary school for boys in the city of Sheffield, South Yorkshire in England, and is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. Since 1995 girls have been admitted to the Sixth Form. Birkdale was founded in 1904 by the Reverend Maurice Asterley as a preparatory school for boys between the ages of 4 and 13 to provide a Christian education and takes its name from its first home, Birkdale House on Newbould Lane. The school moved in 1915 to the Oakholme building under Mr Griffiths' leadership (1909–1939). At the start of the Second World War, the school evacuated to Derbyshire under Mr Roberts, Head Master in 1939. After the war, Mr Roberts moved his pupils to Uttoxeter creating Brocksford Hall School, whilst twenty boys returned to Oakholme Road under Mr Heeley in 1942 who later became Head Master in 1943. The Westbury building was purchased in 1946 from Thomas Cole of Cole Brothers (now John Lewis) to allow for the continued expansion of the school. The Endcliffe building on Endcliffe Crescent was purchased in 1975 with the Grayson and Johnson Buildings following later to create the current school and campus. The period of
    7.67
    3 votes
    27
    Exeter School

    Exeter School

    Exeter School is a selective independent co-educational day school for pupils between the ages of 7 and 18 located in Exeter, Devon, England. In 2012 there were around 180 pupils in the Junior School and 715 in the Senior School. The school maintains close links with its pupils through the Old Exonian Club which meets annually around the country. The School traces its origins from the opening of the Exeter Free Grammar School on 1 August 1633, attended mainly by the sons of the City freemen. Exeter’s wealthy merchants, notably Tommy Walker, provided the finance, with sufficient bequests to pay the Headmaster £50 a year and to install the school in the medieval buildings of St John’s Hospital, which had stood on the south side of the High Street since the 12th Century. In 1878 the school opened as Exeter Grammar School at a new campus designed by noted architect William Butterfield. The school occupies this 25-acre (100,000 m) site on Victoria Park Road to this day. The cost at the time was £7,600 with a further £16,750 spent on the erection of buildings. It was decided that St John’s Hospital Trust had to pay to Exeter School the net annual income of all endowments for Exhibitions
    7.67
    3 votes
    28
    Hawtreys

    Hawtreys

    Hawtreys Preparatory School was an independent boys' preparatory school, first established in Slough, later moved to Westgate-on-Sea, then to Oswestry, and finally to a country house near Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire. In its early years it was known as St Michael's School. In 1994, the school merged with Cheam School, near Newbury, Berkshire. The school was founded in 1869 by the Reverend John Hawtrey. He had been a boy at Eton, from the age of eight. In later life he became a master at Eton and was offered his own house of boys. He decided to remove all of the younger boys from the school. With the permission of Eton College, he took the lowest two forms out to a separate school in Slough and housed them in what is now St Bernard's Catholic Grammar School, Slough. This was known as St Michael's School, and was opened on 29 September 1869, (St Michael's day). John Hawtrey's son, Edward, removed the school to Westgate-on-Sea early in 1883. When Edward Hawtrey died, the name of the school was changed to Hawtreys. The school buildings were requisitioned during the Second World War and the school moved to Oswestry, to the home of Sir William Wynn-Williams. In 1946 it moved to Tottenham
    7.67
    3 votes
    29

    Saffron Walden County High School

    Saffron Walden County High School is a coeducational academy school and an ex-specialist Technology College for ages 11–18 in Saffron Walden, Essex, England. The headmaster is John Hartley. It is also an accredited training school. It is much bigger than most secondary schools, with 1950 students on roll, 1552 of whom are in Years 7 to 11 (as of 2003). Saffron Walden County High School was awarded Academy Status in June 2011, becoming part of the Saffron Academy Trust - operated by the Saffron Educational Trust (SET). In most year groups there are more boys than girls, although the balance varies from year to year. There are a growing number of students from ethnic minority groups. A low proportion of students speak English as an additional language. Recent intakes at Year 7 have been of 'above average ability', and GCSE examinations in recent years have won the school a reputation of success with similar levels of success in A level results in the school's excellent sixth form. It consistently performs above average in secondary school league table scores and is one of the top performing comprehensive schools. The school is located in a semi-rural area of north-west Essex and has
    5.20
    5 votes
    30

    Stonyhurst Saint Mary's Hall

    Stonyhurst St Mary's Hall (commonly known as S.M.H.) is the preparatory school to Stonyhurst College. It is an independent co-educational Catholic school founded by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). It is primarily a day school but has some boarders. As the lineal descendant of Hodder Place the school lays claim to be the oldest preparatory school in the country. It is situated on an adjacent site to Stonyhurst College, outside the small village of Hurst Green, near Clitheroe in rural Lancashire and next to the hamlet of Woodfields. Stonyhurst College was founded in 1593 as the English Jesuit College at St Omers in present-day France at a time when Catholic education was prohibited by law in England. Having moved to Bruges in 1762 and then Liege in 1773, due to the persecution of the Jesuit order which ran the school, it finally settled at Stonyhurst in 1794. An attempt had been made to found a preparatory school to the College at St Omers, which would have been based in Boulogne but this was abandoned and ultimately thwarted by the expulsion of the Jesuits from France in 1762. In 1768 new buildings were erected for a preparatory school at Bruges; this 'Little College' was closed in
    9.00
    2 votes
    31

    Aldenham School

    Aldenham School is a co-educational independent school for pupils aged thirteen to eighteen, located between Elstree and the village of Aldenham in Hertfordshire, England. There is also a preparatory school for pupils from the ages of five to thirteen. The school was founded in 1597 by Richard Platt, a proprietor of a London brewery and Master of the Brewers' Company in 1576 and 1581. In 1596 Queen Elizabeth I granted him letters patent to build "the Free Grammar School and Almshouses" at Aldenham; the foundation stone was laid in 1597. Before Platt died in 1600 he obtained an endowment for the School by a covenant between himself and the Brewers' Company. It became a village elementary school, taking in private pupils. In the early 19th century an investigation by the Education Charities Commission of the Poor led to the Tudor Grammar School being demolished and replaced by two new schools: a lower school providing an elementary education for the local population, and a grammar school for fee paying boarders. In the 1860s, the Platt estate in St Pancras, London, which provided the endowment of the school, was compulsorily purchased for the construction of St Pancras railway
    7.33
    3 votes
    32
    Boarding school

    Boarding school

    Boarding school is a school where some or all pupils study and live during the school year with their fellow students and possibly teachers and/or administrators. The word 'boarding' is used in the sense of "bed and board," i.e., lodging and meals. Some boarding schools also have day students who attend the institution by day and return off-campus to their families in the evenings. Many independent (private) schools in the Commonwealth of Nations are boarding schools. Boarding school pupils (a.k.a. "boarders") normally return home during the school holidays and, often, weekends, but in some cultures may spend the majority of their childhood and adolescent life away from their families. In the United States, boarding schools comprise various grades, most commonly grades seven or nine through grade twelve - the high school years. Some also feature military training, though this is generally offered only at specialized military schools. Some American boarding schools offer a post-graduate year of study in order to help students prepare for college entrance, most commonly to assimilate foreign students to American culture and academics before college. In the former Soviet Union similar
    7.33
    3 votes
    33
    Glebe House School & Nursery

    Glebe House School & Nursery

    Glebe House School & Nursery is an independent coeducational day and weekly boarding school for children from the age of six months to 13 years, located in the Victorian seaside town of Hunstanton, Norfolk, England. Children can become boarders from the age of seven years. The Headmaster is John Crofts In the summer of 2006, the school featured in a Channel 4 two-part documentary series entitled Admission Impossible, a programme following the applications of six children to their first-choice schools. The young boy applying to Glebe House was successful in gaining a scholarship and, thanks to a bursary scheme and the generosity of numerous benefactors nationwide, was able to enter Division (Year) III the following September. Glebe House School began life in 1874 under the name of St Edmund's School, Hindhead. St Edmund's was relocated in 1901 to Surrey, at which point the original Hunstanton site was purchased by Howard Cambridge Barber and renamed Glebe House School; part of the site on which the school stands was rented from the Church, hence the name "Glebe". Barber wished to provide a preparatory boarding school for boys, from which pupils would feed into English public
    7.33
    3 votes
    34

    Greenhills School

    Greenhills School is an independent college preparatory school (grades 6-12) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States. Greenhills Upper School was recognized as one of six national Intel Schools of Distinction in 2007 for excellence as one of the nation's top schools for science. The program recognizes one school for math and one for science in each of three school ranges (elementary, middle and high school). Admission to Greenhills is competitive. Applicants in the 9th through the 12th grades are required to take the Secondary School Admission Test and are also required to spend a day at the school to ensure that Greenhills will be a proper fit. Applicants also have to have three recommendations, send their transcript, and complete short answer questions and essays. About 60% of students come from Ann Arbor, and others come from cities such as Novi, Plymouth, Dexter, Farmington Hills, Ypsilanti, Howell, Fenton, Canton, Northville, and more. Upper school tuition was $18,225 and middle school tuition was $17,865 for the 2010-2011 school year, with 21% of the student body receiving some financial aid. The average for grants was $9,537. Greenhills offers a comprehensive extracurricular
    7.33
    3 votes
    35
    West Buckland School

