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Best American Civil War Military Unit of All Time

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    1
    8.29
    7 votes
    2

    32nd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 32nd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. On Dec. 27, 1861, Alexander McKinstry of Mobile, Alabama wrote the Confederate States War Department requesting authority to raise a regiment. His offer to Secretary of War James Seddon included a proposal to arm each enlisted man in his regiment with a Bowie knife and a pike. At the time McKinstry already held a commission as Colonel, 48th Alabama Militia Regiment, based in Mobile County, Alabama. As an officer of militia, on Feb. 18, 1862, McKinstry purchased 854 uniform jackets and pants, 677 pair of shoes, plus shirts, great coats and flannel drawers. The Confederate Government later reimbursed the state for this clothing, suggesting that officers and men of McKinstry's 32nd Alabama Regiment received it. The regiment entered Confederate service at Camp Goodwin, near Mobile, Alabama, Apr. 18, 1862. Companies and Their Captains On Nov. 23, 1863, this regiment and the 58th Regiment Alabama Infantry were consolidated to form the 32nd and 58th (Consolidated) Alabama Infantry Regiment. Abstract of the Field Return, Army of Mobile, Mar. 31, 1862. 16
    7.71
    7 votes
    3

    1st Battalion of Native Cavalry, California Volunteers

    • Unit size designation: Battalion
    The 1st Battalion of Native Cavalry, California Volunteers was a cavalry battalion in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Recruits were largely drawn from the Californio population (colloquially known as "Native Californians"), though its ranks included Yaqui and Mission Indians as well as immigrants from Mexico, Latin America and Europe (particularly France). In addition to its ethnic makeup, the Battalion is also considered unusual for being one of the few lancer units in the United States Army. The Battalion spent its entire term of service in California and Arizona Territory. After a grueling march across the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts, the Battalion arrived at their new duty station, Fort Mason, near the settlement of Calabazas on the border in August, 1865. They were joined there by Companies D, E, and G of the 7th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry. From there, the Battalion was to act against the Apaches as well as patrol the International Line against incursions by the forces of the Mexican Empire and its French allies. The neighboring Mexican State of Sonora had recently fallen to Imperial forces (as part of the French Intervention), forcing Governor Ignacio
    9.80
    5 votes
    4
    8.00
    6 votes
    5

    22nd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 22nd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. This regiment was organized at Montgomery, Alabama November, 1861, and armed by private enterprise. It first served in Mobile, Alabama; from there it was ordered to Corinth, Mississippi and reached Tennessee in time for the Battle of Shiloh, where it suffered severe loss. It fought at Munfordville, 14 to 16 September 1862; at Perryville, 8 October, and at Murfreesboro, 31 December to 2 January 1863. It took a very brilliant part in the impetuous assault on Rosecrans' army at the Battle of Chickamauga, 20 September, and suffered severely, losing almost two-thirds of its forces, the killed including five color-bearers. It served in the campaign in Georgia, losing heavily in the battles around Atlanta, Georgia July, 1864, and at Jonesboro, 31 August and 1 September. It was also distinguished at Franklin, 30 November; at Nashville, 15th and 16 December; at Kinston, North Carolina, 14 March 1865, and at Bentonville, 19th to 21 March. In April it was consolidated with the Twenty-fifth, Thirty-ninth and Fiftieth, under Colonel Toulmin. Colonel John C.
    8.80
    5 votes
    6

    42nd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 42nd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.43
    7 votes
    7

    1st Regiment Alabama Volunteer Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st (First) Alabama Volunteer Cavalry Regiment served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 1st (First) Alabama Cavalry was raised at Montgomery, Alabama, in November 1861. Ordered to Tennessee, the regiment fought at the Battle of Shiloh in April of 1862. It then fought at the Battle of Boonville, Mississippi and Blackland. In Kentucky with General Joseph Wheeler, it was engaged at the Battle of Perryville in October of 1862. Returning to middle Tennessee, the regiment lost many men at the Second Battle of Murfreesboro, Battle of Stones River in December of 1862 and January of 1863. On the retreat to Tullahoma and Chattanooga, it again lost many men at Duck River. In September of 1863, the regiment fought at the Battle of Chickamauga. In east Tennessee with Longstreet, it fought at Clinton, Knoxville, and Mossy Creek. It was part of the force on the Sequatchee raid, fought at Dandridge. During Sherman's Atlanta Campaign, the regiment harassed the enemy. Again, in Tennessee, it fought at Waynesboro, and at Fiddler's Pond. http://www.civilwararchive.com/Confedreg/confalcav.htm. Then, it fought at Kilpatrick, Averysboro, and Bentonville. 1st Regiment Alabama
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    7.00
    6 votes
    9

    2nd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.83
    6 votes
    10

    1st Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Regiment Alabama Infantry (African Descent) was an infantry regiment recruited from African-Americans that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 1st Infantry was raised at Corinth, Mississippi on May 21, 1863 after Federal troops occupied the area. The regiment was redesignated the 55th U.S. Regiment Colored Troops on March 11, 1864.
    7.80
    5 votes
    11

    6th Georgia Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 6th Georgia Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It was organized at Macon, Georgia, in April 1861. Future governor of Georgia, Alfred H. Colquitt, was elected its first colonel. The regiment fought in the Battle of Fredericksburg, the Battle of Antietam and participated in Stonewall Jackson's flank attack at the Battle of Chancellorsville. The unit later saw action at battery Wagner near Charleston, South Carolina, and the battle of Olustee near Ocean Pond, Florida. The remnants and survivors of the regiment surrendered at Greenboro, North Carolina on April 26, 1865, to forces under the command of William T. Sherman.
    7.80
    5 votes
    12

    5th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 5th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States, attached to the Department of the Pacific and Department of New Mexico.
    6.67
    6 votes
    13

    1st Dakota Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Battalion
    The 1st Dakota Cavalry was a Union battalion of two companies raised in the Dakota Territory during the American Civil War. They were used for service along the frontier, primarily to protect the settlers during the Sioux Uprising of 1862. By order of the War Department, organization of a cavalry unit was begun in the winter of 1861-2, with recruiting stations established at Yankton, Vermillion, and Bon Homme. At Yankton, with Captain Nelson Miner commanding, the 98 men of Company A were mustered into service on 19 Apr 1862. They first were stationed at Fort Randall under Lt Col Pattee of the 7th Iowa Cavalry, but detachments of the company were afterward sent to protect the settlements at Yankton, Vermillion, Sioux Falls and Brule Creek. Upon the commencement of the August 1862 uprising, Company A escorted the settlers as they moved to protective stockades.Governor William Jayne also called for "every able-bodied man to arms in defense of the homes of Dakota", with 399 men responding. At this time Captain Alpheus G Fuller, an early settler in the territory, began raising a cavalry militia in Bon Homme and Charles Mix counties, the "Miltia Brigade of Dakota". Failing to form a
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    2nd Maryland Cavalry, CSA

    2nd Maryland Cavalry, CSA

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Maryland Cavalry, a.k.a. Gilmor's Partisan Rangers, was a Confederate unit in the American Civil War. The unit was founded and commanded by Colonel Harry Gilmor. Gilmor was a member of the Towson Guards (a.k.a. Baltimore Horse Guards), when the Civil War started. Due to his political views, he was taken prisoner by the U.S. Federal government and imprisoned at Fort McHenry. After he was released, he went to the Shenandoah Valley to join the Confederate Army. He served as a scout for Colonel Turner Ashby, General J. E. B. Stuart's predecessor. Gilmor joined as a Private, but was quickly promoted to Sergeant Major. In March, 1862, he had raised his own company, which was attached to the 12th Virginia Cavalry. Gilmor served with General Stonewall Jackson at McDowell County, West Virginia in May 1862. Gilmor's Cavalry Company spent the next three months scouting, serving as couriers and harassing enemy camps and trains. In September 1862, Harry Gilmor was with General Jackson when he crossed the Potomac River into Maryland. While in Maryland, Gilmor went on "French leave", to see his family in Towson, Maryland, just north of Baltimore. While en route to his family home, Glen
    6.50
    6 votes
    15
    6.50
    6 votes
    16
    15th (Josey's) Arkansas Volunteer Infantry

    15th (Josey's) Arkansas Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 15th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The unit was originally formed from existing militia units and designated as the 1st Regiment, Arkansas State Troops. After being transferred from state service to Confederate service the unit was redesignated as the 15th Arkansas. There were two other regiments which also received the designation of "15th Arkansas". The 21st (McRae's) Arkansas Infantry was redesignatedConfederate States of America| the 15th Arkansas in February 1863, but to avoid confusion, was normally referred to as the 15th (Northwest) Arkansas. This second "15th Arkansas" was surrendered at Vicksburg in July 1863. A third regiment, under command of Colonels Gee and later Johnson, also received the designation 15th Arkansas Infantry. This last regiment surrendered at Port Hudson, Louisiana in July 1863. At the beginning of the American Civil War, Arkansas organized a total of 48 infantry regiments for service with the Confederate Army. Most, like the 15th Arkansas, served the majority of the war in the "Western Theater". The 1st Regiment, Arkansas State Troops, was organized from existing
    7.40
    5 votes
    17

    1st Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    • Conflict(s) participated in: Battle of Santa Rosa Island
    The 1st Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.40
    5 votes
    18

    19th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 19th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 19th Alabama was formed in Huntsville, Alabama on August 14, 1861. The unit fought in the battle of Shiloh on April 6 and 7 1862. The regiment surrendered at Salisbury, North Carolina at the end of the war.
    8.50
    4 votes
    19

    Ahl's Heavy Artillery Company

    • Unit size designation: Company (military unit)
    Ahl's Independent Company, Heavy Artillery (officially known as the 1st Delaware Heavy Artillery) was a heavy artillery battery that served in the Union army in the American Civil War. The company was mainly composed of former Confederate prisoners of war who had sworn allegiance to the Union (over 200 so-called "galvanized Yankees"). The company (Delaware's only heavy artillery company during the war) was organized at Fort Delaware on July 27, 1863, not long after the Battle of Gettysburg. The company was assigned to garrison and guard duty at Fort Delaware during their entire period of service. Its commander was Capt. George W. Ahl, and nearly all the officers had come to the fort with Independent Battery G, Pittsburgh Heavy Artillery. The company mustered out on July 25, 1865.
    8.50
    4 votes
    20

    3rd Regiment Alabama Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 3rd Regiment Alabama Cavalry was a cavalry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.20
    5 votes
    21

    48th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 48th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.20
    5 votes
    22

    41st Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 41st Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    8.25
    4 votes
    23

    17th (Griffith's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 17th Arkansas Infantry (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The unit became split during the transfer of General Earl Van Dorn's Army of the West to Corinth, Mississippi in April 1862. The portion of the unit that was transfered east of the Mississippi River was eventually consolidated and became part of the 11th and 17th Consolidated Arkansas Infantry Regiment. The portion of the unit which remained in Arkansas was reorganized as the 35th Arkansas Infantry Regiment. The unit, originally known as the 17th (Rector's) Infantry Regiment, was organized at Fort Smith, Arkansas, on 17 November 1861. The men elected Frank A. Rector, who would later command the 35th Arkansas Infantry Regiment, colonel of the regiment. The other regimental officers were: The regiment consisted of eight companies, which were drawn mostly from Sebastian County and the surrounding area. The unit was composed of volunteer companies from the following counties: The regiment's first major action was the Battle of Pea Ridge in March 1862, where, from most accounts, Rector's regiment did not acquit itself well. A Missouri (Confederate) artillery battery found the
    9.33
    3 votes
    24

    20th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 20th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    4th United States Colored Infantry Regiment

    4th United States Colored Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th United States Colored Infantry Regiment was an African American unit of the Union Army during the American Civil War. A part of the United States Colored Troops, the regiment saw action in Virginia and North Carolina, taking part in the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign, the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, North Carolina, and the Carolinas Campaign. Organized at Baltimore, Maryland from July 15 to September 1, 1863, the 4th Regiment was first sent to Fort Monroe, Virginia, on October 1 before moving to Yorktown, Virginia. As part of the XVIII Corps, the unit participated in several expeditions and engagements: an expedition to Mathews County from October 4 to October 9, 1863, Wistar's Expedition against Richmond from February 6 to February 8, 1864, action at New Kent Court House on February 8, an expedition to Bottom's Bridge in aid of Brigadier General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick's cavalry from March 1 to March 4, an expedition into King and Queen County from March 9 to March 12, and an expedition into Mathews and Middlesex Counties from March 17 to March 21. In May 1864, the 4th left Yorktown and took part in Brigadier General Benjamin F. Butler's operations on the south
    9.33
    3 votes
    26

    61st Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 61st Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    9.33
    3 votes
    27
    Atlantic Blockading Squadron

    Atlantic Blockading Squadron

    • Unit size designation: Squadron
    The Atlantic Blockading Squadron was a unit of the United States Navy created in the early days of the American Civil War to enforce a blockade of the ports of the Confederate States. It was formed in 1861 and split up the same year for the creation of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron and the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Following President Abraham Lincoln’s proclamation of a blockade of Southern ports on April 19, 1861 the Navy Department found it necessary to subdivide the territory assigned to the Home Squadron. This resulted in the creation of the Coast Blockading Squadron and the Gulf Blockading Squadron in early May 1861. In orders sent on May 1, 1861 Secretary of the Navy Gideon Wells appointed Flag Officer Silas H. Stringham to command the Coast Blockading Squadron. Stringham received this order and took command on May 4, 1861. His new command was to be headquartered at Hampton Roads, Virginia and was given responsibility for the blockading of the coast from the capes of the Chesapeake to the southern extremity of Florida and Key West. On May 17, 1861 the Coast Blockading Squadron was re-designated the Atlantic Blockading Squadron. On September 16, 1861
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    6.80
    5 votes
    30

    34th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 34th Arkansas Infantry (1862–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The regiment was originally designated by the state military board as the 2nd Regiment, Northwest Division, District of Arkansas. Immediately following the Battle of Pea Ridge, General P. G. T. Beauregard, acting for General Albert S. Johnston, ordered General Earl Van Dorn to bring his Army of the West to Corinth, Mississippi, to join Johnston's force for an attack on the Union Army at Shiloh, Tennessee. Additionally General Van Dorn moved all the supplies he could, including the machinery and stores at the Little Rock Arsenal, to northern Mississippi with him, and left few men behind. However, due to bad roads Van Dorn failed to reach Corinth until a week after the Battle of Shiloh. Meanwhile, in the aftermath of the Battle of Pea Ridge, Northwest Arkansas was ravaged by the Union Army invaders until General Curtis moved his army southeast to Batesville, Arkansas in May 1862. Arkansas Governor Henry Massey Rector issued an address on May 5, 1862, calling for the formation of 30 new infantry companies and 20 new cavalry companies. Most of the state's militia regiments had
    6.80
    5 votes
    31

