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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Church of All Time

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    1
    Church of England

    Church of England

    • Dioceses: Diocese of Bath and Wells
    The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The church considers itself within the tradition of Western Christianity and dates its formal establishment principally to the mission to England by St Augustine of Canterbury in AD 597. As a result of Augustine's mission, the church in England came under the authority of the Pope. Initially prompted by a dispute over the annulment of the marriage of Henry VIII to Catherine of Aragon, the Church of England separated from the Roman Catholic Church in 1534 and became the established church by an Act of Parliament in the Act of Supremacy, beginning a series of events known as the English Reformation. During the reign of Queen Mary I, the Church was fully restored under Rome in 1555. Papal authority was again explicitly rejected after the accession of Queen Elizabeth I when the Act of Supremacy of 1558 was passed. Catholic and Reformed factions vied for determining the doctrines and worship of the church. This ended with the 1558 Elizabethan settlement, which developed the understanding that the church was to be both Catholic and Reformed: During
    7.20
    5 votes
    2

    Saint Catherine Catholic Church in Kapaa

    Saint Catherine Catholic Church in Kapaa is a parish of the Roman Catholic Church of Hawaii in the United States. Located in Kapaa on the island of Kauai, the church falls under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Honolulu and its bishop. It is named after Saint Catherine.
    8.50
    4 votes
    3
    St. Paul's Cathedral

    St. Paul's Cathedral

    • Archdioceses: Cariboo
    St Paul's Cathedral, Kamloops, was the cathedral of the former Anglican Diocese of Cariboo, which was dissolved because of its inability to meet tort judgments against it in respect of abuse in Indian residential schools. The former diocese is now designated the "Parishes of the Central Interior" and they are served not by a diocesan bishop of their own but by a suffragan bishop to the Metropolitan of British Columbia. The parish church of St Paul's in Kamloops nevertheless retains its nominal designation as a cathedral and its rector that of a dean, despite there being no diocese to be dean of. The building is an extremely modest one both in size and furniture and fittings. The Bishop having responsibility for the Parishes of the Central Interior is Rt. Rev. Barbara Andrews; the Dean is the Very Rev. Louise Peters. Other clergy of the former cathedral are the Rev. Dan Hines and the Rev. Canon Jack Phelps.
    6.40
    5 votes
    4
    Church of the Province of Central Africa

    Church of the Province of Central Africa

    The Church of the Province of Central Africa is part of the Anglican Communion, and includes 15 dioceses in Botswana, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The Primate of the Church is the Archbishop of Central Africa. Albert Chama is the current Archbishop, being installed on 20 March 2011, succeeding Bernard Amos Malango who retired in 2007. Archbishop Chama continues to serve as Bishop of Northern Zambia, and is the first Zambian to be Archbishop of Central Africa. In 1861, the first Anglican missionary to the area was Bishop Charles Frederick Mackenzie, who arrived with David Livingstone. In 1855, he went to Natal with Bishop John Colenso. They worked among the English settlers till 1859. In 1860, Mackenzie became head of the Universities' Mission to Central Africa and he was consecrated bishop in St George's Cathedral, Cape Town, on 1 January 1861. Following Dr David Livingstone's request to Cambridge, Bishop Mackenzie took on the position of being the first missionary bishop in Malawi (Nyasaland). Moving from Cape Town, he arrived at Chibisa’s village in June 1861 with the goal to establish a mission station at Magomero, near Zomba. Bishop Mackenzie worked among the people of the
    5.80
    5 votes
    5
    Episcopal Church of the Sudan

    Episcopal Church of the Sudan

    The Episcopal Church of Sudan is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion in Sudan and South Sudan. The province consists of 28 dioceses, each one headed by a bishop. The current Primate is the Most Rev. Daniel Deng Bul. The episcopal see of the Archbishop of Sudan is at Juba. The incumbent serves the church as both its Primate and its Metropolitan archbishop, and is titled 'Archbishop of Sudan, and Bishop of Juba'. He represents the province to the rest of the Anglican Communion, and serves on the international Primates' Meeting. In February 2008, the Episcopal Church of Sudan elected Bishop Daniel Deng Bul of the Diocese of Renk to serve as its next archbishop, succeeding Archbishop Joseph Marona, who retired on 31 December 2007 after serving eight years in the office. The first major Anglican mission in Sudan was founded in Omdurman in 1899, under the auspices of the Church Mission Society. The mission led to widespread conversion to Christianity throughout southern Sudan. Missionary activity came first under the Diocese in Jerusalem, and then, in 1920, as part of the new Diocese of Egypt and the Sudan, with Llewellyn Henry Gwynne as its first bishop. As the pace of
    6.75
    4 votes
    6
    Church of Sweden