    West Buckland School

    West Buckland School is an English public school located in North Devon between the villages of West Buckland and East Buckland, on the edge of Exmoor, 9 miles (12.9 km) east of Barnstaple. It comprises a senior school including a sixth form, preparatory school and a nursery. The current headmaster since 1997 is John Vick, who is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. There are approximately 720 pupils, of whom around 100 board; 40% of boarders are from abroad. The day pupils are drawn from a wide area of North Devon and Somerset and many use daily the large school busses provided in collaboration with local coach operators. West Buckland School was founded as the "Devon County School" in 1858 by Rev. J.L. Brereton, Prebendary of Exeter Cathedral and Rector of West Buckland, to provide a public school education for sons of farmers and the middle class. The foundation stone of the Gothic style buildings was laid in October 1860 by Hugh Fortescue, 2nd Earl Fortescue, KG, (d.1861), of Castle Hill, Filleigh, Filleigh, who had provided land and other support for the school. Marble busts of both men, sculpted by E.B. Stephens in 1861, are displayed on the staircase
    7.33
    3 votes
    36

    Heathfield St Mary's

    Heathfield School is a girls' independent boarding school in Ascot, Berkshire, England. In 2006, the school absorbed St Mary's School, Wantage and was briefly named Heathfield St Mary's School but reverted to Heathfield School in 2009 to prevent confusion with the nearby St Mary's School, a Catholic boarding school. It is one of two remaining full boarding girls' schools in the United Kingdom, meaning all pupils board at the school full-time. The school's grounds cover 36 acres (15 ha) situated in Ascot, providing access to London, major airports, the M3 and M4 motorways as well as the surrounding countryside. The school stands in 36 acres of grounds on the outskirts of Ascot and has done so since Heathfield School was founded in 1899 by Eleanor Beatrice Wyatt, its first headmistress. In 1882, at the age of 24, Miss Wyatt and her mother had opened Queen's Gate School in South Kensington, London. Until this point Miss Wyatt had been concentrating on educating boys and girls from the lower-middle and lower classes; however, she was convinced that the best way to further education for all was to educate those who could in turn educate others. This coincided with Miss Wyatt’s desire to
    5.75
    4 votes
    37
    King's College

    King's College

    King's College is a coeducational, secondary boarding school in Taunton, Somerset, England. It is an independent school of 430 pupils aged 13 to 18, including about 300 boarders. The head of the school is currently Richard Biggs, who started his first academic year in the winter of 2007. King's College Taunton was founded in 1880. The building was designed by C.E. Giles and built between 1867 and 1869. A new chapel followed in 1903 designed by W. E. Tower. It has been designated as a Grade II listed building. Benjamin Disraeli stood for MP in Taunton, and many of his early political appearances took place on what is currently the school's 1st XI cricket pitch. After the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1936, Emperor Haile Selassie I fled In exile to Bath. During his stay in the UK many of his younger children went to Kings College, and the Emperor himself distributed the awards at the end of every academic year. The school purchased pyrland Hall in the 1950s which now houses the King's Hall School co-educational prep school. Many of the boarding houses still hold trophies related to now defunct activities on which is it inscribed that that particular prize was handed out by Haile
    5.75
    4 votes
    38

    St Albans High School for Girls

    St Albans High School is an independent day school for girls aged 4 to 18, located in the city of St Albans, Hertfordshire with a primary school in the nearby village of Wheathampstead. It provides girls with good quality educational provision in all sections of the school. The school states that, “We aim to give each girl the stimulus to develop her academic abilities to the full and to engage in a wide range of interests…to encourage the formation of personal values and responsibilities.… According to the ISI, the school's aims are: The High School is near the city centre of St Albans and as a result has limited space. Nevertheless, there are many facilities: an indoor swimming pool, numerous halls, fitness suite, drama studio, and a music block. Ten minutes away are the school's large playing fields which include eight tennis courts, two lacrosse pitches and athletics field areas. For many years the school has joined forces with the nearby St Albans School (the boys' school) to put on an annual joint choral concert in St Albans Abbey in the Spring. The school has strong links the Abbey, and the girls join a Eucharist service there once a term. There is also a candle-lit Service
    8.50
    2 votes
    39

    KIPP: the Knowledge Is Power Program

    KIPP, the Knowledge Is Power Program, is a nationwide network of free open-enrollment college-preparatory schools in under-resourced communities throughout the United States. KIPP schools are usually established under state charter school laws and KIPP is America’s largest network of charter schools. Its headquarters are in Suite 1700 of the 135 Main Street building in the Financial District, San Francisco. KIPP began in 1994 when teachers Dave Levin and Mike Feinberg completed their Teach For America commitment and launched a program for fifth graders in a public school in inner-city Houston, Texas. Feinberg developed KIPP Academy Houston into a charter school, while Levin went on to establish KIPP Academy New York in the South Bronx. The original KIPP Academies have a sustained record of high student achievement. The schools operate on the principle that there are no shortcuts: outstanding educators, more time in school, a rigorous college-preparatory curriculum, and a strong culture of achievement and support will help educationally underserved students develop the knowledge, skills, and character needed to succeed in top quality high schools, colleges, and in the competitive
    10.00
    1 votes
    40

    Cheltenham Ladies' College

    The Cheltenham Ladies' College is an independent boarding and day school for girls aged 11 to 18 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. During her time at the Cheltenham Ladies' College, then headmistress Vicky Tuck also served as the head of the Girls School Association. In the Financial Times' Secondary School ranking, the Cheltenham Ladies College placed at 34 in 2011 and 14 in 2010. Having introduced the International Baccalaureate in 2010, school rankings have yet to reflect this change. The Tatler's School Guide 2012 noted that the school is "a rigorous academic place". The Good Schools Guide described the school as a "famous and strong traditional girls' boarding school". The school was founded in 1853. In 1858, the Principal's post was taken by Dorothea Beale, a prominent Suffragette educator who founded St Hilda's College, Oxford. The school crest depicts two doves, taken from the Cheltenham town shield, above three stars, which are in turn above a daisy, a school symbol. The school uniform consists of a white blouse, green skirt and green jumper with a badge featuring the House colours. Sixth Form girls are given the option of trousers or pencil skirts (navy with
    8.00
    2 votes
    41
    The Cathedral School, Llandaff

    The Cathedral School, Llandaff

    The Cathedral School, Llandaff is a coeducational Welsh independent day school located in Llandaff, a district north of the Welsh capital Cardiff. Originally established as a choral foundation to train choir boys for the affiliated Llandaff Cathedral, it is now part of the Woodard Schools foundation and continues to provide choristers for the cathedral. It is the only surviving Anglican choir school in Wales and is a member of the ISC, IAPS and Choir Schools Association. The exact date of establishment is unknown but early records show that a school of some kind has existed in Llandaff since the 9th Century and it carried on through the Middle Ages. During Henry VIII's reign the Church fell victim to the Dissolution of the Monasteries as a great deal of Church property was disposed of and in 1553 the Manor of Llandaff was sold. This included Bryn-y-Gynnen which was the Bishop's Manor House and was situated close to the cathedral. During the reign of Elizabeth I the people of Glamorgan agreed to fund a teacher at £12 per annum. The school survived an impoverished time during 1691, when it was called the Free School, and was housed in the Chapter House. Between 1744 and 1746, the
    8.00
    2 votes
    42
    Loughborough High School

    Loughborough High School

    Loughborough High School is a selective, independent, fee-paying independent school for girls in Loughborough, Leicestershire, England. It is one of three private schools known collectively as the Loughborough Endowed Schools, along with Loughborough Grammar School for boys and Fairfield Preparatory School. All three of the Endowed Schools are autonomous, and yet they share the same vision and educational ethos, supported by a united board of governors. Founded in 1850, it is believed to be one of the country’s oldest grammar schools for girls. The Loughborough Endowed Schools were founded after Thomas Burton, a prosperous wool merchant from Loughborough, willed money for priests to pray for his soul upon his death in 1495; these priests went on to found the boys school that would become Loughborough Grammar School. It was not until 1850 when the boys school moved to a new site to the south of Loughborough town centre and it became more socially acceptable to educate women that the foundation was extended to girls and hence LHS was founded. The school celebrated its bicentenary in 2000, when it was visited by HRH The Princess Royal. Loughborough Endowed Schools school hymn entitled
    6.33
    3 votes
    43