    4th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    7.75
    4 votes
    34

    35th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 35th Arkansas Infantry (1862–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The unit was originally organized as 17th (Griffiths) Arkansas Infantry Regiment and later reorganized as the 35th Arkansas. The unit was finally reorganized as the 22nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment. 35th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was organized during the summer of 1862 and later redesignated as the 22nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment. It was organized from remnants of the 17th (Griffiths) Arkansas Infantry Regiment and former Militia members who enlisted in the summer of 1862. It was also known as the 1st (Rector's War Regiment) Arkansas Infantry. The unit was placed in Fagan's and A. T. Hawthorne's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department. Its commanding officers were Colonels Frank Rector, James P. King and Henry J. McCord, Lieutenant Colonel John W. Wallace, and Majors John J. Dillard and Mark T. Tatum. Under the command of Colonel James P. King, the 35th Arkansas fought at the Battle of Bayou Fourche and the Battle of Helena where it reported 75 casualties. Later, under the command of Colonel Henry J. McCord, the unit saw action at the Battle of Jenkins' Ferry.
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    7.75
    4 votes
    36

    1st Colorado Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Colorado Cavalry was formed in 1862 by Territorial Governor John Evans, composed mostly of members of the 1st Colorado Infantry and of C and D Companies of the 2nd Colorado Infantry. It was formed both to protect Colorado against incursions from the Confederate forces and to fight the Native Americans who already inhabited the area. Command of this unit was given Colonel John Chivington, who had distinguished himself at the Battle of Glorietta Pass in the New Mexico Territory early in 1862, against Confederate forces. The 1st Colorado Cavalry would go on under Chivington to perpetrate one of the most shameful slaughters of American Indians in history, the Sand Creek Massacre. In early 1864, the 1st Colorado Veteran Volunteers (aka the Veterans Battalion) appears to have initiated the Colorado War by attacking Cheyenne Indians at Fremont's Orchard. The resulting hostilities and Indian retaliations brought traffic on the wagon trails into Denver to a standstill. Peace negotiations were in progress, and encampments of Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians on Sand Creek had been assured by the US Government that they would not be attacked. Instead, in what is known as the Sand Creek
    6.60
    5 votes
    37

    3rd Regiment California Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 3rd Regiment California Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. This regiment was organized at Stockton and at Benicia Barracks, from October 31 to December 31, 1861, to serve three years. The regiment was first commanded by Colonel Patrick Edward Connor. After the formation of the regiment at Stockton, four companies were sent to Humboldt County during the month of November, 1861. During the month of July, 1862, Colonel Connor was sent, with his regiment, to the District of Utah, in which it was on duty for the balance of its term of service. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States. Its largest engagement was the Bear River Massacre or Battle of Bear River on January 29, 1863 in southeastern Washington Territory (present-day Franklin County, Idaho). On the expiration of its term of service, the original members of the regiment (except veterans) were mustered out, and the veterans and new recruits were consolidated into a battalion of four companies on October 29, 1864, and was afterwards known as the Third Battalion of Infantry, comprising companies, A, B, C, and D. On December 9, 1865, Companies C
    6.60
    5 votes
    38
    5.67
    6 votes
    39

    6th Regiment Alabama Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 6th Alabama Cavalry was organized near Pine Level early in 1863, This regiment was part of a brigade commanded by Brigadier-General James Holt Clanton (1827–1871), a Montgomery attorney that had served as a U.S. Army private in the Mexican War during 1848. In November 1861 Clanton had raised and commanded the 1st Alabama Cavalry as a Colonel, a regiment that served with distinction at the bloody Battle of Shiloh (April 1862). Clanton's new brigade included not only the 6th but also the 7th Alabama Cavalry, the 61st and 57th Alabama Infantry, and two batteries of artillery. First posted to the south Alabama town of Pollard, Clanton and his brigade were ordered to north Alabama in February 1864. They would be headquartered at Gadsden in Etowah County on the east bank of the Coosa River with their mission being to protect the coal and iron sections in that area, protect the public works at Selma, and to organize and complete the 8th Alabama Cavalry. By this time the 6th Cavalry had already moved to Meridian, MS but was ordered to rejoin Clanton in Gadsden. The 6th was subsequently involved in several skirmishes with elements of the 15th and 16th U.S. Army Corps near Decatur,
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    8.67
    3 votes
    41

    2nd Regiment Arkansas Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment Arkansas Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War.
    8.67
    3 votes
    42

    14th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 14th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 14th Alabama was mustered in at Richmond, Virginia on August 1, 1861. The regiment surrendered at Appomattox Court House. The 14th mustered 1,317 men during its existence. It suffered approximately 250 killed in action or mortally wounded and 350 men who died of disease, for a total of approximately 600 fatalities. An additional 159 men were discharged or transferred from the regiment.
    7.25
    4 votes
    43

    25th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 25th Arkansas Infantry (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The unit was originally organized as Turnbull's 11th Arkansas Infantry Battalion. Upon being increased by the required number of companies the battalion was organized as the 30th Arkansas Infantry Regiment but was later redesignated as the 25th Arkansas Infantry. There were two regiments officially designated as the 30th Arkansas Infantry. The other "30th Arkansas" served west of the Mississippi River, in the Department of the Trans-Mississippi and was also known as 5th Trans-Mississippi Regiment or the 39th Arkansas or Rogan's Arkansas Cavalry during Price's 1864 Missouri Expedition. The 25th Arkansas Infantry was organized as the 30th Arkansas Infantry Regiment on June 18, 1862, when the 11th Battalion Arkansas Infantry was increased to a regiment. Turnbull's battalion is mentioned as a part of a group of units belonging to the "White River forces" under the command of Colonel James H. McCarver of the 14th Arkansas at Pocahontas, Arkansas on March 31, 1862. The unit is described in a "morning report" of that date as a temporary battalion under the command of Captain
    7.25
    4 votes
    44

    44th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 44th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.25
    4 votes
    45

    51st Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 51st Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    12th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    12th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    The 12th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union army during the American Civil War. It was formed on June 14, 1861 in Boston, Massachusetts. Its original commander was Colonel Fletcher Webster, son of the famed U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, Daniel Webster. The unit was known as the "Webster Regiment" after its first colonel. Col. Webster began recruiting in April 1861 shortly after the attack on Fort Sumter. At that time, most recruits in Massachusetts were used to fill up the ranks in the existing state militia regiments, therefore it was several weeks before Webster had managed to recruit a full regiment. The unit was trained at Fort Warren in Boston harbor. On July 19, 1861, the regiment was reviewed by Governor John Albion Andrew on Boston Common and presented with its colors. On July 23, the 12th Massachusetts departed Boston for the war front. The regiment was first assigned to the Army of the Shenandoah under the command of Major General Nathaniel P. Banks. Until the spring of 1862, the regiment was employed in uneventful picket duty in the vicinity of Frederick, Maryland. In late February, the 12th Massachusetts, as part of
    8.33
    3 votes
    47

    21st Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 21st Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    21st Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    21st Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 21st Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was organized in Worcester, Massachusetts and mustered into service on August 23, 1861. After garrison duty at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, the regiment served with the Coast Division commanded by Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside. The Coast Division was deployed in January 1862 for operations on the coast of North Carolina, and participated in the Battle of Roanoke Island and the Battle of New Bern among other engagements. Burnside's division was recalled to Virginia in July 1862. The 21st Massachusetts was then attached to the Army of the Potomac and participated in several of the largest battles of the Civil War, including the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Antietam, and the Battle of Fredericksburg. The most devastating engagement of the war for the 21st was the Battle of Chantilly, fought on September 1, 1862, during which the unit suffered 35 percent casualties. From March 1863 to January 1864, the 21st served with Burnside in the Department of the Ohio, seeing action in Kentucky and eastern Tennessee. In May 1864, the
    8.33
    3 votes
    49

    7th Regiment Georgia Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Regiment Georgia Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized on May, 1861 in Atlanta, Georgia.
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    8.33
    3 votes
    51

    4th Regiment Georgia Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th Regiment Georgia Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in April 1861.
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    1st Maryland Cavalry, CSA

    1st Maryland Cavalry, CSA

    The 1st Maryland Cavalry, was a volunteer Confederate unit in the American Civil War, part of the Maryland Line (CSA). The history of the 1st Maryland Cavalry begins with the decision of 18 members of Company K, 1st Virginia Cavalry not to re-enlist on May 15, 1862, after serving a year in the Confederate Army. Company K was predominantly Marylanders and had served with Stuart's 1st Virginia almost from the outset of the war. These men believed that Maryland should have its own Cavalry Regiment and so they set out to raise it. Recruiting was brisk, and Company A was quickly formed with Captain Ridgely Brown at its helm. Company A would provide the nucleus around which the regiment would be built, but it would have to be built in the field. Company A was ordered to the Valley and attached to Colonel Munford's 2nd Virginia until a full battalion of cavalry could be raised. The 1st Maryland's initial history is one and the same as the 2nd Virginia's. It participated in Jackson's Valley Campaign, distinguishing itself at Harrisonburg against the 1st New Jersey Cavalry. It supported the 1st Maryland Infantry at Cross Keys, was with Jackson at Richmond, Manassas, and Antietam. Gradually
    7.00
    4 votes
    53

    1st Regiment of California Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Regiment California Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States. Most of the 1st California was recruited from August to October 1861, with the exception of Company K, which was organized the following February. Many of its companies were formed from companies of the California Militia taken intact into federal service others from individuals drawn from the militia. James H. Carleton served as colonel, Joseph R. West as lieutenant colonel and Edwin A. Rigg as major. It came under the command of the Department of the Pacific (later it would come under the Department of New Mexico). After some training at Camp Downy near Oakland and Camp Latham near Los Angeles. Companies D, F and G were sent to establish and garrison Camp Wright, in November 1861. Detachments from the camp captured Daniel Showalter's party near Warner's Ranch, November 20-29, 1861. In December, 1861, five companies of the regiment were sent to Fort Yuma on the Colorado River and the others to various posts around Southern California. The regiment was assigned to a force called the California
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment was a regiment of the United States Army during the American Civil War, most famous for its defense of Little Round Top at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1863. The 20th Maine was organized in the state of Maine on August 20, 1862, with Col. Adelbert Ames as its commander. It became part of Col. Strong Vincent's Brigade of the 1st Division of the V Corps of the Army of the Potomac. The brigade consisted of the 16th Michigan Infantry (with Brady's independent company of sharpshooters attached), 44th New York Infantry, 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry, and the 20th Maine Infantry Regiments. At Gettysburg, the regiment was commanded by Col. Joshua L. Chamberlain. Maj. Ellis Spear took command after Chamberlain was appointed brigade commander in August 1863. The regiment served at Antietam (held in reserve), Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville The soldiers were quarantined in the rear area due to illness from a tainted small pox vaccine that they had been ordered to have. Other battles included Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Totopotomoy and Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Five Forks, and
    7.00
    4 votes
    55

    2nd Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment Alabama Infantry (African Descent) was an infantry regiment recruited from African-Americans that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 2nd Infantry was raised at Pulaski, Tennessee on November 20, 1863. The regiment was redesignated the 110th U.S. Regiment Colored Troops on June 25, 1864.
    7.00
    4 votes
    56

    2nd Colorado Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment Colorado Cavalry was a cavalry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 2nd Colorado Cavalry was organized at St. Louis, Missouri by consolidation of the 2nd Colorado Infantry and 3rd Colorado Infantry to date from October 1863 under the command of Colonel James Hobart Ford. The regiment was attached to District of Southeast Missouri, Department of Missouri, to December 1863. District of St. Louis, Missouri, Department of Missouri, to January 1864. District of Central Missouri, Department of the Missouri, to December 1864. District of the Upper Arkansas to September 1865. The 2nd Colorado Cavalry mustered out of service at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas on September 23, 1865. The regiment was organized at Benton Barracks, Missouri, until January 1863. Since January 1863, Companies F, G, H, and K were on duty in the Colorado Territory at Fort Lyon and other areas until November 26, 1863. From Fort Lyon they stayed at Fort Riley, Kansas between November 26 and December 25, 1863. They marched to Kansas City, Missouri, reaching Kansas City on January 6, 1864. They went through Kansas City to Dresden January 16, 1864. After staying at Dresden
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    30th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 30th Regiment Connecticut Infantry was a volunteer infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 30th Regiment was composed of African American troops, and on May 18, 1864, the regiment was consolidated with the 31st United States Colored Troops.
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Army of the Potomac

    Army of the Potomac

    • Unit size designation: Field army
    • Conflict(s) participated in: Battle of Chancellorsville
    The Army of the Potomac was the major Union Army in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War. The Army of the Potomac was created in 1861, but was then only the size of a corps (relative to the size of Union armies later in the war). Its nucleus was called the Army of Northeastern Virginia, under Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell, and it was the army that fought (and lost) the war's first major battle, the First Battle of Bull Run. The arrival in Washington, D.C., of Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan dramatically changed the makeup of that army. McClellan's original assignment was to command the Division of the Potomac, which included the Department of Northeast Virginia under McDowell and the Department of Washington under Brig. Gen. Joseph K. Mansfield. On July 26, 1861, the Department of the Shenandoah, commanded by Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, was merged with McClellan's departments and on that day, McClellan formed the Army of the Potomac, which was composed of all military forces in the former Departments of Northeastern Virginia, Washington, Baltimore, and the Shenandoah. The men under Banks's command became an infantry division in the Army of the Potomac. The army started with
    7.00
    4 votes
    59

    2nd Florida Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    An integral part of the 2nd Florida Regiment, the 2nd Florida was organized in April and July 1861 and mustered into Confederate service for 12 months near Jacksonville, Florida on July 13, 1861. It was reorganized on May 11, 1862. Assignments for the 2nd were:
    8.00
    3 votes
    60

    33rd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 33rd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    8.00
    3 votes
    61

    35th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 35th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    8.00
    3 votes
    62

    40th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 40th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    22nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    22nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 22nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union army during the American Civil War. The 22nd Massachusetts was organized by Senator Henry Wilson (future Vice-President during the Ulysses Grant administration) and was therefore known as "Henry Wilson's Regiment." It was formed in Boston, Massachusetts, and established on September 28, 1861, for a term of three years. Arriving in Washington in October 1861, the regiment spent the following winter in camp at Hall's Hill, near Arlington in Virginia. It became part of the Army of the Potomac, with which it would be associated for its entire term of service. The regiment saw its first action during the Siege of Yorktown in April 1862. It was involved in the Peninsular Campaign, particularly the Battle of Gaines' Mill during which it suffered its worst casualties (numerically) of the war. Their worst casualties in terms of percentages took place during the Battle of Gettysburg (60 percent). The 22nd Massachusetts was present for virtually all of the major battles in which the Army of the Potomac fought, including the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Antietam, the Battle of Fredericksburg,
    6.75
    4 votes
    65