    Church of Sweden

    • Dioceses: Diocese of Karlstad
    • Archdioceses: Archdiocese of Uppsala
    The Church of Sweden (Swedish: Svenska kyrkan) is the largest Christian church in Sweden. The church professes the Lutheran faith and is a member of the Porvoo Communion. With 6,589,769 baptized members, it is the largest Lutheran church in the world, although combined, there are more Lutherans in the member churches of the Evangelical Church in Germany (10 million). Until 2000 it held the position of state church. Approximately 2% of the church's members regularly attend Sunday services. The Church of Sweden, by law, is organized in the following manner: The Primate of the Church of Sweden is the Archbishop of Uppsala, currently Anders Wejryd. King Gustav I Vasa instigated the Church of Sweden in 1526 during his reign as King of Sweden. This act separated the church from the Roman Catholic Church and its canon law. In 1572, the Swedish Church Ordinance became the first Swedish church order following the Reformation. The Church of Sweden became Lutheran at the Uppsala Synod in 1593 when it adopted the Augsburg Confession to which most Lutherans adhere. At this synod, it was decided that the church would retain the three original Christian creeds: the Apostles', the Athanasian, and
    8.33
    3 votes
    7
    Anglican Church of Australia

    Anglican Church of Australia

    • Dioceses: Anglican Diocese of The Northern Territory
    • Archdioceses: Anglican Diocese of Sydney
    • Geographical scope: Australia
    The Anglican Church of Australia is a member church of the Anglican Communion. It was previously officially known as the Church of England in Australia and Tasmania (renamed in 1981). It is the second largest church in Australia, behind the Roman Catholic Church in Australia. When the First Fleet was sent to New South Wales in 1787, the Reverend Richard Johnson of the Church of England was licensed as chaplain to the Fleet and the settlement. In 1825 the Revd Thomas Scott was appointed Archdeacon of Australia under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Calcutta. The Revd William Grant Broughton, who succeeded Scott in 1829, was consecrated the first (and only) "Bishop of Australia" in 1836. In early Colonial times, Church of England clergy worked closely with the governors. Richard Johnson, a chaplain, was charged by the governor, Arthur Phillip, with improving "public morality" in the colony, but he was also heavily involved in health and education. The Reverend Samuel Marsden (1765–1838) had magisterial duties, and so was equated with the authorities by the convicts. He became known as the "flogging parson" for the severity of his punishments. Some of the Irish convicts had been
    7.67
    3 votes
    8
    Anglican Church of Kenya

    Anglican Church of Kenya

    The Anglican Church of Kenya is part of the Anglican Communion, and includes 30 dioceses. The Primate of the Church is the Archbishop of Kenya. The Church became part of the Province of East Africa in 1960, but by 1970 Kenya and Tanzania were divided into separate Provinces. The church was founded originally as the diocese of Eastern Equatorial Africa (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania) in 1884, with James Hannington as the first bishop; however, Anglican missionary activity had been present in the area since 1844, when Dr. Johann Ludwig Krapf landed in Mombasa. The first Africans were ordained to the priesthood in 1885. In 1898, the diocese was split into two, with the new diocese of Mombasa governing Kenya and northern Tanzania (the other diocese later became the Church of Uganda); northern Tanzania was separated from the diocese in 1927. Mass conversions of Africans began as early as 1910. In 1955, the diocese's first African bishops, Festo Olang’ and Obadiah Kariuki, were consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury in Uganda (Olang’ would be elected the first African archbishop in 1970); in 1960, the province of East Africa, comprising Kenya and Tanzania, was formed with Leonard James
    7.67
    3 votes
    9
    Saint Lucy Parish