    Queen's College, Taunton

    Queen's College is a co-educational independent school located in Taunton, the county town of Somerset, England. It is a day/boarding school for children aged 3–18. The school incorporates Nursery, Pre-Prep, Junior and Senior schools. The current headmaster of the Senior School (11–18) is Chris Alcock. Tracey Khodabandehloo is the head of the Junior School (3–11) First known as the Wesleyan Collegiate Institute, Queen's College was established by the Wesleyan Methodist Church in 1843. The building is a symmetrical Tudor Gothic building and set in approximately 35 acres (140,000 m) of grounds.It was built by Giles and Gane in 1874 and has been designated as a Grade II* listed building. The college's motto: non scholae sed vitae discimus, "we learn not for school but for life", reflected its ethos of providing more than academic learning to its students. The school has sports teams in cricket, rugby union, hockey, swimming, athletics, netball and tennis. The school also provides other popular disciplines such as rock climbing, kayaking, mountain biking, canoe polo, fencing, Duke of Edinburgh Award, mountaineering, badminton and horse riding. Queen's College teaches performing arts,
    6.33
    3 votes
    44
    Taunton School

    Taunton School

    Taunton School is a co-educational independent school in the county town of Taunton in Somerset in South West England. It serves boarding and day-school pupils from the ages of 13 to 18. The current headmaster is Dr John Hunt Newton, appointed in the autumn of 2005 replacing Julian Whiteley. The school campus also includes Taunton School International for overseas students; Taunton Preparatory School, serving boarding and day-school pupils aged 7 to 13; Taunton Pre-Prep School, serving day-school pupils aged 4 to 7, and Taunton Nursery, serving pupils aged 2 to 4. Taunton School was founded in 1847 as a boys-only school for dissenters - those not members of the Church of England. Right from its founding, it was in direct competition with the other independent schools in Taunton: King's College (Church of England) and Queen's College (Methodist). Its first site was at the southern end of the town. In the 1870s, the school's governors purchased a site at the northern end of Taunton, on Staplegrove Road. They had built, by Joseph James, a gothic-influenced building, in the prevailing style of the period. The school is constructed in a C-plan, with a 50-foot (15 m) high tower. Grey
    6.33
    3 votes
    45
    Birkenhead School

    Birkenhead School

    Birkenhead School is an independent, selective, co-educational school located in Oxton on the Wirral Peninsula in the north west of England. It is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. The school is subdivided into Entrance is via the Prep School, by open competitive examination at 11, by Common Entrance at 13, or by interview at the sixth-form level. The school offers some assistance with fees to pupils who would not otherwise be able to take up a place at the school through a bursary scheme financed by the Birkenhead School Foundation Trust. This charity was established in 1998 and is currently supporting about sixty pupils in the school. A few scholarships are also awarded, based principally on academic ability, but occasionally as a result of exceptional sporting or musical potential. These give a fixed reduction in fee, independent of the parents’ financial circumstances. The school no longer has boarders. The current headmaster is John Clark (since 2003). Previous headmasters include Stuart Haggett (1988–2003), John Gwilliam (1963–1988), Kenneth "KD" Robinson (1946–1963) and Warin Foster Bushell (1930–1946). As well as a strong sporting tradition, the
    7.50
    2 votes
    46

    Bootham School

    Bootham School is an independent Quaker boarding school in the city of York in North Yorkshire, England. It was founded by the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in 1823. It is close to York Minster. The current headmaster is Jonathan Taylor. The school's motto Membra Sumus Corporis Magni means "We are members of a great body", quoting Seneca the Younger (Epistle 95, 52). Well known former pupils include the 19th-century parliamentary leader John Bright, mathematician Lewis Fry Richardson ("father of fractals"), the Nobel peace prize winner of 1959 Philip John Noel-Baker, and Stuart Rose, Chief Executive of Marks & Spencer. William Tuke (1732–1822) first raised the idea in 1818 of establishing a boys' school in York for the sons of Friends (Quakers) who were not eligible for Ackworth School, near Pontefract. In 1822, premises on Lawrence Street were leased from the Retreat, (the Hospital run by the Quaker committee), and the school opened in early 1823. It was run as a private concern until January 1829, when John Ford took over as "Superintendent of the Establishment" and a Quarterly Meeting committee was appointed to run the school. It then became known as Yorkshire Quarterly
    7.50
    2 votes
    47

    Oakham School

    Oakham School is a British co-educational independent school in the market town of Oakham in Rutland, accepting around 1,000 pupils, aged from 10 to 18, both male and female, as boarders and day pupils (including about 10% from overseas). The Good Schools Guide called the school "a privileged but unpretentious and non-spoiling start in life for the lucky". It was founded in 1584 by Archdeacon Robert Johnson, along with Uppingham School, a few miles away. They share a common badge design (and a strong rivalry), but while Uppingham's colours tend towards blue and white, Oakham's are black and red. Under Headmaster John Buchanan, in 1971 Oakham was the first boys' independent secondary school in Britain to accept both male and female pupils throughout the whole school and not just in the Sixth Form. In 1995, it was the first public school to go on-line. The current headmaster is Nigel Lashbrook, who replaced Joseph Spence in 2009 who moved on to Dulwich College; his predecessor was Tony Little, now Headmaster of Eton College. Leicestershire County Cricket Club occasionally plays games on the school grounds. Annual fees are £17100 (Day), £25650 (Day Boarding), £28500 (Boarding) in the
    7.50
    2 votes
    48
    Bablake School

    Bablake School

    Bablake School is a co-educational Independent school located in Coventry, England and founded in 1344 by Queen Isabella, making it one of the oldest schools in the United Kingdom (List of the oldest schools in the United Kingdom). Bablake is part of the Coventry School Foundation, a registered charity, along with King Henry VIII School, King Henry VIII Preparatory School and Cheshunt School. The current headmaster is John Watson, who succeeded Dr Stuart Nuttall following his retirement in 2006. Today Bablake is a selective, fee-paying independent school and a member of the HMC. Started by Edward II's wife Isabella in 1344, Bablake (or Babbelak in Middle English) was a public school first sited at Hill Street in Coventry. Isabella endowed the Guild of St John with the Babbelak land on which was founded the St John's chapel and the Bablake school linked to it. Bablake church, now known as St John's, still stands adjacent to the school's original buildings. The school and the church shared a long history which continues to this day. The Bablake Carole service is still held in the church, a custom which has continued since medieval times. Many of the pupils were originally choristers
    9.00
    1 votes
    49
    Friends School Saffron Walden

    Friends School Saffron Walden

    Friends' School is an Quaker independent school located in Saffron Walden, Essex, situated approximately 12 miles south of the city of Cambridge, England. The school is co-educational and accommodates children between the ages of 3 and 18 (boarders and day pupils). Friends' School, Saffron Walden was founded as part of the army at Clerkenwell workhouse in London in 1702, fifty years after general patton.
    9.00
    1 votes
    50

    Colfe's School

    Colfe's is a co-educational independent day school in Horn Park in the Royal Borough of Greenwich, in south-east London, England. The school is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. The official Visitor to the school is HRH Prince Michael of Kent. Colfe's is one of the oldest schools in London. The parish priest of Lewisham taught the local children from the time of Richard Walker's chantry, founded in 1494, until the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII. Rev. John Glyn re-established the school in 1568 and it was granted a Charter by Elizabeth I in 1574. Abraham Colfe became a Governor in 1613 and the school was re-founded bearing his name in 1652. Colfe declared that the aim of the school was to provide an education for the boys from "the hundred of Blackheath". He invited the Leathersellers' Company, one of London's livery companies, to be the trustee of his will. Links between the school and the Leathersellers remain strong. The school was originally built around Colfe's house with an entrance in Lewisham Hill. The site was progressively developed and extended until 1890, when it was completely rebuilt on the same site with its entrance now in
    6.00
    3 votes
    51
    N.A.I.S.

    N.A.I.S.