    7th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Because it was in the same brigade as the 7th New Hampshire Volunteer Regiment, both regiments were often jointly called the '77th New England'. The regiment was organized at New Haven, Connecticut on September 13, 1861. It mustered out on July 20, 1865, and discharged at New Haven, Connecticut on August 11, 1865. In October and November of 1863, the regiment's status changed. It was equipped as a "boat infantry" for the specific purpose of leading an amphibious night assault on Fort Sumter, South Carolina. Although the 7th trained at Folly Island, South Carolina, the project was ultimately ended because it was deemed impractical. The Regiment, which numbered 1000 men, lost during service 11 Officers and 157 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 192 Enlisted men by disease. Total 364.
    6.75
    4 votes
    66

    37th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 37th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized on the spring of 1862 in Auburn, Alabama.
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    4th Regiment Kentucky Volunteer Infantry

    4th Regiment Kentucky Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 4th Kentucky Infantry was organized at Camp Dick Robinson and mustered in for a three year enlistment on October 9, 1861 under the command of Colonel Speed Smith Fry. In February 1864, the regiment was reorganized at Lexington, Kentucky as the 4th Regiment Kentucky Mounted Infantry. The regiment was attached to Thomas' Command, Army of the Ohio, to November 1861. 2nd Brigade, Army of the Ohio, to December 1861. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Army of the Ohio, to September 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, III Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, Center, XIV Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, XIV Corps, to October 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, XIV Corps, to June 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to November 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division of Mississippi, to August 1865. The 4th Kentucky Infantry mustered out of service at Macon, Georgia on August 17, 1865. Moved to Crab Orchard, Ky., October 28, 1861, thence
    9.00
    2 votes
    68

    65th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 65th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    9th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    9th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 9th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was a military unit from Boston, Massachusetts, USA, part of the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. It is also known as "The Fighting Ninth". It existed from 1861 to 1864 and participated in several key battles during the war. The unit is an Irish heritage unit, with many volunteers having been born in Ireland. The Ninth Regiment was created on 11 June 1861 under the command of Colonel Thomas Cass in Boston recruiting primarily Irish-Americans. Initial funding for the regiment came from Patrick Donahoe, publisher of The Boston Pilot. Initially sheltered at Boston's Faneuil Hall, they later camped at Long Island in Boston Harbor. On 30 June 1861, the unit arrived in the Washington, D.C. vicinity and was welcomed by President Abraham Lincoln. They remained in the vicinity of Arlington Virginia performing picket duty and built a fort on the Potomac River called Fort Cass after their commanding officer. As a unit of the Army of the Potomac under the command of Major General George B. McClellan, the regiment moved south with the rest of the Army in pursuit of the confederate forces. On 26 June 1862 the regiment
    9.00
    2 votes
    70

    36th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 36th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (1862–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The unit, which was originally known as McRea's Emergency Regiment, was originally organized as the 28th Arkansas Infantry Regiment. Following the Battle of Prairie Grove, the regiment was reorganized and redesignated as the 36th Arkansas Infantry Regiment. The unit is also occasionally referred to as the 2nd Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment. 36th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was originally organized in June 26, 1862, as the 28th Arkansas Infantry Regiment, under the command of Colonel Dandridge McRae. The unit was originally intended as a mounted force, but was dismounted shortly after being formed along with three other newly formed mounted commands, by order of General Thomas C. Hindman. It served in the brigades of Generals McRae, L. C. Gause, and Roane in the Trans-Mississippi Department. The field officers were Colonels McRea, James M. Davie and John E. Glenn, Lieutenant Colonels W. S. Hanna and Walter C. Robinson, and Major Joseph F. Hathaway. The unit was composed of volunteer companies from the following counties: 28th Arkansas Infantry mustered by
    5.80
    5 votes
    71
    5.00
    6 votes
    72
    7.67
    3 votes
    73

    10th Connecticut Regiment Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 10th Connecticut Regiment Infantry was one of Connecticut's most successful civil war regiments, compling an exemplary record of service in the Union Army. The 10th Regiment saw action in the coastal campaign during the early years of the war, which culminated with the siege of Charleston. The 10th went on to fight the trench battles of Richmond, earning praise from Union generals and Ulysses S. Grant. The 10th was active at the war’s very end, when they blocked Robert E. Lee’s attempt to escape from Virginia. And, the 10th was present at Appomattox Court House when Lee surrendered to Grant. All told, the 10th regiment fought in twenty three battles and at least as many skirmishes. The 10th Connecticut Regiment Infantry was originally formed from the 10th Connecticut Volunteers. After the Union loss at the first Battle of Bull Run, in the summer of 1861, volunteers poured into the Union army ranks. In September, members of the 10th regiment started arriving at Camp Buckingham in Hartford. Members of the 10th regiment came from Connecticut towns large and small, including, Hartford, New Haven, Derby, Manchester, Sprague, New London, Stamford and Greenwich. After a few months at
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    10th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    10th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 10th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union army during the American Civil War. Organized at Hampden Park in Springfield, Massachusetts in the early summer of 1861 and consisting mostly of men from western Massachusetts, the regiment was mustered in on June 21, 1861. It was originally led by Colonel Henry Shaw Briggs, an attorney and prominent citizen of Pittsfield, Massachusetts.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    14th Connecticut Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 14th Connecticut Infantry (Nutmeg Regiment) was an infantry regiment that participated in the American Civil War. It participated in the Battle of Gettysburg, helping to repulse the Confederate attack on the third day known as Pickett's Charge. The 14th Connecticut was organized at Hartford, Connecticut, on August 23, 1862, and mustered into the volunteer army. The organization of the Fourteenth Regiment began under the order promulgated May 22, 1862, to furnish Connecticut's contingent of the fifty thousand men called for by the War Department at Washington to go into "Camp of Instruction" at Annapolis, Md. Recruiting for the regiment began at once, but progressed slowly until, in July, after the Union reverses on the peninsula, the President called for three hundred thousand volunteers for three years or the war, when it received a tremendous impulse and the regiment filled up rapidly, being the first one to complete its organization under that call. It was recruited from the state at large, having its rendezvous, named "Camp Foote," at Hartford. Initially, 1,015 men were mustered under the command of Colonel Dwight Morris. As an example, over the course of the war, 181 men
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    44th Regiment Indiana Infantry

    44th Regiment Indiana Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 44th Indiana Infantry, an American Civil War regiment, was organized at Fort Wayne, Indiana, on October 24, 1861, with Hugh B. Reed, a Fort Wayne druggist, as colonel, and officially mustered in on November 22, 1861. It was composed mostly of volunteers from what was then Indiana's Tenth Congressional District in the northeastern part of the state. In December, the regiment left for Henderson, Kentucky. It camped at Calhoun, Kentucky, until February 1862, when it moved to Fort Henry, Tennessee, then to Fort Donelson, Tennessee, where it participated in the siege of the fort, taking heavy casualties there. The regiment was engaged both days, April 6–7, 1862, at the Battle of Shiloh, where it suffered 33 killed and 177 wounded. It participated in the Siege of Corinth, Mississippi, and fought at Stones River, Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge. It was assigned provost (police) duty at Chattanooga, Tennessee, before being mustered out on September 14, 1865. Frederick Dyer (see references) reports that the regiment's total combat fatalities were four officers and 76 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, and nine officers and 220 enlisted men who died of disease. The Indiana
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    55th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    55th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 55th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The regiment is sometimes referred to as the Canton Rifles or the Douglas Brigade 2nd Regiment. The 55th Illinois Infantry was organized at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illinois and mustered into Federal service on October 31, 1861. Training continued at Benton Barracks, Missouri. The 55th was part of Sherman's Yazoo Expedition. The regiment was mustered out on August 14, 1865. The regiment suffered casualties including nine officers, 149 enlisted men who were killed in action, or mortally wounded, and two officers and 127 enlisted men who died of disease, for a total of 286 fatalities.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    56th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 56th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in the summer of 1863.
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    7th Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    7th Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 7th Iowa Infantry was organized at Burlington, Iowa and assembled into Federal service between July 24 and August 4, 1861. The regiment was sent out on July 12, 1865. Unit strength was 1552. The regiment lost 7 officers and 134 enlisted men who were killed in action or who died of their wounds and 4 officers and 160 enlisted men who died of disease, for a total of 305 fatalities. 354 were wounded.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Graves' Battery

    Graves' Battery

    • Unit size designation: Artillery battery
    The Graves Battery, which had 73 troops and was led by Major Rice E. Graves Jr., was a part of the First Kentucky C Company, led by General John C. Breckinridge. This company was, in turn, a component of the First Kentucky Brigade, nicknamed the "Orphan Brigade". Major Rice Evan Graves Jr., was attending the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, on a Presidential appointment recommended by the Kentucky second congressional district representative Samuel O. Peyton, when he resigned to join the Confederate Army at Camp Boone in Saint Bethlehem, Tennessee now incorporated and merged intoClarksville, Tennessee, according docucments on file at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. Graves was born in Virginia and raised nearYelvington, Kentucky, about 12 miles east of Owensboro, Kentucky on KY Hwy 144. The Fort Donelson National Battlefield, maintained by the U.S. National Park Service at Dover, Tennessee has a large section of the battlefield named in honor of Major Graves entitled "Graves Battery". Major Graves led his battery into many battles such as the Battle at Fort Donelson-in Dover, Tennessee; Fortification for the defense of Bowling
    10.00
    1 votes
    84

    1st Arkansas Consolidated Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Arkansas Consolidated Infantry (1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. This unit was created in April 1865 from the remnants of Arkansas regiments assigned in the Confederate Army of Tennessee. Another 1st Arkansas Consolidated Regiment had been formed the previous year in the Department of the Trans-Mississippi from the remnants of several Arkansas units which had been captured the at the Siege of Vicksburg and Port Hudson during the summer of 1863. The remnants of ten depleted Arkansas regiments, along with one mostly-Arkansas regiment, in the Army of Tennessee were consolidated into a single regiment at Smithfield, North Carolina, on April 9, 1865. The new regiment was commanded by Col. Edward Alexander Howell, formerly of the 5th Arkansas Infantry Regiment. The following list indicates how the former regiments were consolidated into the new unit. These regiments were so depleted that many of them had been in various field consolidations prior to this reorganization, but this represented the official end of their existence. This regiment surrendered with the Army of Tennessee at Greensboro, North Carolina, April 26, 1865 and the men
    6.50
    4 votes
    85

    2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery (originally raised as the 19th Connecticut Infantry) was a volunteer infantry regiment which served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 19th Connecticut Infantry was mustered in on July 25, 1862. L.W. Wessells was colonel and Elisha S. Kellogg lieutenant colonel. It was sent to Washington, D.C. a few weeks later. In September, Wessells resigned due to ill health and Kellogg was promoted to colonel in his place. The regiment was reorganized as a heavy artillery regiment on November 23, 1863. In May 1864, the 2nd was sent to the Army of the Potomac, where it was assigned to the Second Brigade, First Division, VI Corps. It suffered its first loss during skirmish duty along the North Anna River. The 2nd Connecticut's first battle was at Cold Harbor on June 1, 1864, where it suffered 323 men killed or wounded, including Kellogg dead with two bullets to the head. It managed to capture 300 prisoners and it briefly reach the Confederate breastworks, but Confederate fire was too heavy for the regiment to maintain its position. Hubbard declined promotion to command of the regiment, so Ranald S. Mackenzie was transferred from the engineers
    6.50
    4 votes
    86

    7th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States, attached to the Department of the Pacific, serving in California and Arizona Territory. They were known as the "Gold Diggers" in reference to the large number of recruits from the California's "Mother Lode" region. Later, they were also called the "Hungry Seventh" for the privations they suffered in Arizona, particularly at Fort Mason. The Regiment included many veterans of the Mexican–American War. While the Regiment was being organized and trained at the Presidio of San Francisco, Jonathan D. Stevenson presented them with the regimental flag of the unit he commanded in the Mexican-American War: The 7th New York Volunteers. The Regiment continued to carry this flag throughout its service, and it flew over Fort Mason during their time there. In the Spring of 1865, the Regimental Headquarters and Companies D, E, and G were assigned to Tubac, Arizona Territory. Though they were there primarily to operate against the Apaches, they were also assigned the job of reinforcing the International Line
    6.50
    4 votes
    87

    Kilcrease Light Artillery

    • Unit size designation: Company (military unit)
    The Kilcrease Light Artillery was a Confederate army artillery company. Headed by Captain Patrick Houston and Captain Frederick L. Villepigue, it was formed in Leon County, Florida in the spring of 1863 upon the dividing of the Leon Light Artillery. The Kilcrease company was assigned to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, and served at St. Johns Island, South Carolina as well as in the Battle of Natural Bridge. The Kilcrease company was also stationed in various locations in Florida. The company was included in the surrender at Tallahassee, Florida, on May 10, 1865. Villepigue had been a first lieutenant with the Leon Light Artillery and was promoted to captain of the Kilcrease company on May 26, 1863. He served with the Kilcrease Light Artillery until November 22, 1864, when he resigned his commission to become Secretary of the Confederate Senate.
    6.50
    4 votes
    88

    1st Regiment Delaware Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Regiment Delaware Volunteer Infantry was a United States volunteer infantry regiment raised for Union Army service in the American Civil War. For part of the war, it was a part of the famed Gibraltar Brigade. When the Civil War began in April 1861, there were only about 16,000 men in the U.S. Army, and many Southern soldiers and officers were already resigning and joining the new Confederate States Army. With this drastic shortage of men in the army, President Abraham Lincoln called on the states to raise a force of 75,000 men for three months to put down the insurrection in the South. Accordingly, the 1st Delaware was raised at Wilmington, Delaware on May 22, 1861 and mustered into Federal service on May 28. The regiment comprised 37 officers and 742 enlisted men under the command of Colonel Henry H. Lockwood. The regiment was attached to the command of Major General John Dix ('Dix's Command", Department of the Potomac) and assigned to duty along the line of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad. The regiment mustered out on August 30, 1861. The war proved to be longer and larger than anyone had expected, and on July 22, 1861, the United States Congress
    8.50
    2 votes
    89

    2nd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Cavalry was an Cavalry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 2nd Alabama Cavalry was raised at Montgomery, Alabama, on May 1, 1862. The regiment surrendered at Forsyth, Georgia. At the end, the regiment mustered about 450 men.
    8.50
    2 votes
    90