    Saint Lucy Parish

    St. Lucy Catholic Parish is the Roman Catholic parish church of the Latin Rite in Campbell, California. The church was originally established as a Mission of Saint Martin Parish of San Jose in 1914. The current church was built in 1957. 37°16′49″N 121°57′00″W / 37.280367°N 121.949965°W / 37.280367; -121.949965
    7.67
    3 votes
    10

    Anglican Church of Canada

    • Dioceses: Anglican diocese of Yukon
    • Geographical scope: Canada
    The Anglican Church of Canada (ACC or ACoC) is the Province of the Anglican Communion in Canada. The official French name is l'Église Anglicane du Canada. In 2001, the Anglican Church counted 641,845 members on parish rolls. The 2001 Canadian Census counted 2,035,500 self-identified Anglicans (6.9 percent of the total Canadian population), making the Anglican Church the third largest Canadian church after the Roman Catholic Church and the United Church of Canada. According to the census, 48 percent of self-identified Anglicans live in Ontario. Until 1955, the Anglican Church of Canada was known as the Church of England in the Dominion of Canada or simply the Church of England in Canada. In 1977, the church's General Synod adopted l'Église Episcopale du Canada as its French-language name. This name was replaced with the current one, l'Église Anglicane du Canada, in 1989; however, the former name is still used in some places along with the new one. A matter of some confusion for Anglicans elsewhere in the world is that while the Anglican Church of Canada is a province of the Anglican Communion, the Ecclesiastical Province of Canada is merely one of four such ecclesiastical provinces
    6.67
    3 votes
    11
    5.00
    4 votes
    12
    Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia

    Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia

    The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia is a church of the Anglican Communion serving New Zealand, Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, and the Cook Islands. The primate of the church, known as the Archbishop of New Zealand, is William Brown Turei. Since 1992, the church (formerly known as the Church of the Province of New Zealand) has consisted of three tikanga or cultural streams: Aotearoa, New Zealand, and Polynesia. The church's constitution says that, among other things, it is required to "maintain the right of every person to choose any particular cultural expression of the faith". As a result the church's General Synod has agreed upon the development of the three-person primacy based on this three tikanga system. This sees Turei sharing the primacy with Bishops David Moxon and Winston Halapua. The church has decided that three bishops shall share the position and style of Archbishop, each representing one of the three tikanga. The three Archbishops sharing the title of Archbishop of New Zealand are: The Most Reverend William Brown Turei, Bishop of Aotearoa, the head of Te Pīhopatanga o Aotearoa, which oversees churches for the indigenous Māori people of New Zealand.); The
    6.33
    3 votes
    13
    Church of Nigeria

    Church of Nigeria

    The Church of Nigeria is the Anglican church in Nigeria. It is the second-largest province in the Anglican Communion, as measured by baptized membership, after the Church of England. It gives its current membership as "over 18 million", out of a total Nigerian population of 140 million. Since 2002 the Church of Nigeria is organised in ecclesiastical provinces, currently in the number of 14. It has rapidly increased the number of its dioceses and bishops from 91 in 2002 to 161, as at May 2012. The administrative headquarters are located in Abuja. Its current primate is Archbishop Nicholas Okoh. Christianity came to Nigeria in the 15th century through Augustine and Capuchine monks from Portugal. The first mission of the Church of England was, though, only established in 1842 in Badagry by Henry Townsend. In 1864 Samuel Ajayi Crowther, a Yoruba and former Slave, was elected Bishop of the Niger. Lagos became a diocese of its own in 1919. Leslie Gordon Vining became Bishop of Lagos in 1940 and in 1951 the first archbishop of the newly inaugurated Province of West Africa. Vining was the last Bishop of Lagos of European descent. On 24 February 1979, the sixteen dioceses of Nigeria were
    8.00
    2 votes
    14

    St. Johannes Kirche

    St. Johannes Kirche was a former Manhattan Lutheran church located at 217 East 119th Street between Second and Third Avenues. It was built in 1873 and reused as Iglesia Luterana Sion by the Lutheran Church in America: “An early masonry church for this community, then remote from the center of the city much further downtown. The church began as a home for a German-speaking congregation—today it serves those who speak Spanish.” Appears to have been demolished.
    8.00
    2 votes
    15
    Church of the Province of Southern Africa