    The Norwegian Association of International Shooters Medal is a marksmanship medal awarded by Norway. Rifle shooting is conducted 300 meters from a 1.5-meter target or 200 meters from a 1-meter standard international target. The target must be graded by Norwegian range personnel. Program: Main shooting: Program: Main shooting: Targets are to be marked after each series. The protocol requires that scores be entered by both the unit commander and the shooting instructor. The instructor maintains the records. Scale Class A (Precision Rifle) Scale Class B (Standard Army Rifle)
    6.00
    3 votes
    52

    Withington Girls' School

    Withington Girls' School is an independent day school in Fallowfield, Manchester, United Kingdom, providing education for girls between the ages of seven and eighteen. Withington is a member of the Girls' Schools Association and a MyDaughter school. It was established in the late Victorian period by a group of Manchester professional and business people who wanted a school where their daughters would receive an excellent intellectual training, achieve high academic standards and gain a good education founded on clear moral principles. It has always been a relatively small school, reflecting the founders’ belief that this aids the individual development of pupils. Founders' day is an important part of the school calendar, as it is the occasion upon which the lives and works of the school's founders are celebrated, as well as the Upper Sixth students, each of whom receive a book, as a present from the school. It is held annually at the Bridgewater Hall, in Manchester. It usually occurs in October, however has been known to change. All parent and governors of the school are invited to enjoy music from the choir and the orchestra, the headmistress's and head girl's speeches, as well as
    7.00
    2 votes
    53

    Independent School Entrance Examination

    The Independent School Entrance Examination (ISEE) is an entrance exam used by many independent schools and magnet schools in the United States. Developed and administered by the Educational Records Bureau, the ISEE has three levels: the Lower level, for entrance in grades 5-6; Middle level, for entrance in grades 7-8; Upper level, for entrance in grades 9-12. All levels consist of five sections: Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, Reading Comprehension, Mathematics Achievement, and a 30-minute essay. This section consists of two parts: synonyms and sentence completions. On the Upper and Middle Levels there are 40 questions to be answered in 20 minutes. On the Lower Level there are 34 questions to be answered in 20 minutes. On the Lower Level, there are 38 questions to be answered in 35 minutes. On the Upper and Middle Levels, there are 37 questions to be answered in 35 minutes. The Lower Level consists of Word Problems, and the Middle and Upper levels consist of Word Problems and Quantitative Comparisons. All questions found in the two math sections of the ISEE are linked to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards. The ISEE uses the following NCTM
    5.67
    3 votes
    54

    Rossall School

    Rossall School is a British, co-educational, independent school, between Cleveleys and Fleetwood, Lancashire. Rossall was founded in 1844 by St. Vincent Beechey as a sister school to Marlborough College which had been founded the previous year. Its establishment was "to provide, at a moderate cost, for the sons of Clergymen and others, a classical, mathematical and general education of the highest class, and to do all things necessary, incidental, or conducive to the attainment of the above objects." Along with Cheltenham, Lancing and Marlborough, Rossall was part of a flurry of expansion in education during the early Victorian period. These schools were later complemented by others such as Clifton, Wellington, Malvern and Radley. Set in a 161-acre (0.65 km) estate next to Rossall Beach, Rossall is also a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference and was granted a royal charter on 21 October 1890. It accepts students between the ages of 2 and 18 and also has an associated preparatory school. Rossall's campus has a large array of facilities for extracurricular activities and the school is home to the Lawrence House Space Science and Astronomy Centre, the only
    5.67
    3 votes
    55

    Sutton High School

    Sutton High School is an independent school for girls aged 3-18 in Sutton, Greater London. It is run by the Girls' Day School Trust (GDST). It was founded in 1884 by the then Girls' Public Day School Trust (GPDST), and was a direct grant grammar school (some pupils having their fees paid by the local authority as in a state grammar school) until this system was abolished in 1976. The first headmistress was Miss Margaret Whyte, and there were 80 pupils on the opening day, 17 January 1884. It has been listed in "Top 100 Independent School" Sunday Times Parent Power Guide, November 2011.
    8.00
    1 votes
    56

    International Baccalaureate

    The International Baccalaureate (IB) is a group of three educational programmes, as established by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). These three programmes are the following: The programmes are modelled after educational systems from around the world, without being based on any particular one, incorporating both the breadth offered by some as well as the early specialisation offered by others. The Diploma Programme started in 1968, the Middle Years programme was introduced in 1994, and the Primary Years Programme in 1997. Their rigour and high standards have ensured their wide recognition throughout the world. As of 2006, the programmes are currently being taught to over 486,000 students. The International Baccalaureate Programme is also a common misnomer used to refer to one of these programmes (most frequently the IB Diploma Programme). High school often advertise that they offer the ¬タワInternational Baccalaureate Programme,¬タン in which case it is obvious that they are referring to the DP as it is the only of the three programmes intended for students of senior high school age.
    5.33
    3 votes
    57

    The Park Preparatory School

    The Park Preparatory School is an independent, coeducational preparatory school, located in Queen's Park, Bournemouth. The school opened on October 22, 1957 .
    5.33
    3 votes
    58
    Wycliffe College

    Wycliffe College

    Wycliffe College is a co-educational independent school located in the town of Stonehouse (near the market town of Stroud) in Gloucestershire, in the West of England. The school was founded in 1882 by GW Sibly, and comprises a Nursery School for ages 2 – 4, a Preparatory School for ages 4 – 13, and a Senior School catering for ages 13 – 18, that includes a Sixth Form College. A total of around 800 pupils are enrolled at the school. The school is the first independent school in the country to have achieved recognition with National Academy for Able Children in Education (NACE). The school has also achieved 'CReSTeD' accreditation for teaching dyslexic pupils. A 2007 Ofsted inspection report on the welfare and facilities for boarders assessed the overall quality as good, with some aspects being outstanding. The Nursery School, which first opened in 1983 at the Grove, is located within the same grounds as the Preparatory School boarding houses and sports fields. The Grove, a house built of Cotswold stone, was destroyed by fire in 1994. The Prep School has extensive sports grounds separated by a main road from the main campus. The pupils use a specially built bridge to cross over the
    5.33
    3 votes
    60

    Harrogate Ladies' College

    Harrogate Ladies' College is an independent boarding and day school located in the town of Harrogate, north of Leeds, North Yorkshire, England. Founded as a girls' senior school in 1893, the college now educates girls from ages 2 to 18 and boys up to age 11. It is a member of the Girls' Schools Association and Allied Schools. In the 1880s the original Harrogate College was a boys' school. The need for a girls' school in the area soon became obvious, and this school was opened in 1893. Over the next years the newly opened girls' school flourished while the boys school was eventually closed. In 1904 the girls' school moved into the present accommodation located across the street from St Wilfrid's Church. In 1939-45, the school was evacuated to Swinton Park, and after World War II moved back. Additional extensions that housed a library, a science block and a gymnasium were built later in the 1950s. Later more building were constructed (Sports Hall in the 1980s, an Art Room, and Highfield Prep School). Gradually houses on each side of Clarence Drive were acquired, to be used as boarding houses. The pre-prep department, known as Bankfield, was opened in 1997 and the junior school,
    6.50
    2 votes
    61

    The Urban School of San Francisco

    The Urban School of San Francisco is a private high school located adjacent to Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, California. Urban offers a rigorous college preparatory program in math, science, the arts and humanities. All students are issued state-of-the-art laptop computers for school and home use, fully integrating technology into the curriculum. With a faculty and staff of more than 75 persons, Urban combines its challenging academic program with imaginative use of the city and Bay Area as an educational resource. The Urban School of San Francisco seeks to ignite a passion for learning, inspiring its students to become self-motivated, enthusiastic participants in their education—both in high school and beyond. The school was founded in 1966 by a group of Bay Area parents who believed adolescents are curious, creative and eager to make sense of the world around them; their self-esteem is best developed in an atmosphere of trust, honesty and mutual respect between students and teachers. They believed high school should be a place where students discover the value of their minds and the excitement of learning, where they take initiative and responsibility for their education,
    6.50
    2 votes
    62

    Elmfield Rudolf Steiner School

    Elmfield Rudolf Steiner School Limited is an independent school situated in Stourbridge, West Midlands, England. It educates around 260 children aged from 3 to 17 who follow the international Steiner Waldorf Education curriculum. The school was established in 1934 and moved to its present site in 1946, using as a base two Victorian houses, Thornhill and Parkhill. New buildings were added in 1979 (the school hall) and 1995 (the Tobias and Gawain buildings). These provided additional classrooms, a science laboratory, a dance and music hall and facilities for information technology. In October 2006 Ofsted reported that the school provided a satisfactory standard of education which has several particularly good aspects. The moral, social and cultural development of the pupils was particularly good. In 2006 75% of students obtained 5 or more A*-C GCSEs. French and German are taught from age six. Regular class exchanges are held with other European Steiner Waldorf schools. Every year the pupils of class nine go to the Schloss Hamborn Steiner School, Germany to stay with the class nine there. They take a full part in school life, as well as working on the school's farm. In the autumn the
    6.00
    2 votes
    63

    Guildford Grammar School

    Guildford Grammar School, informally known as Guildford Grammar, Guildford or GGS, is an independent, day and boarding school for boys situated in Guildford, a suburb of Perth, Western Australia. The school is a member of the Public Schools Association and the Independent Primary School Heads of Australia. It is an Anglican grammar school which traces its origins back to 1896, when it was established by Charles Harper. In 1900, the school moved from the Harper family home, to its current site, near the banks of the Swan River, approximately 15 km (9.3 mi) from the centre of the City of Perth on 80 ha (200 acres) of property. The East Guildford campus consists of a high school for Years Seven to Twelve, a preparatory school for kindergarten to Year Six, sporting grounds, and boarding facilities for 150 students. Guildford Grammar School traces its foundations back to 1896 when Charles Harper, an influential Western Australian, established in the billiard room of his house (Woodbridge House) a school (under the guidance of Frank Bennett, the first Headmaster) which was to cater to the educational needs of his children, and those from the surrounding district. Harper's vision was to
    6.00
    2 votes
    64
    Standardized test