    4th Regiment of California Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th California Infantry was a volunteer infantry regiment recruited from northern California during the American Civil War. It was organized at Sacramento, Placerville, and Auburn in September and October 1861. Most of the recruits, caught up in war fever, expected to be sent to the eastern battlefields. They were disappointed to be instead ordered to garrison duty and related tasks on the West Coast, where they spent the remainder of their enlistments. The regiment served principally in the District of Oregon, (Oregon and Washington Territory), and in the District of Southern California. None of these duties required regimental strength, so the companies of the regiment were detached and scattered. The regiment was mustered out on April 18, 1866. A group located in western and central Oregon and northern California reenacts Company D. Companies A, B, C, D and E were sent to the Washington Territory in late 1862 and were recalled at varying times throughout 1862. One of the best documented of these detachments is that of Company D, which was sent to Fort Hoskins and Fort Yamhill in Oregon. It participated in the Expedition from Siletz Block House to Coos Bay April 21-May 12,
    8.50
    2 votes
    91

    62nd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 62nd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Orphan Brigade

    Orphan Brigade

    • Unit size designation: Brigade
    The Orphan Brigade was the nickname of the First Kentucky Brigade, a group of military units recruited from the Commonwealth of Kentucky to fight for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. The brigade was the largest Confederate unit to be recruited from Kentucky during the war. Its original commander was Major General John C. Breckinridge, former Vice President of the United States and candidate for President, who was enormously popular with Kentuckians. Units of the Orphan Brigade were involved in many military engagements in the American South during the course of the war, including the Battle of Shiloh. In 1862, Breckinridge was promoted to division command and was succeeded in the brigade by Brig. Gen. Roger W. Hanson. At the Battle of Stones River, the brigade suffered heavy casualties in an assault on January 2, 1863, including General Hanson. Breckinridge—who vehemently disputed the order to charge with the army's commander, General Braxton Bragg—rode among the survivors, crying out repeatedly, "My poor Orphans! My poor Orphans." noted brigade historian Ed Porter Thompson, who used the term in his 1868 history of the unit. The term came from how
    8.50
    2 votes
    93

    1st Battalion California Volunteer Mountaineers

    • Unit size designation: Battalion
    1st Battalion California Volunteer Mountaineers was an infantry battalion in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States, attached to the Department of the Pacific. It was organized from men from the counties of Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity, Klamath, Siskiyou, and Del Norte, and other parts of California, between May 30, 1863 and March 16, 1864, for special service in the redwood forests and mountains that was being fought over in the Bald Hills War in Humboldt County within the Humboldt Military District. The Battalion mustered out June 14, 1865. In a report to Lieut. Col. R. C. Drum, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Pacific on October 13, 1862, following the escape of Lassic and several hundred other warriors from the Smith River Reservation, Col. Francis J. Lippitt, Commander of the Humboldt Military District: Governor Stanford called for the organization of the Mountaineer Battalion on the recommodation General Wright on February 7, 1863, in the following proclamation:
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    9th Indiana Infantry Regiment

    9th Indiana Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment was a volunteer infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was organized on April 22, 1861, for three-months' service in Indianapolis. After being reorganized for three years' service in late August and early September 1861, the 9th took part in many major battles, including Shiloh, Stones River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Kennesaw Mountain and the Siege of Atlanta. The 9th was mustered out on September 28, 1865, after duty at San Antonio and New Braunfels, Texas. Governor Oliver Hazard Perry Morton appointed Robert H. Milroy as colonel of the 9th on April 26, 1861, nearly two weeks after the firing began at the Battle of Fort Sumter. By September 3, 1861, Milroy had become a brigadier general. He continued to command troops in West Virginia (as Commander of the Cheat Mountain District) into 1862. By the time the 9th was assigned to William B. Hazen's 19th Brigade of Buell's Army of the Ohio in March 1862, Colonel Gideon C. Moody, a former prosecutor and politician, commanded the regiment. Hazen called Moody "a most gallant officer." Isaac C.B. Suman, initially the captain of Company H,
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Sturgis Rifles

    Sturgis Rifles

    The Sturges' Rifles (also spelled Sturgis) was an infantry company that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The Sturges' Rifles were a company of Illinois militia sharpshooters mustered into Federal service on May 6, 1861. The company served as part of Major General George B. McClellan's headquarters bodyguard throughout his command. McClellan had been a member of the company prior to the war and outfitted them with the Sharps rifle, an expensive rifle not issued to regular infantrymen. The company was mustered out on November 25, 1862. The regiment had one enlisted man die of disease, for a total of one fatality.
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    27th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 27th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized during the winter of 1861 in St. Heinian, Tennessee.
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    6.25
    4 votes
    99

    11th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 11th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 11th Alabama was mustered in at Lynchburg, Virginia, on June 17, 1861. Some of the companies making up the regiment had been already in service for several months at the time of mustering. The regiment surrendered at Appomattox Court House. The 11th mustered 1192 men during its existence. The regiment suffered approximately 270 killed in action or mortally wounded and 200 men who died of disease, for a total of approximately 470 fatalities. An additional 170 men were discharged from the regiment and 80 were transferred to other units.
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    132nd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    132nd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 132nd Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry is an infantry regiment that first served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was among scores of regiments that were raised in the summer of 1864 as Hundred Days Men, an effort to augment existing manpower for an all-out push to end the war within 100 days. Later reactivated as the 132nd Infantry Regiment, the unit served as an active-duty regiment with the United States Army in World War I and World War II. The 132nd Illinois Infantry was organized at Chicago, Illinois, and mustered into Federal service on June 1, 1864, for a one-hundred-day enlistment. The 132nd relieved veteran troops and performed garrison duty at Paducah, Kentucky, until October 1864. The regiment was mustered out of service on October 17, 1864. The regiment suffered 12 enlisted men who died of disease, for a total of 12 fatalities. The 132nd Infantry Regiment was organized from other Illinois militia units and activated in July 1917. Assigned to the 33rd Infantry Division, it was redesignated on 12 October 1917 as the 132d Infantry Regiment. Sent overseas in May 1918, the 132nd participated in the Battle of Hamel, the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, and
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    16th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 16th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102

    2nd Arkansas Light Artillery

    2nd Arkansas Light Artillery, also referred to as the Clark County Artillery (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army artillery battery which served during the American Civil War. The battery was recruited and organized in Arkadelphia, Arkansas in May 1861, immediately following the outbreak of the war. Organized by Captain Franklin Roberts, a local watch maker and first commander of the unit, the battery was made up mostly of Clark County men, and was initially sent to the depot at Pitman's Ferry, near Pocahontas, Arkansas. Though he expected immediate deployment to operations in Kentucky, the depot's commander, Colonel Solon Borland, placed a hold on this artillery battery, opting to instead keep them at the depot to defend against a possible Union attack. It remained in this duty for two months, then was sent for service in Mississippi. The battery received little to no formal military training, learning about military movements, operations and strategy almost entirely through trial and error. Equipped as a "horse artillery" unit, the battery was fully mounted, making it extremely mobile and capable of fast movements during battle actions. For this reason, the battery became a part of
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    8th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 8th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States, serving in posts around San Francisco Bay, and on the Columbia River., attached to the Department of the Pacific.
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Army of Northern Virginia

    Army of Northern Virginia

    • Unit size designation: Field army
    • Conflict(s) participated in: Battle of Chancellorsville
    The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War, as well as the primary command structure of the Department of Northern Virginia. It was most often arrayed against the Union Army of the Potomac. Three districts were created under the Department of Northern Virginia: While the Aquia and Potomac Districts ceased to exist by the spring of 1862, the need remained for military organization in the Valley throughout the remainder of the war, and the Valley District remained in place for the duration of the war. The name Army of Northern Virginia referred to its primary area of operation, as did most Confederate States Army names at the time. The Army originated as the (Confederate) Army of the Potomac, which was organized on June 20, 1861, from all operational forces in northern Virginia. On July 20 and July 21, the Army of the Shenandoah and forces from the District of Harpers Ferry were added. Units from the Army of the Northwest were merged into the Army of the Potomac between March 14 and May 17, 1862. The Army of the Potomac was renamed Army of Northern Virginia on March 14. The Army of
    7.00
    3 votes
    105

    58th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 58th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. Increasing the 9th Battalion Alabama Infantry to ten companies by addition of Capt. John A. Avirett's "St. Clair Sharpshooters" and Capt. Samuel D. Oliver's Co. "E", 2nd Battalion Georgia Sharpshooters, the Confederate States War Department announced the 58th Alabama Regiment on Aug. 13, 1863 (S.O. 192, A.& I.G.O). The official date is usually cited as July 25, 1863, the day that Secretary of War James Seddon initialed the proposal to organize this regiment Companies and their captains - “A” of St. Clair County, Alabama, "Springville Volunteers”, Capt. George S. Markham, “B” of Fayette County, Alabama, Capt. Edward Crenshaw, “C” of Jefferson County, Alabama and St. Clair County, Alabama, Capt. Wayne E. Lee, “D” of St. Clair County, Alabama, Capt. William M. Inzer, “E” of Butler County, Alabama, “Ben Edwards Grays”, Capt. Gilbert G. Holland, “F” of Calhoun County, Alabama, Capt. Samuel D. McClellen, “G” of St. Clair County, Alabama, “Saint Clair Greys”, Capt. Sidney F. Lister, “H” of Dallas County, Alabama, Capt. Calvin L. Harrell, “I” of St. Clair
    5.20
    5 votes
    106

    28th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 28th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.00
    4 votes
    107

    2nd Regiment California Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment California Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States. Organized at San Francisco and Carson City September 2, 1861, to December 30, 1862 and attached to Department of the Pacific. The regiment was first assembled at the Presidio, San Francisco, and after completing its organization, five companies were sent to Oregon and Washington Territory, to relieve the regular troops, and two companies were sent to Santa Barbara. The troops of this regiment sent to Oregon were afterwards returned to California. It was mustered out during the month of October, 1864. On the muster out of the original regiment, in October, 1864, the veterans, together with new recruits, were again organized into a regiment. The Regiment was ordered to Arizona Territory, August 15, 1865, by the order of the Department of California. It was posted at Camp on San Pedro River from October 1865 to December 31, 1865 (later renamed Camp Grant, Arizona), until it was recalled to be mustered out at San Francisco, April 16. Company H was the last unit of the Regiment to be mustered out July
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    24th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    24th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 24th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, also known as the 1st Hecker Jaeger Regiment, was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was made up almost exclusively of German and Hungarian immigrants. It was the first unit mobilised for the war in Chicago, and was composed of many Forty-Eighters, veterans of the revolutions of 1848 in Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The 24th Illinois Infantry was organized at Chicago, Illinois and mustered into Federal service on July 8, 1861. The regiment was mustered out on August 6, 1864. The regiment suffered 3 officers and 86 enlisted men who were killed in action or who died of their wounds and 2 officers and 82 enlisted men who died of disease, for a total of 173 fatalities.
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    32nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    32nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 32nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union army during the American Civil War. The nucleus of the regiment was a battalion of six companies raised in September 1861 to garrison Fort Warren, the largest fortification in Boston harbor. The battalion was originally known as the 1st Battalion Massachusetts Infantry or the Fort Warren Battalion. The unit was transferred to the battle front following Abraham Lincoln's urgent call for troops in response to the Confederate advance on Washington during Jackson's Valley Campaign in May 1862. The Fort Warren Battalion arrived in Northern Virginia in June 1862 and, though it did not yet have a complete regimental roster of 10 companies, it then became known as the 32nd Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. In July 1862, the 32nd was assigned to the Army of the Potomac and was shipped to Fortress Monroe to join its new command at the close of the unsuccessful Peninsular Campaign. During the summer of 1862, four more companies were added to the unit and by September 3, 1862, the 32nd had a full regimental roster. The regiment took part in 30 battles overall including the Second Battle of Bull Run, the
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    2 votes
    110
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    2 votes
    111
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    9th Connecticut Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 9th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers was a volunteer infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was established in September 1861 as an Irish regiment, composed mainly of soldiers born in Ireland or first generation Irish Americans. The regiment saw action in number major battles, particularly in the Western Theater. The 9th Infantry was formed in September 1861, primarily using recruits whose terms of enlistments in Connecticut's early three-months regiments had expired. Its first field officers were relatively experienced soldiers. Colonel Thomas W. Cahill of New Haven had a number of years experience with the antebellum state militia as captain of the Emmet Guards, while Lieutenant Colonel Richard Fitzgibbons and Major Frederick Frye had both served as captains of three-month companies at the First Battle of Bull Run in July. Although recruitment at Camp English in New Haven proceeded slowly due to the lack of proper clothing and equipment, the regiment had 845 men when it left New Haven in November by rail for Camp Chase in Lowell, Massachusetts. There, the 14th was part of Brigadier General Benjamin Butler’s "New England Brigade" organized for the
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army cavalry regiment during the American Civil War. Of the Arkansas Confederate units formed during the war, only the 3rd Arkansas saw more combat action than the 1st Mounted Rifles. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Arkansas formed some 48 infantry regiments, and a number of cavalry units. With the exception of the 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment, all of the Arkansas units would sign one year enlistments, thus leading to assignments in what was referred to as the "western theater", due to most of the large scale battles being fought in the east. The 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles would sign one year enlistments, then later would sign a "three year or the duration of the war" extension. First organized in Little Rock, Arkansas on June 16, 1861, the regiment was initially commanded by Colonel Thomas J. Churchill. The regiment was composed of the following volunteer companies: The regiment was first attached to General Benjamin McCulloch's Brigade. By August, they were on the move toward Springfield, Missouri, where they first saw action in the Battle of Wilson's Creek. Following that battle, the regiment was dispatched to Indian
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
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    1 votes
    115

    25th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 25th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    29th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    29th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 29th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union army of the United States during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in December 1861 when three new companies were attached to a battalion of seven Massachusetts companies that had been in active service since May 1861. These seven companies had been recruited to fill out the 3rd Massachusetts and 4th Massachusetts regiments and had signed on for three years of service. When the 3rd and 4th Massachusetts were mustered out in July 1861, the seven companies that had signed on for three years were grouped together to form a battalion known as the Massachusetts Battalion. Finally, in December 1861, three more companies were added to their roster to form a full regiment and the unit was designated the 29th Massachusetts. The regiment took part in 29 battles and four sieges in a variety of theaters of the war. After their early service at Fortress Monroe in Virginia, the 29th was attached, in the spring of 1862, to the Army of the Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign as part of the famed Irish Brigade. The 29th had the distinction of being the only regiment of non-Irish ethnicity to
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    2nd Regiment California Volunteer Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment California Volunteer Cavalry was a cavalry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States, with most of its companies dispersed to various posts. 2nd Regiment California Volunteer Cavalry was organized under the President's second call upon the State for troops in August 1861. By October 30, 1861, the regiment was organized and mustered into the service. The companies were assembled at Camp Alert in San Francisco. After completing the organization of the regiment, and a short period for drill and discipline, the regiment was sent, by companies, to various posts within the Department of the Pacific. The final muster out of the regiment was in March, 1866.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118