    Church of the Province of Southern Africa

    The Anglican Church of Southern Africa, known until 2006 as the Church of the Province of Southern Africa, is the Anglican province in the southern part of Africa, including dioceses in Angola, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Saint Helena, South Africa and Swaziland. In South Africa, there are at least 4 million Anglicans out of an estimated population of 45 million. The Anglican Church of Southern Africa is one of the oldest and largest Christian communities in South Africa today. The primate is the Archbishop of Cape Town. The current archbishop is Thabo Makgoba who succeeded Njongonkulu Ndungane. During the years 1986 to 1996 the primate was Nobel Peace Prize laureate Desmond Tutu. The first Anglican clergy to minister regularly at the Cape were military chaplains who accompanied the troops when the British occupied the Cape Colony in 1795 and then again in 1806. The second British occupation resulted in a growing influx of civil servants and settlers who were members of the Church of England, and so civil or colonial chaplains were appointed to minister to their needs. These were under the authority of the governor. The first missionary of the Society for the Propagation of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    16
    Iglesia Anglicana del Cono Sur de las Americas

    Iglesia Anglicana del Cono Sur de las Americas

    The Anglican Church of the Southern Cone of America (Spanish: Iglesia Anglicana del Cono Sur de América) is the ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion that covers the countries of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. Formed in 1981, as of 30 November 2007, the province reported 22,000 members. Its members in South America are thinly spread, making it one of the smaller provinces in the Anglican Communion in terms of numbers, although one of the largest in geographical extent. During the 19th century, immigrants to South America brought Anglicanism with them(Milmine p.8). In Britain a voluntary Anglican society was formed in 1844 to evangelize the inhabitants of Tierra del Fuego. This later became The South American Mission Society (SAMS) and extended its activities the Araucanian regions of Chile and the Chaco. It still plays an important place in the life of the church. The first Diocese was established in 1869 as the Diocese of the Falkland Islands and the rest of South America excepting British Guyana with its Bishop resident in Buenos Aires.(Milmine p.11) Despite its title, the diocese's effective territory was restricted to the Southern Cone plus
    9.00
    1 votes
    17

    Kostol Božského Srdca Ježišovho v borinke

    Situated in the middle of village Borinka, built on foundations as old as 1864, stands a roman catholic church "Boᅤᄒskᅢᄅho srdca Jeᅤᄒiᅤᄀovho". His excellency bishop M. Bubniᅣヘ of Roᅤ햬ネava, born in 1877 in Borinka, granted the church a title of parish church. Later he ordered to build a calvary near his birth house in Volavec (part of Borinka). He died during the war and in 1947 his remains were moved to a chapel near the church. Na zᅢᄀkladoch starᅤᄀej stavby v strede obce Borinka stojᅢᆳ rᅢᆳmsko-katolᅢᆳcky kostol Najsvᅢᄂtejᅤᄀieho srdca Jeᅤᄒiᅤᄀovho z roku 1864. Jeho excelencia najdᅢᄡstojnejᅤ갨 pᅢᄀn Michal Bubniᅣヘ, Roᅤ햬ネavskᅢᄑ biskup, ktorᅢᄑ sa narodil r. 1877 v Borinke vo Volavci dal 24.1.1900 Borinskᅢᄅmu kostolu titul farnosᅤᆬ. Neskᅢᄡr nechal vystavaᅤᆬ vo Volavci pri svojom rodiᅣヘovskom dome kalvᅢᄀriu. Zomrel poᅣヘas vojny a v roku 1947 boli jeho ostatky prevezenᅢᄅ a pochovanᅢᄅ v kaplnke vedᅣᄒa kostola.
    6.50
    2 votes
    18
    Church of Uganda