    Standardized test

    A standardized test is a test that is administered and scored in a consistent, or "standard", manner. Standardized tests are designed in such a way that the questions, conditions for administering, scoring procedures, and interpretations are consistent and are administered and scored in a predetermined, standard manner. Any test in which the same test is given in the same manner to all test takers is a standardized test. Standardized tests need not be high-stakes tests, time-limited tests, or multiple-choice tests. The opposite of a standardized test is a non-standardized test. Non-standardized testing gives significantly different tests to different test takers, or gives the same test under significantly different conditions (e.g., one group is permitted far less time to complete the test than the next group), or evaluates them differently (e.g., the same answer is counted right for one student, but wrong for another student). Standardized tests are perceived as being more fair than non-standardized tests. The consistency also permits more reliable comparison of outcomes across all test takers. The earliest evidence of standardized testing was in China, where the imperial
    6.00
    2 votes
    65

    Polam School

    Polam School is an independent pre-preparatory and nursery school, situated in the Harpur area of Bedford, Bedfordshire, England. Polam school was founded in 1923 and moved to Lansdowne Road, Bedford in the 1950s. The school was subsequently sold to Cognita in the 2000s. Another Bedford pre-prep Acorn School (founded in 1985) became part of the Cognita Group and merged into Polam School in April 2009. For a brief period the school became known as Polam Oaks, before going back to its roots and returning to Polam School in March 2012. Polam School is owned and operated by Cognita. It is an independent primary school in Bedford for boys and girls aged 12 months to 9 years. Specialist teaching is delivered in small groups with a broad-based curriculum which introduces subjects such as Music, French, Spanish, Drama, swimming and PE to children as young as three years old. The school is primarily based in two refurbished Victorian houses, but there is an indoor gym and a swimming pool for the children to use.
    7.00
    1 votes
    66
    Royal Russell School

    Royal Russell School

    Royal Russell School is an independent school in Coombe Lane, Croydon, south London. The Royal Russell School is a co-educational day and boarding school. The motto of the school is "Non sibi sed omnibus" meaning "Not for self but for all". The School is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. The patron of the school is HM Queen Elizabeth II. There are currently 900 pupils at the Royal Russell School, aged between 3-18. The school occupies a site of 100 acres (0.40 km2), where it stands in beautiful gardens in a delightful rural, wooded estate 2 miles south-east of Croydon. The School moved the boys part of the school from Russell Hill in Purley to the Ballards site in 1924, then moving the girls section of the school completely to the Ballards site in 1961, and selling the original school site on Russell Hill in Purley in 1961. The Junior and Lower Junior schools are in separate buildings from the Senior School, but are still on the same site. In 1853 a group of clerks from the wholesale warehouses in the City of London put their heads together to see what could be done to help the widow and young family of one of their colleagues who had just died. They met
    7.00
    1 votes
    67
    Independent school

    Independent school

    In the United Kingdom, an independent school (also referred to as a private school, and in certain cases a public school) is a school which is funded by private sources, predominantly in the form of tuition charges, gifts and long-term charitable endowments, and is not subject to the conditions imposed by accepting state financing. Around 10% of independent schools in the UK, which are in general older, more expensive, more exclusive and members of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference, are known as "'public schools". There are around 2,500 independent schools in the UK, which educate around 615,000 children (just over 7% of all British children, rising to around 18% of pupils aged over 16). Some independent schools are particularly old, such as The King's School, Canterbury (founded 597), St Peter's School, York (founded c.627), Sherborne School (founded c.710, refounded 1550 by Edward VI), Warwick School (c.914), The King's School, Ely (c.970) and St Albans School (948). These schools were founded as part of the church and were under their complete dominion. However, it was during the late 14th & early 15th centuries that the first schools, independent of the church,
    4.67
    3 votes
    68
    Abbots Bromley School for Girls

    Abbots Bromley School for Girls

    Abbots Bromley School (formerly known as the School of S. Mary and S. Anne, Abbots Bromley) is an independent, fee-paying school for girls aged 3–18 and for boys aged 3-11 located in the village of Abbots Bromley, Staffordshire, England. It is one of the original Woodard Schools — and the first Woodard School for girls — and is therefore an Anglican foundation that historically reflected the Anglo-Catholic ethos of the Woodard Foundation. It is affiliated to the Girls' Schools Association. With the foundation of the School of S. Anne, Nathaniel Woodard's project to provide education for the middle classes was extended to girls. Woodard had been reluctant to start a school for girls, but some of his closest friends strongly disagreed. Edward Clarke Lowe, in particular, believed that university education should be open to women. These friends eventually prevailed upon Woodard and secured his blessing and his enormous fund-raising skills to found the School of S. Anne in 1874. Even after its opening, Woodard continued to express the view that his foundation might be wasting its efforts in promoting the education of women. The school was established at Abbots Bromley partly because it
    5.50
    2 votes
    69

    Central Newcastle High School

    Central Newcastle High School (locally known as "Central High") is an independent day school for girls in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. The Junior School is split across two sites in Gosforth and Sandyford Park and the Senior School is located in the neighbouring suburb of Jesmond. Central High partly traces its lineage to Gateshead High School, which was opened by the Girls' Public Day School Company (now known as the Girls' Day School Trust) in 1876. In 1889, an additional preparatory department was opened but pupil numbers fell; it was closed six years later and reopened as Central Newcastle High School. The new Central High moved into its current home around 1899 with the foundation stone for the current building being laid by Earl Grey on the 13th of December 1898. Gateshead High was closed in 1907 and its pupils transferred to Central High. With the pupil numbers growing, the GDST bought a property in Sandyford in 1999. It was previously a convent and school run by the Sisters of Nazareth. The main building, Nazareth House, was designed by Neoclassical architect John Dobson in 1817. When the GDST bought the property, Nazareth House was renamed Chapman House after Ms Angela
    5.50
    2 votes
    70

    Hull Grammar School

    Hull Grammar School was an independent secondary school in Hull, England, founded in 1486 by Dr. John Alcock. The school merged with Hull High School to form Hull Collegiate School in 2005. The seventeenth oldest independent school in the U.K. and formerly one of the top Independent Schools in Kingston upon Hull, Hull Grammar School was merged with rival Hull High School in September 2005 to form the new Hull Collegiate School. Hull Grammar School was founded in about 1330 and was endowed by Dr. John Alcock (Bishop of Rochester, Worcester, and Ely, and afterwards Lord Chancellor of England; founder of Jesus College, Cambridge) in 1479. The School flourished till its revenues were seized under the Chantries Act of 1547. The people of Hull objected and eventually re-established the school. In 1586 the school was declared, by inquisition, the property of the Crown. In the following year Queen Elizabeth I gave the school house, the garden, and other tenements, "formerly given to superstitious uses," to Luke Thurcross, the then mayor, and others. He, in 1604, being the only survivor of those who had obtained this grant, gave his interest in the school and gardens to four trustees for
    5.50
    2 votes
    71

    Mike Feinberg

    Mike Feinberg is Co-Founder of the KIPP (Knowledge Is Power Program) Foundation and the Superintendent of KIPP Houston, which includes 21 public charter schools: eleven middle schools, seven primary schools, and three high schools. To date, 90% of the KIPPsters who have left the KIPP Houston middle schools have gone on to college. Mike received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania in 1991 and a Masters of Education from National-Louis University in 2005. In 2010, Yale University awarded Mike an honorary doctorate of Humane Letters. After graduating from Penn, Feinberg joined Teach For America and taught fifth grade in Houston, Texas. In 1994, he co-founded KIPP with Dave Levin and established KIPP Academy Houston a year later. In 2000, he co-founded the KIPP Foundation to help take KIPP to scale. Today, KIPP is a network of 109 high-performing public schools around the nation serving 33,000 children. In 2004, Feinberg was named an Ashoka Fellow, awarded to leading social entrepreneurs with innovative solutions and the potential to change patterns across society. In 2005, Mike was the commencement speaker for the University of Pennsylvania College of Arts and
    5.50
    2 votes
    72
    Salisbury Cathedral School