    3rd Regiment Arkansas Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The3rd Regiment Arkansas Volunteer Cavalry was a cavalry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War.
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
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    1 votes
    120
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (Josey's) (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment that served during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in May 1861 under the command of Colonel Patrick Cleburne. It served throughout the war in the western theater, seeing action in the Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia campaigns. Following its depletion in numbers the regiment was consolidated several times with other Arkansas regiments, finally merging in 1865 into the 1st Arkansas Consolidated Infantry Regiment. There were two other regiments which also received the designation of "15th Arkansas". The 21st (McRae's) Arkansas Infantry was redesignated 15th Arkansas in February 1863, but to avoid confusion, was normally referred to as the 15th (Northwest) Arkansas Infantry Regiment. This second "15th Arkansas" was surrendered at Vicksburg in July 1863. A third regiment, under command of Colonels Gee and later Johnson, also received the designation 15th Arkansas Infantry. This last regiment surrendered at Port Hudson, Louisiana in July 1863. The 1st Regiment, Arkansas State Troops, was organized mainly from existing volunteer militia companies several of which had
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    6.67
    3 votes
    123

    24th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 24th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.67
    3 votes
    124

    2nd Regiment Arkansas Volunteer Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment Arkansas Volunteer Cavalry (1862–1865) was a cavalry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Although Arkansas joined the Confederate States of America in 1861, not all of its citizens supported secession. Arkansas formed some 48 infantry regiments to serve in the Confederate Army, but also formed another 11 regiments that served in the Union Army. The 2nd Arkansas Cavalry was organized at Helena, Arkansas and Pilot Knob, Missouri and mustered into Federal service in July 1862. The regiment was mustered out August 20, 1865.
    6.67
    3 votes
    125

    46th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 46th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in the spring of 1862 in Loachapoka.
    6.67
    3 votes
    126

    4th Regiment, Arkansas State Troops

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th Infantry, Arkansas State Troops (1861) was an Arkansas State infantry regiment that served during the American Civil War. After being raised in mid-1861, the regiment was assigned to the command of Brigadier General Nicholas Bartlett Pearce, who was the commander of the 1st Division, Provisional Army of Arkansas. The regiment is referred to as the "4th Regiment Arkansas Volunteers", or "Walker's Regiment" in contemporary accounts; it was disbanded shortly after the Battle of Wilson's Creek in August 1861. Another Arkansas unit also had the designation 4th Arkansas, the 4th Arkansas Infantry Regiment which formed after the Battle of Wilson's Creek, and spent most of its service in the Confederate Army of Tennessee. There is no connection between the two units. At the beginning of the war, the Arkansas Succession Convention created the Provisional Army of Arkansas. The Provisional Army was to consist of two divisions, the 1st Division in the western part of the state was to be commanded by Brigadier General Pearce, and the 2nd Division in the eastern half of the state, commanded by Major General James Yell. The intent of the Secession Convention was to transfer these state
    6.67
    3 votes
    127

    7th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment (1863–1865) was a Confederate Army cavalry regiment during the American Civil War. This regiment was formed on July 25, 1863 by adding independent companies to J. F. Hill's Arkansas Cavalry Battalion. The 7th Cavalry was commanded by Colonel John F. Hill, Lieutenant Colonel Oliver Basham, and Majors J. L. Adams and J. C. Ward. Many former members of the 10th Arkansas Militia Regiment joined this unit. The unit was composed of companies from the following counties: The unit served in General Cabell's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and fought in the following engagements: This regiment surrendered at Galveston, Texas.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128

    13th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 13th Arkansas Infantry (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. Organized mainly from companies, including several prewar volunteer militia companies, raised in northeastern Arkansas, the regiment was among the first transferred to Confederate Service, and spent virtually the entire war serving in Confederate forces east of the Mississippi River. After the unit sustained heavy casualties during the Battle Murfreesboro, the unit spent most of the rest of the war field consolidated with the 13th Arkansas Infantry Regiment, to form the 5th/13th Arkansas Infantry Regiment. The 13th Arkansas was formally organized on 29 July 1861 at Camp Ground in Greene County, Arkansas, with about 1,000 men. The companies (less Co. K) mustered into Confederate service at Harrisburg, Arkansas, on July 23, 1861. Company K, the "Erin Guards," was from St. Louis, Missouri; the rest of the companies were from northeast Arkansas. Colonel A. D. Grayson was the mustering officer. The regiment was organized from the following companies: The original regimental officers elected at the formation of the regiment were: The 13th Arkansas was ordered to a camp at
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    1st Florida Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Florida Cavalry was organized in July 1861, at Tallahassee and left for the western theater in 1862. Members of the regiment came primarily from Alachua, Clay, Columbia, Duval, Leon, Levy, Nassau and Suwannee counties. The 1st Florida Cavalry Regiment surrendered in North Carolina in April 1865.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    1st Maryland Infantry, CSA

    1st Maryland Infantry, CSA

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Maryland Infantry, CSA was a regiment of the Confederate army, formed shortly after the commencement of the American Civil War in April 1861. The unit was made up of volunteers from Maryland who, despite their home state remaining in the Union during the war, chose instead to fight for the Confederacy. The regiment saw action at the First Battle of Bull Run, in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign, and in the Peninsular Campaign. It was mustered out of service in August 1862, its initial term of duty having expired. Many of its members, unable or unwilling to return to Union-occupied Maryland, went on to join a new regiment, the 2nd Maryland Infantry, CSA, which was formed in its place. By April 1861 it was clear that war between North and South was inevitable. On April 19 Baltimore was disrupted by riots, during which Southern sympathizers attacked Union troops passing through the city by rail, causing what were arguably the first casualties of the Civil War. Major General George H. Steuart, commander of the Maryland Militia ordered his militia to assemble, armed and uniformed, to repel the Federal soldiers, as Steuart himself was strongly sympathetic to the Confederacy, along
    7.50
    2 votes
    131

    27th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 27th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (1862–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The unit served entirely in the Department of the Trans-Mississippi and eventually surrendered at Marshall Texas at the end of the war. 27th Infantry Regiment was organized at Yellville, Arkansas, in July 1862, composed of a handful of companies of mounted volunteers, which were dismounted and reinforced with several companies of conscripts. James R. Shaler, a Missourian who had previously served in the Missouri State Guard, was appointed colonel of the new regiment. The field officers were Colonels Beal Gaither and James R. Shaler, and Lieutenant Colonels A. J. Magenis and James M. Riggs. The unit was composed of companies from the following counties: The 27th Arkansas participated in most of the principal battles fought in the Trans-Mississippi Department after September 1862, among which were the Battle of Prairie Grove, the Battle of Bayou Fourche, the Battle of Pleasant Hill, and the Battle of Jenkins Ferry. The 27th Arkansas was initially was assigned to Colonel Robert G. Shaver's 2nd Brigade of Daniel M. Frost's 3rd Division of Major General Thomas C.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    55th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 55th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in the spring of 1862 in Corinth.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    7th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    5.50
    4 votes
    135
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    5.50
    4 votes
    137
    2nd Maryland Infantry, CSA

    2nd Maryland Infantry, CSA

    The 2nd Maryland Infantry, CSA (Known initially as the First Maryland Battalion), was a Confederate infantry regiment made up of volunteers from Maryland who, despite their home state remaining loyal to the Union during the American Civil War, chose instead to fight for the Confederacy. The regiment was largely made up of volunteers from the 1st Maryland Infantry, CSA, which was disbanded in August 1862, its initial term of duty having expired. They saw action at many of the fiercest battles of the Civil War, taking part in the brutal fighting at Culp's Hill at the Battle of Gettysburg. The unit suffered such severe casualties during the war that, by the time of General Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, only around forty men remained. In August 1862 the 1st Maryland Infantry, CSA was disbanded at Gordonsville, Virginia, at the expiry of its initial twelve month term of duty. The 1st Maryland Infantry was a regiment of the Confederate army, formed shortly after the commencement of the American Civil War in April 1861. The unit was made up of volunteers from Maryland, and saw action at the First Battle of Bull Run and in the Shenandoah Valley
    6.33
    3 votes
    138

    32nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 32nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment, also called 4th Trans-Mississippi Regiment, (1862–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. This Regiment was designated at various times as Matlock's Battalion Arkansas Cavalry, 4th Regiment (Gause's) Trans-Mississippi Infantry, and Gause's Regiment Arkansas Infantry. In the summer of 1862, General Thomas C. Hindman appointed Charles H. Matlock to establish a recruiting headquarters at Camp Cache, near Cache River. General Hindman appointed Charles H. Matlock Lieutenant Colonel on June 11, 1862 and on 16 June 1862, Matlock organized Matlock's Battalion of Arkansas Cavalry. Lucien C. Gause, formerly of the Jackson Guards, became Matlock’s adjutant and Charles L. Young was appointed Major. Captain William L. Jeffers’ Missouri Cavalry Company was attached to Colonel Matlock's Battalion on the 16th of June, having previously operated independently in Southeast Missouri and Northern Arkansas. Matlock's Cavalry Battalion was dismounted to serve as infantry on July 18, 1862, by orders from General Hindman. Jeffers’ Missouri Cavalry Company was re-mounted and transferred on July 18, 1862, by order of Major General
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    6.33
    3 votes
    140

    60th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 60th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.33
    3 votes
    141

    McLain's Independent Battery Colorado Light Artillery

    McLain's Independent Battery Colorado Light Artillery was an artillery battery that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was sometimes misspelled as "McLane's Battery". The battery was organized at Denver, Colorado Territory on December 15, 1862 and mustered in under the command of Captain William D. McLain. The battery was attached to the District of Colorado to July 1864. District of Upper Arkansas to December 1864. District of South Kansas to April 1865. District of North Kansas to August 1865. McLain's Independent Battery Colorado Light Artillery mustered out of service on August 31, 1865. Duty at Fort Lyon, Colorado Territory, operating against Indians, December 1862 to July 1863. At Camp Weld until December 1863. Scout from Fort Garland, Colorado Territory, October 12–16, 1863. At Denver December 1863 to June 1864. Expedition from Denver to Republican River, Kansas, April 8–23, 1864. Action at Big Bushes, Smoky Hill, Kansas, April 16. Ordered to District of Kansas June 1864. At Fort Larned, District of South Kansas, until August 1864. (A detachment was at Lawrence, Kansas.) Ordered to Lawrence August 9, and duty in District of Upper Arkansas. Stationed
    6.33
    3 votes
    142

    10th Georgia Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 10th Georgia Regiment was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It participated in most of the key battles of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. The regiment was raised in various counties throughout the state of Georgia and was mustered into Confederate service in June 1861 in Richmond, Virginia. It was initially assigned to Magruder's Peninsula Division. It served with the Army of Northern Virginia for the entire war, except during Longstreet's late 1863 expedition to Georgia and East Tennessee. The regiment was assigned to the Semmes-Bryan-Simms brigade.
    8.00
    1 votes
    143

    18th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 18th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 18th Alabama was mustered in at Auburn, Alabama on September 4, 1861. The regiment surrendered at Meridian, Mississippi on May 4, 1865.
    8.00
    1 votes
    144

    1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Arkansas Infantry (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The regiment was raised in April 1861 by Colonel Thompson B. Flournoy. It moved first to Virginia, but transferred back to Tennessee and served the rest of the war in the western theater, seeing action in the Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia campaigns. Following its depletion in numbers, the regiment was consolidated several times with other Arkansas regiments, finally merging in 1865 into the 1st Arkansas Consolidated Infantry Regiment. There were three regiments known as "1st Arkansas" during the war. The second unit with the designation of "1st Arkansas" was the 1st Infantry, Arkansas State Troops, which was mustered in to Confederate service at Pitman's Ferry, Arkansas, on 23 July 1861, under the command of Colonel Patrick Cleburne; this unit was eventually redesignated as the 15th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry. The third unit bearing the title "1st Arkansas" was the 1st Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, which served with the Union Army. The 1st Arkansas regiment began its organization in April 1861, before Arkansas had even seceded from the Union. The first Arkansas Secession
    8.00
    1 votes
    145

    1st Georgia Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Georgia Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was first organized May 1, 1862, with men recruited from Fulton and other counties. The companies first named were twelve months' troops (regulars), a majority re-enlisting for the war, while others were mustered out when the twelve months expired. In 1862, they were led by Col. William J. Magill (wounded at Antietam), and then by Capt. Richard A. Wayne. By September 1863, they were led by Maj. James Clarke Gordon. They were surrendered along with Joseph E. Johnston's army at Bennett Place in North Carolina on April 26, 1865. Sometimes confused with Colonel James N. Ramsey's 1st Georgia Infantry, which was formed in Macon on April 3, 1861, and mustered out of service in Augusta on March 10, 1862.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    26th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 26th Arkansas Infantry (1862–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The regiment was also known as Morgan's Battalion and the 3rd Trans-Mississippi Rifle Regiment. The unit served entirely in the Department of the Trans-Mississippi and eventually surrendered at Marshall Texas at the end of the war. The 26th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was among the first regiments organized in wake of the defeat of Confederate forces at the Battle of Pea Ridge in February 1862. General Earl Van Dorn had received orders to move his army from Arkansas to Corinth, Mississippi to support Confederate operations in that area. General Van Dorn took with him virtually every organized Confederate force and stripped the state of supplies. General Van Dorn left Brigadier General John S. Roane, in command in Arkansas. In a report in late May 1862, a month after General Van Dorn had left, General Roane stated that he had only eight companies of infantry and one regiment of cavalry available for the defense of Little Rock. Many of the infantry companies mentioned in General Roan's report were those companies that would eventually become the 26th Arkansas Infantry which
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    28th Massachusetts Infantry regiment