    Church of Uganda

    The Church of the Province of Uganda (or Church of Uganda) is a member church of the Anglican Communion. Currently there are 34 dioceses which make up the Church of Uganda, each headed by a bishop. Each diocese is divided into archdeaconries, each headed by a senior priest known as an archdeacon. The archdeaconries are further subdivided into parishes, headed by a parish priest. Parishes are subdivided into sub-parishes, headed by lay readers. As of the 2002 Census, 8,782,821 Ugandans (35.9% of the population) consider themselves affiliated with the church. The current Primate and Metropolitan Archbishop is the Most Reverend Henry Luke Orombi, who was enthroned in 2004 and retires in December 2012. The Diocese of Kampala is the fixed episcopal see of the Archbishop, but unlike many other fixed metropolitical sees, the incumbent is not officially known as 'Archbishop of Kampala', but bears the longer title 'Archbishop of Uganda and Bishop of Kampala'. The primary source for this section is listed in the References section below Shergold Smith and C. T. Wilson of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) were the first European Anglican missionaries to Uganda when they arrived in June
    6.00
    2 votes
    19
    Old Saint Paul's

    Old Saint Paul's

    Old St. Paul's is a former cathedral in the Diocese of Wellington of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia. It is an example of 19th-century Gothic Revival architecture adapted to colonial conditions and materials. It is at 34 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon, Wellington, New Zealand, close to the New Zealand Parliament. Old St. Paul's was designed by Reverend Frederick Thatcher, then vicar of St. Paul's, Thorndon. The foundation stone was laid by Sir George Grey in August 1865. The church was consecrated by Bishop Abraham on Trinity Sunday, on 27 May 1866. It is constructed entirely from New Zealand native timbers, with stunning stained glass windows. The interior has been likened to the upturned hull of an Elizabethan galleon - exposed curving trusses and kauri roof sarking. The flags displayed in the nave include the ensigns of the Royal Navy, the New Zealand Merchant Navy and the United States Marine Corps (second division), which was stationed in Wellington during World War II. The church retains close links with the New Zealand Defence Force. Some of the walls and columns of Old St. Paul's are decorated with memorial plaques, including many dedicated to those
    6.00
    2 votes
    20
    Anglican Church of Tanzania

    Anglican Church of Tanzania

    • Dioceses: The Diocese of Zanzibar
    • Geographical scope: Tanzania
    The Anglican Church of Tanzania (ACT) is a member of the Anglican Communion based in Dodoma. It consists of 26 dioceses (25 on the Tanzanian mainland, and 1 on Zanzibar) headed by their respective bishops. It seceded from the Province of East Africa in 1970, which it shared with Kenya. The current Archbishop is the Most Reverend Dr. Valentino Mokiwa, the Bishop of the Diocese of Dar es Salaam. The Church became part of the Province of East Africa in 1960. From 1970 until 1997, then was known as the Church of the Province of Tanzania. Today it is known as the Anglican Church of Tanzania or ACT. The church was founded originally as the Diocese of Eastern Equatorial Africa (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania) in 1884, with James Hannington as the first bishop; however, Anglican missionary activity had been present in the area since the Universities' Mission to Central Africa and the Church Missionary Society began their work in 1864 and 1878 at Mpwapwa. In 1898, the diocese was split into two, with the new diocese of Mombasa governing Kenya and northern Tanzania (the other diocese later became the Church of Uganda); northern Tanzania was separated from the diocese in 1927. In 1955, the diocese's
    8.00
    1 votes
    21
    Sheng Kung Hui

    Sheng Kung Hui

    The Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui (abbreviated SKH), also known as the Hong Kong Anglican Church (Episcopal), is the Anglican Church in Hong Kong and Macau. It is the 38th Province of the Anglican Communion. It is also one of the major denominations in Hong Kong. The Most Rev. Dr. Paul Kwong is the current Archbishop and Primate of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui and Bishop of the Diocese of Hong Kong Island with his seat at St. John's Cathedral. The Rt. Rev. Dr. Thomas Soo is Bishop of the Diocese of Western Kowloon, and also the chairman of Hong Kong Christian Council and the Board of the Hong Kong Bible Society. The Anglican Church is a global family and a fellowship of churches which trace their roots to the Church of England, with a province being a basic autonomous unit. There are presently 38 independent and self-governing provinces spanning over 160 countries. With well over 100 million members, The Holy Anglican Communion is the third largest church in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches. In the Anglican Communion, there is no central governing authority. Churches uphold and proclaim the Catholic and Apostolic faith. The front-line unit of
    5.50
    2 votes
    22
    Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil

    Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil

    The Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil (Portuguese: Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil) is an ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion that covers Brazil. Originally under the metropolitcal supervision of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil became an independent province in 1965 and consists of a single metropolitical province, so that one bishop serves as both Metropolitan and Primate. In this role he uses the style of "The Most Reverend", but does not have the usual title of "Archbishop", being known by the alternative title of "Bishop Primate" (Bispo Primaz). The Bishops Primate have been: A substantial proportion of the priests of the province are women, but all the bishops are men. The president of the House of Clergy and Laity for the first time is a lay woman mrs Selma, who was elected at the General Synod for a three year term. The General Secretary of the Church is the Reverend Arthur Cavalcante, also appointed at the General Synod for a three year term. Anglican ministry in Brazil began as a number of chaplaincies catering for expatriate Anglicans in 1810. The first known parish was settled in Nova Lima, State of Minas Gerais
    7.00
    1 votes
    23
    Episcopal Church in the United States of America

    Episcopal Church in the United States of America

    The Episcopal Church (also officially known as the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America) is a mainline Anglican Christian church found mainly in the United States, as well as in Honduras, Taiwan, Colombia, Ecuador, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, the British Virgin Islands and parts of Europe. The Episcopal Church is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and many other territories where it has a presence (excluding Europe). The Episcopal Church describes itself as being "Protestant, yet Catholic." In 2010, the Episcopal Church had a baptized membership of 2,125,012 both inside and outside the United States. In the U.S., it had a baptized membership of 1,951,907, making it the nation's 14th largest denomination. The Church was organized shortly after the American Revolution when it was forced to separate from the Church of England, as Church of England clergy were required to swear allegiance to the British monarch, who is the Supreme Governor of the Church of England. It became, in the words of the 1990 report of the Archbishop of Canterbury's Group on the Episcopate, "the first Anglican Province outside the British Isles." Now
    5.00
    1 votes
    24
    Christ's Church of the Valley

    Christ's Church of the Valley

    Christ's Church of the Valley (CCV) is a Christian Non-Denominational megachurch located in Peoria, Arizona, found in northwestern Maricopa County. The church was founded in 1982 by senior pastor Dr. Donald Wilson. Weekend church attendance exceeds 15,000, making it the largest non-denominational church in Arizona and the 16th largest church in the United States. The church currently employs over 100 full-time and part-time staff members. CCV is a church that believes that life is an adventure. They are not about mere religion or a specific denomination; they are about introducing people to the adventure that a life with Christ can bring, and then challenging and encouraging them to live a life of significance.

 Whether people have never been to church, been hundreds of times, or are somewhere in between, this church invites everyone to get to know CCV and, more importantly, to get to know Christ. CCV is ONE church with multiple locations. Christ's Church of the Valley was founded by Dr. Don Wilson in 1982 with services held in a rented movie theatre. Since that time, Christ’s Church of the Valley has held services in an elementary school, a strip mall, and a building known as
    4.00
    1 votes
    25

    St giles

    The church, with its chapel of the Holy Innocents, was dedicated by Ralph, Bishop of Rochester at some time during his period of office, 1108 - 1115.
    4.00
    1 votes
    26
    St Nicholas' Church, Worth

    St Nicholas' Church, Worth

    St Nicholas Church is a Church of England parish church in Worth, a village in Crawley, England. At one time it had the largest geographical parish in England. The church is of Saxon origin, and parts of it probably date to between AD 950 and 1050. It was built in what at the time was a forest. The reason for building a church here is unknown, but the area may have had good hunting grounds, and royal or noble visitors to the grounds would need a place to pray in comfort. As it was a large church isolated in the forest, it is unlikely it was just for local needs. After the Norman conquest of England in 1066, William the Conqueror gave the church to his son-in-law William de Warenne, whose coat of arms is still visible in the stained glass windows of the church. In the 14th century the church was passed from the de Warrenne family to the Fitzalan family, who lost it in 1415 to Nevills, Earl of Abergavenny. The tower, with its broached and shingled spire, was added in 1871 by Anthony Salvin. In 1986 workmen were treating roof timbers of the church for protection against vermin when a fire broke out. The fire brigade quickly put out the blaze, saving the main building, but the roof
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