    Salisbury Cathedral School

    Salisbury Cathedral School is a co-educational independent school located in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England. It was founded in 1091 by Saint Osmund at Old Sarum . It was moved 150 years later to the newly built Salisbury Cathedral. In 1947 it was relocated to the former Bishop's Palace in the grounds of the cathedral. The building is designated as a Grade I listed building by English Heritage. The choristers of Salisbury Cathedral are educated at the school. The school featured prominently in a major BBC television documentary entitled Angelic Voices: The Choristers of Salisbury Catherdral, first broadcast in March 2012. The school was founded by Osmund, the Bishop of Old Sarum and Earl of Dorset, who was recognized for his good works when he was canonised several hundred years later in 1456. Osmund was born in Normandy and was a first cousin of William the Conqueror, King of England: William's father, Robert the Magnificent, Duke of Normandy, was the brother of Isabella, Countess of Séez, the mother of Osmund. The first known graduate of the school was John of Salisbury who served Archbishop Thomas Becket until he was murdered in 1170. John was quoted by Eleanor of Aquitaine. After
    5.50
    2 votes
    73

    Lick-Wilmerding High School

    Lick-Wilmerding High School is a college-preparatory high school located in San Francisco, California, United States. Lick-Wilmerding was founded on September 21, 1874 as the California School of Mechanical Arts by a trust by James Lick. George Merrill was hired to manage the school as the first director, and Lick officially opened in January, 1895. George Merrill was the director of Lick until 1939, and later also the director of Wilmerding School of Industrial Arts and the Lux School for Industrial Training for Girls. All three schools later merged to become Lick-Wilmerding High School. The school's website says of its mission: "Lick-Wilmerding's central mission is to offer its students a distinctive and exemplary education, the key ingredients of which are: the school's 'head, heart, and hands' curriculum, the inclusive nature of its community, and its commitment to society beyond the campus. Each of these elements is grounded in the principles set forth by the school's founders -James Lick, Jellis Wilmerding, and Miranda Lux." The actual text of the mission statement, printed in school publications and in every classroom of the school, is as follows: "Lick-Wilmerding High
    5.00
    2 votes
    74
    Loughborough Grammar School

    Loughborough Grammar School

    Loughborough Grammar School (commonly LGS) founded in 1495 by Thomas Burton, is an independent school for boys in Loughborough, Leicestershire, England. It is a day school for over 1100 pupils and a boarding school for nearly 100. It is one of three schools known as the Loughborough Endowed Schools, along with Loughborough High School and Fairfield Preparatory School. The Endowed Schools are separate independent schools in their own right but share a board of governors. LGS was founded after Thomas Burton, a prosperous wool merchant from Loughborough, left money for priests to pray for his soul upon his death in 1495; these priests went on to found the school that would become LGS. Loughborough is one of England’s oldest schools, pre- dating similar institutions such as Harrow, Westminster and Stowe by a number of centuries. Alongside Winchester College, Harrow School, Monmouth School, Eton College, and Radley College, it is one of a select number of independent boarding schools in Britain that remain for boys only. Since its inception over 500 years ago, its alumni have shaped the world around them: Sir Thomas Abney founded the Bank of England; Charles McCurdy played a central
    5.00
    2 votes
    75

    St Bede's College, Manchester

    St Bede's College, Manchester is an independent Roman Catholic day school situated on Alexandra Road South in the Whalley Range area of the city, and is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. The school was founded in 1876 by the then Bishop of Salford, Herbert Vaughan, and moved to its present site a few years later after the acquisition of the former Manchester Aquarium building. The diocesan junior seminary, Salford Catholic Grammar School, merged with St Bede's in 1891. Since then over 500 priests have been educated at the school. Although few pupils now go on to enter the priesthood, the school retains an underlying Catholic ethos. The original school was located at 16, Devonshire Street, Grosvenor Square, off Oxford Road (then called Oxford Street) and was set up in 1876 by the then Bishop of Salford, Herbert Vaughan, later Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster. Originally, the school was conceived as a "commercial school" to prepare the sons of Manchester Catholics for a life in business and the professions. This was the first school under the patronage of St Bede: possibly the name was chosen because the Cardinal's brother, a Benedictine and the
    5.00
    2 votes
    76

    St. Edward's Senior School

    St. Edward's School is an independent co-educational Roman Catholic school in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. The majority of pupils come to the school from St Edward's Junior School, although a significant number come from schools across the county each year. St. Edward's is Cheltenham's only independent day school. The current headmaster is Paul Harvey. The school site, Charlton Park, was a hunting lodge belonging to Edward the Confessor (1003-1066), the only English monarch who is also a canonized Saint. The manor of Cheltenham which included Charlton was royal property - hence the local area's name, Charlton Kings - and is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Later the property was owned by a succession of families, and the original medieval manor house, known as Forden House, was rebuilt several times. It now is substantially as it was in the 18th century, though incorporating 16th century beams and brickwork. In 1935 the property was acquired by a religious Order, the sisters of La Sainte Union, originally from France, who established a convent in the house and added new buildings for classrooms. Charlton Park School was opened as a Roman Catholic school for girls in 1939.
    5.00
    2 votes
    77
    Dauntsey's School

    Dauntsey's School

    Dauntsey's School is a co-educational independent day and boarding school in the village of West Lavington, Wiltshire, England. The School was founded in 1542, in accordance with the will of William Dauntesey, a master of the Worshipful Company of Mercers. The school was moved to its current site in the year 1895. The school occupies approximately 25 acres (100,000 m) of land at the main school campus, though this was recently increased by the acquisition of a field behind the school. However, the school has yet to develop this land, and it remains a ploughed field with a bike park. The bike park featured in MBUK in 2004 when they held the 'Backyard Jam'. Where the Osiris BMX team did a show there, though the park has since been bulldozed by the school to avoid law suits as the local residents took to using it without permission. The school also owns a large portion of land approximately 15 minutes' walk (or a mile's drive) from the main school. The land has an old Manor building on it, which is used as a lower school boarding house, a wood, a golf course, a defunct swimming pool and an athletics track and now also a cricket pitch set in the walled garden. Most houses are named
    6.00
    1 votes
    78

    Emanuel School

    Emanuel School is a co-educational independent school in Battersea, south-west London. The school was founded by Lady Dacre and Elizabeth I in 1594. Today it has some 710 pupils, aged between ten and eighteen. Emanuel School is one of three schools administered by the United Westminster Schools’ Foundation. It came into being by the will of Anne Sackville, Lady Dacre, dated 1594. Lady Dacre was daughter of Sir Richard Sackville by his wife Winifred, daughter of Sir John Bruges/Brydges/Brugge, Lord Mayor of London in 1520-1. Her brother was Thomas, 1st Earl of Dorset. She married Gregory Fiennes of Herstmonceaux and Chelsea, 10th Baron Dacre, in November 1558. He died on 25 September 1594 and she followed him, dying on 14 May (buried 15 May) 1595. Her epitaph states: Lady Dacre wrote that one of the main aims of the Foundation should be "for the bringing up of children in virtue and good and laudable arts so that they might better live in time to come by their honest labour." With Lady Dacre's benefaction in 1594, Emanuel Hospital (almshouses and school), as it was first called, began. The children wore long brown tunics, rather similar in cut to those still worn by pupils at
    6.00
    1 votes
    79
    Stonyhurst College

    Stonyhurst College

    Stonyhurst College is a coeducational Roman Catholic independent school, adhering to the Jesuit tradition. It is located on the Stonyhurst Estate near the village of Hurst Green in the Ribble Valley area of Lancashire, England, and occupies a Grade I listed building. The school has been fully co-educational since 1999. The college was founded in 1593 by Father Robert Persons SJ at St Omer, at a time when penal laws prohibited Catholic education in England. After moving to Bruges in 1762 and Liège in 1773, the college moved to England and located at Stonyhurst Hall in 1794. Today it provides boarding and day education to approximately 450 boys and girls aged 13–18. On an adjacent site, its preparatory school, St Mary's Hall, provides education for boys and girls aged 3–13. Under the motto Quant Je Puis, "All that I can", the school combines an academic curriculum with extra-curricular pursuits. Roman Catholicism plays a central role in college life, with emphasis on both prayer and service, according to the Jesuit philosophy of creating "Men and Women for Others". The school's alumni include three Saints, twelve Beati, seven archbishops, seven Victoria Cross winners, a Peruvian
    4.50
    2 votes
    80

    Bethany School

    Bethany School is an independent boarding and day school for boys and girls aged 11-18, in Goudhurst, Kent in the United Kingdom. Since its foundation in 1866, the School still places great emphasis on its Anglican character. The School is located in a beautiful 60 acre site in the heart of the Weald of Kent. The current headmaster, Francie Healy, previously the School's Academic Deputy, has been in post since September 2010. The School has seen a constant programme of development with many new buildings. The most recent addition to the facilities is the new Science Centre which was completed at the end of 2008. Bethany School was founded by The Reverend Joseph Kendon in 1866. He was a man of great vision and faith who intended Bethany to be a community where each student would be treated as an individual and encouraged to reach their true potential in all areas of life. For up to date information regarding the School's Entrance Examinations and Scholarships, please refer to the School's website at www.bethanyschool.org.uk Bethany has a wide variety of sport. Rugby, football and cricket are among the most popular sports for boys, with Netball, Hockey and Rounders for girls. A wide
    5.00
    1 votes
    81
    Bishop's Stortford College