    28th Massachusetts Infantry regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 28th Massachusetts Infantry regiment was the second primarily Irish American volunteer infantry regiment recruited in Massachusetts for service in the American Civil War. The regiment's motto (or cry) was Faugh a Ballagh (Clear the Way!) The 28th was raised in Boston and received its initial training at Camp Cameron in Cambridge and Somerville. The unit underwent additional training at Fort Columbus in New York Harbor before being dispatched in early 1862 for its first active duty assignment. After serving briefly under Gen. Benjamin Butler in the Carolinas and with the 9th Corps during the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia's first campaign into the North, the 28th Massachusetts was assigned to the II Corps as the fourth regiment of the famed Irish Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. Thomas Francis Meagher. Known for their distinctive Tiffany-embroidered green flag and Gaelic war cry, "Faugh a Ballagh" (Clear the Way), the Irishmen of the 28th Massachusetts saw action in most of the Union Army's major eastern theatre engagements – Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Overland Campaign, and the siege of Petersburg – and were present for Gen. Robert E.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    8.00
    1 votes
    149

    63rd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 63rd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    8.00
    1 votes
    150

    10th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 10th Arkansas Infantry (July 1861 – May 11, 1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War from the state of Arkansas. The unit is also known as A. R. Witt's Infantry, C. M. Cargile's Infantry, E. L. Vaughan's Infantry, Thomas D. Merrick's Infantry, S. S. Ford's Infantry, Obed Patty's Infantry, George A. Merrick's Infantry, Zebulon Venable's Infantry and Robert C. Bertrand's Infantry in contemporary accounts. After being captured at the Siege of Port Hudson, the unit reorganized as a mounted infantry unit, and was known as the 10th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment or Witt's Arkansas Cavalry. The 10th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was mustered into Confederate Service in July 1861 at Springfield in Conway County. Its members were drawn from the counties of Cleburne, Van Buren, Conway, and Perry. The unit comprised the following volunteer companies: The unit was originally commanded by Colonel T. D. Merrick, who had formerly held the rank of Major General of the Arkansas Militia and who carried Governor Rector's demand for the surrender of the Little Rock Arsenal to its commander in February, 1861. The regiment was armed with weapons which the state
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    23rd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 23rd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    38th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 38th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 38th Alabama was mustered in at Mobile, Alabama n May 1862. The regiment surrendered at Meridian, Mississippi on May 4, 1865.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    53rd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 53rd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    57th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 57th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.00
    2 votes
    156

    6th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 6th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    8th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 8th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 8th Alabama was mustered in at Richmond, Virginia on June 10, 1861. The regiment surrendered at Appomattox Court House. The 8th mustered 1377 men during its existence. It suffered approximately 300 killed in action or mortally wounded and 170 men who died of disease, for a total of approximately 470 fatalities. An additional 236 men were discharged or transferred from the regiment.
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    7.00
    2 votes
    159

    3rd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 3rd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.00
    3 votes
    160

    9th Regiment Alabama Cavalry II

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 9th Regiment Alabama Cavalry II was a cavalry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in the summer of 1864 in Blue Mountain.
    6.00
    3 votes
    161

    2nd Regiment Georgia Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Regiment Georgia Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in Brunswick, Georgia and was mustered in June 1861.
    5.67
    3 votes
    162

    8th Regiment Alabama Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 8th Regiment Alabama Cavalry was a cavalry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    5.67
    3 votes
    163

    12th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 12th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164

    1st Colorado Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Colorado Volunteers (officially the 1st Regiment of Colorado Volunteers) was a volunteer infantry regiment of the United States Army formed in the Colorado Territory in 1861 and active in the American West in the late 19th century. The regiment was formed shortly after the outbreak of the American Civil War by order of William Gilpin, the first governor of the territory. Recruiters began enlisting men in August 1861, just six months after the organization of the territory. Known as "Gilpin's Pet Lambs" for the involvement of the governor in its formation, the regiment served in the Western Theater, at first serving in various detachments throughout the territory. The regiment's most notable service came in the New Mexico Campaign in the spring of 1862, in which they helped repulse the advance of the Army of New Mexico under Henry Hopkins Sibley at the battles of Glorieta Pass and Peralta. In November 1862, the unit was reorganized along with Companies C and D of the 2nd Colorado Infantry into the 1st Colorado Cavalry. (This was done since the US War Department believed cavalry would be better in protecting the Western trails and for fighting the various Indian tribes.) The
    6.50
    2 votes
    165

    29th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 29th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    6.50
    2 votes
    167

    5th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 5th Arkansas Infantry, also called the Fighting Fifth (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment organized in Arkansas to serve for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. It served throughout the war in the western theater, seeing action in the Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia campaigns. Following its depletion in numbers the regiment was consolidated several times with other Arkansas regiments, finally merging in 1865 into the 1st Arkansas Consolidated Infantry Regiment. Another Arkansas unit also had the designation 5th Arkansas, the 5th Regiment, Arkansas State Troops which participated in the Battle of Wilson's Creek, but was never transferred to Confederate Service. There is no connection between the two units. This regiment was organized for one year in state service at Gainesville, Greene County, Arkansas, on June 28, 1861 and was transferred to Confederate service on July 27, 1861 at Pocahontas, Arkansas. It was reorganized for the war at Corinth, Mississippi on May 12, 1862. The field officers were David C. Cross, Lucius Featherston, Peter V. Green, and J. E. Murray; Lieutenant Colonels E. A. Howell and B. F. Sweeney; and Majors T. W.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    6.50
    2 votes
    169

    6th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 6th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States attached to the Department of the Pacific. The Regiment was organized at Benicia Barracks, San Francisco on February 1, 1863. 6th Regiment mustered out from October 25 to December 20, 1865. The only recorded engagements of the Regiment occurred with the detachment sent to the Humbolt District in 1864, near the end of the Bald Hills War. It had engagements with the indians in the Skirmish at Booth's Run, May 1 (Company "E") and Kneeland's Prairie May 2 (Company "E"), near Boynton's Prairie May 6 (Company "C") and at Grouse Creek May 23 (Companys "E" and "G").
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    5.33
    3 votes
    171

    10th Regiment Alabama Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 10th Regiment Alabama Cavalry was a cavalry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized in the winter of 1863-1864.
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    7.00
    1 votes
    174

    47th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 47th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175

    9th Georgia Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 9th Georgia Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The 9th Georgia Volunteer Infantry formed in June 1861 and contained men from around the State of Georgia. The regiment fought at Gettysburg, Siege of Knoxville, and participated in the Wilderness Campaign while serving under General James Longstreet. For their actions at Gettysburg, they received the Confederate Roll of Honor. Aside from a brief stint in the Army of Tennessee, the 9th spent most of its time during the war with Longstreet in the Army of Northern Virginia and ended their service with that corps. Future Atlanta mayor, George Hillyer served with the 9th and wrote a book about their action at Gettysburg entitled My Gettysburg Battle Experiences.
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    7th Regiment Alabama Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Regiment Alabama Cavalry was a cavalry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    4.50
    4 votes
    177
    6.00
    2 votes
    178

    31st Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 31st Arkansas Infantry (1862–1863) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War from the state of Arkansas. The 31st Arkansas served throughout the war in the western theater, seeing action in the Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia campaigns. Following its depletion in numbers the regiment was consolidated several times with other Arkansas regiments, finally merging in 1865 into the 1st Arkansas Consolidated Mounted Rifles. In the fall of 1861, the Confederacy was in need of more soldiers. Lieutenant Thomas H. McCray of the 5th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was sent back to Arkansas from Kentucky by General William Hardee to recruit one or more companies of "sharpshooters" from the north central part of the state including Conway, Independence, Jackson, Pope, Van Buren, and Yell Counties McCray began enlisting soldiers in early November, and by late November, had two companies totaling 150 men at Pocahontas, Arkansas as part of a brigade size force under the command of Colonel Solon Borland. McCray’s recruits were retained in Arkansas by Colonel Borland because he had received intelligence that the state was under the threat of invasion from Southeastern
    6.00
    2 votes
    179

    5th Regiment Alabama Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 5th Regiment Alabama Cavalry was a cavalry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    6.00
    2 votes
    180

    Williamson's Arkansas Infantry Battalion

    • Unit size designation: Battalion
    The Williamson's Arkansas Infantry Battalion (1862) was a Confederate Army infantry battalion during the American Civil War. The battalion was organized in March 1862 by Colonel John L. Williamson, apparently immediately following the final muster of the 15th Arkansas Militia Regiment. Williamson had also commanded the 15th Arkansas Militia Regiment from Pope County. Three companies for this battalion were recruited from Pope County, including several former 15th Militia Regiment members. It was apparently intended to be recruited to a full regiment but the battalion was still recruiting and organizing when it was swept up by General Earl Van Dorn when he transferred his army to Mississippi following the Battle of Pea Ridge. The battalion was formally organized at Camp Churchill Clark, near Corinth, Mississippi, on May 8, 1862. However, it was decided to disband the battalion instead, so the election of officers was invalidated and the battalion formally broken up on May 25, 1862. The battalion was composed of companies from the following counties: The component companies were distributed among other Arkansas battalions and regiments as follows:
    6.00
    2 votes
    181

    31st Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 31st Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    5.00
    3 votes
    182

    39th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 38th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    5.00
    3 votes
    183

    3rd Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 3rd Regiment Alabama Infantry (African Descent) was an infantry regiment recruited from African-Americans that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 3rd Infantry was raised at Pulaski, Tennessee on January 3, 1864. The regiment was redesignated the 111th U.S. Regiment Colored Troops on June 25, 1864.
    5.00
    3 votes
    184

    3rd Florida Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    3rd Infantry Regiment was formed near Pensacola, Florida, in July, 1861. Its companies were recruited in the counties of St. Johns, Hernando, Jefferson, Duval, Wakulla, Madison, Columbia, and Suwannee. The unit served along the coast at Talbot Island and Cedar Keys, then moved to Mobile. After fighting at Perryville it was assigned to Preston's, Stovall's, Finley's, J.A. Smith's Brigade, and during December, 1862, consolidated with the 1st Florida Infantry Regiment. The 3rd was engaged at Murfreesboro and Jackson, then participated in the campaigns of the Army of Tennessee from Chickamauga to Bentonville. It was organized with 950 officers and men, and the 1st/3rd lost twenty-six percent of the 23 in action at Chickamauga. In December, 1863, this command totalled 240 men and 119 arms, but only a remnant surrendered in April, 1865. The field officers were Colonel William S. Dilworth; Lieutenant Colonels Lucius A. Church, Elisha Mashburn, and Arthur J.T. Wright; and Major John L. Phillips. 1862 1863 1864 1865
    5.00
    3 votes
    185

    3rd Regiment Georgia Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 3rd Regiment Georgia Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized on May 8, 1861.
    5.00
    3 votes
    186

    26th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 26th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized on the summer of 1861 at Tuscumbia.
    5.50
    2 votes
    187

    36th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 36th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 36th Alabama was mustered in at Mount Vernon Arsenal on May 12, 1862. The regiment surrendered at Meridian, Mississippi on May 4, 1865.
    5.50
    2 votes
    188

    49th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 49th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    5.50
    2 votes
    189

    4th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment (1862–1865) was a Confederate Army Cavalry regiment from the state of Arkansas during the American Civil War. The regiment was designated at various times as Carroll's Regiment Arkansas Cavalry, Thompson's Regiment Arkansas Cavalry, and Gordon's Regiment Arkansas Cavalry. During the same time it was also known as 1st Regiment Arkansas Cavalry, 2nd Regiment Arkansas Cavalry, 9th Regiment Arkansas Cavalry and the 11th Regiment Arkansas Cavalry. The 4th Arkansas Cavalry was mustered into Confederate service at Camp Massard, Arkansas, on July 11, 1862, for three years or the war. The unit was composed of volunteer companies from the following counties: 4th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment served in General Cabell's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and took an active part in the Battle of Poison Spring and the Battle of Marks' Mills where twenty-one percent of the 117 engaged were disabled. Later it participated in Price's Missouri Expedition and reported 106 casualties. During the spring of 1865 the 4th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment disbanded.
    5.50
    2 votes
    190

    4th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    4th Arkansas Infantry (August 17, 1861 – April 26, 1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment from the state of Arkansas during the American Civil War. The 4th Arkansas served throughout the war in the western theater, seeing action in the Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia campaigns. Following its depletion in numbers the regiment was consolidated several times with other Arkansas regiments, finally merging in 1865 into the 1st Arkansas Consolidated Mounted Rifles. Another Arkansas unit also had the designation 4th Arkansas, the 4th Regiment, Arkansas State Troops which participated in the Battle of Wilson's Creek, but was never transferred to Confederate Service. There is no connection between the two units. Originally known as the "Southwestern Arkansas Regiment", the 4th Arkansas was organized at Mount Vernon, Missouri, from volunteer companies from the southwestern part of Arkansas, which arrived in Missouri just after the Battle of Wilson's Creek. The original eight companies which were mustered into service at Miller's Springs, Missouri, on August 17, 1861, were: Two additional companies were added on October 26, 1861 at Fort Smith, Arkansas: An eleventh company was
    5.50
    2 votes
    191

    6th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    6th Arkansas Infantry (June 10, 1861 – April 26, 1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. Organized mainly from volunteer companies, including several preware volunteer militia units, raised in the southern half of Arkansas, the regiment was among the first transferred to Confederate Service. It served virtually the entire war in Confederate forces east of the Mississippi River. After the unit sustained heavy casualties during the Battle of Shiloh and Bragg's Kentucky Campaign, the unit spent most of the rest of the war field consolidated with the 7th Arkansas Infantry Regiment, to form the 6th/7th Arkansas Infantry Regiment. The 6th Infantry was mustered into state service in Little Rock, Arkansas on June 10, 1861, a little less than a month after the state first began raising infantry regiments. The 6th Arkansas, also known as the 6th Arkansas, State Troops and the 6th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, was made up of volunteer companies from the following counties: The regiment's first commander was Colonel Richard Lyon. The other regimental officers were: The regiment was armed with weapons which the state confiscated when the Federal Arsenal at
    5.50
    2 votes
    192

    8th Connecticut Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 8th Connecticut Infantry was an infantry regiment that fought in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized at Camp Buckingham, Hartford, in September, 1861, It was first commanded by Colonel Edward Harland of Norwich. The regiment drew most of its enlisted from northern Hartford and Litchfield counties and was composed mostly of merchants and farmers form the Housatonic River and CT River Valleys south to near New Milford and north to the Massachuseets state line and west to present day Hartford. The division had many free black men as well. The regiment left Hartford October 17, 1861 for a camp of instruction at Jamaica, Long Island, and there received its colors. It proceeded to Annapolis, where it spent the fall. Early in January, 1862, the Eighth sailed with the Burnside Expedition to North Carolina as part of the IX Corps. It was held in reserve during the Battle of Roanoke Island. It was engaged in the Battle of New Bern, on March 14, 1862. The Eighth then participated in the successful siege of Fort Macon, during the March and April 1862. From there the regiment proceeded to Fredricksburg in July, 1862. On September 1 the Eighth accompanied
    5.50
    2 votes
    193

    17th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 17th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 18th Alabama was mustered in at Montgomery, Alabama in August 1861. The regiment surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina on April 1865. Col. Virgil S. Murphy
    4.67
    3 votes
    194
    7th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    7th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union army during the American Civil War. It was formed on June 15, 1861 in Taunton. Its original commander was Colonel Darius N. Couch who would eventually be promoted to command the II Corps of the Army of the Potomac and, after that, the Department of the Susquehanna. The 7th Massachusetts consisted almost entirely of men from Bristol County, Massachusetts. The regiment was trained at Camp Old Colony in Taunton, Massachusetts. On June 15, 1861, its members were mustered into service. On July 11, the 7th Massachusetts left for Washington, D.C. where it remained encamped until the spring of 1862. For most of that period, the regiment was stationed in Brightwood, now a neighborhood of Washington but, at the time, outside of the urban area of the city. There they worked with other regiments to construct a defensive fortification known as Fort Stevens. The conditions at Fort Stevens were favorable as compared to many winter camps during the Civil War and the regiment had a very low rate of sickness. During their first winter, the command of the 7th Massachusetts changed rapidly. Couch was promoted to
    4.67
    3 votes
    195

    27th Connecticut Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 27th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment recruited in New Haven, Connecticut, for service in the American Civil War. The 27th Connecticut was raised in the late summer of 1862 in response to President Abraham Lincoln's nationwide call for volunteers to put down the rebellion. The regiment would serve for a nine month enlistment, unlike the usual three-year enlistments, inducing many older, married men to answer the call. This is evident by the fact that the average age of the 27th Connecticut was 27 years, about six years older than the average age of Union soldiers in general. The 27th Connecticut departed for Washington, D.C., on October 22 and was attached to the Military District of Washington until November 7, 1862. It was then attached to the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, and it advanced to Falmouth, Virginia. In its nine months of service, the 27th fought in the three largest campaigns in the eastern theatre of the war. First at the Battle of Fredericksburg, on December 13, 1862, during which they launched an attack up Marye's Heights under their brigade commander Col. Samuel K. Zook. Their second taste of
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    35th Regiment Indiana Infantry

    35th Regiment Indiana Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 35th Regiment Indiana Infantry was organized on December 11, 1861 during the American Civil War, and mustered out October 23, 1865. It was known as the First Irish as it was mainly made up Irish Americans. Dyer, F.H. 1908. A compendium of the war of the rebellion compiled and arranged from official records of the federal and Confederate armies... The Dyer Publishing Company. Des Moines, Iowa, USA.
    6.00
    1 votes
    197

    4th Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th Regiment Alabama Infantry (African Descent) was an infantry regiment recruited from African-Americans that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 4th Infantry was raised at Decatur, Alabama on March 31, 1864 and was attached to the garrison at Pulaski, Tennessee until May 1864. The regiment was redesignated the 106th U.S. Regiment Colored Troops on May 16, 1864.
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    7th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    7th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It participated in most of the campaigns and battles of the Army of the Potomac in the Eastern Theater. The 7th Maine was organized at Augusta, Maine, and mustered into Federal service for a three-year enlistment on August 21, 1861. After organization and training, the regiment left the state for Baltimore, Maryland, on August 23. Subsequently, it was attached to Dix's Division and assigned to duty in the city until October 25, 1861. The 7th was then assigned to Davidson's Brigade, W. F. Smith's Division, Army of the Potomac, until March 1862. It moved to Washington, D.C. and was on duty at Georgetown Heights until November 7. From there, the 7th camped at Lewinsville, Virginia, until March 1862. It was then part of the brigade's advance on Manassas, Virginia, from March 10–15. The regiment was then assigned to the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 1862. It subsequently returned to Alexandria, Virginia, and thence moved to Fort Monroe on March 23–24. It took part in the brigade's reconnaissance to Watt's Creek from
    6.00
    1 votes
    199

    9th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 9th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 9th Alabama was mustered in at Richmond, Virginia in late May 1861. The regiment surrendered at Appomattox Court House. The 9th mustered 1138 men during its existence. It suffered approximately 200 killed in action or mortally wounded and 175 men who died of disease, for a total of approximately 375 fatalities. An additional 208 men were discharged or transferred from the regiment.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200

    2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 2nd Arkansas Infantry (June 1, 1861 – May 26, 1865) was an army regiment of the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was raised in May 1861 under Colonel Thomas C. Hindman. It served throughout the war in the western theater, in the Confederate Army of Tennessee, seeing action in the Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia campaigns. Following its depletion in numbers the regiment was consolidated several times with other Arkansas regiments, finally merging in 1865 into the 1st Arkansas Consolidated Infantry Regiment. The regiment is separate from and has no connection with the 2nd Regiment, Arkansas State Troops, which participated in the Battle of Wilson's Creek and is also separate from the 2nd Arkansas Consolidated Infantry Regiment which was formed in 1864 from remnants of regiments surrendered at Vicksburg and Port Hudson. Raised at Helena, Arkansas in the spring of 1861 at the expense of Thomas Carmichael Hindman who had only recently resigned from the United States Congress due to the Arkansas secession and the formation of the Confederate States of America. By June 1, 1861, Hindman had raised ten companies from eastern and central Arkansas which would
    4.33
    3 votes
    201
    5.00
    2 votes
    202

    45th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 45th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    5.00
    2 votes
    203

    5th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 5th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    5.00
    2 votes
    204

    7th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 7th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry (1861−1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War composed of troops from northeast Arkansas. Organized mainly from companies, including several preware volunteer militia companies, raised in northeastern Arkansas, the regiment was among the first transferred to Confederate Service, and spent virtually the entire war serving in Confederate forces east of the Mississippi River. After the unit sustained heavy casualties during the Battle of Shiloh and Bragg's Kentucky Campaign, the unit spent most of the rest of the war field consolidated with the 6th Arkansas Infantry Regiment, to form the 6th/7th Arkansas Infantry Regiment. The 7th Arkansas was mustered into State service on June 16, 1861 at Smithville in Lawrence County, Arkansas. The unit was inducted into Confederate Service in July 1861 at Camp Shaver, near Pocahontas, Arkansas. The regimental staff at the time of organization of the 7th Arkansas were: The company officers at the time of organization were: Note: Capt. James Archer, Co. C, resigned before the company was mustered into service and was succeeded by Capt. William M. Blackburn, whose date of rank
    5.00
    2 votes
    205
    4.50
    2 votes
    206
    4.50
    2 votes
    207
    97th Regiment Indiana Infantry

    97th Regiment Indiana Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 97th Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Organized in southwestern Indiana in 1862, the regiment saw action throughout the South at the siege of Vicksburg, the Battle of Atlanta and Sherman's March to the Sea. They were mustered out June 9, 1865 in Washington, D.C. after a victorious parade through Washington. "Virtual Cemetery" of members of Co. F, 97th Indiana Infantry
    4.50
    2 votes
    208
    I Corps

    I Corps

    • Unit size designation: Corps
    I Corps (First Corps) was the designation of three different corps-sized units in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Separate formation called the I Corps served in the Army of the Ohio/Army of the Cumberland under Alexander M. McCook from September 29, 1862 to November 5, 1862, in the Army of the Mississippi under George W. Morgan from January 4, 1863 to January 12, 1863, and in the Army of the Potomac and Army of Virginia (see below). The first two were units of very limited life; the third was one of the most distinguished and veteran corps in the entire Union Army, commanded by very distinguished officers. The I Corps was activated March 13, 1862, when President Abraham Lincoln ordered the creation of a four-corps army, then under the command of Major General George B. McClellan. The first commander of this corps was Major General Irvin McDowell and it contained three divisions. Originally intended to go to the Peninsula Campaign with the rest of the army, it was instead detached and left in the Fredericksburg area after Stonewall Jackson's actions in the Shenandoah Valley caused the Lincoln Administration to fear for Washington's safety. One of its divisions, the
    4.50
    2 votes
    209

    13th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 13th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
    5.00
    1 votes
    210
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
    15th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    15th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 15th Regiment of Alabama Infantry was a Confederate volunteer infantry unit from the state of Alabama during the American Civil War. Recruited from six counties in the southeastern part of the state, it fought mostly with Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, though it also saw brief service with Braxton Bragg and the Army of Tennessee before returning to Virginia for the duration of the war. Out of 1958 men listed on the regimental rolls throughout the conflict, 261 are known to have fallen in battle, with sources listing an additional 416 deaths due to disease, 218 were captured (46 died), 66 deserted and 61 were transferred or discharged. By the end of the war, only 170 men remained to be paroled. The 15th Alabama is most famous for being the regiment that confronted the 20th Maine on Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863. Despite several ferocious assaults, the 15th Alabama was ultimately unable to dislodge the Union troops, and was eventually forced to retreat in the face of a desperate bayonet charge led by the 20th Maine's commander, Col. Joshua L. Chamberlain. This assault was vividly recreated in Ronald F. Maxwell's 1993 film
    5.00
    1 votes
    212

    1st Cavalry Regiment, Arkansas State Troops

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Cavalry Regiment, Arkansas State Troops (1861) was an Arkansas State infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized at Camp Walker, near Harmony Springs, Benton County, Arkansas. The regiment was officially designated as the Third Regiment (Cavalry), Arkansas State Troops by the State Military Board, but was designated as the 1st Arkansas Cavalry by Brigadier General Nicholas Bartlett Pearce, Commander, 1st Division, Provisional Army of Arkansas. The regiment is referred to as the "Carroll's Regiment" in contemporary accounts. At the beginning of the war, the Arkansas Succession Convention created the Provisional Army of Arkansas. The Provisional Army was to consist of two divisions, the 1st Division in the western part of the state was to be commanded by Brigadier General Pearce, and the 2nd Division in the eastern half of the state, commanded by Major General James Yell. The intent of the Secession Convention was to transfer these state troop regiments into Confederate service as quickly as possible, to avoid the cost of paying for a large state army. The troops of the eastern division were transferred to the command of Brigadier General
    5.00
    1 votes
    213

    1st Regiment Alabama Siege Artillery

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Regiment Alabama Siege Artillery (African Descent) was an artillery regiment recruited from African-Americans that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was renamed the 6th US Colored Heavy Artillery. Under the leadership of Major Lionel Booth, the 6th US Colored Heavy Artillery fought at the Battle of Fort Pillow on April 12, 1864. The regiment had a strength of 8 Officers and 213 men. The 1st Siege Artillery was raised at LaGrange, LaFayette and Memphis, Tennessee, as well as Corinth, Mississippi on June 20, 1863 after Federal troops occupied the area. The regiment was redesignated the 6th U.S. Regiment Colored Heavy Artillery on March 11, 1864. On March 17, Lieut-Colonel Thomas J. Jackson was placed in command of the regiment. The next day he turned the command over to newly promoted Major Lionel F. Booth. The regiment arrived at Fort Pillow on March 29 and, being the senior officer, Major Booth was placed in command of the fort. On April 12, the fort was attacked by approximately 3000 troops lead by General James R. Chalmers and Confederate Cavalry Corps commander, General Nathan B. Forrest. The battery took positions inside the inner fort
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    214

    1st Regiment Arkansas Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Regiment Arkansas Volunteer Infantry (1863–1865) was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Although Arkansas joined the Confederate States of America in 1861, not all of its citizens supported secession. Arkansas formed some 48 infantry regiments to serve in the Confederate Army, but also formed another 11 regiments that served in the Union Army. Because it was utterly impossible to form a Union unit in Arkansas in the first two years of the war, most Union supporters traveled elsewhere to join. However, by 1863 Union forces were knocking at the door of Arkansas, and many Arkansans still loyal to the Union flocked to them to join. The 1st Arkansas Infantry was organized at Fayetteville, Arkansas and mustered into Federal service on March 25, 1863. Initially the regiment was attached to the Army of the Frontier, under Brigadier General John Schofield. They saw minor action in the area of Fayetteville, and later near Perryville, Arkansas, had minor skirmishes with Confederate forces under the command of Brigadier General William Lewis Cabell. They were then assigned scout duty in an area that included Mount Ida, Arkansas down to
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    215

    54th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 54th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
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    216

    8th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 8th Arkansas Infantry (July 13, 1861 – April 26, 1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War from the state of Arkansas. It served throughout the war in the western theater, seeing action in the Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia campaigns. Following its depletion in numbers the regiment was consolidated several times with other Arkansas regiments, finally merging in 1865 into the 1st Arkansas Consolidated Infantry Regiment. The unit was enrolled in state service on July 13, 1861 at Camp Price near Jacksonport, Arkansas. The unit was inducted into Confederate Service on September 10, 1861. The unit was originally composed of units from the following counties: The original regimental officers of the 8th Arkansas were:: The regiment was armed with weapons which the state confiscated when the Federal Arsenal at Little Rock was seized by Arkanssas State Militia troops in February 1861. Disposition of the weapons found in the Arsenal is somewhat sketchy, but from various records it can be surmised that the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Arkansas Infantry Regiments, mustered in June, 1861, were issued M1816/M1822 .69 caliber flintlocks. They retained these
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    217
    11th Independent Battery Indiana Light Artillery

    11th Independent Battery Indiana Light Artillery

    • Unit size designation: Artillery battery
    The 11th Independent Battery Indiana Light Artillery, generally known as the 11th Indiana Battery, was an artillery battery in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It served in several important campaigns in the Western Theater, including the Battle of Chickamauga in late 1863. Recruited at Fort Wayne, Indiana, in late 1861, the 11th Indiana Battery was mustered into service at on December 17, 1861, at Indianapolis, Indiana. It was ordered to report for duty in Louisville, Kentucky, on February 6, 1862. The battery was consolidated with the 18th Indiana Battery on November 21, 1864.
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    218
    123rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    123rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 123rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. In 1863 and 1864 it was temporarily known as the Mounted Infantry, 123rd Regiment. This regiment was organized at Camp Terry, Mattoon, Coles County, Illinois by Colonel James Monroe, who at the time was major of the 7th Illinois Infantry. Companies A, C, D, H, I and K were from Coles County; B from Cumberland; E from Clark; F and G from Clark and Crawford. As a colonel in 1861, Ulysses S. Grant organized his first command, the 21st Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment, in Mattoon. It was mustered into service on September 6, 1862, with James Monroe as Colonel, Jonathan Biggs, of Westfield, Clark County, as Lieutenant Colonel, and James A. Connolly, of Charleston, Illinois, as Major. On the 19th of September 1862, the Regiment was loaded into freight cars at Mattoon, and transported to Louisville, Kentucky, where it was at once put to work, under Major General William "Bull" Nelson, to fortify the city against Confederate General Braxton Bragg, who was then advancing on it in pursuit of Union General Don Carlos Buell. On October 1, having been assigned
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    219
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    18th (Marmaduke's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 18th Arkansas Infantry (Marmaduke's) (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army infantry regiment during the American Civil War. The unit was also briefly identified as the 1st Arkansas Infantry Battalion. The unit was most often referred to as the 3rd Confederate Infantry Regiment. The designation "Confederate Infantry Regiment" was intended to convey the difference between Provisional Confederate Army units and Regular Confederate Army Units, with Provisional units being those regiments who received a state designation such as "XX Arkansas Infantry Regiment" In practice, the designation was most often utilized when Regiments were assembled utilizing companies from more than one confederate state. The "3rd Confederate Infantry Regiment" is occasionally misidentified as the 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment commanded by Colonel Van H. Manning. The 18th Arkansas Infantry started out as 7 of 22 companies which comprised the so-called "Hindman Legion." Col. Thomas C. Hindman had recruited ten companies at his own expense for the 2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment, and then an additional seven companies at his own expense which, along with four cavalry companies and an artillery battery, became
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    221