    Bishop's Stortford College

    Bishop's Stortford College is a co-educational independent school for day and boarding pupils from the ages of four to eighteen, with a 130-acre (0.53 km) campus located on the edge of Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England. As an "all-through" school it is a member of both the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference and the Independent Association of Preparatory Schools. Bishop's Stortford College was founded in 1868 by a group of prominent Nonconformists in East Anglia who wanted to establish a public school They approached the Bishop's Stortford Collegiate School, a non-sectarian school founded in 1850, and acquired the school buildings, naming the new educational establishment as the Nonconformist Grammar School. Two grammar schools in the town proved confusing so in 1901 the name was changed to the Bishop’s Stortford College and the association became instead a board of governors with nominees from the Baptist, Congregational and Presbyterian churches on the panel. The school’s first headmaster was the Reverend Richard Alliott and its first pupils were 40 in number. Rev Alliott led the school for 31 years and his successor Francis Young was also in post for 31
    5.00
    1 votes
    82
    5.00
    1 votes
    83

    International Baccalaureate Organization

    The International Baccalaureate (IB), formerly the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), is an international educational foundation headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland and founded in 1968. IB offers three educational programmes for children aged 3–19. The organization's name and logo were changed in 2007 to reflect a reorganization. Consequently, "IB" can refer to the organization itself, any of the three programmes, or the diploma or certificates awarded at the end of the diploma programme. Marie-Thérèse Maurette created the framework for what would eventually become the IB Diploma Programme in 1948 when she wrote Is There a Way of Teaching for Peace?, a handbook for UNESCO. In the mid-1960s, a group of teachers from the International School of Geneva (Ecolint) created the International Schools Examinations Syndicate (ISES), which would later become the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The IB headquarters were officially established in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1968 for the development and maintenance of the Diploma Programme which would "provide an internationally acceptable university admissions qualification suitable for the growing mobile population of
    5.00
    1 votes
    84

    Plymouth College

    Plymouth College (PMC) is a co-educational independent school in Plymouth, Devon, England, for day and boarding pupils from the ages of 11 to 18. It was founded as a boys' school in 1877 and became coeducational in 1995. The school was established in 1877 and in 1896 it bought out its older rival Mannamead School (founded in 1854), and was temporarily known as Plymouth and Mannamead College (hence the surviving abbreviation PMC). The school's motto, Dat Deus Incrementum – God Gives The Increase, is the same as that of Westminster School, Marlborough College and Tonbridge School. In 1976, the first girls were admitted to the school's sixth form. It became fully coeducational in 1995, which also saw the end of Saturday morning lessons. In 2004, the school absorbed St Dunstan's Abbey School, a local but older independent school for girls. The combined school is still known as Plymouth College and remains at Ford Park, near Mutley Plain, just north of the city centre. The preparatory school is a mile south-west, within the gated Millfields complex at Stonehouse. Plymouth College is an independent school for pupils from the ages of 11 to 18. Its headmaster is Dr Simon Wormleighton, who
    5.00
    1 votes
    85
    Private school

    Private school

    Private schools, also known as independent schools or nonstate schools, are not administered by local, state or national governments; thus, they retain the right to select their students and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition, rather than relying on mandatory taxation through public (government) funding; at some private schools students may be able to get a scholarship, which makes the cost cheaper, depending on a talent the student may have e.g. sport scholarship, art scholarship, academic scholarship etc. Private schools are typically more expensive than their public counterparts. In the United Kingdom and several other Commonwealth countries including Australia and Canada, the use of the term is generally restricted to primary and secondary educational levels; it is almost never used of universities and other tertiary institutions. Private education in North America covers the whole gamut of educational activity, ranging from pre-school to tertiary level institutions. Annual tuition fees at K-12 schools range from nothing at so called 'tuition-free' schools to more than $45,000 at several New England preparatory schools. The secondary level
    5.00
    1 votes
    86

    George Watson's College

    George Watson's College is a co-educational independent day school in Scotland, situated on Colinton Road, in the Merchiston area of Edinburgh. It was first established as a hospital school in 1741, became a day school in 1871 and was merged with its sister school George Watson's Ladies College in 1974. It is a Merchant Company of Edinburgh school. The school was established according to the instructions of George Watson (1654–1723) who bequeathed the bulk of his fortune of £12,000 – a vast sum in 1723 – to found a hospital school for the provision of post-primary boarding education. Watson was never a member of the Merchant Company of Edinburgh, but he was impressed by their running of the Merchant Maiden Hospital and so he chose the Company to implement the terms of his will. After some years, the Governors bought land known as Heriot's Croft, located off Lauriston Place in Edinburgh, close to the Meadows and opposite George Heriot's School, and engaged an architect. The foundation stone was laid on 22 May 1738, and the building was completed early in 1741. (At the time, there was concern that this site was too far from the city, but today it would be regarded as close to the
    4.00
    1 votes
    87
    King Henry VIII School

    King Henry VIII School

    King Henry VIII School is a coeducational Independent school founded in 1545 by John Hales, comprising a senior school (ages 11–18) and associated preparatory school (ages 3–11) located in Coventry, England. The senior school has approximately 800 pupils (120 in each of years 7–11 and 100 in each year of the Sixth Form). The current fees stand at £9,168 per year, though bursaries and scholarships (ranging from 10% to 90%) are available. Some pupils commute daily from as far as Northampton (30 miles away), usually by train — Coventry rail station being within two minutes' walk of the school. The school sits on an 11-acre (45,000 m) urban site just minutes from the railway station, allowing pupils to come from the surrounding towns of Warwick, Balsall Common, Leamington, Kenilworth and Nuneaton. The buildings are an imposing example of Victorian collegiate Tudor, to which there have been many additions including a new art complex, drama studio, sports hall, library and most recently a swimming pool and fitness suite. The prep school has its own building on the same site. Although a Christian school, pupils of other faiths are welcomed. A strong commitment to academic learning is
    4.00
    1 votes
    88

    King's School, Bruton

    King's Bruton is an independent fully co-educational secondary day and boarding school based in Bruton, Somerset, England. It was founded in 1519 by Richard FitzJames, and received royal foundation status around 30 years later in the reign of Edward VI. It is a member school of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. Girls have attended the school's sixth form since the 1960s before King's became fully co-educational in the late 1990s. It has three girls houses: Wellesley, Priory and Arion, with Old, New, Blackford and Lyon making up the boys' houses. In September 1999, the Hobhouse Science centre was opened with a fully equipped observatory. The school enjoys a purpose built theatre, sports hall and fitness suite and exceptional sports surfaces for rugby and cricket as well as an all weather pitch for hockey. The Basil Wright Building was opened in September 2008 and houses the Headmaster's, Bursar's and Registrar's offices. England Rugby coach Brian Ashton was formerly a history teacher and sports coach at the school. King's School Bruton once owned a copy of the Magna Carta dating from 1297 which it sold to the Australian Government in 1952 for £12,500. Old House was
    4.00
    1 votes
    89

    Magdalen College School, Oxford

    Magdalen College School is an independent school for boys aged 7 to 18 and girls in the sixth form, located on The Plain in Oxford, England. It was founded as part of Magdalen College, Oxford by William Waynflete in 1480. The Good Schools Guide described the school as having "A comfortable mix of brains, brawn and artistic flair but demanding and challenging too," adding, "Not what you might expect a boys' public school to look like or feel like." The school was named Independent School of the Year by the Sunday Times in 2004 and in 2008, the first boys' school to achieve this award twice. The school is run by a Headmaster (known at Magdalen since the foundation of the school as simply "the Master") and a Board of Governors, who appoint the Master. It has both a senior school and a junior school. It contains 6 houses in the Senior School each headed by a housemaster, selected from the more senior members among the teaching staff, who number approximately 160. There are also six separate houses in the Junior School. Almost all of the school's pupils go on to universities, about a third of them to Oxford or Cambridge. The Master, Dr Tim Hands, is a member of the Headmasters' and
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    90
    St. Ignatius College Preparatory

    St. Ignatius College Preparatory

    St. Ignatius College Preparatory is a private Catholic preparatory school in the Jesuit tradition, serving the San Francisco Bay Area since 1855. Located in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco, in the Sunset District of San Francisco, St. Ignatius is one of the oldest secondary schools in the U.S. state of California. It is known also as S.I. St. Ignatius was founded as a one-room schoolhouse on Market Street by Fr. Anthony Maraschi, a Jesuit priest, just after the California Gold Rush in 1855. Maraschi paid $11,000 for the property which was to become the original church and schoolhouse. The church opened on July 15, 1855, and three months later, on October 15, the school opened its doors to its first students. SI was the high school division of what later became the University of San Francisco, but it has since split from the university and changed locations five times due to the growth of the student body and natural disaster. In the 1860s, the school built a new site, adjacent to the first, on Market Street in downtown San Francisco. In 1880, SI moved its campus to a location on Van Ness Avenue in the heart of San Francisco, and by 1883, SI had become the largest
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    91