    1st Battalion of Georgia Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Battalion
    The 1st Battalion of Georgia Infantry (Union) was an infantry battalion that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War, despite being organized from a state that had seceded from the Union. In late 1864, the Federal armies under William T. Sherman had captured Atlanta and were marching towards the Atlantic Ocean and the port city of Savannah. At the end of October, efforts were made to recruit loyal men to join the Federal army for duty in the rear lines to free up veterans for front-line combat duty. A number of men from Dawson County enlisted in two companies, and others from Pickens County joined Company B. Some of these enlistees were ex-POWs from Atlanta who had served in the Confederate States Army, but had since sworn allegiance to the Federal government. The battalion was mustered in at Marietta, Georgia on October 31, 1864. It was assigned as an unattached unit to the Department of the Cumberland, and subsequently guarded the Western & Atlantic Railroad near Dalton, Georgia, until March 1865. The battalion was then attached to the 1st Brigade, 2nd Separate Division, District of the Etowah, Department of the Cumberland, and guarded the railroads near the Etowah
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    222

    1st Regiment Delaware Volunteer Infantry (3 months)

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Regiment Delaware Volunteer Infantry (May - August 1861) was a United States volunteer infantry regiment of the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was organized on May 22, 1861 in Wilmington, Delaware, served for three months under the command of Major General John Dix, and was mustered out of service in August 1861.
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    223
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    3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    3rd Arkansas, or 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment (May, 1861 – April 12, 1865) was a Confederate Army regiment during the American Civil War, and the most celebrated unit from that state. Formed and initially commanded by Colonel Albert Rust, and later falling under the command of Colonel Van H. Manning, the regiment was part of the Army of Northern Virginia serving under General Robert E. Lee. The regiment served for the duration of the war, from the late months of 1861 through to the Surrender at Appomattox Court House in 1865. They were the only Arkansas regiment to serve the entire war in the east, where most of the major battles were fought. They were also the only Arkansas regiment to initially sign up for the duration of the war, with all other regiments from that state signing on for a one year enlistment. The regiment was formed in May and June 1861, initially by Dr. W. H. Tebbs, who would be appointed a captain, and Van H. Manning who would later command the regiment. Early in May, 1861, Dr. W. H. Tebbs, Captain of a volunteer company raised on Bayou Bartholomew, in Ashley county, and Captain Van H. Manning, the Captain of a company organized at Hamburg, in Ashley County,
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    225

    3rd Regiment, Arkansas State Troops

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 3rd Infantry, Arkansas State Troops (1861) was an Arkansas State infantry regiment that served during the American Civil War. The regiment was designated as the 2nd Infantry, Arkansas State Troops, by the State Military Board, but it was named the 3rd Arkansas by Brigadier General Nicholas Bartlett Pearce, Commander, 1st Division, Provisional Army of Arkansas. The regiment is generally referred to as the "3rd Regiment, Arkansas State Troops", or "Gratiot's Regiment" in contemporary accounts. This unit is distinguished from the 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment which served in the Eastern Theater of War in the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. The unit is also distinguished from a later state organization known as Adams' 3rd Arkansas State Troops, which was organized in 1862 and participated in the Battle of Prairie Grove before being disbanded. At the beginning of the war, the Arkansas Succession Convention created the Provisional Army of Arkansas. The Provisional Army was to consist of two divisions: the 1st Division in the western part of the state was to be commanded by Brigadier General Pearce, and the 2nd Division in the eastern half of the state, commanded by Major
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    226

    5th Regiment, Arkansas State Troops

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 5th Regiment, Arkansas State Troops (1861) was an Arkansas State infantry regiment that served during the American Civil War. Formed in mid-1861, the regiment was assigned to the command of Brigadier General Nicholas Bartlett Pearce, Commander, 1st Division, Provisional Army of Arkansas. It was disbanded after the Battle of Wilson's Creek in August 1861. Another Arkansas unit also had the designation 5th Arkansas, the 5th Arkansas Infantry Regiment which belonged to the Confederate Army of Tennessee. There is no connection between the two units. In the spring of 1861, as the secession crisis deepened, many additional volunteer companies were being formed in the Arkansas State Militia. The Militia Law of Arkansas as published in 1860 provided for a two-tiered militia system. Section one of the law made all able-bodied free white male inhabitants between the ages of 18 and 45 liable for service. Section 57 of the Militia Act established the second tier of militia organization, the volunteer company. The act allowed each county to raise up to four volunteer companies. These volunteer companies were to be either infantry, riflemen, cavalry, or artillery. While the volunteer
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    227

    10th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 10th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. The 10th Alabama was mustered in at Montgomery, Alabama on June 4, 1861. The regiment surrendered at Appomattox Court House. The 10th mustered 1429 men during its existence. It suffered approximately 300 killed in action or mortally wounded and 180 men who died of disease, for a total of approximately 470 fatalities. An additional 249 men were discharged or transferred from the regiment.
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    228

    11th Florida Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 11th Regiment, Florida Infantry was an infantry regiment from Florida that served in the Confederate States Army from 1864 to 1865. The 11th Infantry Regiment was organized in June 1864 by consolidating part of the 2nd and the 4th Florida Infantry Battalions. Many of the men serving in the regiment were recruited in Hendry, Jackson, and Bradford counties. Placed in General Finegan's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia, it was active at Cold Harbor, then saw action in the Petersburg siege south of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. In April 1865, it surrendered 4 officers and 19 men. The field officers were Colonel Theodore W. Brevard, Lieutenant Colonel James F. McClellan, and Major John H. Gee. List of Florida Civil War Confederate units
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    18th Independent Battery Indiana Light Artillery

    18th Independent Battery Indiana Light Artillery

    • Unit size designation: Artillery battery
    The 18th Independent Battery Indiana Light Artillery also known as Lilly's Hoosier Battery and Lilly's battery, was a civil war regiment formed in Indiana during the American Civil War. The regiment was formed at the end of 1860 by 22-year-old Eli Lilly, an Indianapolis pharmacist. He had recruitment posters placed around the city and recruited primarily among his friends and classmates. The unit contained six ten-pound Parrott rifled guns, and was manned by 150 men. The unit mustered in Indianapolis where it was drilled during 1861. Lilly was elected captain of the unit in August 1862 when the unit was deployed to join the Lightning Brigade commanded by Col. John T. Wilder. The unit first saw action in the Battle of Hoover's Gap, and was later in the Second Battle of Chattanooga and the Battle of Chickamauga. The unit was enlisted for three years, and most members left the unit in the end of 1863. Several members, including Lilly reenlisted when their term expired, but were assigned to new units.
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    233

    19th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 19th Regiment Connecticut Infantry was a volunteer infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Organized from July to October of 1862 in Litchfield, Connecticut, the 19th regiment was attached to the Army of Potomac for much of 1863 for garrison duties around Washington. On November 1863, the 19th Regiment was reorganized and designated as the 2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery.
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    234

    1st Alabama Cavalry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Alabama Cavalry Regiment was a cavalry regiment recruited from Southern Unionists that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 1st Alabama Cavalry was raised from Alabama Unionists at Huntsville, Alabama and Memphis, Tennessee in October, 1862 after Federal troops occupied the area. It was attached to the XVI Corps in various divisions until November 1864, when it became part of the XV Corps. During this time, its duties mostly consisted of scouting, raiding, reconnaissance, flank guard, and providing screening to the infantry while on the march. The regiment was selected by Major General William T. Sherman to be his escort as he began his march to the sea. It was assigned to the Third Division of the Cavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi in January 1865. It fought at the battles of Monroe's Crossroads and Bentonville and was present at the surrender of the Army of Tennessee at the Bennett Place. It was sent to the District of Northern Alabama, Department of the Cumberland in June 1865. The regiment was mustered out of service at Huntsville, Alabama on October 20, 1865, with only 397 men present. Out of the 2,000 men who served in the unit
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    235

    1st Arkansas Union Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    1st Arkansas Union Cavalry (1862–1865) was a cavalry regiment from the state of Arkansas that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Although Arkansas had joined the Confederate States of America in 1861, not all of its citizens supported secession. Arkansas formed some 48 Confederate Army infantry regiments, along with several cavalry regiments and artillery batteries. However, citizens of that state also formed some 11 Union Army infantry regiments, and another 6 cavalry regiments along with 2 artillery batteries. The 1st Arkansas Cavalry was formed in Springfield, Missouri in July 1862. They immediately returned to Arkansas due to roaming bands of Confederate guerrillas that were harassing Union sympathizers, seeing brief skirmishes in that realm. Following the Battle of Pea Ridge, Union forces briefly occupied parts of Northern Arkansas, but following the Union forces moving their headquarters to Independence County, Arkansas, many Union supporting families were once again left exposed, leading many of them to move north to Missouri. The 1st Arkansas Union Cavalry's first combat action in battle was during the Battle of Prairie Grove, on December 7, 1862. They
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    236

    1st Battalion of Veteran Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Battalion
    The 1st Battalion of Veteran Infantry was a California Volunteer infantry battalion in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It spent its entire term of service in the western United States. This battalion was organized at Franklin, Texas under the command of Major Joseph Smith, (formerly of 5th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry) between November and December, 1864, by consolidating the veterans of the 1st Regiment California Volunteer Infantry, into two companies, which became Companies A and B, and consolidating the companies of the 5th Regiment California Volunteer Infantry into five companies, which became Companies C, D, E, F, and G, of the battalion. On March 16, 1865 a Company F was broken up for the purpose of distributing the men among the other companies, due to the difficulty in obtaining recruits to keep up all the companies to the minimum required by law. The same order directed Colonel Rigg (formerly of 1st California Infantry) to assume command with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, with headquarters at Fort Craig. The battalion was mustered out in September 1866. When this battalion was mustered out in September 1866, officers and members who wished to be
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    1st Regiment California Volunteer Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 1st Regiment California Volunteer Cavalry was a cavalry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was first formed of five companies as 1st Battalion, 1st Regiment California Volunteer Cavalry between August and October 31, 1861, at Camp Merchant near Oakland. After the battalion was organized it was sent to Southern California, three companies being stationed at Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, and two at Camp Carleton, near San Bernardino. November 20–29, 1861, a detachment under Second Lt. C. R. Wellman was stationed at Camp Wright, and pursued and captured Dan Showalter's party west of the San Jose Valley and Warner's Ranch. The battalion remained in Southern California until the spring of 1862, when it became part of the California Column, and formed the advance force of that Column during the march to New Mexico Territory and Texas. In 1863, the Regiment was brought to full strength when seven more companies were raised to bring it to a full strength of twelve companies. The five companies first organized were mustered out August 31, 1864, the terms of service of most of the men having expired. Two new companies, B and C, were organized in New Mexico, by
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    27th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    27th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 27th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment was a nine-month regiment raised for service in the Union Army during the American Civil War. One of eight regiments raised by Maine in the fall of 1862 under the call for men to serve nine-month terms, the 27th Maine was formed primarily of volunteers from York County, Maine. They went into camp at Portland, Maine on 10 September, with the officers being mustered into service on the 19th and the enlisted men on the 30th. After a short furlough home, and the addition of a few later enlistments to complete the regiment, they left for Washington, D.C. on 20 October 1862. The unit was attached to the XXII Corps, first belonging to Casey's Division and later to the division of General John Joseph Abercrombie. They served as pickets in the defenses of the capital through their entire term. First encamped on East Capitol Hill upon their arrival in Washington, they soon moved to Arlington Heights, Virginia and afterward to Hunting Creek, where they went into winter quarters until March 1863. In the spring, they relocated along with the 25th Maine to Chantilly, Virginia and were there until 25 June, when they were transferred into the Army of the
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    30th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 30th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
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    243

    34th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 34th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
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    244

    3rd Arkansas Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    3rd Arkansas Cavalry (1861–1865) was a Confederate Army cavalry regiment from Arkansas during the American Civil War. At the outbreak of hostilities between the north and south, Arkansas began raising troops to serve in the Confederate Army. The state raised some 48 infantry regiments, along with several cavalry regiments and artillery batteries. The 3rd Arkansas Cavalry was first organized in Little Rock, Arkansas on June 10, 1861, by former senator and soldier Solon Borland. Borland, who was at the time serving as a state militia commander for Northern Arkansas, was initially named a Colonel of the regiment. However, that post was "elected" by the members of the regiment, and Borland was not reelected in May 1861. On July 27, 1861, the regiment was mustered into the Confederate Army for one years service which they later extended, and sent to Corinth, Mississippi, but without Borland. Borland by this time had been replaced by Colonel Samuel G. Earle. The regiment was placed under the command of Major General Joseph Wheeler, and later became a part of the Army of Mississippi. They saw their first real battle action on October 3 and 4, 1862 at the Second Battle of Corinth, where
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    3rd Regiment Indiana Cavalry

    3rd Regiment Indiana Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 3rd Regiment Indiana Cavalry, also designated the 45th Regiment Indiana Infantry or the 45th Regiment Indiana Volunteers was a military unit from the U.S. state of Indiana that participated in the American Civil War. It consisted of two separate "wings" that never operated together:
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    246

    43rd Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 43rd Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
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    4th Regiment Arkansas Cavalry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 4th Regiment Arkansas Volunteer Cavalry was a cavalry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War.
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    249

    59th Regiment Alabama Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 59th Regiment Alabama Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.
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    250

    5th Regiment Georgia Infantry

    • Unit size designation: Regiment
    The 5th Regiment Georgia Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was organized on May 11, 1861.
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