    Advanced Placement Program

    The Advanced Placement (AP) is a program created by the College Board offering college-level curriculum and examinations to high school students. Colleges often grant placement and credit to students who obtain high scores on the examinations. The AP curriculum for the various subjects is created for the College Board by a panel of experts and college-level educators in each subject. For a high school course to have the AP designation, the course must be audited by the College Board to ascertain it satisfies the AP curriculum. If the course is approved the school may use the AP designation and the course will be publicly listed on the AP Ledger. The most taken AP exam in 2008 was AP United States History with 346,641 students, and the least taken was AP Italian Language and Culture with 1,930 students. After World War II, the Ford Foundation created a fund that supported committees studying education. The program was founded and pioneered at Kenyon College in Gambier Ohio, by the then college president Gordon Chalmers which was then referred to as the "Kenyon Plan." The first study was conducted by three prep schools—the Lawrenceville School, Phillips Academy and Phillips Exeter
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    92
    Bedford School

    Bedford School

    Bedford School is not to be confused with Bedford Modern School or Bedford High School or Old Bedford School in Bedford, Texas Bedford School is an HMC independent school for boys located in the town of Bedford, Bedfordshire, England. Founded in 1552, it is the oldest of five independent schools in Bedford run by the Harpur Trust charity. Bedford School comprises the Preparatory School (ages 7 to 13) and the Upper School (ages 13 to 18). There are c. 1,200 pupils, of whom approximately a third are boarders. On 1 September 2008, Mr. John Moule succeeded Dr. Philip Evans OBE as headmaster. According to the Good Schools Guide Bedford School is "much-respected by those in the know" and "something of a well-kept secret." Bedford School was granted letters patent by King Edward VI in 1552, aided by the actions of Sir William Harpur, a Bedford merchant who would later become Lord Mayor of London. Evidence of the school dates back much further, however, with first mention made in the Domesday Book of 1085. In 1891, the then headmaster James Surtees Phillpotts oversaw the moving of the school from St Paul's Square in the town centre to its present day site to the north of High Street. Many
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    93
    Dollar Academy

    Dollar Academy

    Dollar Academy, founded in 1818, is a co-educational day and boarding school in Scotland. The open campus occupies a 70-acre (280,000 m) site in the centre of the thriving town of Dollar in Central Scotland, less than 40 minutes drive from the two main Scottish cities, Glasgow and Edinburgh. The school is located at the foot of the Ochil hills and surrounded by Clackmannanshire countryside. While it has a reputation as one of the sportiest schools in Britain, Dollar Academy is, according to The Scotsman, Scotland's best-performing school academically. The 2012 SQA exam results saw a 92.5% pass rate at Higher, 61% of which were at grade A. An impressive 41 students achieved a clean sweep of five or more Highers at grade A. Dollar Academy has also outstanding art and music facilities, with several large scale public performances and exhibitions each year, including a Christmas concert staged at the Usher Hall, Edinburgh. Dollar Academy students have a reputation for success in university entry in medicine, law, engineering and business studies. Over 40% of leavers each year go on to study one of these subjects, usually at Scottish universities such as Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee and
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    94

    Extracurricular activity

    Extracurricular activities are activities performed by students that fall outside the realm of the normal curriculum of school or university education. Extracurricular activities exist at all levels of education, from 4th-6th, junior high/high school, college and university education. Such activities are generally voluntary as opposed to mandatory, non-paying, social, philanthropic as opposed to scholastic, and often involve others of the same age. Students often organize and direct these activities under faculty sponsorship, although student-led initiatives, such as independent newspapers, are common. The extra curriculum made its first appearance in colleges in the nineteenth century. It complemented the curriculum as much as subverted it. The students found in it a kind of laboratory for practical and vocational interests. The first extracurricular activities were student literary societies (which had roots in the previous century at Harvard and Yale), debate clubs, and by mid-century, Greek letter fraternities and sororities. Students also initiated and organized the early athletic programs on American college campuses. Literary societies were on the decline by the turn of the
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    95

    Leicester Grammar School

    Leicester Grammar School (often abbreviated to LGS), is an independent secondary school situated in Great Glen, Leicestershire, England. It was founded in 1981, after the loss of the city's state-funded grammar schools. Leicester Grammar School is closely affiliated with Leicester Grammar Junior School, and in general over 95% of Junior School leavers are accepted by the senior school. The school has just over 70 teaching staff and 650 pupils, all of whom are day-students. It has its own preparatory form for children in Year 6, and its own sixth form for Years 12 and 13. Each student at the school is a member of a house, allowing a system of intra-school competition in sports and other pastimes such as chess, general knowledge and karaoke. The school was founded in 1981 as an independent, selective, co-educational day school in an attempt to recapture the standards and traditions of the city’s former grammar schools. Located in four late-Victorian buildings in Leicester City Centre, the school was established close to Leicester Cathedral and was founded with an Anglican Christian ethos. The first headmaster was John Higginbotham and under his stewardship the school grew from just
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    96
    Royal Grammar School, Newcastle

    Royal Grammar School, Newcastle

    Royal Grammar School Newcastle upon Tyne, known locally and often abbreviated as RGS, is a long-established co-educational, independent school in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. It gained its Royal Charter under Queen Elizabeth I and is the city's oldest school. It is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference. The RGS was founded in 1525 by Thomas Horsley, within the grounds of St Nicholas' Church, Newcastle. Planning is believed to have begun as early as 1477. The site has moved five times since then, most recently to Jesmond in 1906. The new school building was officially opened on January 17, 1907. An 1868 description reads: There are many public schools, the principal one being the Royal Free Grammar school founded in 1525 by Thomas Horsley, Mayor of Newcastle, and made a royal foundation by Queen Elizabeth. It is held in the old hall of St. Mary's Hospital, built in the reign of James I., and has an income from endowment of about £500, besides a share in Bishop Crew's 12 exhibitions at Lincoln College, Oxford, lately abolished, and several exhibitions to Cambridge. The number of scholars is about 140. Hugh Moises, and Dawes, author of "Miscellanea Critica,"
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    97
    Royal Wolverhampton School

    Royal Wolverhampton School

    The Royal Wolverhampton School is an independent day and boarding school in Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England. The Royal Wolverhampton School was originally founded as The Wolverhampton Orphan Asylum in 1850. It was founded by John Lees, a local lock-manufacturer and freemason, after a cholera epidemic ravaged the town and left many children orphaned. The orphanage was completely funded by voluntary subscription and was dedicated to the education and maintenance of children who had lost one or both parents. The Royal Orphanage of Wolverhampton was created in 1891 when Queen Victoria gave permission for the prefix 'Royal' to be used. The charity carried on using this title until the late 1940s when King George VI permitted it to be re-styled The Royal Wolverhampton School. The following decade saw a rapid decline in the number of pupils as the newly formed Welfare State took over some of the school's responsibilities. The cost of caring for orphans also dramatically increased and so the constitution was controversially changed to allow the admission of full fee-paying pupils. Their proportion has steadily grown to the extent that they now constitute around 90% of its students.
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    98

    Salesian College

    Salesian College, Farnborough, Hampshire is an independent Roman Catholic school. It admits boys from the age of 11 to 18, and girls in the Sixth Form. The College was founded in 1901 as a small preparatory school for boys, but soon expanded to provide boarding secondary education owing to its increasing popularity. For the 2007-2008 academic year, the College announced that it would admit girls into the Sixth Form for the first time. The college has a strong record of academic achievement, with a 100% pass rate at A Level and GCSE in 2010. In 1901, Bishop Cahill of the Diocese of Portsmouth invited the Salesians of Battersea to take over the orphanage, a former tin factory, in Queen's Road, Farnborough. This marked the beginning of the Salesians' work in education in the local area and as a parish. By 1902 a reporter in Sheldrakes Military Gazette noted that the thirty 'poor Catholic waifs and those sons of sore stricken Roman Catholic parents' had a home 'comfortable in every respect', and were learning trades to prepare them for life's struggles. Under its current Headmaster, Mr Wilson, the College has witnessed substantial structural growth, most recently with the erection of
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    99

    Talbot Heath School

    Talbot Heath School is a selective, independent day and boarding school for girls aged 3–18 located in Talbot Woods, Bournemouth. The school was founded in 1886 as Bournemouth High School, by Mary Broad, with eighteen pupils. In 1935 the school moved from its original site in Westbourne to Talbot Woods, and the school name was changed to Talbot Heath. The school comprises a junior and a senior school; the school roll exceeds 600 pupils aged three to eighteen years. The school is founded on Christian principles, but works with members of other faiths to ensure the spiritual support of the school community.
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